History WesternAnimation / SupermanTheatricalCartoons

12th Feb '16 6:58:31 PM Eddy1215
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* DeadHandShot: In "Destruction Inc."

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* DeadHandShot: In "Destruction Inc."" and "The Mummy Strikes".
12th Feb '16 5:46:34 PM Eddy1215
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* TakenForGranite: In "The Underground World", the professor and Lois Lane comes across a statue of the professors long lost father, who originally discovered the caves, but disappeared into them. Lois soon realizes that the statue IS him, and the Birdmen of the Underground World intend to turn them into statues as well.

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* TakenForGranite: In "The Underground World", the professor and Lois Lane comes across a statue of the professors professor's long lost father, who originally discovered the caves, but disappeared into them. Lois soon realizes that the statue IS him, and the Birdmen of the Underground World intend to turn them into statues as well.


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* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: We never do find out why the villains in "Destruction Inc" plotted to blow up the munitions factory, let alone killed the night watchman.
7th Feb '16 3:46:57 PM nombretomado
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From the studio that brought you such classics as WesternAnimation/BettyBoop and ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}, [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] played a major role in cementing [[Franchise/{{Superman}} the Man of Steel]] as a pop culture icon by means of these lavishly animated, massive budget short subjects which served to bring Superman to the big screen, from TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation. These cartoons were a big deal back in the '40s -- the first short, "[[WesternAnimation/TheMadScientist The Mad Scientist]]", nearly won the 1942 UsefulNotes/AcademyAward (losing to a [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Disney]] [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto short]], "Lend A Paw"). These cartoons were among the first cartoons that were made for genuine action and drama, rather than crude comedy, which was part of what contributed to their success. Paramount in fact had such confidence in the shorts being a hit, they even had had '''trailers''' made for them -- yes, that's right, trailers for ''short cartoons.'' Try to wrap your head around that.

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From the studio that brought you such classics as WesternAnimation/BettyBoop and ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}, [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] played a major role in cementing [[Franchise/{{Superman}} the Man of Steel]] as a pop culture icon by means of these lavishly animated, massive budget short subjects which served to bring Superman to the big screen, from TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation.UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation. These cartoons were a big deal back in the '40s -- the first short, "[[WesternAnimation/TheMadScientist The Mad Scientist]]", nearly won the 1942 UsefulNotes/AcademyAward (losing to a [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Disney]] [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto short]], "Lend A Paw"). These cartoons were among the first cartoons that were made for genuine action and drama, rather than crude comedy, which was part of what contributed to their success. Paramount in fact had such confidence in the shorts being a hit, they even had had '''trailers''' made for them -- yes, that's right, trailers for ''short cartoons.'' Try to wrap your head around that.
1st Feb '16 10:56:30 PM SpaceDrake
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* DamselInDistress: If Lois isn't being BoundAndGagged at the hands of the villians, she's being put in a DeathTrap, menaced by a rampaging monster, or at the mercy of some natural disaster, all so Supes can swoop in and save her.
* DamselOutOfDistress: In ''Billion Dollar Limited'', at the first sight of robbery, she unhesitatingly picks up one of the fallen guards' tommy-guns and ''fires back''. She then makes her way to the engine and repeatedly sounds the whistle, which quickly alerts everyone (Including Supes) that the train is in trouble. She only has to be bailed out when the robbers lob a ''bomb'' at her.

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* DamselInDistress: If Lois Lane has a complicated relationship with this trope. Generally speaking, if Lois isn't being BoundAndGagged at the hands of the villians, she's being put in a DeathTrap, menaced by a rampaging monster, or at the mercy of some natural disaster, all so Supes can swoop in and save her.
her. ''However...''
* DamselOutOfDistress: DamselOutOfDistress: ...In ''Billion Dollar Limited'', at the first sight of robbery, she unhesitatingly picks up one of the fallen guards' tommy-guns and ''fires back''. She then makes her way to the engine and repeatedly sounds the whistle, which quickly alerts everyone (Including Supes) that the train is in trouble. She only has to be bailed out when the robbers lob a ''bomb'' at her. Other shorts, particularly the earlier ones, have her performing similar feats of competency and only really put her in "distress" when she would logically just be completely outclassed as a normal human being.
29th Jan '16 9:53:04 PM TitoMosquito
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* TheWorldIsNotReady: Perry White decides to burn Lois's photos of the Underground World and pull the plug on the story, reasoning that no one would belive such a tale. In his defence, it does sound ridiculous if you think about it.

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* TheWorldIsNotReady: Perry White decides to burn Lois's photos of the Underground World and pull the plug on the story, reasoning that no one would belive such a tale.tale (even if Superman is involved). In his defence, it does sound ridiculous if you think about it.
4th Jan '16 5:38:50 PM SilentStranger
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* DisneyVillainDeath: One of the nazi henchmen in "Jungle Drums" gets killed while grappling with Superman atop the AntiAir gun they've disguised as a large stone idol. He takes a leap at Superman but accidently goes over the edge and plunges to his death. We dont see the impact, but we do see his hand bounce to a stop.


