History Woolseyism / Film

7th Aug '16 6:56:56 AM LtFedora
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* The German dub of ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'' contains one during "Roses of Success." The original English contains a mention of Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, while the German version mentions Wilhelm Röntgen, discoverer of x-rays.

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* The German dub of ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'' contains one during "Roses of Success." The original English contains a mention of Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, while the German version mentions Wilhelm Röntgen, discoverer of who discovered x-rays.
30th Jul '16 2:57:18 PM PhantomDusclops92
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to:

* The Italian dub of ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove'' is one big Woolseyism. Most jokes from the original version were ignored and replaced with a new one, even adding some jokes that were not in the original. From Kuzco referring to Yzma as "Dracula's ugly grandma" to Yzma asking to Kronk if he is feeling "the black power" when brewing the clearly pink potion, prompting Kronk to answer "[[SarcasmMode Truly black, indeed]]". And the most infamous one, Kronk's answer when Yzma can't explain how they got back before Kuzco being changed from "By all accounts, it doesn't make sense" to "[[BreakingTheFourthWall Everyone in the audience is asking that too!]]"
15th Jun '16 6:32:30 PM Doug86
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** Another slight change in the Mexican Spanish dub, and also overlaps with TranslationCorrection of sorts, is about John Matrix's birthplace in the film. In the original version, Matrix was born in then-West Germany, hence his European accent. Since in the Mexican dub Matrix does not use any European accent in his voice and the name ''John Matrix'' doesn't sound German for the Mexican translators, they changed with Matrix being born in an American base in West Germany. This is quite fitting, since the U.S. have military bases in Germany since WorldWarII.

to:

** Another slight change in the Mexican Spanish dub, and also overlaps with TranslationCorrection of sorts, is about John Matrix's birthplace in the film. In the original version, Matrix was born in then-West Germany, hence his European accent. Since in the Mexican dub Matrix does not use any European accent in his voice and the name ''John Matrix'' doesn't sound German for the Mexican translators, they changed with Matrix being born in an American base in West Germany. This is quite fitting, since the U.S. have military bases in Germany since WorldWarII.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.
15th May '16 6:11:28 AM LtFedora
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Added DiffLines:

* The German dub of ''Film/ChittyChittyBangBang'' contains one during "Roses of Success." The original English contains a mention of Alexander Graham Bell, inventor of the telephone, while the German version mentions Wilhelm Röntgen, discoverer of x-rays.
3rd May '16 12:51:21 AM erforce
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* A lot of German film dubs from before the mid-nineties took liberties in translation. Blatant example in the first ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' film. Arnold rudely interrupts a caller at a public phone booth to look up Sarah Connor's address in the book. Said caller mentions Arnold to have "a serious attitude problem". [[SarcasmMode Very witty indeed]]. Compare the German version:

to:

* A lot of German film dubs from before the mid-nineties took liberties in translation. Blatant example in the first ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' ''[[Film/TheTerminator Terminator]]'' film. Arnold rudely interrupts a caller at a public phone booth to look up Sarah Connor's address in the book. Said caller mentions Arnold to have "a serious attitude problem". [[SarcasmMode Very witty indeed]]. Compare the German version:
30th Apr '16 12:26:44 AM annette12
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* Examples from Czech dubbed versions of foreign movies:
** In ''Film/{{Jumanji}}'', the hero said when attacking the carnivorous plant: "It's harvest time, Adele!" ''Adéla ješte nevečeřela'' (''Film/AdeleHasntHadHerDinnerYet'') is a Czech movie, and the titular Adele is a man-eating plant created by a mad scientist.
** In the Czech version of the first ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movie, the translators have smuggled in a number of references to popular Czech fairy tales.
*** And the Czech dubbing of ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movies in general have a lot of these.
* Polish versions of ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' are loaded with Woolseyisms, pretty much like all movies translated by Bartosz Wierzbieta. Not that it's bad, though - Wierzbieta's translations and "localization" of jokes that are more obscure in Poland are almost universally praised there.
* The Latino Spanish version of the Donkey in ''Shrek'' was dubbed by Mexican comedian Eugenio Derbez, who took a lot of liberties with the script and even referenced his (at the time) popular sketch TV show, yet the dubbing worked giving the nature of the character.
* This gem from the Polish version of ''Film/PulpFiction'':
--> '''Fabienne''': Czyj to Harley? (''Whose Harley is that?'')
--> '''Butch''': Zeda. (''It's Zed's.'')
--> '''Fabienne''': Kto to jest Zed? (''Who's Zed?'')
--> '''Butch''': Zed zszedł, kochanie. (''Zed passed away, baby.'' - which sounds in Polish almost exactly like the original "Zed's dead" as the two words rhyme.)
** Turning the "I'm gonna get medieval on your ass!" line into the equally highly {{meme}}tic "Zrobię ci z dupy jesień średniowiecza!" (''I'm gonna make The Autumn of the Middle Ages[[note]]reference to the title of Dutch author Johan Huizinga's book[[/note]] out of your ass!'').
* Because of the ProductionPosse, ''Film/FierceCreatures'' is known as ''A Lemur Called Rollo'' in Poland.
* The Italian dub of ''Film/BatmanReturns'' is full of these. "I have other fish to fry" becomes the equivalent Italian expression, "ho altre gatte da pelare", which literally means... "other [female] cats to skin". Also, in Italian, "pistola" means "gun", and "pistolino" is a colloquialism for penis. Hence, the line "You poor guys. Always confusing your pistols with your privates" becomes "confondete sempre le vostre pistole coi vostri pistolini".
* Various dubs of ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights'' change the gag when Robin Hood tells the Sheriff, "unlike other Robin Hoods, I speak with an English accent" because foreign viewers who saw the dubbed 1991 Creator/KevinCostner film ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves'' wouldn't get the joke. So, it is changed to another line deriding Costner. For example, the German dub changes the line into something like "because unlike that other Robin Hood, I do not cost the producers 5 million", putting stress on ''kosten'' (cost) as a pun on Costner.
** The French dub had "Unlike my predecessors, I do not [[Film/DancesWithWolves dance with wolves]]."
* The Italian version of ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'' is full of these. One example; 'Werewolf?' 'There. There wolf, there castle!' Was translated with a mispronunciation of 'ulula' (howls) to sound like the sardinian dialect's 'u l'u là', 'it's there'. So, it became 'Là. Lupu u l'u là, e castellu, u l'u lì.' 'The wolf is there and the castle is here.', the single most famous line from the movie in Italy. Also, the "Damn your eyes!" "Too late" exchange was translated as "Questo è un malocchio!" "E questo no?" ("Malocchio" means "curse" but also sounds like "bad eye", hence Igor's claim being "what about this other eye?")
** In the German dub of the same movie, Igor helpfully explains his preferred pronunciation of his name as ("Eye-gor") thusly: "Eiger. Von der Nordwand." A reference to the famous North face of the Eiger. Later he makes a bad attempt to cover up that he fetched an abnormal brain, saying that it belonged to "Abby someone." - "Abby who?" - "Abby Normal." In the German version he explains he brought the brain of a cleric, an abbot. So the original owner of the monster's brain supposedly was one ''Abt Normal''.
* The Latin American dub of the 2008 ''Film/GetSmart'' movie got back the original voice actor for Smart and he ad-libbed many of the jokes, sometimes placing Mexican pop-culture references over the original ones and overall made the film much more true to the original series than the English version was.

