History YMMV / Frankenstein

15th Jan '18 3:10:48 AM WillBGood
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* HollywoodHomely: It's never made clear exactly why the Creature is so hideous, other than he's big, he has watery eyes, and yellowish skin. Victor designed the Creature to be an ideal human specimen, and the [[http://io9.com/see-the-earliest-illustration-of-shelleys-frankenstein-1627183813 in the earliest illustrations]], he looks like {{Poldark}}.

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* HollywoodHomely: It's never made clear exactly why the Creature is so hideous, other than he's big, he has watery eyes, and yellowish skin. Victor designed the Creature to be an ideal human specimen, and the [[http://io9.com/see-the-earliest-illustration-of-shelleys-frankenstein-1627183813 in the earliest illustrations]], he looks like {{Poldark}}.Series/{{Poldark}}.
23rd Dec '17 3:44:11 PM Vampireandthen
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** Victor letting Justine take the fall for William's murder, even though he knows she is innocent and could prove it if he tried. Sure, nobody might believe him, but he's a smart guy, he could think of something.

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** Victor letting Justine take the fall for William's murder, even though he knows she is innocent and could prove it if he tried.tried, because he fears people might think he is crazy or guilty. Sure, nobody might believe him, but he's a smart guy, he could think of something. This is the point where Victor starts going downhill.
23rd Dec '17 3:42:35 PM Vampireandthen
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** [[spoiler:Victor destroying the body of the Creature's mate, ''right in front of him,'' can be seen as this.]]

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** [[spoiler:Victor destroying Victor letting Justine take the body fall for William's murder, even though he knows she is innocent and could prove it if he tried. Sure, nobody might believe him, but he's a smart guy, he could think of the Creature's mate, ''right in front of him,'' can be seen as this.]]something.
29th Sep '17 7:30:06 PM WarriorSparrow
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* HilariousInHindsight: A central monstrous character whose real AllThereInTheManual name is Adam, who ended up wanting someone to love despite thinking no human could love him. Are we talking about Adam Frankenstein or [[Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast Prince Adam]]?
13th Jul '17 9:03:43 AM Cieloazul
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* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: The Creature. While it's easy to feel sorry for his sore life since his creation and his long rants about how being shunned leads to being evil are difficult to refute, they expose precisely that he is reflexive enough to realize the wrongness of his FreudianExcuse, yet he chooses to invoke it straight and become consciously evil.
30th May '17 8:12:27 AM StarTropes
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* TheWoobie: Justine. Pure-hearted, but gets executed for a murder she didn't commit.
15th May '17 2:31:56 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* AlternateAesopInterpretation: The intended Aesop of the story was not to play God, but it is very easy to - see Broken Aesop below - instead come to the conclusion of much better Aesop being to take responsibility for your actions.

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* AlternateAesopInterpretation: The intended Aesop of the story was not to play God, but it is very easy to - see Broken Aesop below - instead come to the conclusion of much better Aesop being to take responsibility for your actions.



* BrokenAesop: On the surface, the novel appears to espouse the fairly anvilicious message that humans are not supposed to play God. Victor Frankenstein himself expressly says it was wrong to create human-like life the artificial way. However the humanoid he created was much smarter, picking up language at an alarming rate, stronger, faster (in the novel at least), and (initally) more moral than most normal humans. [[ThenLetMeBeEvil His evil nature only grew out of his constant abuse at the hands of humans who were too terrified to give him a chance and from Victor's hatred and neglect]]. The tragedy is that all the bloodshed caused by the creature could easily have been avoided had Victor Frankenstein taken care of his creation instead of leaving it to die. Indeed, anything more than just cruelly abandoning the newborn confused creature would have helped greatly. He also could have put in the extra effort to make his creation look more acceptable to humans. The humans he approached could have given him a chance instead of beating him up, or the creature could have realized how horribly superficial humans are and worn a mask when he approached them. Even if Victor Frankenstein had simply kept his word to create a companion for his creature and simply rendered her infertile most of the deaths could have been averted.
19th Apr '17 4:00:07 AM Vampireandthen
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* DracoInLeatherPants: The Creature/Adam Frankenstein/The Monster, whatever you want to call him. In most adaptions of Mary Shelly's novel, he often does get treated much more sympathetically, most notably in the original film, which makes him into a clueless monster which doesn't know its own strength. In the novel itself, he kills a fair number of Victor's loved ones, and is much smarter, perhaps on par with Victor. To be fair, he does feel rather bad at the end, and decides to commit suicide.

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* DracoInLeatherPants: The Creature/Adam Frankenstein/The Monster, whatever you want to call him. In most adaptions of Mary Shelly's novel, he often does get treated much more sympathetically, most notably in the original film, which makes him into a clueless monster which doesn't know its own strength. In the novel itself, [[spoiler: he kills a fair number of Victor's loved ones, and is much smarter, perhaps on par with Victor. To be fair, he does feel rather bad at the end, and decides to commit suicide.]]


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** [[spoiler:Victor destroying the body of the Creature's mate, ''right in front of him,'' can be seen as this.]]
19th Apr '17 3:57:18 AM Vampireandthen
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Added DiffLines:

* DracoInLeatherPants: The Creature/Adam Frankenstein/The Monster, whatever you want to call him. In most adaptions of Mary Shelly's novel, he often does get treated much more sympathetically, most notably in the original film, which makes him into a clueless monster which doesn't know its own strength. In the novel itself, he kills a fair number of Victor's loved ones, and is much smarter, perhaps on par with Victor. To be fair, he does feel rather bad at the end, and decides to commit suicide.
19th Apr '17 3:47:52 AM Vampireandthen
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* IAmNotShazam: Many people call Frankenstein's Monster "Frankenstein", while he actually has no name. "Frankenstein" is the name of his maker, Victor Frankenstein. But we can probably blame Mary Shelley for that; it would be a lot clearer to all if she'd called her novel "Doctor Frankenstein". This confusion dates back nearly as far as the novel itself, and became established during periods when the actual book was out of print, but its characters and plot were being emulated by stage plays, knockoffs and parodies throughout the pre-copyright 19th century. Ironically, since one could argue that Frankenstein is the "father" of the creature, you could say that the creature's last name ''is'' Frankenstein.

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* IAmNotShazam: Many people call Frankenstein's Monster "Frankenstein", while he actually has no name. "Frankenstein" is the name of his maker, Victor Frankenstein. But we can probably blame Mary Shelley for that; it would be a lot clearer to all if she'd called her novel "Doctor Frankenstein". This confusion dates back nearly as far as the novel itself, and became established during periods when the actual book was out of print, but its characters and plot were being emulated by stage plays, knockoffs and parodies throughout the pre-copyright 19th century. Ironically, since one could argue that Frankenstein is the "father" of the creature, you could say that the creature's last name ''is'' Frankenstein.
Frankenstein. Mary Shelly referred to the Monster as Adam in letters to her friends, which does make some sense, seeing as it is the first of its kind.
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