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* PaperThinDisguise: One of the villains from "Showdown" impersonates Superman at the behest of his boss. Thing is, aside from obviously not having any powers, the henchman looks ''nothing'' like Superman, he's not even muscular.


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* TakenForGranite: In "The Underground World", the professor and Lois Lane comes across a statue of the professors long lost father, who originally discovered the caves, but disappeared into them. Lois soon realizes that the statue IS him, and the Birdmen of the Underground World intend to turn them into statues as well.


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** How about the villain from "The Mechanical Monsters"? What does he do when he sees that Superman is trouncing his robots? Leg it while Superman is busy? Of course not, he stands there like an idiot until the last robot is demolished and Superman throws the pile on the control console. Then he tries to hold Lois hostage, but instead of trading her life for safe passage, which Superman would uphold if he agreed to do so, he tries to kill her and THEN runs for it. Yeah, he ends up in jail.


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* TheWorldIsNotReady: Perry White decides to burn Lois's photos of the Underground World and pull the plug on the story, reasoning that no one would belive such a tale. In his defence, it does sound ridiculous if you think about it.
4th Dec '15 10:21:34 PM TitoMosquito
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The Fleischer Brothers, Max and Dave, had to make similar mental gymnastics themselves at the beginning when they were approached by Paramount to make this series. Already stretched from [[WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels their ill-fated]] [[WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown feature film projects]] and the terrible falling out between them, they were in no mood to take on this project, which presented considerable demands for a more realistic style. So, they tried to scare off the studio execs by saying they would need around $100,000 per short, an astronomical figure considering the typical Creator/Disney short, the biggest averaged budgeted company in animation was around $25,000. To their shock, Paramount compromised at $50,000 per short and the Fleischers just could not turn down money like that, making the ''Superman'' cartoons the biggest budgeted (adjust for inflation) animation short series in Hollywood history. And boy, [[EyeCandy does it show in the art]].

On top of that, this was the series that turned Superman into a FlyingBrick. To elaborate, at the time Superman's aerial abilities were limited to literally "Leaping Tall Buildings InASingleBound," and the Fleischers intended to adhere to this, but they couldn't animate it without it looking stupid and awkward [[note]]The only short where they tried to do this was in "The Arctic Giant", and it's about as ridiculous looking as you'd expect[[/note]]. They copped out and just gave him flight, and hence an archetype was born.

to:

The Fleischer Brothers, Max and Dave, had to make similar mental gymnastics themselves at the beginning when they were approached by Paramount to make this series. Already stretched from [[WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels their ill-fated]] [[WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown feature film projects]] and the terrible falling out between them, they were in no mood to take on this project, which presented considerable demands for a more realistic style. So, they tried to scare off the studio execs by saying they would need around $100,000 per short, an astronomical figure considering the typical Creator/Disney Creator/{{Disney}} short, the biggest averaged budgeted company in animation was around $25,000. To their shock, Paramount compromised at $50,000 per short and the Fleischers just could not turn down money like that, making the ''Superman'' cartoons the biggest budgeted (adjust for inflation) animation short series in Hollywood history. And boy, [[EyeCandy does it show in the art]].

On top of that, this was the series that turned Superman into a FlyingBrick. To elaborate, at the time Superman's aerial abilities were limited to literally "Leaping Tall Buildings InASingleBound," and the Fleischers intended to adhere to this, but they couldn't animate it without it looking stupid and awkward [[note]]The awkward[[note]]The only short where they tried to do this was in "The Arctic Giant", and it's about as ridiculous looking as you'd expect[[/note]]. They copped out and just gave him flight, and hence an archetype was born.



* MySuitIsAlsoSuper: Superman's cape can redirect the flow of molten lead without even getting singed. Justified in that it actually DID have this ability in the Golden Age of Comics, an early comic shows that the fabric in Supermans spaceship was used to make his costume, and was almost as indestructible as him.

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* MySuitIsAlsoSuper: Superman's cape can redirect the flow of molten lead without even getting singed. Justified in that it actually DID have this ability in the Golden Age of Comics, an early comic shows that the fabric in Supermans Superman's spaceship was used to make his costume, and was almost as indestructible as him.
22nd Oct '15 7:10:41 AM JamesAustin
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** ''Superman: Doomsday'' makes two -- in The Fortress of Solitude, the flying car from "The Bulleteers" and one of the robots from "The Mechanical Monsters" make "blink and you'll miss 'em" cameos (although one must beg the question where he got them, since the bullet car was completely incinerated in its short, and Superman destroyed all of the robots from Mechanical Monsters-or better yet, why he even has them laying around out in the open in his fortress [[MST3KMantra in the first place]]).
** The {{ComicStrip/Popeye}} cartoons which Famous was making at the time made some shout outs to this series, with one of them, "She-Sick Sailors", having Bluto dress up as Superman to try and woo Olive. Incidentally, the theme when Clark changes to Superman is suspiciously similar to the "Spinach power up" jingle in the Popeye cartoons.

