History WesternAnimation / SuperFriends

7th Jul '17 8:40:51 AM themisterfree
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* AdaptedOut: Despite Darkseid and and his forces appearing during the ''Super Powers'' era, New Genesis, Orion, Highfather, and their associates were never shown or reference, for some reason.
15th Jun '17 3:18:31 AM TitoMosquito
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** And in a very non-heroic example, Lex Luthor's dimwitted henchman Otis from the era's live-action ''Film/{{Superman}}'' movies appeared in the episode "Lex Luthor Strikes Back", under the name "Orville".

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** And in a very non-heroic example, Lex Luthor's dimwitted henchman Otis from the era's live-action ''Film/{{Superman}}'' movies appeared in the episode "Lex Luthor Strikes Back", under the name "Orville"."Orville Gump".
4th Jun '17 2:03:05 PM TnAdct1
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** In Alex Ross' ''Justice'', SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is furious that the other supervillains have left him out of their Legion of Doom. The original plan was to have the Joker be part of the Legion of Doom, but with Creator/Filmation using him as part of ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'', he (and a few other Batman villains) were off-limits.

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** In Alex Ross' ''Justice'', SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is furious that the other supervillains have left him out of their Legion of Doom. The original plan was to have the Joker be part of the Legion of Doom, but with Creator/Filmation Creator/{{Filmation}} using him as part of ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'', he (and a few other Batman villains) were off-limits.
4th Jun '17 2:02:40 PM TnAdct1
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* MythologyGag: In Alex Ross' ''Justice'', SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is furious that the other supervillains have left him out of their Legion of Doom. The Joker wasn't a part of the Legion of Doom in the animated series.

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* MythologyGag: MythologyGag:
**
In Alex Ross' ''Justice'', SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker is furious that the other supervillains have left him out of their Legion of Doom. The original plan was to have the Joker wasn't a be part of the Legion of Doom Doom, but with Creator/Filmation using him as part of ''WesternAnimation/TheNewAdventuresOfBatman'', he (and a few other Batman villains) were off-limits.
** In "Superfriends: Rest
in Peace", Batman's "death" takes place outside of a movie theater, which itself is a nod to how his parents died on the animated series.way home from a night at the movies.
24th May '17 1:33:16 PM Xtifr
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* The series was revived in 1977 as '''''The All-New Super Friends Hour''''', with some [[ReTool reworking]] of the concept. Most notably, the "Junior Super Friends" were replaced with the [[VoluntaryShapeshifter shape-shifting]] ComicBook/WonderTwins, Zan and Jayna, and their [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys monkey]], Gleek, who, unlike their predecessors, had actual semi-useful (if occasionally silly) superpowers. Episodes typically contained more action with the heroes having to get tough with their enemies and less {{Anvilicious}} point-making and plodding stories. This and subsequent seasons included short segments on health, safety, crafts, stage magic and a simple word puzzle related to the show's main story. ''The All-New Super Friends Hour'' was divided into two parts: one half-hour episode, and another half hour of ThreeShorts, which typically followed a pattern: first, two of the original four heroes; then, a short spotlighting the new Wonder Twins; then, the main story with the entire team; and finally, an episode spotlighting one established hero and introducing another hero, who generally would later appear on the next series:
* '''''Challenge of the Super Friends''''' in 1978 had the largest cast of the various series: 11 heroes and 13 villains (see HeroesUnlimited). Three of the more notable heroes ''not'' present were the Wonder Twins and Gleek. By this time, the stories began to resemble those found in the actual comic books, although some of the heroes and villains existed only in animation, including four new "[[CaptainEthnic Minority]]" heroes, Black Vulcan (Black), Apache Chief (Native American), El Dorado (Mexican), and Samurai (Asian). It also introduced the original LegionOfDoom, a group of the Super Friends' greatest enemies united to conquer the world with plans none of them could complete alone. The most fondly remembered series, it evolved as it went on. Most episodes focused on a MacGuffin, and early episodes ended with a VillainExitStageLeft, as if actually capturing the Legion would end their threat, despite the fact that's ''never'' how it works in comic books (see FailureIsTheOnlyOption, JokerImmunity, CardboardPrison). Once they got over that, later episodes raised the stakes and had the Legion introduce ever greater threats, with episode titles starting to take on names like "The Final Challenge" and "Doomsday." The penultimate episode involved the Super Friends being picked off one by one by a "[[AppliedPhlebotinum Noxium Crystal]]" but ultimately being revealed as robots; the final episode ''begins'' AfterTheEnd, as we follow a group of {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s as they encounter the scene and wonder what happened. It turns out the Legion fired a solar flare at Earth, and with Superman out of commission, the Super Friends activated their "global force field"; the mixture of the two bathed the Earth in deadly radiation. It ultimately ends with the aliens using TimeTravel to push the inevitable ResetButton, ''moving the moon'' in the path of the flare (seriously). Originally was still part of an hour-long show; the episodes they ran with, which included the core five and the Wonder Twins, are now very rare and almost entirely forgotten, and the last six were out-and-out {{Missing Episode}}s until a 2005 DVD release contained this entire group.
* '''''World's Greatest Super Friends''''', 1979: Core five members and the Wonder Twins. Only eight episodes; one WholePlotReference after another. The only two exceptions are a MirrorUniverse and an {{Homage}} to ''Superman The Movie''. Mostly ran with reruns originally, which helps explain it.

