History WMG / WilliamShakespeare

17th Jun '17 5:03:35 PM Gosicrystal
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* First of all, Shakespeare's works don't indicate a ''very'' educated gentleman, he does get a lot of stuff horribly wrong ("seacoast of Bohemia" anybody?) and some of the stuff he does get right might well have been AccidentallyAccurate. He also throws in a lot of lowbrow humor, which is in full consistency with the lowbrow entertainment theater was at that time considered to be. On the other hand, his vocabulary is extraordinarily large and he does show passing knowledge of at least some of the classics, so it is likely that whoever wrote Shakespeare had at least some education. However, some scholars (I forgot who) have mentioned a book that was basically "the classics for dummies" that was rather popular in Shakespeare's time and noted that Shakespeare never or hardly ever shows knowledge that could not be gotten from this book.

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* First of all, Shakespeare's works don't indicate a ''very'' educated gentleman, he does get a lot of stuff horribly wrong ("seacoast of Bohemia" anybody?) and some of the stuff he does get right might well have been AccidentallyAccurate.a case of AccidentallyCorrectWriting. He also throws in a lot of lowbrow humor, which is in full consistency with the lowbrow entertainment theater was at that time considered to be. On the other hand, his vocabulary is extraordinarily large and he does show passing knowledge of at least some of the classics, so it is likely that whoever wrote Shakespeare had at least some education. However, some scholars (I forgot who) have mentioned a book that was basically "the classics for dummies" that was rather popular in Shakespeare's time and noted that Shakespeare never or hardly ever shows knowledge that could not be gotten from this book.
8th Jun '17 6:22:35 AM Julia1984
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%%* WMG/TheTempest

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%%* * WMG/TheTempest
30th Mar '17 9:31:20 AM crazysamaritan
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* There has been a tremendous amount of speculation that Creator/WilliamShakespeare was merely an actor and was used as a front for somebody else who wrote his famous plays. The finger is generally pointed at such notables as Sir Francis Bacon, Queen Elizabeth, Creator/ChristopherMarlowe, and Edward de Vere, meaning any or all of them could have written the plays ("all of them" being [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything the "Round Table" Hypothesis]]). Creator/MarkTwain was one of the [[OlderThanRadio earliest]] prominent believers in these theories.

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* There has been a tremendous amount of speculation that Creator/WilliamShakespeare was merely an actor and was used as a front for somebody else who wrote his famous plays. The finger is generally pointed at such notables as Sir Francis Bacon, Queen Elizabeth, Creator/ChristopherMarlowe, and Edward de Vere, meaning any or all of them could have written the plays ("all of them" being [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything the "Round Table" Hypothesis]]).Hypothesis). Creator/MarkTwain was one of the [[OlderThanRadio earliest]] prominent believers in these theories.
11th Mar '17 4:06:36 PM nombretomado
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[[WMG: [[RomeoAndJuliet Friar Laurence]] is [[AMidsummerNightsDream Oberon]]. ]]
Because I was reading ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' and thought, "Where ''else'' have I read a Shakespeare play in which a mysterious man plays God by using herbs to help a couple of young lovers and 'make everything right'?"

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[[WMG: [[RomeoAndJuliet [[Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet Friar Laurence]] is [[AMidsummerNightsDream [[Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream Oberon]]. ]]
Because I was reading ''AMidsummerNightsDream'' ''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream'' and thought, "Where ''else'' have I read a Shakespeare play in which a mysterious man plays God by using herbs to help a couple of young lovers and 'make everything right'?"
4th Mar '17 11:09:59 AM nombretomado
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* There has been a tremendous amount of speculation that Creator/WilliamShakespeare was merely an actor and was used as a front for somebody else who wrote his famous plays. The finger is generally pointed at such notables as Sir Francis Bacon, Queen Elizabeth, Creator/ChristopherMarlowe, and Edward de Vere, meaning any or all of them could have written the plays ("all of them" being [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything the "Round Table" Hypothesis]]). MarkTwain was one of the [[OlderThanRadio earliest]] prominent believers in these theories.

to:

* There has been a tremendous amount of speculation that Creator/WilliamShakespeare was merely an actor and was used as a front for somebody else who wrote his famous plays. The finger is generally pointed at such notables as Sir Francis Bacon, Queen Elizabeth, Creator/ChristopherMarlowe, and Edward de Vere, meaning any or all of them could have written the plays ("all of them" being [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything the "Round Table" Hypothesis]]). MarkTwain Creator/MarkTwain was one of the [[OlderThanRadio earliest]] prominent believers in these theories.
12th Jun '16 8:55:45 PM PaulA
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*** Plus Marlowe wrote plays which had the same basic plots and themes of some of Shakespeare's plays, unnecessary duplication if he was also Shakespeare, and also dramatically different ideas about people in the world. Take Marlowe's "The Jew of Malta", his version of Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice". Marlowe's Jew, Barabas (a clear reference to the Bible's "Barrabas" who was released in place of Jesus) is a mustache-twirling one-dimensional melodrama villain who delights in violating his own religion, and at one point poisons an entire convent of nuns '''which includes his own daughter'''. Shakespeare's Shylock gets one of the more famous sympathy-gathering monologues of all time--"If you prick us, do we not bleed?"--as well as being a devout Jew right up to the point where he is forced to convert or be executed.

