History UsefulNotes / YanksWithTanks

29th Jan '16 9:40:50 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and when paired with US belligerency this scared the Soviets so much it nearly caused WorldWarThree on two notable occasions (the 'Cuban Crisis' of '63 and 'Able Archer Exercise' of '83). After the conciliatory atttitude of the renowned peacemaker UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan laid Soviet fears of annihilation to rest, the USSR's long-term high military expenses (previously needed to keep up with the US) caught up with her and contributed to her relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
to:
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and when paired with US belligerency this scared the Soviets so much it nearly caused WorldWarThree on two notable occasions (the 'Cuban Crisis' of '63 '62 and 'Able Archer Exercise' of '83). After the conciliatory atttitude of the renowned peacemaker UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan laid Soviet fears of annihilation to rest, the USSR's long-term high military expenses (previously needed to keep up with the US) caught up with her and contributed to her relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
29th Jan '16 9:39:44 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and when paired US belligerency this scared the Soviets so much it nearly caused WorldWarThree on two notable occasions (1963 and 1983). After the conciliatory atttitude of the renowned peacemaker UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan laid Soviet fears of annihilation to rest, the USSR's long-term high military expenses (previously needed to keep up with the US) caught up with her and contributed to her relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
to:
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and when paired with US belligerency this scared the Soviets so much it nearly caused WorldWarThree on two notable occasions (1963 (the 'Cuban Crisis' of '63 and 1983).'Able Archer Exercise' of '83). After the conciliatory atttitude of the renowned peacemaker UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan laid Soviet fears of annihilation to rest, the USSR's long-term high military expenses (previously needed to keep up with the US) caught up with her and contributed to her relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
29th Jan '16 9:37:30 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and the USSR's even higher proportional military expenses (needed to keep up with the US) contributed to the stagnation and consequent reforms which eventually resulted in its relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
to:
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and when paired US belligerency this scared the Soviets so much it nearly caused WorldWarThree on two notable occasions (1963 and 1983). After the conciliatory atttitude of the renowned peacemaker UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan laid Soviet fears of annihilation to rest, the USSR's even higher proportional long-term high military expenses (needed (previously needed to keep up with the US) caught up with her and contributed to the stagnation and consequent reforms which eventually resulted in its her relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
29th Jan '16 8:37:48 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The '''Willys MB''' (and identical twin '''Ford GPW'''), known better around the world as the Jeep. Standard light vehicle of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and used for quite a while after that, it was and still is also widely purchased by civilians. The US Lend-Lease sent over 50,000 Willys Jeeps to Russia alone, and for decades after "Willys" was a Russian slang term for light truck.
to:
* The '''Willys MB''' (and identical twin '''Ford GPW'''), known better around the world as the Jeep. Standard light vehicle of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and used for quite a while after that, it was and still is also widely purchased by civilians. The US Lend-Lease sent over 50,000 Willys Jeeps to Russia alone, the Soviet Union, which didn't produce an equivalent-sized vehicle and for didn't realise how useful they could be until they got them - whereupon they seem to have fallen in love with the hardy little thing. For decades after "Willys" was a Russian slang term for light truck.truck.

* The '''M2 Bradley''' is the current primary infantry fighting vehicle for the US Army. Designed to be able to carry up to six troops and be able to keep up with the M1 Abrams, the Bradley has played a key role in American mechanized warfare. Built as an answer to the Russian BMP, the Bradley is capable of carrying and supporting troops as well as engaging enemy armor. The Bradley is armed with a 25 mm chain gun, TOW missiles, and firing ports for the troops inside. However, it is an aging design and a classic case of too many cooks involved in its design, and the Army is currently looking for a replacement. ** Firing ports have been phased out, as well as the Bradley kicking a whole ton of ass for an 'aging design' * The '''Stryker''' is a new family of armored combat vehicles that seek to replace the US Army's older vehicles. The Stryker is an embodiment the US armed forces' new emphasis on speed, deployability, and utility. Capable of carrying up to 9 troops, the Stryker provides much need protection and combat support, yet is small and light enough to be carried on a standard C-130. It can also be modified for a number of specialized uses such as artillery support, mobile command vehicle, ambulance, and reconaissance. The tradeoff for this speed and deployability is significantly less armor than its heavier cousins, but thanks to armor upgrades it is more than capable of taking whatever is thrown at it. Most Stykers are armed with the venerable Browning M2 heavy machine gun, though there are specialist variants armed with 105mm guns, antitank missiles and mortars for support fire.