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* The series was revived in 1977 as '''''The ''The All-New Super Friends Hour''''', Hour'', with some [[ReTool reworking]] of the concept. Most notably, the "Junior Super Friends" were replaced with the [[VoluntaryShapeshifter shape-shifting]] ComicBook/WonderTwins, Zan and Jayna, and their [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys monkey]], Gleek, who, unlike their predecessors, had actual semi-useful (if occasionally silly) superpowers. Episodes typically contained more action with the heroes having to get tough with their enemies and less {{Anvilicious}} point-making and plodding stories. This and subsequent seasons included short segments on health, safety, crafts, stage magic and a simple word puzzle related to the show's main story. ''The All-New Super Friends Hour'' was divided into two parts: one half-hour episode, and another half hour of ThreeShorts, which typically followed a pattern: first, two of the original four heroes; then, a short spotlighting the new Wonder Twins; then, the main story with the entire team; and finally, an episode spotlighting one established hero and introducing another hero, who generally would later appear on the next series:
* '''''Challenge ''Challenge of the Super Friends''''' Friends'' in 1978 had the largest cast of the various series: 11 heroes and 13 villains (see HeroesUnlimited). Three of the more notable heroes ''not'' present were the Wonder Twins and Gleek. By this time, the stories began to resemble those found in the actual comic books, although some of the heroes and villains existed only in animation, including four new "[[CaptainEthnic Minority]]" heroes, Black Vulcan (Black), Apache Chief (Native American), El Dorado (Mexican), and Samurai (Asian). It also introduced the original LegionOfDoom, a group of the Super Friends' greatest enemies united to conquer the world with plans none of them could complete alone. The most fondly remembered series, it evolved as it went on. Most episodes focused on a MacGuffin, and early episodes ended with a VillainExitStageLeft, as if actually capturing the Legion would end their threat, despite the fact that's ''never'' how it works in comic books (see FailureIsTheOnlyOption, JokerImmunity, CardboardPrison). Once they got over that, later episodes raised the stakes and had the Legion introduce ever greater threats, with episode titles starting to take on names like "The Final Challenge" and "Doomsday." The penultimate episode involved the Super Friends being picked off one by one by a "[[AppliedPhlebotinum Noxium Crystal]]" but ultimately being revealed as robots; the final episode ''begins'' AfterTheEnd, as we follow a group of {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s as they encounter the scene and wonder what happened. It turns out the Legion fired a solar flare at Earth, and with Superman out of commission, the Super Friends activated their "global force field"; the mixture of the two bathed the Earth in deadly radiation. It ultimately ends with the aliens using TimeTravel to push the inevitable ResetButton, ''moving the moon'' in the path of the flare (seriously). Originally was still part of an hour-long show; the episodes they ran with, which included the core five and the Wonder Twins, are now very rare and almost entirely forgotten, and the last six were out-and-out {{Missing Episode}}s until a 2005 DVD release contained this entire group.
* '''''World's ''World's Greatest Super Friends''''', Friends'', 1979: Core five members and the Wonder Twins. Only eight episodes; one WholePlotReference after another. The only two exceptions are a MirrorUniverse and an {{Homage}} to ''Superman The Movie''. Mostly ran with reruns originally, which helps explain it.