to:

[[AC:Animated Films]]
* Examples from Czech dubbed versions of foreign movies:
** In ''Film/{{Jumanji}}'', the hero said when attacking the carnivorous plant: "It's harvest time, Adele!" ''Adéla ješte nevečeřela'' (''Film/AdeleHasntHadHerDinnerYet'') is a Czech movie, and the titular Adele is a man-eating plant created by a mad scientist.
''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'':
** In the Czech version of the first ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movie, the translators have smuggled in a number of references to popular Czech fairy tales.
***
tales. And the Czech dubbing of ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' movies in general have a lot of these.
* Polish ** The polish versions of ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' are loaded with Woolseyisms, pretty much like all movies translated by Bartosz Wierzbieta. Not that it's bad, though - Wierzbieta's translations and "localization" of jokes that are more obscure in Poland are almost universally praised there.
* ** The Latino Spanish version of the Donkey in ''Shrek'' was dubbed by Mexican comedian Eugenio Derbez, who took a lot of liberties with the script and even referenced his (at the time) popular sketch TV show, yet the dubbing worked giving the nature of the character.
* This gem from the Polish version of ''Film/PulpFiction'':
--> '''Fabienne''': Czyj to Harley? (''Whose Harley is that?'')
--> '''Butch''': Zeda. (''It's Zed's.'')
--> '''Fabienne''': Kto to jest Zed? (''Who's Zed?'')
--> '''Butch''': Zed zszedł, kochanie. (''Zed passed away, baby.'' - which sounds in Polish almost exactly like the original "Zed's dead" as the two words rhyme.)
** Turning the "I'm gonna get medieval on your ass!" line into the equally highly {{meme}}tic "Zrobię ci z dupy jesień średniowiecza!" (''I'm gonna make The Autumn of the Middle Ages[[note]]reference to the title of Dutch author Johan Huizinga's book[[/note]] out of your ass!'').
* Because of the ProductionPosse, ''Film/FierceCreatures'' is known as ''A Lemur Called Rollo'' in Poland.
* The Italian dub of ''Film/BatmanReturns'' is full of these. "I have other fish to fry" becomes the equivalent Italian expression, "ho altre gatte da pelare", which literally means... "other [female] cats to skin". Also, in Italian, "pistola" means "gun", and "pistolino" is a colloquialism for penis. Hence, the line "You poor guys. Always confusing your pistols with your privates" becomes "confondete sempre le vostre pistole coi vostri pistolini".
* Various dubs of ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights'' change the gag when Robin Hood tells the Sheriff, "unlike other Robin Hoods, I speak with an English accent" because foreign viewers who saw the dubbed 1991 Creator/KevinCostner film ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves'' wouldn't get the joke. So, it is changed to another line deriding Costner. For example, the German dub changes the line into something like "because unlike that other Robin Hood, I do not cost the producers 5 million", putting stress on ''kosten'' (cost) as a pun on Costner.
** The French dub had "Unlike my predecessors, I do not [[Film/DancesWithWolves dance with wolves]]."
* The Italian version of ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'' is full of these. One example; 'Werewolf?' 'There. There wolf, there castle!' Was translated with a mispronunciation of 'ulula' (howls) to sound like the sardinian dialect's 'u l'u là', 'it's there'. So, it became 'Là. Lupu u l'u là, e castellu, u l'u lì.' 'The wolf is there and the castle is here.', the single most famous line from the movie in Italy. Also, the "Damn your eyes!" "Too late" exchange was translated as "Questo è un malocchio!" "E questo no?" ("Malocchio" means "curse" but also sounds like "bad eye", hence Igor's claim being "what about this other eye?")
** In the German dub of the same movie, Igor helpfully explains his preferred pronunciation of his name as ("Eye-gor") thusly: "Eiger. Von der Nordwand." A reference to the famous North face of the Eiger. Later he makes a bad attempt to cover up that he fetched an abnormal brain, saying that it belonged to "Abby someone." - "Abby who?" - "Abby Normal." In the German version he explains he brought the brain of a cleric, an abbot. So the original owner of the monster's brain supposedly was one ''Abt Normal''.
* The Latin American dub of the 2008 ''Film/GetSmart'' movie got back the original voice actor for Smart and he ad-libbed many of the jokes, sometimes placing Mexican pop-culture references over the original ones and overall made the film much more true to the original series than the English version was.
character.