to:
* The '''M2 Bradley''' is the current primary infantry fighting vehicle for the US Army. Designed to be able to carry up to six troops and be able to keep up with the M1 Abrams, the Bradley has played a key role in American mechanized warfare. Built as an answer to the Russian BMP, Soviet BMP-2, the Bradley is capable of carrying and supporting troops as well as engaging enemy armor.armor, though actually using it in that capacity is likely unwise given [[GlassCannon its paper-thin armor]]. The Bradley is armed with a 25 mm chain gun, TOW missiles, and firing ports for the troops inside. However, it is an aging design and a classic case of too many cooks involved in its design, and the Army is currently looking for a replacement. ** Firing ports have been phased out, as well as the Bradley kicking a whole ton of ass in asymmetric warfare even for an 'aging design' * The '''Stryker''' is a new family of armored combat vehicles that seek to replace the US Army's older vehicles. The Stryker is an embodiment the US armed forces' new emphasis on speed, deployability, compact size, light weight, and utility.versatility. Capable of carrying up to 9 troops, the Stryker provides much need protection and combat support, yet is small and light enough to be carried on a standard C-130. It can also be modified for a number of specialized uses such as artillery support, mobile command vehicle, ambulance, and reconaissance. The tradeoff for this speed and deployability is significantly less armor than its heavier cousins, but thanks to armor upgrades it is more than capable of taking whatever is thrown at it. Most Stykers are armed with the venerable Browning M2 heavy machine gun, though there are specialist variants armed with 105mm guns, antitank missiles and mortars for support fire.

* The '''M1 Abrams'''' is America's main battle tank. It was born of a resolve to not repeat the horrific American tanker casualties of WWII due to [[ZergRush sacrificing ten inferior tanks to destroy a single German one]]--especially if they were going to defend bottlenecks in West Germany like the Fulda Gap and Hof Corridor during the Cold War from the inexpensive and even more numerous Chinese and Soviet tanks. That's why the first iteration of the Abrams, rolled out in 1981, had features like Chobham composite laminate armor[[note]]Disputed. Some say it's only the original M1 that uses it, while others claim it always has been using another type of Depleted Uranium based armor that is very similar to the English Chobham armor. Nevertheless, the way the armor works is supposed to be very similar to how Chobham is described to work[[/note]], a FLIR sensor suite (''very'' expensive for the time), laser rangefinder and ballistic computer. It got the last piece of its original wish list with the [=M1A1=], replacing the older 105mm/L52 M68 rifled main gun with the [[{{BFG}} German Rheinmetall 120mm/L44 smoothbore main gun]], licensed-made as the M256. The Abrams is also powered by a gas turbine. It's so fast that the Army puts a governor on the engine to keep them from speeding. With the governor removed, it can reach 70mph on a decent road--even though it weighs 68 tons. That's putting the "lightning" in LightningBruiser. Unfortunately, this means it's also a gas guzzler (roughly 1 gallon per mile, and it takes 10 gallons just to ''start'' the engine), and its speed leads to problems like having an entire Abrams unit run out of fuel and wait for five hours for fuel trucks to arrive. [[note]]Oops...:The unit happened to be in downtown Baghdad at the time surrounded by hostiles and with only a few Bradleys as back-ups. In addition, without fuel the Abrams isn't even a very expensive pillbox as it cannot even fire its cannon or power its electronics.[[/note]] On the other hand, its engine can accept most any commonly available flammable or combustible liquids as a fuel, compared to a diesel engine needing well, diesel. In a nonfiction book of his (Armored Cav), Creator/TomClancy recounted a story of an Abrams tank in the Gulf War. Having been immobilized by an enemy shot while deep in hostile territory, the crew of the tank found themselves in what military experts would call "a crappy situation". In the space of thirty seconds or so the immobilized tank destroyed four enemy tanks, two of which got shots off, hitting the tank but completely bouncing off of its proprietary DU-laced armor. When reinforcements arrived they decided it was too much trouble to lug the tank back, and decided to destroy it on site. The American tanks took turns shooting another 8 or 9 times before the turret was penetrated, detonating the ammo stocks--which had little effect due to the blowout hatches installed. The tank's turret was taken back to the US for analysis while the chassis was refit with another turret and returned to action in a week. That's some serious armor. In another example contained in David Zucchino's book, Thunder Run: The Armored Strike to Capture Baghdad, one of the Abrams was disabled by enemy fire. Forces attempting to destroy it on-site set off thermite grenades in the main hatch, detonating both the explosives and the ammunition stored in the tank. This was followed by the tank receiving a HEAT round from another Abrams, and then an AGM-65 Maverick anti-armor missile, as well as two AGM Hellfire missiles were fired via gunship into the tank. The end result? The interior of the tank was demolished, but its armor and exterior appeared relatively unharmed. This tank's a God-damned "[[MechWarrior Battlemech]]".