* The show was revived ''again'' in 1984 as the MerchandiseDriven '''''Super Friends: The Legendary Super Powers Show,''''' intended to tie in with the ''Super Powers'' toy line from Creator/{{Kenner}}. The show consisted of two 15-minute shorts, except for some two-part half-hours. It introduced Firestorm, who was so heavily spotlighted as to be accused of being a MartyStu. This was also the series that introduced {{ComicBook/Darkseid}} and his fellow villainous ComicBook/NewGods of Apokolips to animation, a decade before ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', although many aspects of his personality were toned down from the original, and he was given a bizarre fixation on making Wonder Woman his bride.
* '''''The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians''''', 1985. Creator/HannaBarbera gave the show a ReTool, eliminating all but one of the characters they created themselves (including the Wonder Twins), introducing Cyborg from the comic books in his animated debut, redoing the character designs, calling the group "The Super Powers Team" instead of the Super Friends, and adding a more HeroesUnlimited feel. The main connection to the previous series was the voices and the villains, as Darkseid was still around. Some of the episodes were darker and more somber than prior ones. Especially the episode dealing with Batman's origin, which just may have the most powerful performance Adam West ever gave in the role.

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* The show was revived ''again'' in 1984 as the MerchandiseDriven '''''Super ''Super Friends: The Legendary Super Powers Show,''''' Show,'' intended to tie in with the ''Super Powers'' toy line from Creator/{{Kenner}}. The show consisted of two 15-minute shorts, except for some two-part half-hours. It introduced Firestorm, who was so heavily spotlighted as to be accused of being a MartyStu. This was also the series that introduced {{ComicBook/Darkseid}} and his fellow villainous ComicBook/NewGods of Apokolips to animation, a decade before ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'', although many aspects of his personality were toned down from the original, and he was given a bizarre fixation on making Wonder Woman his bride.
* '''''The ''The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians''''', Guardians'', 1985. Creator/HannaBarbera gave the show a ReTool, eliminating all but one of the characters they created themselves (including the Wonder Twins), introducing Cyborg from the comic books in his animated debut, redoing the character designs, calling the group "The Super Powers Team" instead of the Super Friends, and adding a more HeroesUnlimited feel. The main connection to the previous series was the voices and the villains, as Darkseid was still around. Some of the episodes were darker and more somber than prior ones. Especially the episode dealing with Batman's origin, which just may have the most powerful performance Adam West ever gave in the role.
24th May '17 1:32:16 PM Xtifr
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* EcoTerrorist: In the episode "Dr. Pelagian's War", Dr. Pelagian is an eco-terrorist out to stop three polluting businessmen.
14th Mar '17 10:35:39 PM Karxrida
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* CivilianVillain: In "Conquerers of the Future", the Legion of Doom pretended to have done a group HeelFaceTurn. The ploy turned out to be ''[[{{Padding}} completely irrelevant]]'' to their plan.


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* FalselyReformedVillain: In "Conquerers of the Future", the Legion of Doom pretended to have done a group HeelFaceTurn. The ploy turned out to be ''[[{{Padding}} completely irrelevant]]'' to their plan.
22nd Feb '17 1:44:40 AM C2
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* UngratefulBastard: In one episode, Superman foils a robbery on a laboratory perpetrated by Mr. Mxyzptlk. But the scientist in charge decides to [[WhatTheHellHero| call him out for allowing the imp to escape]]. As one YouTube comment [[LampshadeHanging| points out]], "Where's the thank you for saving your ungrateful hide?"

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* UngratefulBastard: In one episode, Superman foils a robbery on a laboratory perpetrated by Mr. Mxyzptlk. But the scientist in charge decides to [[WhatTheHellHero| [[WhatTheHellHero call him out for allowing the imp to escape]]. As one YouTube comment [[LampshadeHanging| [[LampshadeHanging points out]], "Where's the thank you for saving your ungrateful hide?"
19th Feb '17 1:24:29 PM VenomousSeal
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* UngratefulBastard: In one episode, Superman foils a robbery on a laboratory perpetrated by Mr. Mxyzptlk. But the scientist in charge decides to [[WhatTheHellHero| call him out for allowing the imp to escape]]. As one YouTube comment [[LampshadeHanging| points out]], "Where's the thank you for saving your ungrateful hide?"
27th Jan '17 8:17:44 PM themisterfree
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* CreatorProvincialism: Minor example- the design of the Hall of Justice was modeled after the old [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati_Museum_Center_at_Union_Terminal Union Terminal]] train station in Cincinnati; Cincy was where Taft Broadcasting, owners of Hanna-Barbera at the time, were headquartered.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WesternAnimation.SuperFriends