* Sometimes, {{Woolseyism}}s can move a rather poor movie into SoBadItsGood territory. Case in point: the French dub of ''Braddock: Missing In Action 3'', featuring [[MemeticBadass Chuck Norris]] as the titular character. One memorable line :
-->'''Littlejohn''': Braddock! I'm warning you, don't step on any toes.
-->'''Col. James Braddock''': I don't step on toes, Littlejohn, I step on necks.
** Became memorable to the point of MemeticMutation in France:
-->'''Littlejohn''': Braddock! Attention où vous mettez les pieds. (Braddock! Pay attention where you put your feet!)
-->'''[[MemeticBadass Col. James Braddock]]''': Je mets les pieds où je veux, Littlejohn. Et c'est souvent dans la gueule. (I put my feet where I want, Littlejohn. And it's often in (people's) faces.)
** One of the worst (or, arguably, best) offenders are these [[MemeticMutation memetic]] one-liners from ''Invasion USA''.
-->'''Matt Hunter''': Si tu te pointes encore, tu peux être sûr que tu repars avec la bite dans un tupperware. (If you ever come back here, I'll stick your dick in a Tupperware bowl.)
-->'''Matt Hunter''': Toi, tu commences à me baver sur les rouleaux. (You're drooling on my balls.)
* The French dubs of Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger movies are prone to this. The dub of ''Film/LastActionHero'' has Arnold call himself "Arnold Albertschweitzer" (a reference to famous medical doctor Albert Schweitzer) and great improvements on the original dialog, like when one of the mooks gets taken out by an ice cream cone to the head ("[[Literature/ForWhomTheBellTolls Pour qui sonne la glace!]] [[IncrediblyLamePun Celui-la j'ai refroidi!]]" - "[[Creator/ErnestHemingway For whom does the ice cream toll?]] That guy I just froze!") and during the Schwarzenhamlet scene ("Moi, doux? Tu veux rire!" - "Me, fair? You're kidding!")
* A lot of German film dubs from before the mid-nineties took liberties in translation. Blatant example in the first ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' film. Arnold rudely interrupts a caller at a public phone booth to look up Sarah Connor's address in the book. Said caller mentions Arnold to have "a serious attitude problem". [[SarcasmMode Very witty indeed]]. Compare the German version:
--> ''Why don't you look up "asshole" in the phone book? I bet you'll find your number listed!''
* The French version of ''Film/DirtyDancing'' has quite a few, which have become so cult that most viewers miss them when they watch the original version. For example, the very flat line "I'm sorry you had to see that, Baby... Sometimes in this world you see things you don't wanna see." became "Parfois, on assiste à des scènes terribles. Malheureusement le monde est une jungle, l’homme est un loup pour l’homme et surtout pour la femme..." ("Sometimes, we see horrible things. Unfortunately, the world is a jungle; man is a wolf to man, and especially to woman.") Some of the lines just have an irresistible NarmCharm that goes perfectly with the story.
* The French version of ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' even created a new expression[[note]]Actually, they brought it back from the grave, as there are indications of its use in French literature as early as 1903 although it had fallen out of use by the time of the dubbing[[/note]]. "Great Scott!" was changed to "Nom de Zeus!", a GoshDangItToHeck version of "Nom de Dieu!" (literally "God's name", but it's more of a "Goddamnit").
** The French dub is actually full of Woolseyisms. For example, the Calvin Klein joke is changed to refer to French fashion designer Pierre Cardin, and the [=DeLorean=] needs 2.21 gigowatts of power (because 2.21 is more easily heard in French.) The "Hey, [=McFly=]!" scene changes the insult from "Irish bug" to "espece de crème anglaise" (a pun on the food creme anglaise and "English piece of shit") and an attempt by Biff to say [=McFly=] [[SoBadItsGood in a British accent.]]
** Actually, on this very scene, Biff calls George "[=McFlan=]". Flan is a kind of custard ; "crème anglaise" is too.
** The Italian and Spanish versions turned Calvin Klein into Levi Strauss (as in the jeans).
* From Wikipedia: "In the German dub of the 2005 movie version of ''Film/{{Bewitched}}'', the line 'The Do-not-disturb sign will hang on the door tonight.' became 'The only hanging thing tonight will be the Do-not-disturb sign.'"



* The French dub of ''Film/AChristmasStory'' is widely considered by bilingual viewers to be far superior to the original thanks in large parts to the lively and emotional delivery of the narrator who has more lines than anyone else in the movie. Kudos to the snappy, catchy French version of the arc words "Tu vas te crever un oeil!" ("You'll put your eye out!")
* In ''Film/{{Hero}}'' there are four scenes where the soldiers yell in unison: before the emperor appears, before the attack on the city Flying Snow and Broken Sword are staying in, [[spoiler:when Nameless is executed]], and [[spoiler:when Nameless is given a hero's burial]]. In the original Chinese the soldiers are simply yelling "Ha! Ha!", but the English subtitles transcribe it as "Hail! Hail!", creating a pun not found in the original work.
* Appears in all but the very earliest movies with Creator/BudSpencer and Creator/TerenceHill. The German dubs give them witty and funny dialogues, often completely changing the original meaning or outright changing the theme of the movie from a grim spaghetti western to a lighthearted buddy romp. The high quality of the dubs (not in accurateness, but in sheer outlandish mannerism) are responsible for the fact that these movies are still extremely popular in Germany.
* French film ''Film/LaHaine'' has a character nicknamed 'ComicBook/{{Asterix}}', famous to the French but likely to be lost on English and American viewers at the time of release. At least one release instead called him [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Snoopy]] in the subtitles. Another character later snarks that they have Obelix with them; he was localised as Charlie Brown.
* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/ThreeHundred'', the famous "This! Is! Sparta!" line was translated as これはスパルタの流儀だ![[note]]Kore wa Sparta no Ryuugi da![[/note]](Roughly translated as '''This Is The Spartan WAY!'''), possibly due of lip-synch issues between the original English line and the literal translation of the phrase, without the ''Ryuugi (Way/Style)'' part.
** On the other hand, in the Japanese official subs (at least the ones used in the trailers), the aforementioned line is translated as スパルタをなめるな![[note]]Sparta wo nameruna![[/note]] ('''Don't mess with the SPARTANS!''')