to:
* The '''M1 Abrams'''' is America's main battle tank. It was born of a resolve to not repeat the horrific American tanker casualties of WWII due to [[ZergRush sacrificing ten inferior tanks to destroy a single German one]]--especially if they were going to defend bottlenecks in West Germany like the Fulda Gap and Hof Corridor during the Cold War from the relatively inexpensive and even more numerous Chinese and Soviet tanks. That's why the first iteration of the Abrams, rolled out in 1981, had features like Chobham composite laminate armor[[note]]Disputed. Some say it's only the original M1 that uses it, while others claim it always has been using another type of Depleted Uranium based armor that is very similar to the English Chobham armor. Nevertheless, the way the armor works is supposed to be very similar to how Chobham is described to work[[/note]], a FLIR sensor suite (''very'' expensive for the time), laser rangefinder and ballistic computer. It got the last piece of its original wish list with the [=M1A1=], replacing the older 105mm/L52 M68 rifled main gun with the [[{{BFG}} German Rheinmetall 120mm/L44 smoothbore main gun]], licensed-made as the M256. The Abrams is also powered by a gas turbine. It's so fast that the Army puts a governor on the engine to keep them from speeding. With the governor removed, it can reach 70mph on a decent road--even though it weighs 68 tons. That's putting the "lightning" in LightningBruiser. Unfortunately, this means it's also a gas guzzler (roughly 1 gallon per mile, and it takes 10 gallons just to ''start'' the engine), and its speed leads to problems like having an entire Abrams unit run out of fuel and wait for five hours for fuel trucks to arrive. [[note]]Oops...:The unit happened to be in downtown Baghdad at the time surrounded by hostiles and with only a few Bradleys as back-ups. In addition, without fuel the Abrams isn't even a very expensive pillbox as it cannot even fire its cannon or power its electronics.[[/note]] On the other hand, its engine can accept most any commonly available flammable or combustible liquids as a fuel, compared to a diesel engine needing well, diesel. In a nonfiction book of his (Armored Cav), Creator/TomClancy recounted a story of an Abrams tank in the Gulf War. Having been immobilized by an enemy shot while deep in hostile territory, the crew of the tank found themselves in what military experts would call "a crappy situation". In the space of thirty seconds or so the immobilized tank destroyed four enemy tanks, two of which got shots off, hitting the tank but completely bouncing off of its proprietary DU-laced armor. When reinforcements arrived they decided it was too much trouble to lug the tank back, and decided to destroy it on site. The American tanks took turns shooting another 8 or 9 times before the turret was penetrated, detonating the ammo stocks--which had little effect due to the blowout hatches installed. The tank's turret was taken back to the US for analysis while the chassis was refit with another turret and returned to action in a week. That's some serious armor. In another example contained in David Zucchino's book, Thunder Run: The Armored Strike to Capture Baghdad, one of the Abrams was disabled by enemy fire. Forces attempting to destroy it on-site set off thermite grenades in the main hatch, detonating both the explosives and the ammunition stored in the tank. This was followed by the tank receiving a HEAT round from another Abrams, and then an AGM-65 Maverick anti-armor missile, as well as two AGM Hellfire missiles were fired via gunship into the tank. The end result? The interior of the tank was demolished, but its armor and exterior appeared relatively unharmed. This tank's a God-damned "[[MechWarrior Battlemech]]".

* The '''Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress''' bomber was the star of the massed bomb attacks the Air Corps flew over Germany and occupied territories (as depicted ''rather'' accurately in ''Film/MemphisBelle''). There they were, hundreds of fat, juicy sitting ducks for the German anti-aircraft crews, not even bothering to try evasive maneuvers (which would throw them off course from their target). But the B-17 had an almost mythic ability to withstand damage and keep flying. Every B-17 crew member had at least one story of returning to base safely without a vertical tail, or with half a wing blown off, or on one engine, etc. etc.
to:
* The '''Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress''' bomber was the star of the massed bomb attacks city-bombing raids the Air Corps flew over executed upon Germany and occupied German-occupied territories (as depicted ''rather'' accurately in ''Film/MemphisBelle'').''Film/MemphisBelle''), destroying the industries within and transport links through them through the destruction of the cities themselves (blocking the railways and roads with rubble). There they were, hundreds of fat, juicy sitting ducks for the German anti-aircraft crews, not even bothering to try evasive maneuvers (which would throw them off course from their target). But the B-17 had an almost mythic ability to withstand damage and keep flying. Every B-17 crew member had at least one story of returning to base safely without a vertical tail, or with half a wing blown off, or on one engine, etc. etc.

** There has been a lot of renewed controversy over the V-22 starting in the late 2000's. Key points include engine ware, stability issues, expense, and a rather nasty prop-wash that led to this embarrassing display in New York http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/31/new.york.fleetweek.accident/index.html. It also hasn't helped that the military hasn't been very forth coming with information, even to congress. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xubYGMxhOA&feature=endscreen
to:
** There has been a lot of renewed controversy over the V-22 starting in the late 2000's. Key points include engine ware, wear, stability issues, expense, and a rather nasty prop-wash that led to this embarrassing display in New York http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/31/new.york.fleetweek.accident/index.html. It also hasn't helped that the military hasn't been very forth coming forthcoming with information, even to congress.their Congress. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xubYGMxhOA&feature=endscreen

The first type are the heroic patriots, willing to fight against the odds to ensure victory for Uncle Sam and freedom, justice, Mom, baseball, and apple pie. These are common for films about, say, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution or UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. The second are as evil imperialists. The leaders are amoral money-grabbing capitalists, the grunts are illiterate and prone to shooting anyone who looks hostile. Most are drugged up and whoring around. Much more common for films about UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar. The middle ground is filled with soldier victims, who started as the first type, but then succumbed to the horrors of war. Depictions leaning closer to the second type will instead paint the war as unjust and the ''leaders'' as corrupt (no matter which war it was): ''Rambo: First Blood'', all Vietnam films, some modern UsefulNotes/WorldWarII films ... you get the idea. Often the rank and file are [[RedShirts cannon fodder]] under [[TheNeidermeyer incompetent officers]].
