History UsefulNotes / WorldWarI

5th Apr '16 11:12:34 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''Film/LegendsOfTheFall'' had Brad Pitt, Aidan Quinn and [[HeyItsThatGuy ET's best friend]] go off to Europe to fight on the Western Front.

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* ''Film/LegendsOfTheFall'' had Brad Pitt, Aidan Quinn and [[HeyItsThatGuy ET's best friend]] friend go off to Europe to fight on the Western Front.
3rd Apr '16 9:51:34 PM TargetmasterJoe
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* ''Film/WonderWoman'' has the titular heroine exploring the world of Man during the time period of WWI.
2nd Apr '16 9:22:05 PM Furienna
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* ''[[Literature/TheAnderssons Drömmar av glas]]'' takes place in 1917. Sweden is mostly spared from the horrors of the war, but food is very scarce in the cities and the towns, and Rebecka's only uncle has been conscripted into the army.

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* ''[[Literature/TheAnderssons Drömmar av glas]]'' by Solveig Olsson-Hultgren takes place in 1917. Sweden is mostly spared from the horrors of the war, but food is very scarce in the cities and the towns, and Rebecka's only uncle has been conscripted into the army.
2nd Apr '16 8:18:40 PM Furienna
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Added DiffLines:

* ''[[Literature/TheAnderssons Drömmar av glas]]'' takes place in 1917. Sweden is mostly spared from the horrors of the war, but food is very scarce in the cities and the towns, and Rebecka's only uncle has been conscripted into the army.
24th Mar '16 4:53:42 AM jormis29
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*** Much of the footage from the movie was used again by the director Simon Wincer in an episode of ''TheYoungIndianaJonesChronicles'' he directed about the same historical incident but with young Indy inserted in as an Entente spy. The episode also featured then-unknown actors Daniel Craig and Catherine Zeta-Jones.

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*** Much of the footage from the movie was used again by the director Simon Wincer in an episode of ''TheYoungIndianaJonesChronicles'' ''Series/TheYoungIndianaJonesChronicles'' he directed about the same historical incident but with young Indy inserted in as an Entente spy. The episode also featured then-unknown actors Daniel Craig Creator/DanielCraig and Catherine Zeta-Jones.Creator/CatherineZetaJones.
29th Feb '16 12:49:02 PM gallium
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* ''Film/TheLostPatrol'' is about a single British cavalry patrol that gets lost in the Mesopotamian desert and endures a harrowing siege while being picked off by unseen Arab enemies.
26th Feb '16 5:14:50 PM spasskysteve
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26th Feb '16 5:14:30 PM spasskysteve
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Another legacy character who fought in the trenches, some obscure painter named [[UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler Adolf something]], would eventually set off [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII the sequel]]. After the high ratings and widespread critical acclaim for the first two installments rumors did abound at one point about a ''second'' sequel, but it appears to be stuck in development and there seems to be little interest in backing the project given the likely costs. A [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar long-running spin-off sidequel]] of a different genre was made, the ending of which more or less tied up all the loose ends and acted as a grand finale for the entire franchise. So, if the franchise is ever revived, it'll be a remake rather than a sequel.
26th Feb '16 5:13:38 PM spasskysteve
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Pushing 1918 into the winner's circle for the title of Worst Year Ever (*cough*[[TheGreatDepression 1932]]*cough*[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII 1944-45]]*cough*) was an influenza pandemic. The Spanish Flu (which actually originated in Fort Riley, Kansas, USA) struck that fall, killing between ''fifty and a hundred million people'' (2.5-5% of the then global population) compared to the war's ten or fifteen million, but has largely been forgotten by history and fiction. The war actually helped its spread (troop transportation), and four years of malnutrition and stress probably hadn't strengthened anyone's immune system, but today it's thought that that flu strain killed by inciting a cytokine storm (basically, your immune system goes berserk and, if its strong enough, accidentally kills you). Certainly the 1918 flu was unusual in that it mostly killed healthy adults, as opposed to the more usual flu victims: the sick, the very young, and the very old. Also ''very'' unusual in that almost ''none'' of the stories or films set in the period even ''mention'' it--even contemporary fiction. ''[[Literature/AnneOfGreenGables Rilla of Ingleside]]'', by Creator/LMMontgomery, chronicles the entire war without touching on it at all.