* The novel and film ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' was released in Germany as ''Bis(s) zum Morgengrauen'', a forced awful pun that can be translated as "Bite at Dawn" or "Till Dawn", depending on whether you read the (s) or not. In the same vein, ''New Moon'' became ''Bis(s) zur Mittagsstunde'' ("Bite at Noon"/"Till Noon") and ''Eclipse'' was ''Bis(s) zum Abendrot'' ("Bite at Sunset"/"Till Sunset"). This {{narm}}tastic style of naming finally paid off when Creator/SeltzerAndFriedberg's ''Film/VampiresSuck'' (itself a pun that can not be recreated in German) could be released as ''Biss zum Abendbrot'' ("A Bite for Supper").



* The German dub of ''Film/FullMetalJacket'' has a couple instances:
** Since ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' was not well known in Germany, Private Pyle's nickname was changed to Private Paula, "Paula" not only sounding similar but being a woman's name.
** Private Brown is called "Private Snowball" in the English original. In the German dub, his nickname is "Private Schneewittchen," or "Private Snow White."
** When Joker utters his famous "Are you John Wayne?" line, and nobody confesses, [=GySgt.=] Hartman quips that "the Fairy fucking Godmother said it!" His line in the German dub:
-->''"Is' wohl der verdammte Weihnachstmann gewesen!"("Guess it must've been the goddamn Santa Claus!")''
* In the Hungarian dub of the second ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' live-action movie, ''Astérix & Obélix: Mission Cléopâtre'', the entire script was written in verse, with incredibly witty rhymes and wordplays, and is seen as one of the most memorable examples of Woolseyism in any Hungarian movie dub. The translation was handled by Dávid Speier, who is quite famous for freely reinterpreting the dialog in movies to insert jokes, puns or references, or to simply replace untranslatable gags. For this reason, he's often hired to translate comedic animated movies. On the other hand, he has also been criticized for going ''too far'', making the dialog sound forced and unnatural in places. Do note, however, that this does not apply to all of his work, as many are simple, straight translations.
* Franchise/{{Godzilla}} has three prominent examples:
** The scenes with Raymond Burr which were added specifically for the North American release, although completely unnecessary[[note]]At least in terms of the plot. The idea was to insert a famous American actor and market him as the star, thus boosting sales and making it financially worth an American release in the first place[[/note]], are still remembered fondly thanks to a combination of NostalgiaFilter and the fact that they honestly did add a certain charm to the film. Similarly, the scene where the Russians were changed from trying to prevent a nuclear launch to ''deliberately trying to launch before they died'' are still beloved purely thanks to the [[NarmCharm Narm factor]].
** Anytime Mecha-Godzilla was referred to as Kiryu (Except for Film/GodzillaVsMechaGodzilla, hilariously enough) in the original Japanese was simply replaced with "Mecha-Godzilla" in the dub. And it works simply because "Mecha-Godzilla" just sounds worlds cooler and more threatening than "Kiryu" to an English speaking audience.
** The BigCreepyCrawlies in ''Film/SonOfGodzilla'', Kamacuras (derived from the Japanese word for mantis, kamakiri) and Kumonga (from kumo, the Japanese word for spider), became Gimantis and Spiega in the original English dub. Spiga carried on into ''Destroy All Monsters''.
* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'', an already dramatic scene in the original version becomes [[UpToEleven even more heart-wrenching]] [[spoiler:when Anakin becomes Darth Vader: Rather than just screaming NOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! at that scene, Vader uses a generic scream in a more loud, painful and more dramatic way]].



* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/{{Downfall}}'', the famous WebVideo/HitlerRants scene sounds [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn_CnTCWgts somewhat different from the original German version]] as Creator/ChikaoOhtsuka's rendition of the Führer tends to sound more like an angry boss, rather than a ''[[VillainousBreakdown really pissed off]]'' man. This is somewhat justified, as his voice actor is an old man, and it's possibly he didn't tried to emulate too hard his German counterpart out of consideration for his own health.



* One of the most famous examples in horror movies: the European cut of ''Film/DawnOfTheDead'', known as ''Zombi'', which was handled by Creator/DarioArgento. It removed most of the humor and social commentary, while giving the film new music by the band Goblin (who [[ProductionPosse frequently collaborated with Argento]] on his soundtracks) and streamlining the pacing to give it more of an action movie feel. It's strongly debated whether the original American version, the DirectorsCut, or Argento's cut is the best version of the film.
* The Japanese dub of the first ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes'' film has a very weird instance of this: Despise the first film being dubbed [[TheOtherDarrin about three times]], Taylor's Japanese voice actor (Creator/GoroNaya, aka [[Anime/LupinIII Inspector Zenigata]]) is the only one who didn't get replaced in all three dubbed versions, but he still did some modifications on some of his lines between versions. The most obvious changes were in the Japanese translation of the famous ending [[spoiler:when Taylor finds out he was in Earth all this time and he curses humanity]]: The first two versions were more or less literal translations of the original English lines, but in the last version Naya's performance was more dramatic and heart-wrenching, while altering quite a bit the lines from the English version. You can see a comparative between all the three Japanese dubbed versions [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lv4t9Kx5Q0A#t=168 here]].
* The Mexican Spanish dub of ''Film/{{Commando}}'', the line when John Matrix says after [[spoiler:throwing a length of pipe clean through Bennett and into a boiler, releasing a jet of steam through him]] ''Let off some steam, Bennett'' was translated with the possibly more badass-sounding ''Date un baño de vapor, Bennett'' (Give yourself a sauna, Bennett).
** In the Japanese dub, the same line was translated (roughly) as ''Now you're going to stink like gas''. You can see a clip of that dub [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBhtDoqU0JI here]].
** Another slight change in the Mexican Spanish dub, and also overlaps with TranslationCorrection of sorts, is about John Matrix's birthplace in the film. In the original version, Matrix was born in then-West Germany, hence his European accent. Since in the Mexican dub Matrix does not use any European accent in his voice and the name ''John Matrix'' doesn't sound German for the Mexican translators, they changed with Matrix being born in an American base in West Germany. This is quite fitting, since the U.S. have military bases in Germany since WorldWarII.