to:
The first type are the heroic patriots, 'patriots', willing to fight against the odds to ensure victory for Uncle Sam and freedom, justice, Mom, baseball, and apple pie. These are common for films about, say, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution or UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. The second are as evil imperialists. The leaders are amoral money-grabbing capitalists, nationalistic imperialists, willing to crush the grunts are illiterate little guy to ensure profits for Uncle Sam and prone to shooting anyone who looks hostile. Most are his corporate cronies, get drugged up up, and whoring around.kill people for fun. Much more common for films about UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar. The middle ground is filled with soldier victims, pitiable soldier-victims, who started as the first type, but then succumbed to the horrors of war.remain sympathetic despite doing (very) bad things. Depictions leaning closer to the second type will instead paint the war as unjust and the ''leaders'' as corrupt (no matter which war it was): ''Rambo: First Blood'', all Vietnam films, some modern UsefulNotes/WorldWarII films ... you get the idea. Often the rank and file are [[RedShirts cannon fodder]] under [[TheNeidermeyer incompetent officers]].

Usually, all the interservice rivalries melt away in a real combat situation--either turning into grudging or earnest respect. (Usually.) Opposition to interservice rivalry and a unified, joint chain of command has been written into US law since the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act]], which was borne out of bad experience with rivalries in Vietnam. The military has been pushing more and more since then to "think purple" (as in, blend all the uniform colors together) in working together across service lines. Officers are expected to serve at least one joint tour to learn to work with other branches of service if they want to remain competitive for promotions. While the image of the "[[DumbMuscle dumb grunt]]" persists, the reality is that the US military does, in fact, value education rather highly. Many recruits sign up in part to get money to pay for higher education through the GI Bill, as well as receive practical training in specialized skills. And as one ascends the ranks, the level of formal education goes up - many [=NCOs=] are college educated, all officers are - the US only commissions college graduates, and graduate education is pretty much a requirement to make flag rank. (The Armed Forces conveniently run a number of graduate-level institutions, many of which are highly-respected in some field or other; for instance, the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks is well-known to be a good research center for security studies and international relations.) It should definitely be mentioned that the US military is one of the only employers in America, as well as being the largest and the only public employer, that can use frank intelligence and mental aptitude tests without fear of being sued for discrimination (the military is exempt from those provisions of the 1964 Civil Rights Act).
to:
Usually, all the The interservice rivalries have come a long way since the trouble times of World War Two, and these days they tend to melt away in a real combat situation--either situations -- often turning into grudging or earnest respect. (Usually.) Opposition to interservice rivalry and a unified, joint chain of command has been written into US law since the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act 1986 Goldwater-Nichols Act]], which was borne out of bad experience with rivalries the egregiously avoidable losses and failures caused by interservice rivalry in Vietnam. The the Vietnam war. Since then their military has been pushing more pushed their personnel to emulate the (now-former) Soviet Army and more since then to "think Bundeswehr in "thinking purple" (as in, blend all the uniform colors together) in working and work together across service lines. Officers are expected to serve at least one joint tour to learn to work with other branches of service if they want to remain competitive for promotions. While the image of the "[[DumbMuscle dumb grunt]]" persists, the reality is that the US military does, has, in fact, value valued education rather highly.highly ever since World War Two. Many recruits sign up in part to get money to pay for higher education through the GI Bill, as well as receive practical training in specialized skills. And as one ascends the ranks, the level of formal education goes up - many [=NCOs=] are college educated, all officers are - the US only commissions college graduates, and graduate education is pretty much a requirement to make flag rank. (The Armed Forces conveniently run a number of graduate-level institutions, many of which are highly-respected in some field or other; for instance, the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks is well-known to be a good research center for security studies and international relations.) It should definitely be mentioned that the US military is one of the only employers in America, as well as being the largest and the only public employer, that can use frank intelligence and mental aptitude tests without fear of being sued for discrimination (the military is exempt from those provisions of the 1964 Civil Rights Act).
29th Jan '16 8:20:04 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Still, whatever the math, it's no small number. Hell, it almost rivals the number of cripples and head-cases from the Soviet Union's Second World War (2.9 million)! In fact, it's so large that, dating from 1776 and taking the largest figure, that works out to an average of 11,500 deaths a year (for comparison, since the 1980s about 40,000 Americans have been killed per year in car crashes).
to:
Still, whatever the math, it's no small number. Hell, it almost rivals the number of Soviet military cripples and head-cases from the Soviet Union's Second World War (2.9 million)! In fact, it's so large that, dating from 1776 and taking the largest figure, that works out to an average of 11,500 deaths a year (for comparison, since the 1980s about 40,000 Americans have been killed per year in car crashes).