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** ''Superman: Doomsday'' makes two -- in The Fortress of Solitude, the flying car from "The Bulleteers" and one of the robots from "The Mechanical Monsters" make "blink and you'll miss 'em" cameos (although one must beg the question where he got them, since the bullet car was completely incinerated in its short, and Superman destroyed all of the robots from Mechanical Monsters-or better yet, why he even has them laying around out in the open in his fortress [[MST3KMantra in the first place]]).
place).
** The {{ComicStrip/Popeye}} ComicStrip/{{Popeye}} cartoons which Famous was making at the time made some shout outs to this series, with one of them, "She-Sick Sailors", having Bluto dress up as Superman to try and woo Olive. Incidentally, the theme when Clark changes to Superman is suspiciously similar to the "Spinach power up" jingle in the Popeye cartoons.



** Whether or not its intentional, the scientist in "The Magnetic Telescope" resembles [[{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel's]] nemesis Dr. Sivana.
*** Or another [[ComicBook/LexLuthor bald mad scientist that causes trouble for Metropolis]].

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** Whether or not its intentional, the scientist in "The Magnetic Telescope" resembles [[{{Shazam}} [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel's]] nemesis Dr. Sivana.
*** Or another
Sivana. And to a lesser degree, to [[ComicBook/LexLuthor that bald mad scientist that causes trouble for Metropolis]].
22nd Oct '15 6:55:07 AM JamesAustin
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->''"Faster than a speeding bullet!''
->''More powerful than a locomotive!''
->''Able to leap tall buildings in a single bound![[note]]alternately, "Able to soar higher than any plane!"[[/note]]''
->''This amazing stranger from the planet Krypton!''
->''The man of steel! (gong ring) SUPERMAN!"''
-->-- The iconic opening of the shorts.

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->''"Faster than a speeding bullet!''
->''More
bullet!''\\
''More
powerful than a locomotive!''
->''Able
locomotive!''\\
''Able
to leap tall buildings in a single bound![[note]]alternately, "Able to soar higher than any plane!"[[/note]]''
->''This
plane!"[[/note]]''\\
''This
amazing stranger from the planet Krypton!''
->''The
Krypton!''\\
''The
man of steel! (gong ring) SUPERMAN!"''
-->-- The iconic opening of the shorts.
shorts



* ShoutOut: The ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' episode "Christmas with the Joker" makes a subtle one to the first short of this series by recreating the superlaser bombardment of Metropolis, right down to a bridge being blown apart, except in that case it's the Joker using a giant cannon on Gotham.

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* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
The ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' episode "Christmas with the Joker" makes a subtle one to the first short of this series by recreating the superlaser bombardment of Metropolis, right down to a bridge being blown apart, except in that case it's the Joker using a giant cannon on Gotham.



* WellIntentionedExtremist: The villain in "The Electric Earthquake" is a Native American with obviously legitimate land claim grievances given his people's terrible history interacting with Europeans, but the fact that he stoops to making terrorist threats and has the destructive means and will to carry them out is obviously beyond the pale.
** The villain's first public appearance is in the Daily Planet, where he tries the legal and moral route of getting his story published in the paper. It is only after it is rejected that he decides to use his deadly machine. Heck, Clark clearly thinks he has a good point.
** On the other hand, the piece of land he wants people to vacate is ''the island of Manhattan,'' one of the most densely populated places on Earth

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* WellIntentionedExtremist: The villain in "The Electric Earthquake" is a Native American with obviously legitimate land claim grievances given his people's terrible history interacting with Europeans, but the fact that he stoops to making terrorist threats and has the destructive means and will to carry them out is obviously beyond the pale.
** The villain's
whose first public appearance is in the Daily Planet, ''Daily Planet'', where he tries the legal and moral route of getting his story published in the paper. It is only after it is rejected that he decides to use his deadly machine. Heck, paper (Heck, Clark clearly thinks he has a good point.
** On
point.) It is only the other hand, fact that both the piece of land he wants people to vacate is ''the island of Manhattan,'' one of the most densely populated places on EarthEarth; and that after it is rejected he decides to stoop to making terrorist threats and has the destructive means and will to carry them out, that is obviously beyond the pale.
13th Oct '15 1:38:48 AM foxley
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Added DiffLines:

* CircusEpisode: ''Terror on the Midway'', where Superman has to save spectators from a [[KillerGorilla ferocious gorilla]].
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