* The German version of Film/{{Watchmen}} has a moment of brilliance as Rorschach is broken out of prison by Niteowl but stops in the middle of his own liberation to kill a midget criminal who has fled into the restroom. Explaining why he's going there, his explanation in the English original is just "I have to use the men's room." The German version, hilariously, makes this "Ich muss noch was Kleines erledigen," which translates as either an idiom of "I have to go pee" OR - literally - "There's something small I have to take care of / finish off".
* In the French dub of ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'', the Scarecrow's line after getting his Doctrate of Thinkology, "Sum of the square roots of any two sides of an isoceles triangle is equal to the square root of the remaining side" becomes "La somme de l'hypoténuse au carré doit être égale á la somme des deux cotés opposés au carré" ("The square of the hypotenuse must equal the squares of the two other sides"), making the equation the Scarecrow states correct, [[WritersCannotDoMath unlike what happened in the original version of the film.]]
** Maybe be a case of CompletelyMissingThePoint; that the Scarecrow couldn't have actually become smarter.




[[AC:Live Action Films]]
* In ''Film/{{Jumanji}}'', the hero said when attacking the carnivorous plant: "It's harvest time, Adele!" ''Adé la ješte nevečeřela'' (''Film/AdeleHasntHadHerDinnerYet'') is a Czech movie, and the titular Adele is a man-eating plant created by a mad scientist.
* This gem from the Polish version of ''Film/PulpFiction'':
--> '''Fabienne''': Czyj to Harley? (''Whose Harley is that?'')
--> '''Butch''': Zeda. (''It's Zed's.'')
--> '''Fabienne''': Kto to jest Zed? (''Who's Zed?'')
--> '''Butch''': Zed zszedł, kochanie. (''Zed passed away, baby.'' - which sounds in Polish almost exactly like the original "Zed's dead" as the two words rhyme.)
** Turning the "I'm gonna get medieval on your ass!" line into the equally highly {{meme}}tic "Zrobię ci z dupy jesień średniowiecza!" (''I'm gonna make The Autumn of the Middle Ages[[note]]reference to the title of Dutch author Johan Huizinga's book[[/note]] out of your ass!'').
* Because of the ProductionPosse, ''Film/FierceCreatures'' is known as ''A Lemur Called Rollo'' in Poland.
* The Italian dub of ''Film/BatmanReturns'' is full of these. "I have other fish to fry" becomes the equivalent Italian expression, "ho altre gatte da pelare", which literally means... "other [female] cats to skin". Also, in Italian, "pistola" means "gun", and "pistolino" is a colloquialism for penis. Hence, the line "You poor guys. Always confusing your pistols with your privates" becomes "confondete sempre le vostre pistole coi vostri pistolini".
* Various dubs of ''Film/RobinHoodMenInTights'' change the gag when Robin Hood tells the Sheriff, "unlike other Robin Hoods, I speak with an English accent" because foreign viewers who saw the dubbed 1991 Creator/KevinCostner film ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves'' wouldn't get the joke. So, it is changed to another line deriding Costner. For example, the German dub changes the line into something like "because unlike that other Robin Hood, I do not cost the producers 5 million", putting stress on ''kosten'' (cost) as a pun on Costner.
** The French dub had "Unlike my predecessors, I do not [[Film/DancesWithWolves dance with wolves]]."
* The Italian version of ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'' is full of these. One example; 'Werewolf?' 'There. There wolf, there castle!' Was translated with a mispronunciation of 'ulula' (howls) to sound like the sardinian dialect's 'u l'u là', 'it's there'. So, it became 'Là. Lupu u l'u là, e castellu, u l'u lì.' 'The wolf is there and the castle is here.', the single most famous line from the movie in Italy. Also, the "Damn your eyes!" "Too late" exchange was translated as "Questo è un malocchio!" "E questo no?" ("Malocchio" means "curse" but also sounds like "bad eye", hence Igor's claim being "what about this other eye?")
** In the German dub of the same movie, Igor helpfully explains his preferred pronunciation of his name as ("Eye-gor") thusly: "Eiger. Von der Nordwand." A reference to the famous North face of the Eiger. Later he makes a bad attempt to cover up that he fetched an abnormal brain, saying that it belonged to "Abby someone." - "Abby who?" - "Abby Normal." In the German version he explains he brought the brain of a cleric, an abbot. So the original owner of the monster's brain supposedly was one ''Abt Normal''.
* The Latin American dub of the 2008 ''Film/GetSmart'' movie got back the original voice actor for Smart and he ad-libbed many of the jokes, sometimes placing Mexican pop-culture references over the original ones and overall made the film much more true to the original series than the English version was.
* The French dubs of Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger movies are prone to this. The dub of ''Film/LastActionHero'' has Arnold call himself "Arnold Albertschweitzer" (a reference to famous medical doctor Albert Schweitzer) and great improvements on the original dialog, like when one of the mooks gets taken out by an ice cream cone to the head ("[[Literature/ForWhomTheBellTolls Pour qui sonne la glace!]] [[IncrediblyLamePun Celui-la j'ai refroidi!]]" - "[[Creator/ErnestHemingway For whom does the ice cream toll?]] That guy I just froze!") and during the Schwarzenhamlet scene ("Moi, doux? Tu veux rire!" - "Me, fair? You're kidding!")
* A lot of German film dubs from before the mid-nineties took liberties in translation. Blatant example in the first ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' film. Arnold rudely interrupts a caller at a public phone booth to look up Sarah Connor's address in the book. Said caller mentions Arnold to have "a serious attitude problem". [[SarcasmMode Very witty indeed]]. Compare the German version:
--> ''Why don't you look up "asshole" in the phone book? I bet you'll find your number listed!''
* The French version of ''Film/DirtyDancing'' has quite a few, which have become so cult that most viewers miss them when they watch the original version. For example, the very flat line "I'm sorry you had to see that, Baby... Sometimes in this world you see things you don't wanna see." became "Parfois, on assiste à des scènes terribles. Malheureusement le monde est une jungle, l’homme est un loup pour l’homme et surtout pour la femme..." ("Sometimes, we see horrible things. Unfortunately, the world is a jungle; man is a wolf to man, and especially to woman.") Some of the lines just have an irresistible NarmCharm that goes perfectly with the story.
