History YMMV / Fahrenheit451

21st Dec '17 1:19:33 AM Gray
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* DeathOfTheAuthor: Later in life, Bradbury [[http://www.laweekly.com/2007-05-31/news/ray-bradbury-fahrenheit-451-misinterpreted/ claimed]] that the book is ''not'' about government censorship. Instead, he says that books are illegal in his story because excessive political correctness censored literature into oblivion and [[NewMediaAreEvil television destroyed interest in reading altogether]], to the point that the people demanded books to be banned. As such, the culprit is the people themselves rather than government. Despite Bradbury's assertions, the book is almost universally read as a statement on government censorship used to pacify the citizenry.

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* DeathOfTheAuthor: Later in life, Bradbury [[http://www.laweekly.com/2007-05-31/news/ray-bradbury-fahrenheit-451-misinterpreted/ claimed]] that the book is ''not'' about government censorship. Instead, he says that books are illegal in his story because excessive political correctness censored literature into oblivion and [[NewMediaAreEvil television destroyed interest in reading altogether]], to the point that the people demanded books to be banned. As such, the culprit is the people themselves rather than government. Despite Bradbury's assertions, the book is almost universally read as a statement on government censorship used to pacify the citizenry. Both interpretations fit, however, and they aren't necessarily mutually exclusive.
2nd Dec '17 7:23:15 AM fruitstripegum
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Added DiffLines:

* HilariousInHindsight: Bradbury successfully predicted headphones, as seen here:
--->"And in her ears the little seashells, the thimble radios tamped tight, and an electronic ocean of sound, of music and talk and music and talk coming in, coming in on the shore of her unsleeping mind."
23rd Oct '17 9:41:32 AM Togie
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** Sadly, with the way the American 2016 election is going, some might argue that this is a case of ValuesDissonance that is radically transforming into ValuesResonance
28th Feb '17 4:21:19 PM MarkyVigoroth
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* ValuesResonance: This novel predicted iPods, flatscreen [=TVs=], the decline of quality in public schools, prescription drug abuse, people abandoning books for new media, and everyone living in fear over war, but not really taking action. The Choose Your Own Adventure television shows are awfully similar to video-games too. Replace the telescreens with smartphones and you have the phenomenon known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phubbing phubbing]].

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* ValuesResonance: This novel predicted iPods, flatscreen [=TVs=], the decline of quality in public schools, prescription drug abuse, people abandoning books for new media, and everyone living in fear over war, but not really taking action. The Choose Your Own Adventure television shows are awfully similar to video-games too. Replace the telescreens with smartphones and you have the phenomenon known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phubbing phubbing]]. If you go by the interpretation that the book is actually about political correctness, then "social justice warriors" got you covered.
1st Feb '17 4:38:10 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* NightmareFuel
** The Mechanical Hound, mostly because its appearance is veiled in mystery.
** Clarisse's getting run down by rowdy teenagers.
** The Book Lady's death. [[spoiler: Beatty's death.]]
** [[spoiler: Faber's HeroicSacrifice against said hound.]]
** Montag coming home to find Mildred unconscious from a drug overdose (and the uncaring doctors coming in to pump her stomach).
** Heck, the entire premise--i.e. "government has banned any form of literacy"--counts.
** From the movie (during the scene of the old lady burning her own house so the firemen can't arrest her): "Nine elevenths are ninety-nine, nine twelfths are a hundred and eight, nine thirteens are a hundred and seventeen, nine fourteenths are a hundred and twenty-six..."
16th Oct '16 10:42:36 AM erttheking
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* MisaimedFandom: Some people have interpreted the novel as saying that television is always garbage. Not only is this not what Bradbury was trying to say, one character directly stamps on the idea. He flat out says that the Parlor Families could easily have the same magic that books did, and that the magic of books wasn't unique to books, or even guaranteed to be found in them. He then says that what Montag is looking for is the infinite detail and awareness that were once in books and could, in theory, be found in everything from radio plays, to movies, to old friends.

to:

* MisaimedFandom: Some people have interpreted the novel as saying that television is always garbage. Not only is this not what Bradbury was trying to say, one character directly stamps on the idea. He Faber flat out says that the Parlor Families could easily have the same magic that books did, and that the magic of books wasn't unique to books, or even guaranteed to be found in them. He then says that what Montag is looking for is the infinite detail and awareness that were once in books and could, in theory, be found in everything from radio plays, to movies, to old friends.
16th Oct '16 10:17:40 AM erttheking
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* MisaimedFandom: Some people have interpreted the novel as saying that television is always garbage. Not only is this not what Bradbury was trying to say, one character directly stamps on the idea. He flat out says that the Parlor Families could easily have the same magic that books did, and that the magic of books wasn't unique to books, or even guaranteed to be found in them. He then says that what Montag is looking for is the infinite detail and awareness that were once in books and could, in theory, be found in anywhere from radio plays, to movies, to old friends.

to:

* MisaimedFandom: Some people have interpreted the novel as saying that television is always garbage. Not only is this not what Bradbury was trying to say, one character directly stamps on the idea. He flat out says that the Parlor Families could easily have the same magic that books did, and that the magic of books wasn't unique to books, or even guaranteed to be found in them. He then says that what Montag is looking for is the infinite detail and awareness that were once in books and could, in theory, be found in anywhere everything from radio plays, to movies, to old friends.friends.
* NightmareFuel
16th Oct '16 10:16:42 AM erttheking
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* NightmareFuel:

to:

* NightmareFuel: * MisaimedFandom: Some people have interpreted the novel as saying that television is always garbage. Not only is this not what Bradbury was trying to say, one character directly stamps on the idea. He flat out says that the Parlor Families could easily have the same magic that books did, and that the magic of books wasn't unique to books, or even guaranteed to be found in them. He then says that what Montag is looking for is the infinite detail and awareness that were once in books and could, in theory, be found in anywhere from radio plays, to movies, to old friends.
16th Oct '16 10:11:16 AM erttheking
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Added DiffLines:

** Sadly, with the way the American 2016 election is going, some might argue that this is a case of ValuesDissonance that is radically transforming into ValuesResonance
29th Dec '15 9:09:12 AM LucaEarlgrey
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** Heck, the entire premise counts.

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** Heck, the entire premise counts.premise--i.e. "government has banned any form of literacy"--counts.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Fahrenheit451