History UsefulNotes / YanksWithTanks

12th Nov '17 7:33:13 AM Game_Fan
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The armed forces of the United States of America are altogether the most powerful military force on the planet. The second-largest military in the world in terms of active personnel, with two million active and reserve personnel, the US also has the second largest existing stock of active nuclear weapons. With eleven aircraft carriers to serve as mobile airstrips and basing rights near on continent (and a lot of amphibious assault ships), the US military has a global reach and relative budget as great as that of UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire in her heyday.

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The armed forces of the United States of America are generally regarded as being altogether the most powerful military force on the planet. The second-largest military in the world in terms of active personnel, with two million active and reserve personnel, the US also has the second largest existing stock of active nuclear weapons. With eleven aircraft carriers to serve as mobile airstrips and basing rights near on continent (and a lot of amphibious assault ships), the US military has a global reach and relative budget as great as that of UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire in her heyday.
21st Oct '17 3:46:54 PM forgetfulkitty
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* The Air Force is often falsely depicted as if it only had pilots, but in fact there are lots of mechanics, technicians and other categories of personnel (military and civilian) needed to keep it all running. The Air Force and its service members are often portrayed as MildlyMilitary (not slackers, but more like police officers and firefighters in attitude) in comparison with the other services, and their facilities are often cleaner and more modern than the others.

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* The Air Force is often falsely depicted as if it only had pilots, but in fact there are lots of mechanics, technicians and other categories of personnel (military and civilian) needed to keep it all running. The Air Force and its service members are often portrayed as MildlyMilitary (not slackers, but more like police officers and firefighters in attitude) in comparison with the other services, and their facilities are often cleaner and more modern than the others. This somewhat egalitarian approach is true in real life as well, if only because the usual combat dynamics are reversed - the officers are the ones fighting (piloting) on the frontlines and the enlisted are not.
23rd Sep '17 8:11:53 AM ScrewySqrl
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* The Air Force primarily fights in the sky. Air Force personnel are often tasked with providing close air support for infantry engagements, as well as maintaining air superiority in a given zone. The Air Force also has control over a large number of the United States' nuclear arsenal.

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* The Air Force primarily fights in the sky. Air Force personnel are often tasked with providing close air support for infantry engagements, as well as maintaining air superiority in a given zone. The Air Force also has control over a large number of the United States' nuclear arsenal. The Air Force is so good at its air superiority role that it can claim that not a single American soldier on the ground has ever been so much as ''wounded'' by enemy aircraft since it was formed in 1947. Something that wasn't true in World War II.
17th Sep '17 11:31:43 AM nombretomado
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The '''United States Navy''' is the third largest navy in the world by numbers alone,[[labelnote:*]]and the most powerful overall according to the Global Firepower Index[[/labelnote]] with over 200 commissioned (the ones that get the USS prefix) ships and over 200 support and standby ships. This is the branch that really sets the US military apart from the rest. Many countries have sizeable defensive forces but none are anywhere as capable in overseas deployment : the USN has 10 full-length nuclear aircraft carriers (ten ''Nimitz''-class carriers (which caused the term "supercarrier" to be coined and also are armed with a vast number of cruise missiles), and a newer one to enter service soon). All of them are individually larger than any other carrier in foreign service, and indeed are nearly twice the size of the next largest aircraft carriers; in addition, they have ten "smaller" amphibious assault ships intended to land Marines with some air support, which are larger than all but three other aircraft carriers in the world - indeed, the US has as many aircraft carriers and more amphibious assault ships than the rest of the world combined (that's 10 and 8, respectively). Then we throw in the destroyers, cruisers, frigates, [[SuperiorFirepowerMissileSubmarines nuclear missile submarines]], attack submarines, and other assorted specialized or smaller craft and bake at 350 degrees for a really dangerous navy. In the 21st century, their continual presence on the high seas and at ports of call all over the world has made them one of the most visible and consistent projections of US global power, even in "peacetime," and has put them in a very active role fighting pirates, terrorists, and other threats to international seagoing trade.