* The French version of ''Film/BackToTheFuture'' even created a new expression[[note]]Actually, they brought it back from the grave, as there are indications of its use in French literature as early as 1903 although it had fallen out of use by the time of the dubbing[[/note]]. "Great Scott!" was changed to "Nom de Zeus!", a GoshDangItToHeck version of "Nom de Dieu!" (literally "God's name", but it's more of a "Goddamnit").
** The French dub is actually full of Woolseyisms. For example, the Calvin Klein joke is changed to refer to French fashion designer Pierre Cardin, and the [=DeLorean=] needs 2.21 gigowatts of power (because 2.21 is more easily heard in French.) The "Hey, [=McFly=]!" scene changes the insult from "Irish bug" to "espece de crème anglaise" (a pun on the food creme anglaise and "English piece of shit") and an attempt by Biff to say [=McFly=] [[SoBadItsGood in a British accent.]]
** Actually, on this very scene, Biff calls George "[=McFlan=]". Flan is a kind of custard ; "crème anglaise" is too.
** The Italian and Spanish versions turned Calvin Klein into Levi Strauss (as in the jeans).
* From Wikipedia: "In the German dub of the 2005 movie version of ''Film/{{Bewitched}}'', the line 'The Do-not-disturb sign will hang on the door tonight.' became 'The only hanging thing tonight will be the Do-not-disturb sign.'"
* Sometimes, {{Woolseyism}}s can move a rather poor movie into SoBadItsGood territory. Case in point: the French dub of ''Braddock: Missing In Action 3'', featuring [[MemeticBadass Chuck Norris]] as the titular character. One memorable line :
-->'''Littlejohn''': Braddock! I'm warning you, don't step on any toes.
-->'''Col. James Braddock''': I don't step on toes, Littlejohn, I step on necks.
** Became memorable to the point of MemeticMutation in France:
-->'''Littlejohn''': Braddock! Attention où vous mettez les pieds. (Braddock! Pay attention where you put your feet!)
-->'''[[MemeticBadass Col. James Braddock]]''': Je mets les pieds où je veux, Littlejohn. Et c'est souvent dans la gueule. (I put my feet where I want, Littlejohn. And it's often in (people's) faces.)
** One of the worst (or, arguably, best) offenders are these [[MemeticMutation memetic]] one-liners from ''Invasion USA''.
-->'''Matt Hunter''': Si tu te pointes encore, tu peux être sûr que tu repars avec la bite dans un tupperware. (If you ever come back here, I'll stick your dick in a Tupperware bowl.)
-->'''Matt Hunter''': Toi, tu commences à me baver sur les rouleaux. (You're drooling on my balls.)
* The French dub of ''Film/AChristmasStory'' is widely considered by bilingual viewers to be far superior to the original thanks in large parts to the lively and emotional delivery of the narrator who has more lines than anyone else in the movie. Kudos to the snappy, catchy French version of the arc words "Tu vas te crever un oeil!" ("You'll put your eye out!")
* In ''Film/{{Hero}}'' there are four scenes where the soldiers yell in unison: before the emperor appears, before the attack on the city Flying Snow and Broken Sword are staying in, [[spoiler:when Nameless is executed]], and [[spoiler:when Nameless is given a hero's burial]]. In the original Chinese the soldiers are simply yelling "Ha! Ha!", but the English subtitles transcribe it as "Hail! Hail!", creating a pun not found in the original work.
* Appears in all but the very earliest movies with Creator/BudSpencer and Creator/TerenceHill. The German dubs give them witty and funny dialogues, often completely changing the original meaning or outright changing the theme of the movie from a grim spaghetti western to a lighthearted buddy romp. The high quality of the dubs (not in accurateness, but in sheer outlandish mannerism) are responsible for the fact that these movies are still extremely popular in Germany.
* French film ''Film/LaHaine'' has a character nicknamed 'ComicBook/{{Asterix}}', famous to the French but likely to be lost on English and American viewers at the time of release. At least one release instead called him [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Snoopy]] in the subtitles. Another character later snarks that they have Obelix with them; he was localised as Charlie Brown.
* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/ThreeHundred'', the famous "This! Is! Sparta!" line was translated as これはスパルタの流儀だ![[note]]Kore wa Sparta no Ryuugi da![[/note]](Roughly translated as '''This Is The Spartan WAY!'''), possibly due of lip-synch issues between the original English line and the literal translation of the phrase, without the ''Ryuugi (Way/Style)'' part.
** On the other hand, in the Japanese official subs (at least the ones used in the trailers), the aforementioned line is translated as スパルタをなめるな![[note]]Sparta wo nameruna![[/note]] ('''Don't mess with the SPARTANS!''')
* The novel and film ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' was released in Germany as ''Bis(s) zum Morgengrauen'', a forced awful pun that can be translated as "Bite at Dawn" or "Till Dawn", depending on whether you read the (s) or not. In the same vein, ''New Moon'' became ''Bis(s) zur Mittagsstunde'' ("Bite at Noon"/"Till Noon") and ''Eclipse'' was ''Bis(s) zum Abendrot'' ("Bite at Sunset"/"Till Sunset"). This {{narm}}tastic style of naming finally paid off when Creator/SeltzerAndFriedberg's ''Film/VampiresSuck'' (itself a pun that can not be recreated in German) could be released as ''Biss zum Abendbrot'' ("A Bite for Supper").
* The German dub of ''Film/FullMetalJacket'' has a couple instances:
** Since ''Series/TheAndyGriffithShow'' was not well known in Germany, Private Pyle's nickname was changed to Private Paula, "Paula" not only sounding similar but being a woman's name.
** Private Brown is called "Private Snowball" in the English original. In the German dub, his nickname is "Private Schneewittchen," or "Private Snow White."
** When Joker utters his famous "Are you John Wayne?" line, and nobody confesses, [=GySgt.=] Hartman quips that "the Fairy fucking Godmother said it!" His line in the German dub:
-->''"Is' wohl der verdammte Weihnachstmann gewesen!"("Guess it must've been the goddamn Santa Claus!")''
