History YMMV / NorseMythology

2nd Apr '17 12:03:33 PM DustSnitch
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* MemeticMutation: {{Jesus}} promised the end of all wicked people. Odin promised the end of all ice giants. [[LogicalFallacies I don't see many ice giants around.]]

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* MemeticMutation: {{Jesus}} UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} promised the end of all wicked people. Odin promised the end of all ice giants. [[LogicalFallacies I don't see many ice giants around.]]
1st Mar '17 2:04:18 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* EvilIsCool: The Frost Giants, Midgard Serpent, Fenris Wolf, Hel, Loki, qualify individually and together.
28th Feb '17 9:03:01 AM JulianLapostat
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* VindicatedByHistory: For most of history, the Norse mythology was deprecated by European intellectuals who honored Greek and Roman mythology, as well as stories from the Bible as being of great value. The Eddas that form the source for the mythologies was written by Sturluson for primarily linguistic reasons and references and not because he ''liked'' the stories. Yet in the 19th, 20th and 21st Century, the Norse myth is considered to be as compelling and moving as other pantheons and its characters Thor, Odin and Loki unleashed a FountainOfExpies in multiple HighFantasy and other genres.

to:

* VindicatedByHistory: For most of history, the Norse mythology was deprecated by European intellectuals who honored Greek and Roman mythology, as well as stories from the Bible as being of great value. The Eddas that form the source for the mythologies was written by Sturluson for primarily linguistic reasons and references as a reference guide towards understanding skaldic poetry and not because he ''liked'' the stories. Yet in the 19th, 20th and 21st Century, the Norse myth is considered to be as compelling and moving as other pantheons and its characters Thor, Odin and Loki unleashed a FountainOfExpies in multiple HighFantasy and other genres.
27th Feb '17 5:08:53 PM JulianLapostat
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* CriticalDissonance: Norse Mythology has always had a bigger influence on popular culture and fantasy (whether its superhero comics, grand opera, epic fantasy, heavy metal music, science fiction) than on high culture (say, modernist fiction, arthouse cinema, avant-garde theater) and so on. The one exception is Music/RichardWagner's Ring Cycle operas which was intended to bridge popular and high culture.

to:

* CriticalDissonance: Norse Mythology has always had a bigger influence on popular culture and fantasy (whether its superhero comics, grand opera, epic fantasy, heavy metal music, science fiction) than on high culture (say, modernist fiction, arthouse cinema, avant-garde theater) and so on. The one exception is Music/RichardWagner's Ring Cycle operas which was intended to bridge popular and high culture.
27th Feb '17 4:23:42 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* CriticalDissonance: Norse Mythology has always had a bigger influence on popular culture and fantasy (whether its superhero comics, grand opera, epic fantasy, heavy metal music, science fiction) than on high culture (say, modernist fiction, arthouse cinema, avant-garde theater) and so on. The one exception is Music/RichardWagner's Ring Cycle operas which was intended to bridge popular and high culture.
27th Feb '17 4:17:37 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* VindicatedByHistory: For most of history, the Norse mythology was deprecated by European intellectuals who honored Greek and Roman mythology, as well as stories from the Bible as being of great value. The Eddas that form the source for the mythologies was written by Sturluson for primarily linguistic reasons and references and not because he ''liked'' the stories. Yet in the 19th, 20th and 21st Century, the Norse myth is considered to be as compelling and moving as other pantheons and its characters Thor, Odin and Loki unleashed a FountainOfExpies in multiple HighFantasy and other genres.
27th Feb '17 4:10:05 PM JulianLapostat
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** While the days of the week in the Anglophone are based on Norse pantheon, the origins and role that Norse Myth played in the cultures of Germans and English-speaking people for most of TheMiddleAges, UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Writers like Shakespeare, Chaucer, Cervantes, Dante, Goethe and Schiller kept making references to the Bible, to the Arabian Nights, to the chivalric cycle of the Middle Ages and especially Greek and Roman mythology but made no references to Norse mythology for source material or poetic reference. German intellectuals deprecated any of the poems deriving from that (UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat noted that ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'' was not worth a powder of shot). The norse myths and the original texts were rediscovered in the late 1600s and 1700s and became popular in the 19th Century, and German and European intellectuals came around to it when Music/RichardWagner composed the Ring Cycle.

to:

** While the days of the week in the Anglophone are based on Norse pantheon, the origins it was entirely forgotten and role that Norse Myth played in the cultures of Germans and English-speaking people obscure for most of TheMiddleAges, UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Writers like Shakespeare, Chaucer, Cervantes, Dante, Goethe and Schiller kept making references to the Bible, to the Arabian Nights, to the chivalric cycle of the Middle Ages and especially Greek and Roman mythology but made no references to Norse mythology for source material or poetic reference. German intellectuals deprecated any of the poems deriving from that (UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat noted that ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'' was not worth a powder of shot). The norse myths and the original texts were rediscovered in the late 1600s and 1700s and became popular in the 19th Century, and German and European intellectuals came around to it when Music/RichardWagner composed the Ring Cycle.
27th Feb '17 4:07:00 PM JulianLapostat
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** The written sources for Norse Mythology are the Eddas by Creator/SnorriSturluson and Icelandic Sagas which were written down in the 1200s, which makes it, as of this writing, ''less'' than a millenia old, younger than ''Literature/TheQuran, Literature/TheShahnameh, Literature/ ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}, Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}, The Song of Roland, Arthurian Sagas'', leave alone ''Literature/TheMahabharata'' and ''Literature/TheRamayana'', and far far younger than Roman and Greek mythology (which dates back to 5th and 6th Century BCE) and ''Literature/TheBible'' (Old and New Testaments).

to:

** The written sources for Norse Mythology are the Eddas by Creator/SnorriSturluson and Icelandic Sagas which were written down in the 1200s, which makes it, as of this writing, ''less'' than a millenia old, younger than ''Literature/TheQuran, Literature/TheShahnameh, Literature/ ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}, Literature/{{Beowulf}}, Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}, The Song of Roland, Arthurian Sagas'', leave alone ''Literature/TheMahabharata'' and ''Literature/TheRamayana'', and far far younger than Roman and Greek mythology (which dates back to 5th and 6th Century BCE) and ''Literature/TheBible'' (Old and New Testaments).
27th Feb '17 4:05:22 PM JulianLapostat
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* DemotedToExtra: Tyr was originally the king of the gods until Odin got more popular. Now everybody just knows him as "that god with the one hand". This resulted in some versions making the RetCon that Tyr was head god first, but stepped down when he lost his hand to Fenrir.

to:

* DemotedToExtra: Tyr was originally the king of the gods until Odin got more popular. Now everybody just knows him as "that god with the one hand".hand" who is the namesake of Tuesday (i.e. Tyr's Day). This resulted in some versions making the RetCon that Tyr was head god first, but stepped down when he lost his hand to Fenrir.



** Unfortunately, due to the [[ThoseWackyNazis Nazi]] deification of all things blond and blue-eyed, a disproportionate number of the "fans" of Norse mythology you'll find these days are Wotanists, a neo-nazi white supremacist sect who wish to return the lighter-skinned "to their ancestral religion." How these nutters would react to the fact that Norse mythology is heavily connected to other Proto-Indo-European religions, with such concepts as a world tree and serpent being observed as far as India and Persia...

to:

** Unfortunately, due to the [[ThoseWackyNazis Nazi]] deification of all things blond and blue-eyed, a disproportionate number of the "fans" of Norse mythology you'll find these days are Wotanists, a neo-nazi white supremacist sect who wish to return the lighter-skinned "to their ancestral religion." How these nutters would react to the fact that Norse mythology is heavily connected to other Proto-Indo-European religions, with such concepts full of InterSpeciesRomance (such as a world tree the marriage between Njodr and serpent Skadi, Loki being observed as far as India a Frost-Giant, Frey falling in LoveAtFirstSight with a giantess), or what can be called the polymorphous perverse (Thor being a WholesomeCrossdresser and Persia...a fetching bride as Freya, Loki's fondness for coupling with animals).
** More to the point, the Norse Gods are described repeatedly in the original myths as vulnerable ''and'' mortal, they are afraid of Frost Giants, Trolls and others and rely greatly on powerful weapons and artifacts (such as Mjolnir) to feel safe, have to sacrifice eyes and limbs to achieve their ends (Odin sacrifices his eye, Tyr sacrifices his arm) and of course there's the fact that in the end, EveryoneDies. Founding an ideology of power and domination based on Gods who are mortal, vulnerable and self-destructive is ComicallyMissingThePoint.



** The written sources for Norse Mythology are the Eddas by Creator/SnorriSturlusson and Icelandic Sagas which were written down in the 1200s, which makes it, as of this writing, ''less'' than a millenia old, younger than ''Literature/TheQuran, Literature/TheShahnameh, Literature/ ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}, Literature/{{Nibelungenleid}}, The Song of Roland, Arthurian Sagas'', leave alone ''Literature/TheMahabharata'' and ''Literature/TheRamayana'', and far far younger than Roman and Greek mythology (which dates back to 5th and 6th Century BCE) and ''Literature/TheBible'' (Old and New Testaments).
** While the days of the week in the Anglophone are based on Norse pantheon, the origins and role that Norse Myth played in the cultures of Germans and English-speaking people for most of TheMiddleAges, UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Writers like Shakespeare, Chaucer, Cervantes, Dante, Goethe and Schiller kept making references to the Bible, to the Arabian Nights, to the chivalric cycle of the Middle Ages and especially Greek and Roman mythology but made no references to Norse mythology for source material or poetic reference. German intellectuals deprecated any of the poems deriving from that (UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat noted that "Literature/{{Nibelungenleid}}" was not worth a powder of shot). The norse myths and the original texts were rediscovered in the late 1600s and 1700s and became popular in the 19th Century, and German and European intellecutals came around to it when Music/RichardWagner composed the Ring Cycle.