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The '''United States Navy''' is the third largest navy in the world by numbers alone,[[labelnote:*]]and the most powerful overall according to the Global Firepower Index[[/labelnote]] with over 200 commissioned (the ones that get the USS prefix) ships and over 200 support and standby ships. This is the branch that really sets the US military apart from the rest. Many countries have sizeable defensive forces but none are anywhere as capable in overseas deployment : the USN has 10 full-length nuclear aircraft carriers (ten ''Nimitz''-class carriers (which caused the term "supercarrier" to be coined and also are armed with a vast number of cruise missiles), and a newer one to enter service soon). All of them are individually larger than any other carrier in foreign service, and indeed are nearly twice the size of the next largest aircraft carriers; in addition, they have ten "smaller" amphibious assault ships intended to land Marines with some air support, which are larger than all but three other aircraft carriers in the world - indeed, the US has as many aircraft carriers and more amphibious assault ships than the rest of the world combined (that's 10 and 8, respectively). Then we throw in the destroyers, cruisers, frigates, [[SuperiorFirepowerMissileSubmarines [[UsefulNotes/SuperiorFirepowerMissileSubmarines nuclear missile submarines]], attack submarines, and other assorted specialized or smaller craft and bake at 350 degrees for a really dangerous navy. In the 21st century, their continual presence on the high seas and at ports of call all over the world has made them one of the most visible and consistent projections of US global power, even in "peacetime," and has put them in a very active role fighting pirates, terrorists, and other threats to international seagoing trade.
17th Sep '17 11:16:15 AM nombretomado
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The '''United States Air Force''' has over 3,000 manned aircraft and a massive proportion of the US's [[PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower Superior Firepower]], and is also making increased use of unmanned vehicles as well (much to the chagrin of its pilots). The USAF is also one of the few air forces in the world with truly stealth aircraft. (No, they haven't sent up a pilot to punch out a Cosmonaut, yet.) In fact, with the Air Force taking responsibility for defense of computer networks as well as assets in space, its mission has been partially re-branded as [[http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123030505 "preserving the freedom of access and commerce,"]] in the air, space, and cyberspace. Amongst the various branches of the US Armed Forces, the Air Force has the most [[MildlyMilitary laid back]] image (sometimes [[InterserviceRivalry gently chided]] as "The Chair Force" by the other branches), owing to the relatively egalitarian way the enlisted and commissioned ranks interact: most of the front-line combat in the Air Force is done by the officers (the USAF requires that all pilots be at least Second Lieutenants), an inverse of how it is done on the ground, and that operation of the larger aircraft often involves close cooperation amongst a small mixed crew of officers and enlisted men.

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The '''United States Air Force''' has over 3,000 manned aircraft and a massive proportion of the US's [[PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower [[UsefulNotes/PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower Superior Firepower]], and is also making increased use of unmanned vehicles as well (much to the chagrin of its pilots). The USAF is also one of the few air forces in the world with truly stealth aircraft. (No, they haven't sent up a pilot to punch out a Cosmonaut, yet.) In fact, with the Air Force taking responsibility for defense of computer networks as well as assets in space, its mission has been partially re-branded as [[http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123030505 "preserving the freedom of access and commerce,"]] in the air, space, and cyberspace. Amongst the various branches of the US Armed Forces, the Air Force has the most [[MildlyMilitary laid back]] image (sometimes [[InterserviceRivalry gently chided]] as "The Chair Force" by the other branches), owing to the relatively egalitarian way the enlisted and commissioned ranks interact: most of the front-line combat in the Air Force is done by the officers (the USAF requires that all pilots be at least Second Lieutenants), an inverse of how it is done on the ground, and that operation of the larger aircraft often involves close cooperation amongst a small mixed crew of officers and enlisted men.