29th Jan '16 8:06:43 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
America currently practices "asymmetrical warfare," which involves exploiting TacticalRockPaperScissors and "AttackItsWeakPoint" strategies to maximize effectiveness. "Asymmetrical Warfare" is a natural evolution of the military doctrines formulated after UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, which caused the brass to realize they'd rather expend money and material than lives. See, in the past, a lot of wars involved situations where two sides were "symmetrical" in composition, being endowed with roughly equal equipment, disposition and manpower (read: "[[WeHaveReserves reserves]]"). Under those circumstances, whoever was the better commander would generally win, but in the meanwhile [[WarIsHell a lot of death and blood happened]]. Today, America fights [[CombatPragmatist pragmatically]], lowering American casualties by exposing as few of them as possible to (effective) enemy fire葉hat is, If they can hurt you, ''don't attack them'', call someone else to hit them who can do so with impunity. With that in mind, there's a ''lot'' of cross-communication in an American war: if the enemy's trying to attack ''your'' weak point, you can (and should) call for help from [[TacticalRockPaperScissors whichever branch of the armed forces would be the best counter]]. (Think the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie: Army calling for help from Air Force; Air Force calling for help from... [[{{Dissimile}} Giant transforming robots]], giant transforming robots calling for help from {{Action Survivor}}s played by Creator/ShiaLaBeouf, and Action Survivors calling for help from the Army.)[[note]] In laymen's terms, this means that either you get [[MoreDakka air support/ navy support ]]to bomb the everloving shit out of the enemy while you hunker down, or you strike preemptively and blow up the enemies emplacements before they even know ou're going to be there.[[/note]] A statistic will [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics say anything if you torture it hard enough]], but the guesses are that there have been between 1.7 and 2.7 million Americans casualties in war, varying by your definition of "casualties" (do non-lethal injuries count?[[note]]Yes, in military usage, the word "casualties" means personnel who are unavailable to their units for whatever reason, including sickness or capture; if you specifically want to refer only to deaths, then the word "fatalities" is used[[/note]], "war" (does the Bay of Pigs invasion count?) and "Americans" (what about stuff during the Thirteen-Colonies period?). Dating from 1776 and taking the largest figure, that works out to an average of 11,500 deaths a year. (In comparison, since the 1980s about 40,000 Americans have been killed per year in car crashes.)
to:
America currently practices As an incredibly powerful military force the US has for some time had the luxury of practicing "asymmetrical warfare," warfare", in which involves exploiting TacticalRockPaperScissors and "AttackItsWeakPoint" strategies to maximize effectiveness. "Asymmetrical Warfare" it is a natural evolution of the military doctrines formulated after UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, which caused the brass to realize they'd rather expend money and material than lives. See, in the past, a lot of wars involved situations where two sides were "symmetrical" in composition, being endowed with roughly equal equipment, disposition and manpower (read: "[[WeHaveReserves reserves]]"). Under those circumstances, whoever was the better commander would generally win, but in the meanwhile [[WarIsHell a lot of death and blood happened]]. Today, America fights [[CombatPragmatist pragmatically]], lowering American casualties by exposing as few of them as possible to (effective) enemy fire葉hat is, If they can hurt you, ''don't attack them'', call someone else to hit them who can do so with impunity. With that in mind, there's a ''lot'' of cross-communication in an American war: if the enemy's trying to attack ''your'' weak point, you can (and should) call for help from [[TacticalRockPaperScissors whichever branch take very few losses because of the armed forces would be extent to which it outmatches its opponents. The last time this was ''not'' the best counter]]. (Think case was the AmericanCivilWar. The USA pairs this extreme aversion to death and wounding with a fairly bog-standard 'Combined-Arms Warfare' doctrine, under which the various combat and support arms co-operate rather than competing. Think the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie: Army calling for help from Air Force; Air Force calling for help from... [[{{Dissimile}} Giant transforming robots]], giant transforming robots calling for help from {{Action Survivor}}s played by Creator/ShiaLaBeouf, and Action Survivors calling for help from the Army.)[[note]] [[note]] In laymen's terms, this means that either you get [[MoreDakka air support/ navy support ]]to bomb the everloving shit out of the enemy while you hunker down, or you strike preemptively and blow up the enemies emplacements before they even know ou're going to be there.[[/note]] A statistic will [[LiesDamnedLiesAndStatistics say almost anything if you torture it hard enough]], employ sufficient 'enhanced interrogation techniques' upon it]], but the guesses are that there have been between 1.7 and 2.7 million Americans casualties 'casualties' in war, varying by war depending on your definition of "casualties" a casualty (do non-lethal injuries count?[[note]]Yes, in count?[[note]] Often yes. In English-language military usage, the word "casualties" means "casualty" refers to personnel who are made unavailable to their units for whatever reason, including sickness or capture; if you specifically want to refer only to deaths, then the word capture. Fatalities and cripplings are known as "fatalities" is used[[/note]], or "irrecoverable losses" [[/note]], "war" (does the Bay of Pigs invasion count?) and "Americans" (what about stuff during the Thirteen-Colonies period?). Dating period, or The American Civil War?). Still, whatever the math, it's no small number. Hell, it almost rivals the number of cripples and head-cases from the Soviet Union's Second World War (2.9 million)! In fact, it's so large that, dating from 1776 and taking the largest figure, that works out to an average of 11,500 deaths a year. (In year (for comparison, since the 1980s about 40,000 Americans have been killed per year in car crashes.) crashes).
