History ValuesDissonance / Music

16th Apr '17 8:12:09 PM Golondrina
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* Neil Diamond's "Cracklin' Rosie" is not about a woman named Rosie; it's about a group of First Nations men in Ontario getting drunk on red wine (the "Rosie") because all the women are gone. This may seem benign, perhaps, to an American, but it's unimaginably ''horrifically'' racist in Western Canada, not just because of the awful "drunken Indian" stereotype but also because of the actual plight of the women, who were being sexually exploited and murdered. The equivalent would be a fluffy pop song about lynching.

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* Neil Diamond's Music/NeilDiamond's "Cracklin' Rosie" is not about a woman named Rosie; it's about a group of First Nations men in Ontario getting drunk on red wine (the "Rosie") because all the women are gone. This may seem benign, perhaps, to an American, but it's unimaginably ''horrifically'' racist in Western Canada, not just because of the awful "drunken Indian" stereotype but also because of the actual plight of the women, who were being sexually exploited and murdered. The equivalent would be a fluffy pop song about lynching.
28th Mar '17 2:39:29 PM Exxolon
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* Music/{{Squeeze}}'s 1978 song "Cool for Cats" has the protagonist picking up a girl at a disco for sex and asking her "lots of questions as she hangs on to the wall" implying she's so intoxicated she can't stand up without support. Par for the course in the TheSeventies but these days having sex with someone too drunk to properly consent is rightly classified as rape.

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* Music/{{Squeeze}}'s 1978 song "Cool for Cats" has the protagonist picking up a girl at a disco for sex and asking her "lots of questions as she hangs on to the wall" implying she's so intoxicated she can't stand up without support. Par for the course in the TheSeventies but these days having sex with someone too drunk to properly consent is rightly classified as rape.
28th Mar '17 2:39:06 PM Exxolon
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Added DiffLines:

* Music/{{Squeeze}}'s 1978 song "Cool for Cats" has the protagonist picking up a girl at a disco for sex and asking her "lots of questions as she hangs on to the wall" implying she's so intoxicated she can't stand up without support. Par for the course in the TheSeventies but these days having sex with someone too drunk to properly consent is rightly classified as rape.
17th Mar '17 7:54:37 PM KoopaKid17
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* Humane groups, animal rights activists in particular, would have a field day with the traditional echo song "Bill Grogan's Goat". For eating shirts off a clothesline, Bill hits his goat with a stick and [[ChainedToARailway ties him to railroad tracks]]. Had it come out in a more recent year, Bill would be seen as abusive and remorseless over attempting to kill his goat.

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* Humane groups, animal rights activists in particular, would have a field day with the traditional echo song "Bill Grogan's Goat". For eating shirts off a clothesline, Bill hits his goat with a stick and [[ChainedToARailway ties him to railroad tracks]]. Had it come out in a more recent year, Bill would be seen as abusive and remorseless over attempting to kill his goat.goat[[note]]Don't worry, the goat throws the shirts up and uses them to flag the train[[/note]].
17th Mar '17 7:51:32 PM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:

* Humane groups, animal rights activists in particular, would have a field day with the traditional echo song "Bill Grogan's Goat". For eating shirts off a clothesline, Bill hits his goat with a stick and [[ChainedToARailway ties him to railroad tracks]]. Had it come out in a more recent year, Bill would be seen as abusive and remorseless over attempting to kill his goat.
16th Mar '17 6:18:06 PM KoopaKid17
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* The holiday standard "Baby, It's Cold Outside" is ''notorious'' for not having aged well since its release. The wintertime duet (it technically has nothing to do with Christmas) is about a man using a snowstorm to convince his girlfriend to spend the night with him, while she repeats that she should go home and worries what people will think if she stays. The song ends with the two singing in unison, "Oh but it's cold, baby it's cold outsiiiiide," implying that she decided to stay after all. When the song was first recorded in 1944, her resistance was meant to sound coy. At the time, it wasn't socially acceptable for a woman to spend the night with a man she wasn't married to, which her lines reflected. The man is saying that the weather makes for the perfect cover story. But in this day and age, women are able to be more straightforward about whether or not they want sex, so it sounds like the boyfriend isn't respecting her wishes and is [[DateRape forcing himself on her]]. In particular, the line "Say, what's in this drink?" sounds '''WAY''' more sinister nowadays than originally intended, where she was simply commenting on the alcoholic strength of her beverage rather than the presence of an illicit substance.
* Speaking of Christmas carols, "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" gets this reaction from more than a few people who actually bother to focus on the lyrics. Sure, the underlying message is that the father is dressed as Santa, which the mother finds cute enough to kiss him over, and the child just so happens to catch them in the act and find it comical. However, the song leaves a number of things open to interpretation, such as infidelity, and a Broken Home situation.

