History YMMV / LesMiserables

6th Jan '18 10:28:41 PM nombretomado
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** There's a small, bizarre subgenre of fanfics where Enjolras succeeds in overthrowing the government and immediately becomes a [[UsefulNotes/FidelCastro Castro]]-style dictator, though most if not all of these are intended as BlackComedy rather than character-bashing. Enjolras also [[AdaptationalVillainy semi-officially received this]] in the 1935 film version, up to and including casting JohnCarradine, better known for many, many horror movie villain roles, in the part.

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** There's a small, bizarre subgenre of fanfics where Enjolras succeeds in overthrowing the government and immediately becomes a [[UsefulNotes/FidelCastro Castro]]-style dictator, though most if not all of these are intended as BlackComedy rather than character-bashing. Enjolras also [[AdaptationalVillainy semi-officially received this]] in the 1935 film version, up to and including casting JohnCarradine, Creator/JohnCarradine, better known for many, many horror movie villain roles, in the part.
2nd Jan '18 4:25:44 AM annieholmes
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** Enjolras and Grantaire. Depending on the production, they do everything from touch foreheads to hug closely during "Drink With Me".
*** Of course, the fact that their actors in the anniversary US touring cast are ''dating'' (now engaged) doesn't help.

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** Enjolras and Grantaire. Depending on the production, they do everything from touch foreheads to hug closely during "Drink With Me".
Me". Anton Zetterholm ''buries'' his Grantaire's head in Enjolras' chest for the hug.
*** Of course, the fact that their actors in the anniversary US touring cast cast, Jason Forbach and Joseph Spieldenner, are ''dating'' (now engaged) married) doesn't help.
12th Dec '17 4:52:36 PM JulianLapostat
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* MisaimedFandom: As noted, the novel was highly popular for a time in the post-Confederate American South. This not only would have offended Hugo deeply, but many other fans and readers might well be confused by this, since the Friends of the ABC are social liberals who ''themselves'' would likely have considered the slave-state, oligarch-favoring Confederacy a blight and an enemy. But they're fighting a doomed battle against a state that wants to keep them down, so a great many Southerners found sympathy for them.

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* MisaimedFandom: As noted, the novel was highly popular for a time in the post-Confederate American South. This not only would have offended Hugo deeply, but many other fans and readers might well be confused by this, since the Friends of the ABC are social liberals who ''themselves'' would likely have considered the slave-state, oligarch-favoring Confederacy a blight and an enemy. Considering they are fanboys of the UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution and the Jacobin Republic[[note]]which was the first state to abolish slavery without compensations and preconditions, a decision that Napoleon overturned)[[/note]]. But they're fighting a doomed battle against a state that wants to keep them down, so a great many Southerners found sympathy for them.
12th Dec '17 4:29:34 PM SpaceDrake
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* AccidentalInnuendo: "I have come to sleep with you," from Marius to Courfeyrac.

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* AccidentalInnuendo: "I have come to sleep with you," from Marius to Courfeyrac. Of course, it's always been a point of debate just ''how'' "accidental" it is.


Added DiffLines:

* MisaimedFandom: As noted, the novel was highly popular for a time in the post-Confederate American South. This not only would have offended Hugo deeply, but many other fans and readers might well be confused by this, since the Friends of the ABC are social liberals who ''themselves'' would likely have considered the slave-state, oligarch-favoring Confederacy a blight and an enemy. But they're fighting a doomed battle against a state that wants to keep them down, so a great many Southerners found sympathy for them.
6th Dec '17 7:21:00 PM SpaceDrake
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** The most notable is the above, with SheIsAllGrownUp happening to Cosette and Marius becoming infatuated with her. Marius' behavior during all this can strike many readers as ''profoundly'' creepy, what with hanging about the places she and Valjean hang out for hours on end (and certainly Valjean gets annoyed with him in-story) and the fact that Marius is 20 while Cosette had just turned 15, but in the 19th century Marius' incredible shyness and his devotion to wanting to see her would have come across as extremely romantic.

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** The most notable is the above, with SheIsAllGrownUp example on the main page happening to Cosette and Marius becoming infatuated with her. Marius' behavior during all this can strike many readers as ''profoundly'' creepy, what with hanging about the places she and Valjean hang out for hours on end (and certainly Valjean gets annoyed with him in-story) and the fact that Marius is 20 while Cosette had just turned 15, but in the 19th century Marius' incredible shyness and his devotion to wanting to see her would have come across as extremely romantic.



*** And in general, many of the narrator's thoughts about women and their behavior come off as overly stereotypical and backward by modern standards.
* ValuesResonance: For 150 years, many issues discussed in ''Les Miserables'' are remarkably pertinent today, as we see men persecuted simply for their past reputation, families divided over such petty issues as political fanaticism, and scoundrels who abuse their position of "caretaker" simply for the money. Victor Hugo's urging that these ills ''must'' be faced are every bit as relevant today as they were in post-Revolutionary France.
* VindicatedByHistory: Critical reception when it first came out was mostly negative, with reviewers finding it [[ArcFatigue too long]], [[WriterOnBoard too preachy]], and [[ValuesDissonance too sympathetic to those smelly poor people]]. To say its reputation has improved is an understatement: it's often lauded as one of the greatest novels ever written, is the national prose epic of France, and has spawned mores adaptations than almost any other work of fiction.

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*** And in general, many of the narrator's thoughts about women and their behavior come off as overly stereotypical and backward by modern standards.
standards. Hugo ''is'' writing in good faith, but he was born, raised, and wrote fifty years or more before women's liberation was even an organized concept.
* ValuesResonance: For being 150 years, years old, many issues discussed in ''Les Miserables'' are remarkably pertinent today, as we see men persecuted simply for their past reputation, families divided over such petty issues as political fanaticism, and scoundrels who abuse their position of "caretaker" simply for the money. Victor Hugo's urging that these ills ''must'' be faced are every bit as relevant today as they were in post-Revolutionary France.
* VindicatedByHistory: Critical reception when it first came out was mostly negative, with reviewers finding it [[ArcFatigue too long]], [[WriterOnBoard too preachy]], and [[ValuesDissonance too sympathetic to those smelly poor people]]. To say its reputation has improved is an understatement: it's often lauded as one of the greatest novels ever written, is the national prose epic of France, and has spawned mores more adaptations than almost any other work of fiction.
4th Dec '17 10:38:46 AM JulianLapostat
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* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: This book became a hit in the post-UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar South thanks to the romantic but doomed Les Amis de l'ABC.

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* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: This book became a hit in the post-UsefulNotes/AmericanCivilWar South thanks to the romantic but doomed Les Amis de l'ABC. Victor Hugo would not approve in the slightest, being a vocal supporter of the Union, an abolitionist, and writing a letter in support of John Brown.
1st Nov '17 2:04:16 PM CJCroen1393
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Added DiffLines:

* JerkassWoobie: Madame Thenardier is not a pleasant individual, but she's implicitly a victim of domestic abuse, is genuinely heartbroken when she's separated from her daughters and is ultimately left to die in prison while her husband escapes.
8th Sep '17 8:58:23 PM Kissinger113
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* JerkassHasaPoint

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* JerkassHasaPointJerkassHasAPoint
20th Aug '17 8:33:36 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their collaborative death, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay faintly homosexual]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their his and Enjolras' collaborative death, death following the defeat of the revolution, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay faintly homosexual]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.
20th Aug '17 8:31:11 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and extensive backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging, and can also double as [[AllThereInTheManual All There in the Manuel]]), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.

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* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and extensive backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging, and can also double as [[AllThereInTheManual All There in the Manuel]]), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor brief role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.LesMiserables