American military vehicles have been widely exported, sometimes after previous use--the ''General Belgrano'', an Argentine Navy light cruiser sunk by the British in the Falklands War, had been an American light cruiser (the ''USS Phoenix'' [CL 46]). The most notable not mentioned in PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower are:

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American military vehicles have been widely exported, sometimes after previous use--the ''General Belgrano'', an Argentine Navy light cruiser sunk by the British in the Falklands War, had been an American light cruiser (the ''USS Phoenix'' [CL 46]). The most notable not mentioned in PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower UsefulNotes/PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower are:



* NATO/US Space Exploration in general, and the Moon Landings in particular. [[SuperiorFirepower The rockets built to carry high-yield strategic nuclear munitions to Soviet cities]], once it became clear that the Soviets would be able to shoot down the US's nuclear-bomber airfleet fairly easily. Guidance systems were bulky and primitive and could only guide a missile to within a few miles of a target, so they would mount ''very'' high-yield nuclear warheads onto some ''rather'' large inter-continental ballistic missiles ([=ICBMs=]) just so they could be sure of annihilating their target-cities - or at least coating them with fallout. The rockets were already designed to exit the earth's atmosphere, and it transpired that The Moon was a far easier target than Sevastopol. Replacing the gigantic nuclear weapon with a space-capsule was almost laughably easy.

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* NATO/US Space Exploration in general, and the Moon Landings in particular. [[SuperiorFirepower [[UsefulNotes/PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower The rockets built to carry high-yield strategic nuclear munitions to Soviet cities]], once it became clear that the Soviets would be able to shoot down the US's nuclear-bomber airfleet fairly easily. Guidance systems were bulky and primitive and could only guide a missile to within a few miles of a target, so they would mount ''very'' high-yield nuclear warheads onto some ''rather'' large inter-continental ballistic missiles ([=ICBMs=]) just so they could be sure of annihilating their target-cities - or at least coating them with fallout. The rockets were already designed to exit the earth's atmosphere, and it transpired that The Moon was a far easier target than Sevastopol. Replacing the gigantic nuclear weapon with a space-capsule was almost laughably easy.



The United States was first to develop the atomic bomb, as well as the first and only nation to actually use the atomic bomb offensively. To date, no one has used the atomic bomb ''defensively,'' either, so except for setting them off to see if they will in fact explode at all, the US is simply "the only nation to use the atomic bomb." The US is now the biggest holder of nuclear weapons. See PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, since they turn up a bit in fiction.

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The United States was first to develop the atomic bomb, as well as the first and only nation to actually use the atomic bomb offensively. To date, no one has used the atomic bomb ''defensively,'' either, so except for setting them off to see if they will in fact explode at all, the US is simply "the only nation to use the atomic bomb." The US is now the biggest holder of nuclear weapons. See PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, UsefulNotes/PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower, since they turn up a bit in fiction.
8th Sep '17 10:34:21 PM HighfalutinEaglet
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** Some of the difficulties that have been encountered include: initial tailhook design not performing well, heat delamination from the engines, transonic buffeting, and the operating system for the onboard computer is nowhere near complete. As these have resulted in delays and expensive fixes. It's thought that, before the jet is retired, more than $1 trillion will be sunk into it--though to be fair it's intended to take the roles of multiple aircraft (F-16, F/A-18, AV-8B) simultaneously and still be in service in the 2060s, and Congress hopes to defray part of the costs by selling the F-35 to other countries.

to:

** Some of the difficulties that have been encountered include: initial tailhook design not performing well, heat delamination from the engines, transonic buffeting, and the operating system for the onboard computer is nowhere near complete. As these have resulted in delays and expensive fixes. It's thought that, before the jet is retired, more than $1 trillion will be sunk into it--though to be fair it's intended to take the roles of multiple aircraft (F-16, F/A-18, AV-8B) simultaneously and still be in service in the 2060s, and Congress hopes to defray part of the costs by selling the F-35 to other countries. Instead of, y'know, having a more centralized industry for it instead of having a few parts built in every State so as to be "fair". That would drive the cost down dramatically.
8th Sep '17 10:11:31 PM HighfalutinEaglet
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The '''United States Navy''' is the third largest navy in the world by numbers alone,[[labelnote:*]]and the most powerful overall according to the Global Firepower Index[[/labelnote]] with over 200 commissioned (the ones that get the USS prefix) ships and over 200 support and standby ships. This is the branch that really sets the US military apart from the rest. Many countries have sizeable defensive forces but none are anywhere as capable in overseas deployment : the USN has 10 full-length nuclear aircraft carriers (ten ''Nimitz''-class carriers, and a newer one to enter service soon). All of them are individually larger than any other carrier in foreign service, and indeed are nearly twice the size of the next largest aircraft carriers; in addition, they have ten "smaller" amphibious assault ships intended to land Marines with some air support, which are larger than all but three other aircraft carriers in the world - indeed, the US has as many aircraft carriers and more amphibious assault ships than the rest of the world combined (that's 10 and 8, respectively). Then we throw in the destroyers, cruisers, frigates, [[SuperiorFirepowerMissileSubmarines nuclear missile submarines]], attack submarines, and other assorted specialized or smaller craft and bake at 350 degrees for a really dangerous navy. In the 21st century, their continual presence on the high seas and at ports of call all over the world has made them one of the most visible and consistent projections of US global power, even in "peacetime," and has put them in a very active role fighting pirates, terrorists, and other threats to international seagoing trade.