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* The holiday standard "Baby, It's Cold Outside" is ''notorious'' for not having aged well since its release. The wintertime duet (it technically has nothing to do with Christmas) is about a man using a snowstorm to convince his girlfriend to spend the night with him, while she repeats that she should go home and worries what people will think if she stays. The song ends with the two singing in unison, "Oh but it's cold, baby it's cold outsiiiiide," implying that she decided to stay after all. When the song was first recorded in 1944, her resistance was meant to sound coy. At the time, it wasn't socially acceptable for a woman to spend the night with a man she wasn't married to, which her lines reflected. The man is saying that the weather makes for the perfect cover story. But in this day and age, women are able to be more straightforward about whether or not they want sex, so it sounds like the boyfriend isn't respecting her wishes and is [[DateRape forcing himself on her]]. In particular, the line "Say, what's in this drink?" sounds '''WAY''' more sinister nowadays than originally intended, where she was simply commenting on the alcoholic strength of her beverage rather than [[SlippingAMickey the presence of an illicit substance.
substance]].
* Speaking of Christmas carols, "I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus" gets this reaction from more than a few people who actually bother to focus on the lyrics. Sure, the underlying message is that the father is dressed as Santa, which the mother finds cute enough to kiss him over, and the child just so happens to catch them in the act and find it comical. However, the song leaves a number of things open to interpretation, such as infidelity, and a Broken Home situation.




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* "Seven Little Girls Sitting in the Backseat", with its lyrics about a driver trying to shy the girls away from another man in the backseat, has aged horribly. Nowadays, the driver would be accused of being a pedophile or at the very least a stalker.
* The eponymous character in "The Little Old Lady (from Pasadena)" is a drag racer who challenges any driver she sees. Decades later, such behavior by elderly drivers in particular don't make the song seem so innocent anymore.
20th Feb '17 6:43:32 PM DesertDragon
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* Rap/hip-hop from the 80s to mid-90s was fairly homophobic. A lot of rappers now regarded as legends (Grandmaster Flash, Music/TheBeastieBoys, Public Enemy, even Will Smith) had songs casually insulting and demeaning members of the LGBT community (usually gay men, but occasionally lesbians or transgender women). Additionally, many of their songs were extremely sexist. While rap today has a problem with sexism, it was even more pronounced in the early days of hip hop. For example, in 2013 Music/RickRoss got in hot water for a lyric that implied he was going to DateRape a woman, in the 90s nobody would bat an eye at that.

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* Rap/hip-hop Rap music from the 80s 80's to mid-90s early 2000's was fairly extremely homophobic. A lot of rappers now regarded as legends (Grandmaster Flash, Music/TheBeastieBoys, Public Enemy, even Will Smith) had songs casually insulting and demeaning members of the LGBT community (usually gay men, but occasionally lesbians or and transgender women). Nowadays, any rapper who wants a chance of mainstream success avoids making homo/transphobic statements, not only in their music but also in interviews and on social media (and if they do, a public apology is quick to follow). Additionally, many of their older rap songs were are extremely sexist. While rap today has a problem with sexism, it was even more pronounced in the early days of hip hop. days. For example, in 2013 Music/RickRoss got in hot water for a lyric that implied he was going to DateRape a woman, woman; in the 90s 90's nobody would bat have batted an eye at that.
30th Dec '16 12:09:15 PM wuggles
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to:

* Rap/hip-hop from the 80s to mid-90s was fairly homophobic. A lot of rappers now regarded as legends (Grandmaster Flash, Music/TheBeastieBoys, Public Enemy, even Will Smith) had songs casually insulting and demeaning members of the LGBT community (usually gay men, but occasionally lesbians or transgender women). Additionally, many of their songs were extremely sexist. While rap today has a problem with sexism, it was even more pronounced in the early days of hip hop. For example, in 2013 Music/RickRoss got in hot water for a lyric that implied he was going to DateRape a woman, in the 90s nobody would bat an eye at that.
26th Dec '16 11:31:12 PM arrgh
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* Mungo Jerry's 1970 hit "In the Summertime", which reached #1 in the UK and Canada and #3 in the US, says, "Have a drink, have a drive, go out and see what you can find" -- where "what you can find" refers implicitly to sexual conquest. Even the edgiest rock today doesn't advocate drinking and driving, especially if you go on a drunken sex hunt from behind the wheel.

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* Mungo Jerry's 1970 hit "In the Summertime", which reached #1 in the UK and Canada and #3 in the US, says, "Have a drink, have a drive, go out and see what you can find" -- where "what you can find" refers implicitly to sexual conquest. find". Even the edgiest rock today doesn't advocate drinking and driving, especially if you go on a drunken sex hunt from behind the wheel.driving.



** Not to mention the part where they say "If her daddy's rich, take her out for a meal/if her daddy's poor, just do what you feel"- which could be interpreted as either using her for sex, or even worse, just raping her.
26th Dec '16 8:24:28 AM DesertDragon
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* The holiday standard "Baby, It's Cold Outside" is ''notorious'' for not having aged well since its release. The wintertime duet (it technically has nothing to do with Christmas) is about a man using a snowstorm to convince his girlfriend to spend the night, while she repeats that she wants to go home and worries what people will think if she stays. The song ends with the two singing in unison, "Oh but it's cold, baby it's cold outsiiiiide," implying that she decided to stay after all. When the song was first recorded in 1944, her resistance was meant to sound coy. At the time, it wasn't socially acceptable for a woman to spend the night with a man she wasn't married to, which her lines reflected. The man is saying that the weather makes for the perfect cover story. But in this day and age, women are allowed to be more straightforward about whether or not they want sex, so it sounds like the boyfriend isn't respecting her wishes and is [[DateRape forcing himself on her]]. In particular, the line "Say, what's in this drink?" sounds '''WAY''' more sinister nowadays than originally intended, where she was simply commenting on the alcoholic strength of her beverage rather than the presence of an illicit substance.

to:

* The holiday standard "Baby, It's Cold Outside" is ''notorious'' for not having aged well since its release. The wintertime duet (it technically has nothing to do with Christmas) is about a man using a snowstorm to convince his girlfriend to spend the night, night with him, while she repeats that she wants to should go home and worries what people will think if she stays. The song ends with the two singing in unison, "Oh but it's cold, baby it's cold outsiiiiide," implying that she decided to stay after all. When the song was first recorded in 1944, her resistance was meant to sound coy. At the time, it wasn't socially acceptable for a woman to spend the night with a man she wasn't married to, which her lines reflected. The man is saying that the weather makes for the perfect cover story. But in this day and age, women are allowed able to be more straightforward about whether or not they want sex, so it sounds like the boyfriend isn't respecting her wishes and is [[DateRape forcing himself on her]]. In particular, the line "Say, what's in this drink?" sounds '''WAY''' more sinister nowadays than originally intended, where she was simply commenting on the alcoholic strength of her beverage rather than the presence of an illicit substance.
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