to:

** The written sources for Norse Mythology are the Eddas by Creator/SnorriSturlusson Creator/SnorriSturluson and Icelandic Sagas which were written down in the 1200s, which makes it, as of this writing, ''less'' than a millenia old, younger than ''Literature/TheQuran, Literature/TheShahnameh, Literature/ ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}, Literature/{{Nibelungenleid}}, Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}, The Song of Roland, Arthurian Sagas'', leave alone ''Literature/TheMahabharata'' and ''Literature/TheRamayana'', and far far younger than Roman and Greek mythology (which dates back to 5th and 6th Century BCE) and ''Literature/TheBible'' (Old and New Testaments).
** While the days of the week in the Anglophone are based on Norse pantheon, the origins and role that Norse Myth played in the cultures of Germans and English-speaking people for most of TheMiddleAges, UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Writers like Shakespeare, Chaucer, Cervantes, Dante, Goethe and Schiller kept making references to the Bible, to the Arabian Nights, to the chivalric cycle of the Middle Ages and especially Greek and Roman mythology but made no references to Norse mythology for source material or poetic reference. German intellectuals deprecated any of the poems deriving from that (UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat noted that "Literature/{{Nibelungenleid}}" ''Literature/{{Nibelungenlied}}'' was not worth a powder of shot). The norse myths and the original texts were rediscovered in the late 1600s and 1700s and became popular in the 19th Century, and German and European intellecutals intellectuals came around to it when Music/RichardWagner composed the Ring Cycle.
27th Feb '17 3:33:54 PM JulianLapostat
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* DemotedToExtra: Tyr was originally the king of the gods until Odin got more popular. Now everybody just knows him as "that god with the one hand". This resulted in some versions making the RetCon that Tyr was head god first, but stepped down when he lost his hand to Fenrir.



* DemotedToExtra: Tyr was originally the king of the gods until Odin got more popular. Now everybody just knows him as "that god with the one hand". This resulted in some versions making the RetCon that Tyr was head god first, but stepped down when he lost his hand to Fenrir.


Added DiffLines:

* NewerThanTheyThink: In many respects, it's [[ZigZaggedTrope the newest ancient polytheistic pantheon]] in history and more importantly, cultural memory:
** The written sources for Norse Mythology are the Eddas by Creator/SnorriSturlusson and Icelandic Sagas which were written down in the 1200s, which makes it, as of this writing, ''less'' than a millenia old, younger than ''Literature/TheQuran, Literature/TheShahnameh, Literature/ ''Literature/{{Beowulf}}, Literature/{{Nibelungenleid}}, The Song of Roland, Arthurian Sagas'', leave alone ''Literature/TheMahabharata'' and ''Literature/TheRamayana'', and far far younger than Roman and Greek mythology (which dates back to 5th and 6th Century BCE) and ''Literature/TheBible'' (Old and New Testaments).
** While the days of the week in the Anglophone are based on Norse pantheon, the origins and role that Norse Myth played in the cultures of Germans and English-speaking people for most of TheMiddleAges, UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance and UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Writers like Shakespeare, Chaucer, Cervantes, Dante, Goethe and Schiller kept making references to the Bible, to the Arabian Nights, to the chivalric cycle of the Middle Ages and especially Greek and Roman mythology but made no references to Norse mythology for source material or poetic reference. German intellectuals deprecated any of the poems deriving from that (UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat noted that "Literature/{{Nibelungenleid}}" was not worth a powder of shot). The norse myths and the original texts were rediscovered in the late 1600s and 1700s and became popular in the 19th Century, and German and European intellecutals came around to it when Music/RichardWagner composed the Ring Cycle.
** Its entry to PopCulturalOsmosis can definitely be credited to Creator/JackKirby and Creator/StanLee who deliberately created ComicBook/TheMightyThor to avert SmallReferencePools and avoid the overexposed Greek and Roman Pantheon, and that comic dates from TheSixties. The Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse is likewise how most audiences around the world who were broadly familiar with the Graeco-Roman classical traditions came to learn of the Norse pantheon.
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