History WesternAnimation / SupermanTheatricalCartoons

18th May '18 11:38:07 AM CJO123
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The Fleischer Brothers, Max and Dave, had to make similar mental gymnastics themselves at the beginning when they were approached by Paramount to make this series. Already stretched from [[WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels their ill-fated]] [[WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown feature film projects]] and the terrible falling out between them, they were in no mood to take on this project, which presented considerable demands for a more realistic style. So, they tried to scare off the studio execs by saying they would need around $100,000 per short, an astronomical figure considering Creator/{{Disney}}'s shorts, the most expensive shorts to produce at the time, cost on average $25,000 per short. To their shock, Paramount negotiated it down to $50,000 per short and the Fleischers just could not turn down money like that, making the ''Superman'' cartoons possibly the most expensive (adjusted for inflation) animated short series in Hollywood history. And boy, [[EyeCandy does it show in the art]].

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The Fleischer Brothers, Max and Dave, had to make similar mental gymnastics themselves at the beginning when they were approached by Paramount to make this series. Already stretched from [[WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels their ill-fated]] [[WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown feature film projects]] and the terrible falling out between them, they were in no mood to take on this project, which presented considerable demands for a more realistic style. So, they Dave tried to scare off the studio execs Paramount by saying they would need around $100,000 per short, an astronomical figure considering Creator/{{Disney}}'s shorts, the most expensive shorts to produce at the time, cost on average $25,000 per short. To their his shock, Paramount negotiated it down to $50,000 per short (equal to almost $900,000 in 2018 dollars) and the Fleischers just could not turn down money like that, making the ''Superman'' cartoons possibly the most expensive (adjusted for inflation) animated short series in Hollywood history. And boy, [[EyeCandy does it show in the art]].
25th Apr '18 4:21:18 AM Theharbo
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* FlamingMeteor: In the opening of 'The Magnetic Telescope', a meteor is dragged towards Earth, soars through the atmosphere, and rolls through Metropolis as a red-hot solid ball of rock - so hot, in fact, that it lights a port authority building on fire just by rolling over it while simultaneously [[ConvectionSchmonvection rolling past dozens of other buildings with no effect]].
2nd Mar '18 10:04:27 PM DSFHBRYNJT
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2nd Mar '18 7:31:21 PM captainpat
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* HotScoop: Lois.
26th Jan '18 2:33:53 AM CJO123
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From the studio that brought you such classics as WesternAnimation/BettyBoop and ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}, [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] played a major role in cementing [[Franchise/{{Superman}} the Man of Steel]] as a pop culture icon by means of these lavishly animated, massive budget short subjects which served to bring Superman to the big screen, from UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation. These cartoons were a big deal back in the '40s -- the first short, "[[WesternAnimation/TheMadScientist The Mad Scientist]]", nearly won the 1942 UsefulNotes/AcademyAward (losing to a [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Disney]] [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto short]], "Lend A Paw"). These cartoons were among the first cartoons that were made for genuine action and drama, rather than crude comedy, which was part of what contributed to their success. Paramount in fact had such confidence in the shorts being a hit, they even had had '''trailers''' made for them -- yes, that's right, trailers for ''short cartoons.'' Try to wrap your head around that.

The Fleischer Brothers, Max and Dave, had to make similar mental gymnastics themselves at the beginning when they were approached by Paramount to make this series. Already stretched from [[WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels their ill-fated]] [[WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown feature film projects]] and the terrible falling out between them, they were in no mood to take on this project, which presented considerable demands for a more realistic style. So, they tried to scare off the studio execs by saying they would need around $100,000 per short, an astronomical figure considering Creator/{{Disney}}'s shorts, the most expensive shorts to produce at the time, costed on average $25,000 per short. To their shock, Paramount compromised at $50,000 per short and the Fleischers just could not turn down money like that, making the ''Superman'' cartoons the biggest budgeted (adjust for inflation) animation short series in Hollywood history. And boy, [[EyeCandy does it show in the art]].

to:

From the studio that brought you such classics as WesternAnimation/BettyBoop and ComicStrip/{{Popeye}}, [[Creator/MaxAndDaveFleischer Fleischer Studios]] played a major role in cementing [[Franchise/{{Superman}} the Man of Steel]] as a pop culture icon by means of these lavishly animated, massive budget short subjects which served to bring Superman to the big screen, from UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation. These cartoons were a big deal back in the '40s -- the first short, "[[WesternAnimation/TheMadScientist The Mad Scientist]]", nearly won was nominated for the 1942 UsefulNotes/AcademyAward (losing to a [[WesternAnimation/ClassicDisneyShorts Disney]] [[WesternAnimation/PlutoThePup Pluto short]], "Lend A Paw"). These cartoons were among the first cartoons that were made for genuine action and drama, rather than crude comedy, which was part of what contributed to their success. Paramount in fact had such confidence in the shorts being a hit, they even had had '''trailers''' made for them -- yes, that's right, trailers for ''short cartoons.'' Try to wrap your head around that.

The Fleischer Brothers, Max and Dave, had to make similar mental gymnastics themselves at the beginning when they were approached by Paramount to make this series. Already stretched from [[WesternAnimation/GulliversTravels their ill-fated]] [[WesternAnimation/MrBugGoesToTown feature film projects]] and the terrible falling out between them, they were in no mood to take on this project, which presented considerable demands for a more realistic style. So, they tried to scare off the studio execs by saying they would need around $100,000 per short, an astronomical figure considering Creator/{{Disney}}'s shorts, the most expensive shorts to produce at the time, costed cost on average $25,000 per short. To their shock, Paramount compromised at negotiated it down to $50,000 per short and the Fleischers just could not turn down money like that, making the ''Superman'' cartoons possibly the biggest budgeted (adjust most expensive (adjusted for inflation) animation animated short series in Hollywood history. And boy, [[EyeCandy does it show in the art]].
25th Jan '18 1:54:19 PM Zeiss
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* BitchInSheepsClothing: Lois is this to Clark when it comes to getting the story before he does. In one case, she drives off just as he's trying to get in her car but he takes the opportunity to change into Superman. In "Volcano," she ''steals his press pass,'' which prevents Clark from being inside the security perimeter when the volcano erupts.

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* BitchInSheepsClothing: Lois is this to Clark when it comes to getting the story before he does. In one case, she drives off just as he's trying to get in her car but he takes the opportunity to change into Superman. In "Volcano," she ''steals his press pass,'' which prevents Clark from being inside the security perimeter when the volcano erupts. Though in "The Mummy Strikes" this habit comes to bite back on Lois as she ends up with both hands injured and heavily bandaged and so unable to do any writing for a while.


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** The unnamed female spy in the very final cartoon, "Secret Agent", clearly was Lois Lane's character design, just colored into a blonde and the voice actress added a foreign accent, and her narrative situation is also identical to Lois.
8th Jan '18 12:45:07 PM Prinzenick
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* GoneHorriblyRight: In "The Magnetic Telescope," you'd think that the professor's counter-warning to the police that any attempt to interfere with his experiments with comets would be disastrous was more of a threat than an honest warning. [[VillainHasAPoint It turns out he had a point all along]] ''after'' the police sabotage his machine, as he soon loses control of his magnet after pulling a comet into the Earth and is unable to send it back to Earth. Disaster ensues.

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* GoneHorriblyRight: In "The Magnetic Telescope," you'd think that the professor's counter-warning to the police that any attempt to interfere with his experiments with comets would be disastrous was more of a threat than an honest warning. [[VillainHasAPoint It turns out he had a point all along]] ''after'' the police sabotage his machine, as he soon loses control of his magnet after pulling a comet into the Earth and is unable to send it back to away from Earth. Disaster ensues.
6th Dec '17 9:16:57 PM marcoasalazarm
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* AsideGlance: The wink Supes gave to the audience OnceAnEpisode.
18th Nov '17 4:30:38 AM RedScharlach
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* DisneyVillainDeath: One of the Nazi henchmen in "Jungle Drums" gets killed while grappling with Superman atop the AntiAir gun they've disguised as a large stone idol. He takes a leap at Superman but accidently goes over the edge and plunges to his death. We dont see the impact, but we do see his hand bounce to a stop.