* In the Hungarian dub of the second ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' live-action movie, ''Astérix & Obélix: Mission Cléopâtre'', the entire script was written in verse, with incredibly witty rhymes and wordplays, and is seen as one of the most memorable examples of Woolseyism in any Hungarian movie dub. The translation was handled by Dávid Speier, who is quite famous for freely reinterpreting the dialog in movies to insert jokes, puns or references, or to simply replace untranslatable gags. For this reason, he's often hired to translate comedic animated movies. On the other hand, he has also been criticized for going ''too far'', making the dialog sound forced and unnatural in places. Do note, however, that this does not apply to all of his work, as many are simple, straight translations.
* Franchise/{{Godzilla}} has three prominent examples:
** The scenes with Raymond Burr which were added specifically for the North American release, although completely unnecessary[[note]]At least in terms of the plot. The idea was to insert a famous American actor and market him as the star, thus boosting sales and making it financially worth an American release in the first place[[/note]], are still remembered fondly thanks to a combination of NostalgiaFilter and the fact that they honestly did add a certain charm to the film. Similarly, the scene where the Russians were changed from trying to prevent a nuclear launch to ''deliberately trying to launch before they died'' are still beloved purely thanks to the [[NarmCharm Narm factor]].
** Anytime Mecha-Godzilla was referred to as Kiryu (Except for Film/GodzillaVsMechaGodzilla, hilariously enough) in the original Japanese was simply replaced with "Mecha-Godzilla" in the dub. And it works simply because "Mecha-Godzilla" just sounds worlds cooler and more threatening than "Kiryu" to an English speaking audience.
** The BigCreepyCrawlies in ''Film/SonOfGodzilla'', Kamacuras (derived from the Japanese word for mantis, kamakiri) and Kumonga (from kumo, the Japanese word for spider), became Gimantis and Spiega in the original English dub. Spiga carried on into ''Destroy All Monsters''.
* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'', an already dramatic scene in the original version becomes [[UpToEleven even more heart-wrenching]] [[spoiler:when Anakin becomes Darth Vader: Rather than just screaming NOOOOOOOOOOO!!!! at that scene, Vader uses a generic scream in a more loud, painful and more dramatic way]].
* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/{{Downfall}}'', the famous WebVideo/HitlerRants scene sounds [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn_CnTCWgts somewhat different from the original German version]] as Creator/ChikaoOhtsuka's rendition of the Führer tends to sound more like an angry boss, rather than a ''[[VillainousBreakdown really pissed off]]'' man. This is somewhat justified, as his voice actor is an old man, and it's possibly he didn't tried to emulate too hard his German counterpart out of consideration for his own health.
* One of the most famous examples in horror movies: the European cut of ''Film/DawnOfTheDead'', known as ''Zombi'', which was handled by Creator/DarioArgento. It removed most of the humor and social commentary, while giving the film new music by the band Goblin (who [[ProductionPosse frequently collaborated with Argento]] on his soundtracks) and streamlining the pacing to give it more of an action movie feel. It's strongly debated whether the original American version, the DirectorsCut, or Argento's cut is the best version of the film.
* The Japanese dub of the first ''Film/PlanetOfTheApes'' film has a very weird instance of this: Despise the first film being dubbed [[TheOtherDarrin about three times]], Taylor's Japanese voice actor (Creator/GoroNaya, aka [[Anime/LupinIII Inspector Zenigata]]) is the only one who didn't get replaced in all three dubbed versions, but he still did some modifications on some of his lines between versions. The most obvious changes were in the Japanese translation of the famous ending [[spoiler:when Taylor finds out he was in Earth all this time and he curses humanity]]: The first two versions were more or less literal translations of the original English lines, but in the last version Naya's performance was more dramatic and heart-wrenching, while altering quite a bit the lines from the English version. You can see a comparative between all the three Japanese dubbed versions [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lv4t9Kx5Q0A#t=168 here]].
* The Mexican Spanish dub of ''Film/{{Commando}}'', the line when John Matrix says after [[spoiler:throwing a length of pipe clean through Bennett and into a boiler, releasing a jet of steam through him]] ''Let off some steam, Bennett'' was translated with the possibly more badass-sounding ''Date un baño de vapor, Bennett'' (Give yourself a sauna, Bennett).
** In the Japanese dub, the same line was translated (roughly) as ''Now you're going to stink like gas''. You can see a clip of that dub [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBhtDoqU0JI here]].
** Another slight change in the Mexican Spanish dub, and also overlaps with TranslationCorrection of sorts, is about John Matrix's birthplace in the film. In the original version, Matrix was born in then-West Germany, hence his European accent. Since in the Mexican dub Matrix does not use any European accent in his voice and the name ''John Matrix'' doesn't sound German for the Mexican translators, they changed with Matrix being born in an American base in West Germany. This is quite fitting, since the U.S. have military bases in Germany since WorldWarII.
* The German version of Film/{{Watchmen}} has a moment of brilliance as Rorschach is broken out of prison by Niteowl but stops in the middle of his own liberation to kill a midget criminal who has fled into the restroom. Explaining why he's going there, his explanation in the English original is just "I have to use the men's room." The German version, hilariously, makes this "Ich muss noch was Kleines erledigen," which translates as either an idiom of "I have to go pee" OR - literally - "There's something small I have to take care of / finish off".
* In the French dub of ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'', the Scarecrow's line after getting his Doctrate of Thinkology, "Sum of the square roots of any two sides of an isoceles triangle is equal to the square root of the remaining side" becomes "La somme de l'hypoténuse au carré doit être égale á la somme des deux cotés opposés au carré" ("The square of the hypotenuse must equal the squares of the two other sides"), making the equation the Scarecrow states correct, [[WritersCannotDoMath unlike what happened in the original version of the film.]] May be a case of CompletelyMissingThePoint; that the Scarecrow couldn't have actually become smarter.