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*** Plus Marlowe wrote plays which had the same basic plots and themes of some of Shakespeare's plays, unnecessary duplication if he was also Shakespeare, and also dramatically different ideas about people in the world. Take Marlowe's "The Jew of Malta", "Theatre/TheJewOfMalta", his version of Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice". Marlowe's Jew, Barabas (a clear reference to the Bible's "Barrabas" who was released in place of Jesus) is a mustache-twirling one-dimensional melodrama villain who delights in violating his own religion, and at one point poisons an entire convent of nuns '''which includes his own daughter'''. Shakespeare's Shylock gets one of the more famous sympathy-gathering monologues of all time--"If you prick us, do we not bleed?"--as well as being a devout Jew right up to the point where he is forced to convert or be executed.
21st Jan '16 9:12:24 AM Jhonny
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* I mean, think about it. Back in those days, England while not yet at the center of a vast multicontinental empire ''did'' engage in trade with most of the then known world. We have no reason to doubt that the Romans already brought black people to England (be it slave or free) and we certainly know that at no point where black people unknown in medieval or early modern Europe. And if you read Sonnet 130, you can indeed get an idea that the woman may in fact be black. "If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head" - that does not sound like "white people" hair to me. So why has this not been mentioned in most analysis? Well PoliticalCorrectHistory of course.

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* I mean, think about it. Back in those days, England while not yet at the center of a vast multicontinental empire ''did'' engage in trade with most of the then known world. We have no reason to doubt that the Romans already brought black people to England (be it slave or free) and we certainly know that at no point where black people unknown in medieval or early modern Europe. And if you read Sonnet 130, you can indeed get an idea that the woman may in fact be black. "If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head" - that does not sound like "white people" hair to me. So why has this not been mentioned in most analysis? Well PoliticalCorrectHistory PoliticallyCorrectHistory of course.
21st Jan '16 9:11:26 AM Jhonny
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[[WMG: The "Dark Lady" is actually (based on) a real woman of recent African descent]]
*I mean, think about it. Back in those days, England while not yet at the center of a vast multicontinental empire ''did'' engage in trade with most of the then known world. We have no reason to doubt that the Romans already brought black people to England (be it slave or free) and we certainly know that at no point where black people unknown in medieval or early modern Europe. And if you read Sonnet 130, you can indeed get an idea that the woman may in fact be black. "If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head" - that does not sound like "white people" hair to me. So why has this not been mentioned in most analysis? Well PoliticalCorrectHistory of course.
21st Jan '16 9:02:22 AM Jhonny
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Also, and yes this introduces yet more WildMassGuessing, there are the "lost years" for which we have exactly zilch evidence as to where Shakespeare was and what he was doing. He may well have traveled Europe, sailed the sea or sat at home and diddled his fingers during that time. And of course any things that appear in his works that cannot be explained by what we ''know'' about Shakespeare (which is preciously little) may be explained by what we ''don't know'' about him

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Also, *Also, and yes this introduces yet more WildMassGuessing, there are the "lost years" for which we have exactly zilch evidence as to where Shakespeare was and what he was doing. He may well have traveled Europe, sailed the sea or sat at home and diddled his fingers during that time. And of course any things that appear in his works that cannot be explained by what we ''know'' about Shakespeare (which is preciously little) may be explained by what we ''don't know'' about him
21st Jan '16 8:40:22 AM Jhonny
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First of all, Shakespeare's works don't indicate a ''very'' educated gentleman, he does get a lot of stuff horribly wrong ("seacoast of Bohemia" anybody?) and some of the stuff he does get right might well have been AccidentallyAccurate. He also throws in a lot of lowbrow humor, which is in full consistency with the lowbrow entertainment theater was at that time considered to be. On the other hand, his vocabulary is extraordinarily large and he does show passing knowledge of at least some of the classics, so it is likely that whoever wrote Shakespeare had at least some education. However, some scholars (I forgot who) have mentioned a book that was basically "the classics for dummies" that was rather popular in Shakespeare's time and noted that Shakespeare never or hardly ever shows knowledge that could not be gotten from this book.
Than there is the question of "why"? Why would someone assume the identity of a merchant's son from Stratford upon Avon to write theater?

to:

First *First of all, Shakespeare's works don't indicate a ''very'' educated gentleman, he does get a lot of stuff horribly wrong ("seacoast of Bohemia" anybody?) and some of the stuff he does get right might well have been AccidentallyAccurate. He also throws in a lot of lowbrow humor, which is in full consistency with the lowbrow entertainment theater was at that time considered to be. On the other hand, his vocabulary is extraordinarily large and he does show passing knowledge of at least some of the classics, so it is likely that whoever wrote Shakespeare had at least some education. However, some scholars (I forgot who) have mentioned a book that was basically "the classics for dummies" that was rather popular in Shakespeare's time and noted that Shakespeare never or hardly ever shows knowledge that could not be gotten from this book.
Than *Than there is the question of "why"? Why would someone assume the identity of a merchant's son from Stratford upon Avon to write theater?



And finally, the argument of him not being well attested in contemporary sources... Well none of his contemporaries of similar birth and means is. Shakespeare was not considered the greatest playwright of even ''his'' time by contemporaries...

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And *And finally, the argument of him not being well attested in contemporary sources... Well none of his contemporaries of similar birth and means is. Shakespeare was not considered the greatest playwright of even ''his'' time by contemporaries...
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