29th Jan '16 7:55:42 AM MAI742
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and the USSR's even higher proportional military expenses, in an attempt to keep up with the US, certainly contributed to the stagnation and consequent reforms that brought the country down.
to:
The US military is the world's most powerful because theirs is the world's largest single economy, and the equivalent value of 4% of everything bought and sold in the country is spent on the military (4% of GDP, about twice the figure of similarly well-developed economies). The USA's spending on its military has generally remained above this level since about 1940, when it first decided to field a military on the same level as the other Great Powers of the day, and the cumulative effect of this high spending has been an increase of its capabilities. The USA's WorldWarTwo and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp Cold-War military budgets were 'much' higher]] than today's, and the USSR's even higher proportional military expenses, in an attempt expenses (needed to keep up with the US, certainly US) contributed to the stagnation and consequent reforms that brought the country down.which eventually resulted in its relatively peaceful self-dismemberment and suicide.
21st Jan '16 11:30:35 AM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The Fighter Fling videos are public domain with respect to the images. They get taken down because of the music.
There are specific but very noteworthy pieces of culture within the services, too. For example, from 1989 to 2004, the F-14 Tomcat squadrons in the Navy Air Corps released an annual ''Fighter Fling,'' a sort of yearbook turned into one long FanVid celebrating all the Tomcat squadrons by setting clips of them being {{Badass}} or [[BunnyEarsLawyer Bunny-Eared]] to whatever music was popular at the time. Some of these videos show up on Website/YouTube occasionally, but as is the case with modern anime/movie/video game-based {{Fan Vid}}s, they are often taken down thanks to DMCA. InterserviceRivalry is another major aspect of American military culture--there are '''countless''' jokes putting one branch on a pedestal at the expense of another (or ''all'' of them). A number of the stereotypes people outside the military have of specific branches are also shared by other branches. For example, the Navy's air corps pilots refer to themselves as ''Aviators'', and look down their nose at the Air Force's mere ''pilots'' -- one claim being that USAF pilots lack the skill to land on a carrier. Meanwhile, the "dumb jarhead" stereotype that other branches have of the Marines probably originated from the UsefulNotes/WorldWarII; the Marines were the only branch that would accept recruits who couldn't read or write. Given that the Marines are the smallest branch of service, however, and the one with the most colorful reputation, they've often been the only branch that routinely meets its recruiting goals, and has the luxury of being particularly selective in the era of the all-volunteer military.
to:
There are specific but very noteworthy pieces of culture within the services, too. For example, from 1989 to 2004, the F-14 Tomcat squadrons in the Navy Air Corps released an annual ''Fighter Fling,'' a sort of yearbook turned into one long FanVid celebrating all the Tomcat squadrons by setting clips of them being {{Badass}} or [[BunnyEarsLawyer Bunny-Eared]] to whatever music was popular at the time. Some of these videos show up on Website/YouTube occasionally, but as is the case with modern anime/movie/video game-based {{Fan Vid}}s, they are often taken down thanks to DMCA. DMCA (due to the music葉he visual elements are public domain from their creation as U.S. government works). InterserviceRivalry is another major aspect of American military culture--there are '''countless''' jokes putting one branch on a pedestal at the expense of another (or ''all'' of them). A number of the stereotypes people outside the military have of specific branches are also shared by other branches. For example, the Navy's air corps pilots refer to themselves as ''Aviators'', and look down their nose at the Air Force's mere ''pilots'' -- one claim being that USAF pilots lack the skill to land on a carrier. Meanwhile, the "dumb jarhead" stereotype that other branches have of the Marines probably originated from the UsefulNotes/WorldWarII; the Marines were the only branch that would accept recruits who couldn't read or write. Given that the Marines are the smallest branch of service, however, and the one with the most colorful reputation, they've often been the only branch that routinely meets its recruiting goals, and has the luxury of being particularly selective in the era of the all-volunteer military.