* Despite its very British humour, the first ''AustinPowers'' movie was dubbed faithfully in Spain (other than Austin and Dr. Evil being dubbed by different actors) and had little success. For the sequels, they allowed Spanish comedian Florentino Fernández to voice all the characters played by Creator/MikeMyers as he pleased, often changing the dialogue and including references to his own TV work, and they became hits.

to:

* Despite its very British humour, the first ''AustinPowers'' ''Film/AustinPowers'' movie was dubbed faithfully in Spain (other than Austin and Dr. Evil being dubbed by different actors) and had little success. For the sequels, they allowed Spanish comedian Florentino Fernández to voice all the characters played by Creator/MikeMyers as he pleased, often changing the dialogue and including references to his own TV work, and they became hits.
hits.
8th Apr '16 7:21:27 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'', John Ratzenberger, who's been in every single Pixar film to date, plays Mack. During the end credits, Mack goes to a drive-in featuring car versions of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'', ''WesternAnimation/MonstersInc.'', and ''WesternAnimation/ABugsLife''. Mack [[ButHeSoundsHandsome praises the John Ratzenberger characters]] at first, until [[HeyItsThatVoice he realizes...]]

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'', John Ratzenberger, who's been in every single Pixar film to date, plays Mack. During the end credits, Mack goes to a drive-in featuring car versions of ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory'', ''WesternAnimation/MonstersInc.'', and ''WesternAnimation/ABugsLife''. Mack [[ButHeSoundsHandsome praises the John Ratzenberger characters]] at first, until [[HeyItsThatVoice he realizes...]]
24th Mar '16 9:15:14 PM Prfnoff
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* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/{{Downfall}}'', the famous WebVideo/HitlerRants scene sounds [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn_CnTCWgts somewhat different from the original German version]] as ChikaoOhtsuka's rendition of the Fuhrer tends to sound more like an angry boss, rather than a ''[[VillainousBreakdown really pissed off]]'' man. This is somewhat justified, as his voice actor is an old man, and it's possibly he didn't tried to emulate too hard his German counterpart out of consideration for his own health.

to:

* In the Japanese dub of ''Film/{{Downfall}}'', the famous WebVideo/HitlerRants scene sounds [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vn_CnTCWgts somewhat different from the original German version]] as ChikaoOhtsuka's Creator/ChikaoOhtsuka's rendition of the Fuhrer Führer tends to sound more like an angry boss, rather than a ''[[VillainousBreakdown really pissed off]]'' man. This is somewhat justified, as his voice actor is an old man, and it's possibly he didn't tried to emulate too hard his German counterpart out of consideration for his own health.
3rd Mar '16 4:28:30 PM Naram-Sin
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* Despite its very British humour, the first ''AustinPowers'' movie was dubbed faithfully in Spain (besides Austin and Dr. Evil being dubbed by different actors) and had little success. For the sequels, they allowed Spanish comedian Florentino Fernández to dub all the characters played by Creator/MikeMyers as he pleased, and became hits.

to:

* Despite its very British humour, the first ''AustinPowers'' movie was dubbed faithfully in Spain (besides (other than Austin and Dr. Evil being dubbed by different actors) and had little success. For the sequels, they allowed Spanish comedian Florentino Fernández to dub voice all the characters played by Creator/MikeMyers as he pleased, often changing the dialogue and including references to his own TV work, and they became hits.
3rd Mar '16 4:25:51 PM Naram-Sin
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* As with the comic strip and the animated series, the film ''Film/DennisTheMenace'' was renamed in Latin America as Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty).
* The Mexican dub of ''WesternAnimation/TheCroods'' takes a lot of liberties, using many Mexican local terms and slang. This is relatively unusual because, in general, dubbing professionals tend to use Neutral Spanish when dubbing and tend to avoid using too much local terminology. As a result, the movie can be hard to understand for Spanish-speakers outside of Mexico.

to:

* As with the comic strip and the animated series, the film ''Film/DennisTheMenace'' was renamed in Latin America as Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty).
* The Mexican dub of ''WesternAnimation/TheCroods'' takes a lot of liberties, using many Mexican local terms and slang. This is relatively unusual because, in general, dubbing professionals tend to use Neutral Spanish when dubbing and tend to avoid using too much local terminology. As a result, the movie can be hard to understand for Spanish-speakers outside of Mexico.
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