History YMMV / LesMiserables

8th Sep '17 8:58:23 PM Kissinger113
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* JerkassHasaPoint

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* JerkassHasaPointJerkassHasAPoint
20th Aug '17 8:33:36 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their collaborative death, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay faintly homosexual]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their his and Enjolras' collaborative death, death following the defeat of the revolution, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay faintly homosexual]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.
20th Aug '17 8:31:11 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and extensive backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging, and can also double as [[AllThereInTheManual All There in the Manuel]]), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.

to:

* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and extensive backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging, and can also double as [[AllThereInTheManual All There in the Manuel]]), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor brief role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.
20th Aug '17 8:29:03 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.

to:

* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and extensive backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging), engaging, and can also double as [[AllThereInTheManual All There in the Manuel]]), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.
20th Aug '17 8:26:49 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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-->'''Courfrerac:''' I saw him. Don't let's speak to him.

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-->'''Courfrerac:''' -->'''Courfeyrac:''' I saw him. Don't let's speak to him.


Added DiffLines:

* SlowPacedBeginning: The novel is infamous for, [[CompressedAdaptation much to the surprise of fans of the musical going into the novel blind]], its many lengthy explanations (many of them being [[AuthorFilibuster Author Filibusters]]) and backstory (although some of it, particularly in the cases of Jean Valjean and Marius, is fairly interesting and engaging), most notably in the beginning, where the novel's first seventy pages and fourteen chapters are devoted to the life and work of Bishop Myriel (who plays a [[DemotedToExtra fairly minor role in the musical]] and [[AdaptedOut is absent from the original French concept album]]) - likewise, it takes seventy pages at least (depending on which edition you're reading) to even reach Jean Valjean, over 100 pages to reach Fantine (the titular character of the novel's first volume) and nearly 800 before the June Revolution (which is the setting for most of the musical and film's second and third acts). And even then, the revolution itself only lasts a little over 150 pages in a 1200 (or more)-page novel.
20th Aug '17 5:29:05 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their collaborative death, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their collaborative death, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay]]).[[AmbiguouslyGay faintly homosexual]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.
20th Aug '17 5:28:02 AM MLPAndFriendsComic301991
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate, bringing in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Enjolras' sexual orientation has been the topic of heated debate, bringing debate (mostly due to Grantaire's role in the novel and their collaborative death, leading some readers to interpret Enjolras as [[AmbiguouslyGay]]). This tends to bring in issues of both shipping and homoerotic context.



* HollywoodHomely: There's an interesting disconnect between how the narrative describes Eponine and how the official illustration depict her. The narrative goes into great detail about how her years of living in squalor have cost her the majority of her looks, but in the illustrations she's not really any uglier than Cosette, just scrawnier and scruffier.

to:

* HollywoodHomely: There's an interesting disconnect between how the narrative describes Eponine and how the official illustration depict her. The narrative goes into great detail about how her years of living in squalor have cost her the majority of her looks, looks (although one chapter later in the novel does describe her as having regained some of her beauty after disconnecting from her family and the various crimes they commit), but in the illustrations she's not really any uglier than Cosette, just scrawnier and scruffier.



** Grantaire "admired, loved, and venerated" Enjolras, and is "subjugated" by his character. Grantaire says Enjolras' "chaste, healthy, firm, direct, hard, candid nature charmed him," and his own "soft, wavering, disjointed, diseased, deformed ideas, attached themselves to Enjolras as to a backbone. His moral spine leaned upon that firmness." The two are compared to several Greek lovers (Achilles and Patrokles, Alexander and Hephestion, Orestes and Pylades, among others) and Enjolras is the one thing Grantaire allows himself to believe in. Moreover, he's ''only'' in the revolution because of his love for Enjolras. It even goes to the point of [[spoiler: asking to die with him, and doing so (while Enjolras smiles at him and holds his hand)]].

to:

** Grantaire "admired, loved, and venerated" Enjolras, and is "subjugated" by his character. Grantaire says Enjolras' "chaste, healthy, firm, direct, hard, candid nature charmed him," and his own "soft, wavering, disjointed, diseased, deformed ideas, attached themselves to Enjolras as to a backbone. His moral spine leaned upon that firmness." The two are compared to several Greek lovers (Achilles and Patrokles, Alexander and Hephestion, Orestes and Pylades, among others) and Enjolras is the one thing Grantaire allows himself to believe in. Moreover, he's ''only'' in the revolution because of his love for Enjolras. It even goes to the point of [[spoiler: asking to die with him, and doing so (while [[AmbiguouslyGay Enjolras smiles at him and holds his hand)]].hand]])]].
14th Jul '17 9:00:04 PM priestessofdan
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* ItWasHisSled: Everyone dies (apart from Cosette, Marius, and the Thénardiers).

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* ItWasHisSled: Everyone dies (apart from Cosette, Marius, M. Thénardier, and the Thénardiers).Azelma).



*** Then again, compared to his parents, the streets do start to seem better.

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*** Then again, compared to his parents, the streets do start to seem better.to be the better option.
14th Jul '17 11:25:23 AM DoktorvonEurotrash
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Added DiffLines:

* AccidentalInnuendo: In the French version of "Stars," Javert sings that he will not slacken in his search "until [Valjean] is on his knees before me". Given the distinct FoeYay in this song, that line could be taken a certain way.
8th Jun '17 5:25:24 AM pochabubbles
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* Jerkass Has a Point

to:

* Jerkass Has a PointJerkassHasaPoint
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.LesMiserables