to:

The '''United States Navy''' is the third largest navy in the world by numbers alone,[[labelnote:*]]and the most powerful overall according to the Global Firepower Index[[/labelnote]] with over 200 commissioned (the ones that get the USS prefix) ships and over 200 support and standby ships. This is the branch that really sets the US military apart from the rest. Many countries have sizeable defensive forces but none are anywhere as capable in overseas deployment : the USN has 10 full-length nuclear aircraft carriers (ten ''Nimitz''-class carriers, carriers (which caused the term "supercarrier" to be coined and also are armed with a vast number of cruise missiles), and a newer one to enter service soon). All of them are individually larger than any other carrier in foreign service, and indeed are nearly twice the size of the next largest aircraft carriers; in addition, they have ten "smaller" amphibious assault ships intended to land Marines with some air support, which are larger than all but three other aircraft carriers in the world - indeed, the US has as many aircraft carriers and more amphibious assault ships than the rest of the world combined (that's 10 and 8, respectively). Then we throw in the destroyers, cruisers, frigates, [[SuperiorFirepowerMissileSubmarines nuclear missile submarines]], attack submarines, and other assorted specialized or smaller craft and bake at 350 degrees for a really dangerous navy. In the 21st century, their continual presence on the high seas and at ports of call all over the world has made them one of the most visible and consistent projections of US global power, even in "peacetime," and has put them in a very active role fighting pirates, terrorists, and other threats to international seagoing trade.
3rd Sep '17 3:44:32 PM WillKeaton
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A statistic will [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics say almost anything if you employ sufficient 'enhanced interrogation techniques' upon it]], but the guesses are that there have been between 1.7 and 2.7 million Americans 'casualties' in war depending on your definition of a casualty (do non-lethal injuries count?[[note]] Often yes. In English-language military usage, the word "casualty" refers to personnel made unavailable to their units for whatever reason, including sickness or capture. Fatalities and cripplings are known as "fatalities" or "irrecoverable losses" [[/note]], "war" (does the Bay of Pigs invasion count?) and "Americans" (what about stuff during the Thirteen-Colonies period, or The American Civil War?).

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A statistic will [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics say almost anything if you employ sufficient 'enhanced interrogation techniques' upon it]], but the guesses are that there have been between 1.7 and 2.7 million Americans 'casualties' in war depending on your definition of a casualty (do non-lethal injuries count?[[note]] Often count?),[[note]]Often yes. In English-language military usage, the word "casualty" refers to personnel made unavailable to their units for whatever reason, including sickness or capture. Fatalities and cripplings are known as "fatalities" or "irrecoverable losses" [[/note]], [[/note]] "war" (does the Bay of Pigs invasion count?) and "Americans" (what about stuff during the Thirteen-Colonies period, or The American Civil War?).
3rd Sep '17 3:43:28 PM WillKeaton
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** The Navy also has its own air corps, as well as units tasked with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Tenth_Fleet cyberspace]], and even [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAWAR normal space]].