19th Dec '15 6:11:47 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
See, in the past, a lot of wars involved situations where two sides were "symmetrical" in composition, being endowed with roughly equal equipment, disposition and manpower (read: "[[WeHaveReserves reserves]]"). Under those circumstances, whoever was the better commander would generally win, but in the meanwhile [[WarIsHell a lot of death and blood happened]]. Today, America fights [[CombatPragmatist pragmatically]], lowering American casualties by exposing as few of them as possible to (effective) enemy fire葉hat is, If they can hurt you, ''don't attack them'', call someone else to hit them who can do so with impunity. With that in mind, there's a ''lot'' of cross-communication in an American war: if the enemy's trying to attack ''your'' weak point, you can (and should) call for help from [[TacticalRockPaperScissors whichever branch of the armed forces would be the best counter]]. (Think the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie: Army calling for help from Air Force; Air Force calling for help from... [[{{Dissimile}} Giant transforming robots]], giant transforming robots calling for help from {{Action Survivor}}s played by ShiaLabeouf, and Action Survivors calling for help from the Army.)[[note]] In laymen's terms, this means that either you get [[MoreDakka air support/ navy support ]]to bomb the everloving shit out of the enemy while you hunker down, or you strike preemptively and blow up the enemies emplacements before they even know ou're going to be there.[[/note]]
to:
See, in the past, a lot of wars involved situations where two sides were "symmetrical" in composition, being endowed with roughly equal equipment, disposition and manpower (read: "[[WeHaveReserves reserves]]"). Under those circumstances, whoever was the better commander would generally win, but in the meanwhile [[WarIsHell a lot of death and blood happened]]. Today, America fights [[CombatPragmatist pragmatically]], lowering American casualties by exposing as few of them as possible to (effective) enemy fire葉hat is, If they can hurt you, ''don't attack them'', call someone else to hit them who can do so with impunity. With that in mind, there's a ''lot'' of cross-communication in an American war: if the enemy's trying to attack ''your'' weak point, you can (and should) call for help from [[TacticalRockPaperScissors whichever branch of the armed forces would be the best counter]]. (Think the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' movie: Army calling for help from Air Force; Air Force calling for help from... [[{{Dissimile}} Giant transforming robots]], giant transforming robots calling for help from {{Action Survivor}}s played by ShiaLabeouf, Creator/ShiaLaBeouf, and Action Survivors calling for help from the Army.)[[note]] In laymen's terms, this means that either you get [[MoreDakka air support/ navy support ]]to bomb the everloving shit out of the enemy while you hunker down, or you strike preemptively and blow up the enemies emplacements before they even know ou're going to be there.[[/note]]
14th Nov '15 1:54:21 AM WildGoose
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Not true, there a hella lot more other strykers than the MGS/
* The '''Stryker''' is a new family of armored combat vehicles that seek to replace the US Army's older vehicles. The Stryker is an embodiment the US armed forces' new emphasis on speed, deployability, and utility. Capable of carrying up to 9 troops, the Stryker provides much need protection and combat support, yet is small and light enough to be carried on a standard C-130. It can also be modified for a number of specialized uses such as artillery support, mobile command vehicle, ambulance, and reconaissance. The tradeoff for this speed and deployability is significantly less armor than its heavier cousins, but thanks to armor upgrades it is more than capable of taking whatever is thrown at it. The most common armament is an American licensed version of the legendary L7 105mm cannon, giving the Stryker the ability to lay down heavy support fire.
to:
* The '''Stryker''' is a new family of armored combat vehicles that seek to replace the US Army's older vehicles. The Stryker is an embodiment the US armed forces' new emphasis on speed, deployability, and utility. Capable of carrying up to 9 troops, the Stryker provides much need protection and combat support, yet is small and light enough to be carried on a standard C-130. It can also be modified for a number of specialized uses such as artillery support, mobile command vehicle, ambulance, and reconaissance. The tradeoff for this speed and deployability is significantly less armor than its heavier cousins, but thanks to armor upgrades it is more than capable of taking whatever is thrown at it. The most common armament is an American licensed version of Most Stykers are armed with the legendary L7 venerable Browning M2 heavy machine gun, though there are specialist variants armed with 105mm cannon, giving the Stryker the ability to lay down heavy guns, antitank missiles and mortars for support fire. fire.

* The '''M1 Abrams'''' is America's main battle tank. It was born of a resolve to not repeat the horrific American tanker casualties of WWII due to [[ZergRush sacrificing ten inferior tanks to destroy a single German one]]--especially if they were going to defend bottlenecks in West Germany like the Fulda Gap and Hof Corridor during the Cold War from the inexpensive and even more numerous Chinese and Soviet tanks. That's why the first iteration of the Abrams, rolled out in 1981, had features like Chobham composite laminate armor[[note]]Disputed. Some say it's only the original M1 that uses it, while others claim it always has been using another type of Depleted Uranium based armor that is very similar to the English Chobham armor. Nevertheless, the way the armor works is supposed to be very similar to how Chobham is described to work[[/note]], a FLIR sensor suite (''very'' expensive for the time), laser rangefinder and ballistic computer. It got the last piece of its original wish list with the [=M1A1=], replacing the older 105mm/L52 M68 rifled main gun with the [[{{BFG}} German Rheinmetall 120mm/L44 smoothbore main gun]], licensed-made as the M256. The Abrams is also powered by a gas turbine. It's so fast that the Army puts a governor on the engine to keep them from speeding. With the governor removed, it can reach 70mph on a decent road--even though it weighs 68 tons. That's putting the "lightning" in LightningBruiser. Unfortunately, this means it's also a gas guzzler (roughly 1 gallon per mile, and it takes 10 gallons just to ''start'' the engine), and its speed leads to problems like having an entire Abrams unit run out of fuel and wait for five hours for fuel trucks to arrive. [[note]]Oops...:The unit happened to be in downtown Baghdad at the time surrounded by hostiles and with only a few Bradleys as back-ups. In addition, without fuel the Abrams isn't even a very expensive pillbox as it cannot even fire its cannon or power its electronics.[[/note]] On the other hand, its engine can accept most any commonly available flammable or combustible liquids as a fuel, compared to a diesel engine needing well, diesel. In a nonfiction book of his (Armored Cav), Creator/TomClancy recounted a story of an Abrams tank in the Gulf War. Having been immobilized by an enemy shot while deep in hostile territory, the crew of the tank found themselves in what military experts would call "a crappy situation". In the space of thirty seconds or so the immobilized tank destroyed four enemy tanks, two of which got shots off, hitting the tank but completely bouncing off of its proprietary DU-laced armor. When reinforcements arrived they decided it was too much trouble to lug the tank back, and decided to destroy it on site. The American tanks took turns shooting another 8 or 9 times before the turret was penetrated, detonating the ammo stocks--which had little effect due to the blowout hatches installed. The tank's turret was taken back to the US for analysis while the chassis was refit with another turret and returned to action in a week. That's some serious armor. In another example contained in David Zucchino's book, Thunder Run: The Armored Strike to Capture Baghdad, one of the Abrams was disabled by enemy fire. Forces attempting to destroy it on-site set off thermite grenades in the main hatch, detonating both the explosives and the ammunition stored in the tank. This was followed by the tank receiving a HEAT round from another Abrams, and then an AGM Maverick anti-armor missile, as well as two AGM Hellfire missiles were fired via gunship into the tank. The end result? The interior of the tank was demolished, but its armor and exterior appeared relatively unharmed. This tank's a God-damned "[[MechWarrior Battlemech]]".
