History WMG / Rent

5th Nov '17 7:01:29 PM DearBenPlatt
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*** They're actually married now.
14th Jan '17 7:22:39 AM Apexpredator
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*There's a "Santa Fe" restaurant on the Upper East Side. Roger could have driven to it, said "Welp. There goes that idea" and driven back. As he's not terribly creative, this is possible. It did take him a year to write half a song, you know.
17th Dec '16 1:39:21 AM ComposerAri
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He has to sell his guitar to buy a car, which can't be a particularly good car, and that doesn't account for how he manages to pay for gas to get all the way there (let alone all the way back). Only in the movie do we see Roger actually IN Santa Fe (though granted Rent has minimal staging anyway). We know he leaves on Halloween, the same day as Angel's funeral, and the play ends on Christmas Eve, which gives him a solid two months, but it's unclear exactly where on that timeline "What You Own" falls and Roger makes it back to New York City, since nothing happens onstage between "What You Own" and the finale. Accounting for driving time both to and from Arizona in a shitty car, even if he did get there he couldn't have been there long. The film even shows him already back in New York when the search for Mimi is on (the film states, for around a month). Taking all that into account, it's very possible he made it no further than the New York

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He has to sell his guitar to buy a car, which can't be a particularly good car, and that doesn't account for how he manages to pay for gas to get all the way there (let alone all the way back). Only in the movie do we see Roger actually IN Santa Fe (though granted Rent has minimal staging anyway). We know he leaves on Halloween, the same day as Angel's funeral, and the play ends on Christmas Eve, which gives him a solid two months, but it's unclear exactly where on that timeline "What You Own" falls and Roger makes it back to New York City, since nothing happens onstage between "What You Own" and the finale. Accounting for driving time both to and from Arizona New Mexico in a shitty car, even if he did get there he couldn't have been there long. The film even shows him already back in New York when the search for Mimi is on (the film states, for around a month). Taking all that into account, it's very possible he made it no further than the New York
27th Sep '16 8:55:50 AM Lullabee
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[[WMG: Angel's birth name was Ángel]]
Like the male Spanish name. Angel uses the English pronunciation because "Angel" with the English pronunciation is usually a female name, but since it's still kind of a male Spanish name, it suits someone who doesn't exactly identify as male or female.

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7th Aug '16 3:02:56 AM dnwassel
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Pretty clearly implying that every minute is a "season of love" (which works given the play's general theme of "making every minute count"), [[Spoiler: and THAT is how you "measure a last year on earth."]] [[Spoiler:(Although, if Angel died on October 31 and Seasons of Love B is an interlude set around April (an earlier version of the script specifies that the events of the following song, "Without You," take place in April), Angel only made it about 308,000 "seasons of love" into the new year).]]

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Pretty clearly implying that every minute is a "season of love" (which works given the play's general theme of "making every minute count"), [[Spoiler: and [[spoiler:and THAT is how you "measure a last year on earth."]] [[Spoiler:(Although, [[spoiler:(Although, if Angel died on October 31 and Seasons of Love B is an interlude set around April (an earlier version of the script specifies that the events of the following song, "Without You," take place in April), Angel only made it about 308,000 "seasons of love" into the new year).]]
7th Aug '16 3:02:01 AM dnwassel
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Pretty clearly implying that every minute is a "season of love" (which works given the play's general theme of "making every minute count"), and THAT is how you "measure a last year on earth." (Although, if Angel died on October 31 and Seasons of Love B is an interlude set around April (an earlier version of the script specifies that the events of the following song, "Without You," take place in April), Angel only made it about 308,000 "seasons of love" into the new year).

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Pretty clearly implying that every minute is a "season of love" (which works given the play's general theme of "making every minute count"), [[Spoiler: and THAT is how you "measure a last year on earth." (Although, "]] [[Spoiler:(Although, if Angel died on October 31 and Seasons of Love B is an interlude set around April (an earlier version of the script specifies that the events of the following song, "Without You," take place in April), Angel only made it about 308,000 "seasons of love" into the new year).
year).]]
7th Aug '16 3:00:28 AM dnwassel
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* The lyric is
--> 525,600 minutes
--> 525,000 seasons of love.
Pretty clearly implying that every minute is a "season of love" (which works given the play's general theme of "making every minute count"), and THAT is how you "measure a last year on earth." (Although, if Angel died on October 31 and Seasons of Love B is an interlude set around April (an earlier version of the script specifies that the events of the following song, "Without You," take place in April), Angel only made it about 308,000 "seasons of love" into the new year).
7th Aug '16 2:51:30 AM dnwassel
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Added DiffLines:


[[WMG: Roger never makes it to Santa Fe.]]