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** The Navy also has its own air corps, as well as units tasked with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Tenth_Fleet cyberspace]], cyberspace,]] and even [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAWAR normal space]].space.]]
3rd Sep '17 3:41:45 PM WillKeaton
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The '''United States Air Force''' has over 3,000 manned aircraft and a massive proportion of the US's [[PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower Superior Firepower]], and is also making increased use of unmanned vehicles as well (much to the chagrin of its pilots). The USAF is also one of the few air forces in the world with truly stealth aircraft. (No, they haven't sent up a pilot to punch out a Cosmonaut, yet.) In fact, with the Air Force taking responsibility for defense of computer networks as well as assets in space, its mission has been partially re-branded as "[[http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123030505 preserving the freedom of access and commerce]]," in the air, space, and cyberspace. Amongst the various branches of the US Armed Forces, the Air Force has the most [[MildlyMilitary laid back]] image (sometimes [[InterserviceRivalry gently chided]] as "The Chair Force" by the other branches), owing to the relatively egalitarian way the enlisted and commissioned ranks interact: most of the front-line combat in the Air Force is done by the officers (the USAF requires that all pilots be at least Second Lieutenants), an inverse of how it is done on the ground, and that operation of the larger aircraft often involves close cooperation amongst a small mixed crew of officers and enlisted men.

The '''United States UsefulNotes/CoastGuard''' is officially part of the Department of Homeland Security in peacetime. In wartime, they switch over to the Department of Defense. They're also a federal regulatory agency. In any case, they do both military and law enforcement. Specifically, the Coast Guard handles things such as maintaining aids to navigation, marine safety, both military and civilian search and rescue, port security, and maritime interception operations. They can also provide law enforcement expertise to other branches (for example, when the Navy is going after pirates). In WWII, the Coast Guard manned destroyers and landing craft[[note]]which is how one Coast Guardsman, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Albert_Munro Douglas Albert Munro]], would end up receiving the Medal of Honor, [[DyingMomentOfAwesome posthumously.]][[/note]], and one of their cutters took part in the battle at Pearl Harbor. Recently, they signed an agreement with the Navy allowing a limited number of Coast Guardsmen to serve with the [=SEALs=].

to:

The '''United States Air Force''' has over 3,000 manned aircraft and a massive proportion of the US's [[PeaceThroughSuperiorFirepower Superior Firepower]], and is also making increased use of unmanned vehicles as well (much to the chagrin of its pilots). The USAF is also one of the few air forces in the world with truly stealth aircraft. (No, they haven't sent up a pilot to punch out a Cosmonaut, yet.) In fact, with the Air Force taking responsibility for defense of computer networks as well as assets in space, its mission has been partially re-branded as "[[http://www.[[http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?storyID=123030505 preserving "preserving the freedom of access and commerce]]," commerce,"]] in the air, space, and cyberspace. Amongst the various branches of the US Armed Forces, the Air Force has the most [[MildlyMilitary laid back]] image (sometimes [[InterserviceRivalry gently chided]] as "The Chair Force" by the other branches), owing to the relatively egalitarian way the enlisted and commissioned ranks interact: most of the front-line combat in the Air Force is done by the officers (the USAF requires that all pilots be at least Second Lieutenants), an inverse of how it is done on the ground, and that operation of the larger aircraft often involves close cooperation amongst a small mixed crew of officers and enlisted men.

The '''United States UsefulNotes/CoastGuard''' is officially part of the Department of Homeland Security in peacetime. In wartime, they switch over to the Department of Defense. They're also a federal regulatory agency. In any case, they do both military and law enforcement. Specifically, the Coast Guard handles things such as maintaining aids to navigation, marine safety, both military and civilian search and rescue, port security, and maritime interception operations. They can also provide law enforcement expertise to other branches (for example, when the Navy is going after pirates). In WWII, the Coast Guard manned destroyers and landing craft[[note]]which craft,[[note]]which is how one Coast Guardsman, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Albert_Munro Douglas Albert Munro]], would end up receiving the Medal of Honor, [[DyingMomentOfAwesome posthumously.]][[/note]], ]][[/note]] and one of their cutters took part in the battle at Pearl Harbor. Recently, they signed an agreement with the Navy allowing a limited number of Coast Guardsmen to serve with the [=SEALs=].
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