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Pushing 1918 into the winner's circle for the title of Worst Year Ever (*cough*[[TheGreatDepression 1932]]*cough*[[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII 1944-45]]*cough*) was an influenza pandemic. The Spanish Flu (which actually originated in Fort Riley, Kansas, USA) struck that fall, killing between ''fifty and a hundred million people'' (2.5-5% of the then global population) compared to the war's ten or fifteen million, but has largely been forgotten by history and fiction. The war actually helped its spread (troop transportation), and four years of malnutrition and stress probably hadn't strengthened anyone's immune system, but today it's thought that that flu strain killed by inciting a cytokine storm (basically, your immune system goes berserk and, if its strong enough, accidentally kills you). Certainly the 1918 flu was unusual in that it mostly killed healthy adults, as opposed to the more usual flu victims: the sick, the very young, and the very old. Also ''very'' unusual in that almost ''none'' of the stories or films set in the period even ''mention'' it--even contemporary fiction. ''[[Literature/AnneOfGreenGables Rilla of Ingleside]]'', by Creator/LMMontgomery, chronicles the entire war without touching on it at all.
21st Feb '16 6:38:59 AM MAI742
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The Verdun offensive was launched by Germany as part of her new Western Front Commander- von Falkenhayn's- strategy of "bleeding France dry" by killing so many of her men that she would sue for peace rather than lose any more and/or taking a vital area in a crushing swoop. The area they chose was the Verdun Salient, a small ring of French forts centered on the town of Verdun jutting into German territory, supplied only by one road and a light single-tracked railway while the German side facing it had three double-tracked railway lines and even more roads. The idea was to get a massive superiority in forces, smash through to take Verdun and kill and capture as many French soldiers as possible, and hand France a painful enough defeat that they might sue for peace. It did not work; after initial victories the French were able to regroup and turn the remaining fortresses into modernized death dealers that could hold out against great odds, and kept the area supplied well-enough that ''the Germans'' were actually the ones who had more soldiers (more than a million to France's "mere" million) die and be crippled as the ground they took was slowly lost. Falkenhayn realized the unfolding fiasco and "retconned" the logic from the offensive, claiming he had never intended to take Verdun itself (when he totally had) and that instead it was meant to tie the French down defending it and kill so many they would give up (which didn't happen). The rest of the budding dictatorship were unamused, and the reverses at the Somme and Verdun led to Falkenhayn being sacked.

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The Verdun offensive was launched by Germany as part of her new Western Front Commander- von Falkenhayn's- strategy of "bleeding France dry" by killing so attrition. There were two elements to this. The first and most important element was avoiding German losses. The second was to inflict as many of her men that she would sue for peace rather than lose any more and/or taking a vital area losses upon the French as possible at the lowest possible cost in a crushing swoop. German lives. The area they he chose was the Verdun Salient, a small ring of French forts centered on the town of Verdun jutting into German territory, supplied only by one road and a light single-tracked railway while the German side facing it had three double-tracked railway lines and even more roads. The idea was to get make some small, short-range attacks of a couple of kilometres (i.e. well within friendly light- and medium- artillery range). The French would then almost certainly try to counter-attack and take it back, whereupon the Germans could use their massive superiority in forces, smash through artillery to take Verdun and kill and capture as many French soldiers as possible, and hand France a painful enough defeat that they might sue for peace. It did not work; after initial victories massacre their forces. Once the French had completely destroyed themselves trying to attack, the Germans might move their artillery up and advance a little further - tempting the French into counterattacking again.

Von Falkenhayn's strategy and operational methodology
were able to regroup brilliant. German forces had all the logistical support and turn battlefield efficiency they needed to see this thing through.

However,
the remaining fortresses into modernized death dealers overall commander of the German forces deployed to Verdun - Crown Prince Wilhelm - decided that could hold out against great odds, and kept the area supplied well-enough he would use that ''the Germans'' were actually massive artillery park to break straight through the ones who had more soldiers (more than a million to France's "mere" million) die French lines and be crippled as seize the ground they took was slowly lost. fortress-city of Verdun. Instead of a slow, boring series of battles which von Falkenhayn realized would get all the unfolding fiasco credit for Wilhelm thought that he could make a name for himself by striking a major or even war-winning blow against the French by acting on his own.

The result was predictable. Wilhelm's forces outran their artillery
and "retconned" were utterly mulched by the logic from French artillery. Because Wilhelm took too much territory, he then had to move his artillery several kilometres into the offensive, claiming he had never intended to take Verdun itself (when he totally had) and captured territory. This meant that instead it was meant to tie of supplying his artillery and his men directly from the French down defending it railways, he had to bridge the gap with trucks and kill so many they would give up (which didn't happen). horses. Of course, Wilhelm had not actually been given enough trucks and horses to do this. Wilhelm's attempts to keep attacking foundred given his insufficient supply of ammunition and his men's horrible losses and exhaustion. Verdun ''was'' a meagrinder - for the Germans as well.

The rest of the budding dictatorship were unamused, and the reverses at the Somme and Verdun led to von Falkenhayn being sacked.
sacked. Wilhelm's political clout, however, prevented them from doing likewise to him.
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