He has to sell his guitar to buy a car, which can't be a particularly good car, and that doesn't account for how he manages to pay for gas to get all the way there (let alone all the way back). Only in the movie do we see Roger actually IN Santa Fe (though granted Rent has minimal staging anyway). We know he leaves on Halloween, the same day as Angel's funeral, and the play ends on Christmas Eve, which gives him a solid two months, but it's unclear exactly where on that timeline "What You Own" falls and Roger makes it back to New York City, since nothing happens onstage between "What You Own" and the finale. Accounting for driving time both to and from Arizona in a shitty car, even if he did get there he couldn't have been there long. The film even shows him already back in New York when the search for Mimi is on (the film states, for around a month). Taking all that into account, it's very possible he made it no further than the New York
border before he had his epiphany and turned the car around.
7th Aug '16 2:34:35 AM dnwassel
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** While Angel is not canonically Latin@, besides casting choices, there are clues in the play that Angel could very well be Latin@: Angel's life motto ("Today for you, tomorrow for me") is a direct translation of a Spanish phrase endorsing acts of kindness towards strangers ("Hoy por tí, mañana por yo"); Angel is close to Mimi (who IS canonically Latina), and duets with Mimi during La Vie Boheme to celebrate (among other things) rice, beans and cheese and huevos rancheros. In the movie, Angel also quips to Collins in Spanish about Mark's fixation on Maureen. The Tony Award-winning first Broadway Angel (also the Angel of the film), Wilson Jermaine Heredia, is Dominicano.




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** He frequently has a joint behind his ear in the film too.



** Evidence: Angel is at the very least Mark's muse, since zir death is what inspires him to finish his work. Mark might not recognize it because it's the nineties, so he might think that he's only attracted to Angel when dressed as a woman, but there's definitely something there.

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** Evidence: Angel is at the very least Mark's muse, since zir Angel's death is what inspires him to finish his work. Mark might not recognize it because it's the nineties, so he might think that he's only attracted to Angel when dressed as a woman, but there's definitely something there.
*** Mark doesn't seem to identify Angel as a woman. He has to be reminded of Angel's pronouns when delivering his part of Angel's eulogy, after first using male pronouns.




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* Mark explicitly refers to Angel as a drag queen at Angel's funeral. Collins, who is closest to Angel, being Angel's partner, living with Angel and nursing Angel through AIDS, uses male pronounces to refer to Angel, as well as calling Angel a boy, which Angel doesn't seem to mind. The characters who use female pronouns to refer to Angel seem to really only know Angel when Angel is presenting as a woman; it's polite in drag culture, too, to use the pronouns of the gender the person is presenting as (unless they specify otherwise). Angel chooses to present as a man at Life Support meetings, and Mark has attended these, so he has seen Angel both ways, which could explain his confusion. Angel's gender IS ill-defined, but the clues that DO exist in the play point far more in the direction of Angel as a drag queen than as identifying as any form of non-binary gender.




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* See above; Mark explicitly calls Angel a drag queen at Angel's funeral. Angel chooses to present as a man at Life Support meetings. Collins consistently refers to Angel using male pronouns. The only characters who don't are characters who really only know Angel when Angel is presenting in drag, with the exception of Mark who has seen Angel both in AND out of drag, and shows confusion about which pronouns to use at the funeral. Rent is also set at a time when New York City had a strong drag culture, particularly in Black and Latin@ communities, and while Angel's race/ethnicity is not canonically specified, casting choices and various clues in the play have consistently implied that Angel is Black and/or Latin@ (the original Broadway Angel, who won a Tony for his portrayal, Wilson Jermaine Heredia, is Dominicano). Angel could very well be intended to represent this subculture.




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* "Ali" isn't a canonical name. As you note, the names were chosen to represent individuals known by cast and crew who had died due to AIDS.




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* I have always interpreted Angel killing Evita as a fairly literal example of [[ShootTheDog Shooting the Dog]], that is, a morally ambiguous act committed mostly out of pragmatism. It shows that Angel has to hustle to survive.
30th Apr '16 8:51:25 PM KirstenA
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[[WMG: Benny never actually told Mark and Roger they didn't have to pay rent.]]

Either Mark and Roger are remembering the interpretation they want to be true or they're straight up trying to gaslight Benny by insisting he said something he didn't say, but either way, Benny never had any intention of letting them live there perpetually rent-free. He really doesn't seem to be such an asshole as to demand an entire year's worth of payment on Christmas unless he's been pushed off over and over. And, from the scene at Life Cafe, we know Mark really has an incredible disregard for the value of others' time and money. He's terribly entitled. So, for example, Benny says "You're golden," meaning he'll be a good landlord and not drive prices up and they simply take it to mean what they want it to mean.



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