to:
* The '''M1 Abrams'''' is America's main battle tank. It was born of a resolve to not repeat the horrific American tanker casualties of WWII due to [[ZergRush sacrificing ten inferior tanks to destroy a single German one]]--especially if they were going to defend bottlenecks in West Germany like the Fulda Gap and Hof Corridor during the Cold War from the inexpensive and even more numerous Chinese and Soviet tanks. That's why the first iteration of the Abrams, rolled out in 1981, had features like Chobham composite laminate armor[[note]]Disputed. Some say it's only the original M1 that uses it, while others claim it always has been using another type of Depleted Uranium based armor that is very similar to the English Chobham armor. Nevertheless, the way the armor works is supposed to be very similar to how Chobham is described to work[[/note]], a FLIR sensor suite (''very'' expensive for the time), laser rangefinder and ballistic computer. It got the last piece of its original wish list with the [=M1A1=], replacing the older 105mm/L52 M68 rifled main gun with the [[{{BFG}} German Rheinmetall 120mm/L44 smoothbore main gun]], licensed-made as the M256. The Abrams is also powered by a gas turbine. It's so fast that the Army puts a governor on the engine to keep them from speeding. With the governor removed, it can reach 70mph on a decent road--even though it weighs 68 tons. That's putting the "lightning" in LightningBruiser. Unfortunately, this means it's also a gas guzzler (roughly 1 gallon per mile, and it takes 10 gallons just to ''start'' the engine), and its speed leads to problems like having an entire Abrams unit run out of fuel and wait for five hours for fuel trucks to arrive. [[note]]Oops...:The unit happened to be in downtown Baghdad at the time surrounded by hostiles and with only a few Bradleys as back-ups. In addition, without fuel the Abrams isn't even a very expensive pillbox as it cannot even fire its cannon or power its electronics.[[/note]] On the other hand, its engine can accept most any commonly available flammable or combustible liquids as a fuel, compared to a diesel engine needing well, diesel. In a nonfiction book of his (Armored Cav), Creator/TomClancy recounted a story of an Abrams tank in the Gulf War. Having been immobilized by an enemy shot while deep in hostile territory, the crew of the tank found themselves in what military experts would call "a crappy situation". In the space of thirty seconds or so the immobilized tank destroyed four enemy tanks, two of which got shots off, hitting the tank but completely bouncing off of its proprietary DU-laced armor. When reinforcements arrived they decided it was too much trouble to lug the tank back, and decided to destroy it on site. The American tanks took turns shooting another 8 or 9 times before the turret was penetrated, detonating the ammo stocks--which had little effect due to the blowout hatches installed. The tank's turret was taken back to the US for analysis while the chassis was refit with another turret and returned to action in a week. That's some serious armor. In another example contained in David Zucchino's book, Thunder Run: The Armored Strike to Capture Baghdad, one of the Abrams was disabled by enemy fire. Forces attempting to destroy it on-site set off thermite grenades in the main hatch, detonating both the explosives and the ammunition stored in the tank. This was followed by the tank receiving a HEAT round from another Abrams, and then an AGM AGM-65 Maverick anti-armor missile, as well as two AGM Hellfire missiles were fired via gunship into the tank. The end result? The interior of the tank was demolished, but its armor and exterior appeared relatively unharmed. This tank's a God-damned "[[MechWarrior Battlemech]]".

If you're wondering, aircraft designations are: F for Fighter, A for ground Assault, B for Bomber, K for tanKer, U for Utility, E for Electronic warfare, Q for unmanned drone, and in the case of the WWII planes, P for Pursuit.
to:
If you're wondering, aircraft designations are: F for Fighter, A for ground Assault, Attack, B for Bomber, K C for tanKer, U for Utility, Cargo, E for Electronic warfare, H for Helicopter, K for tanKer, M for special Missions, V for [=VTOL=], U for Utility, Q for unmanned drone, and in the case of the WWII planes, P for Pursuit.
This list shows the last 10 events of 366. Show all.