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* DisneyVillainDeath: One of the Nazi henchmen in "Jungle Drums" gets killed while grappling with Superman atop the AntiAir gun they've disguised as a large stone idol. He takes a leap at Superman but accidently accidentally goes over the edge and plunges to his death. We dont see the impact, but we do see his hand bounce to a stop.



* GodGuise: Its heavily implied that the Nazi commander and his men are posing as gods to the African tribe serving them in "Jungle Drums", altough not stated outright.

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* GodGuise: Its heavily implied that the Nazi commander and his men are posing as gods to the African tribe serving them in "Jungle Drums", altough although not stated outright.



* {{Hammerspace}}: Subtly subverted in "Showdown". Initially it's unclear where the spandax-clad impostor is carrying the stolen jewels (and [[ShootingSuperman the gun that he pulls on the real Superman]]), but after losing his cape, he can be clearly seen to be wearing a hip-satchel.

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* {{Hammerspace}}: Subtly subverted in "Showdown". Initially it's unclear where the spandax-clad spandex-clad impostor is carrying the stolen jewels (and [[ShootingSuperman the gun that he pulls on the real Superman]]), but after losing his cape, he can be clearly seen to be wearing a hip-satchel.



* MalevolentMaskedMen: The train robbers from "Billon Dollar Limited". They're shown briefly unmasked just before they begin the heist.

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* MalevolentMaskedMen: The train robbers from "Billon "Billion Dollar Limited". They're shown briefly unmasked just before they begin the heist.



* NonMaliciousMonster: The Arctic Giant, which goes on a rampage, only because it was scared and confused after being woken from it's deep freeze.

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* NonMaliciousMonster: The Arctic Giant, which goes on a rampage, only because it was scared and confused after being woken from it's its deep freeze.



* PetTheDog: The Arctic Giant, after it's rampage is stopped, is set into a wildlife reserve. After all, it only went berserk because it was scared and confused.

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* PetTheDog: The Arctic Giant, after it's its rampage is stopped, is set put into a wildlife reserve. After all, it only went berserk because it was scared and confused.



* WellIntentionedExtremist: The villain in "The Electric Earthquake" is a Native American with obviously legitimate land claim grievances given his people's terrible history interacting with Europeans, and whose first public appearance is in the ''Daily Planet'', where he tries the legal and moral route of getting his story published in the paper (Heck, Clark clearly thinks he has a good point.) It is only the fact that both the piece of land he wants people to vacate is ''the island of Manhattan,'' one of the most densely populated places on Earth; and that after it is rejected he decides to stoop to making terrorist threats and has the destructive means and will to carry them out, that is obviously beyond the pale.

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* WellIntentionedExtremist: The villain in "The Electric Earthquake" is a Native American with obviously legitimate land claim grievances given his people's terrible history interacting with Europeans, and whose first public appearance is in the ''Daily Planet'', where he tries the legal and moral route of getting his story published in the paper (Heck, (heck, Clark clearly thinks he has a good point.) It is only the fact that both the piece of land he wants people to vacate is ''the island of Manhattan,'' one of the most densely populated places on Earth; and that after it is rejected he decides to stoop to making terrorist threats and has the destructive means and will to carry them out, that is obviously beyond the pale.



* TheWorldIsNotReady: Perry White decides to burn Lois's photos of the Underground World and pull the plug on the story, reasoning that no one would belive such a tale (even if Superman is involved). In his defence, it does sound ridiculous if you think about it.

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* TheWorldIsNotReady: Perry White decides to burn Lois's photos of the Underground World and pull the plug on the story, reasoning that no one would belive believe such a tale (even if Superman is involved). In his defence, defense, it does sound ridiculous if you think about it.
12th Nov '17 12:37:14 PM Tork
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** The flight was created specifically because Superman leaping over tall buildings in a single bound looks a little silly in motion. The one short where he actually does this, “The Arctic Giant”, kind of shows this to be true.
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