History YMMV / JesusChristSuperstar

8th Jan '16 9:53:47 PM Octavian
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* HamAndCheese: Pilate tends to be played with either this or TranquilFury. Fred Johanson (2000) is an example of the former; Alex Hanson (2012), of the latter. Barry Dennen (1973) does both at different times, but errs toward ham, albeit with not as much over-the-top attack-dog viciousness as Johanson. ** Worth noting is that Pilate's apparent one constant character trait is being out of his depth, and a lot of his characterisation comes from this. Barry Dennen's Pilate is relatively calm when we meet him in Act I, but becomes angrier and more vicious throughout the show as a result of the stress and strain of trying to understand and to dispense justice while knowing the crowd will lynch him if he doesn't give them what they want. ** Meanwhile, Fred Johanson's Pilate is near tears from fear in "Pilate's Dream", but resolutely macho and hypermasculine when next we see him - the tears are his real self, while the borderline psychotic rage which characterises the rest of his performance is a facade of machismo put on to please the crowd and give the impression of strong, merciless leadership. Reinforcing this impression is the fact that in the lull just before the final "Remember Caesar" section of "Trial Before Pilate", when Jesus is the only person who can see his face, the facade falls and the rattled, extremely scared look from before is back. ** Among the major portrayals, Hanson's Pilate is different in that he is negotiating from a position of strength; Dennen's Pilate risks being physically torn apart by the mob, while Johanson's Pilate risks an unsustainable loss of face. Hanson's Pilate seems to be better-protected, and as a result he remains relatively calm even up to the start of "Trial Before Pilate", when he begins to sense that things are not as they should be and that the problem will not blow over on its own. His eventual rage is not born of fear; it comes from bemusement, turning to frustration and helplessness.
8th Jan '16 9:24:01 PM Octavian
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*** Caiaphas and Annas, oddly enough, also get this in the 2012 production. It's relatively restrained, but there are a few looks shared in quiet moments; most notably, in this production, Judas punches Caiaphas in the face in the "Damned For All Time" section of "Judas' Death", and Annas hands Caiaphas a small towelette to wipe off the blood, giving him a positively throbbing look as he does so. The height disparity (6'6'' Caiaphas v. rather diminutive Annas) and the [[RedOniBlueOni distinct difference in manner]] (Caiaphas blue, Annas red) add to the impression.

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* ObviouslyEvil: The Priests in the 2012 version. They all wear suits (very much like investment bankers, in this Occupy-themed production), their council seems to take place in a boardroom, and their insignia (seen at the start of This Jesus Must Die) is an Eye of Providence (evoking the Illuminati) in a laurel wreath (evoking Rome). Caiaphas specifically falls straight into this, with his slicked-back hair and BeardOfEvil. ** [[AvertedTrope Averted]] with Caiaphas in the otherwise fairly straightforward 2000 version, however. He has a relatively benevolent-looking face, as opposed to Annas, who looks almost exactly like [[HarryPotter Voldemort]]. Played straight by Pilate in the same version - he has a chinstrap BeardOfEvil and his costume is a combination of a Gestapo officer and a Roman legionary.
16th Oct '15 5:48:00 AM Mooncinder
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** WordOfGod from Tim Rice says that his aim as far as presenting Judas' character was more to with showing what he might have done in the same situation rather than making him [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation interesting]].
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** WordOfGod from Tim Rice says that his aim as far as presenting Judas' character was more to do with showing what he might have done in the same situation rather than making him [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation interesting]].
16th Oct '15 5:47:28 AM Mooncinder
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** How much you end up sympathising with him is, of course, up the the interpretation of the audience. Either he was a pawn in God's/Jesus' plan, a pawn in the Pharisees' plans, or misguided but ultimately chose his fate. (Or a mix)
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** How much you end up sympathising with him is, of course, up the to the interpretation of the audience. Either he was a pawn in God's/Jesus' plan, a pawn in the Pharisees' plans, or misguided but ultimately chose his fate. (Or a mix)
26th Aug '15 1:51:56 PM DoktorvonEurotrash
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** The 2000 version has the look of realisation on Jesus' face when he is held down to the cross and sees one of the soldiers picking up a nail.
6th Aug '15 7:38:46 PM CasWarner
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** The brutality of the crucifixion having been foreshadowed during the 1973 movie's "Gethsemane", where the moment Jesus accepts his fate, there's a montage of zooms on images of his crucifixion as depicted in paintings across the years since.
30th Jun '15 10:35:06 AM Scorpio3002
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** On a different note, whether or not Christ is actually divine is ambiguous. There is evidence both for (his prophecy to Peter and Judas) and against (Jesus running from the lepers instead of healing them, and his prayers in Gethsemane) in the music, and it is typically left to the individual production to sort it out, usually in Judas' "Jesus Christ Superstar" number and after Jesus' death, where some productions will throw in a hint that he has resurrected.
25th Apr '15 9:22:05 AM pittsburghmuggle
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* TheWoobie: Mary Magdalene. Depending on the production, Jesus and/or Judas could be as well.
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* TheWoobie: TheWoobie: ** Mary Magdalene. Depending on the production, Jesus and/or Judas could be as well. ** Pilate. He really wants to be anywhere else.
6th Apr '15 8:00:50 AM Doc_Loki
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** Caiaphas comes across a bit this way, particularly if you know the history of the area. His interest is in preserving the status quo, not because the status quo is so good, but because the Romans will brutally put down any rebellions - like they eventually did a generation later when Judea rose in arms. Caiaphas is willing to sacrifice Jesus' life because he believes that doing so will save many, many other lives.
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** Caiaphas comes across a bit this way, particularly if you know the history of the area. His interest is in preserving the status quo, not because the status quo is so good, but because the Romans will brutally put down any rebellions - like they eventually did a generation later when Judea rose in arms. Caiaphas is willing to sacrifice Jesus' life because he believes that doing so will save many, many other lives. This is fairly ruthless, but it's not evil or sadistic (as Caiaphas is often portrayed elsewhere and Annas still is here).
6th Apr '15 7:59:46 AM Doc_Loki
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** Caiaphas comes across a bit this way, particularly if you know the history of the area. His interest is in preserving the status quo, not because the status quo is so good, but because the Romans will brutally put down any rebellions - like they eventually did a generation later when Judea rose in arms. Caiaphas is willing to sacrifice Jesus' life because he believes that doing so will save many, many other lives.
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