History UsefulNotes / TheMoon

18th Sep '16 5:34:01 PM JamesAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[caption-width-right:250:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon You should kill us all on sight!]]]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:250:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon [[caption-width-right:350:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon You should kill us all on sight!]]]]
18th Sep '16 5:33:49 PM JamesAustin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:250:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/250px-FullMoon2010_5637.jpg]]

to:

[[quoteright:250:http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/250px-FullMoon2010_5637.jpg]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/350px_fullmoon2010_5637.jpg]]



{{UsefulNotes/Earth}}'s only--or at least, only significant--natural satellite. While it's referred to as [[SpellMyNameWithAThe the Moon]], it's called by its Roman name, '''Luna''', when differentiating it with the other satellites in the Solar System. It has been named Selene, Cynthia, and Diane by the Roman and Greek ancients as well. Of course, this is where the word "lunar" comes from, as well as the Greek prefix seleno- (e.g selenophobia, fear of the moon.)

It orbits our planet some 400,000 kilometers away, taking 27.3 days to go all the way around once. (Since the Earth will have moved some distance around {{UsefulNotes/the sun}} by the time the moon has orbited once, it takes a little longer--29.5 days total, to be precise--for the lunar light-cycle to get back around to the same phase it started in.) Tidal forces long ago caused the moon to lock in synchronous rotation with the Earth, so that the same side is always facing us.

to:

{{UsefulNotes/Earth}}'s UsefulNotes/{{Earth}}'s only--or at least, only significant--natural satellite. While it's referred to as [[SpellMyNameWithAThe the Moon]], it's called by its Roman name, '''Luna''', when differentiating it with the other satellites in the Solar System. It has been named Selene, Cynthia, and Diane by the Roman and Greek ancients as well. Of course, this is where the word "lunar" comes from, as well as the Greek prefix seleno- (e.g selenophobia, fear of the moon.)

It orbits our planet some 400,000 kilometers away, taking 27.3 days to go all the way around once. (Since the Earth will have moved some distance around {{UsefulNotes/the UsefulNotes/{{the sun}} by the time the moon has orbited once, it takes a little longer--29.5 days total, to be precise--for the lunar light-cycle to get back around to the same phase it started in.) Tidal forces long ago caused the moon to lock in synchronous rotation with the Earth, so that the same side is always facing us.
19th Aug '16 6:40:58 AM AnotherGuy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


{{UsefulNotes/Earth}}'s only--or at least, only significant--natural satellite. While it's referred to as [[SpellMyNameWithAThe the Moon]], it's referred to its Roman name, '''Luna''', when differentiating it with the other satellites in the Solar System. It has been named Selene, Cynthia, and Diane by the Roman and Greek ancients as well. Of course, this is where the word "lunar" comes from, as well as the Greek prefix seleno- (e.g selenophobia, fear of the moon.)

to:

{{UsefulNotes/Earth}}'s only--or at least, only significant--natural satellite. While it's referred to as [[SpellMyNameWithAThe the Moon]], it's referred to called by its Roman name, '''Luna''', when differentiating it with the other satellites in the Solar System. It has been named Selene, Cynthia, and Diane by the Roman and Greek ancients as well. Of course, this is where the word "lunar" comes from, as well as the Greek prefix seleno- (e.g selenophobia, fear of the moon.)
19th Aug '16 6:39:05 AM AnotherGuy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Currently, our best guess at how such a humongous companion came into existence is that a UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}-sized planetesimal struck the Earth early in its formation period, which knocked loose a huge chunk of material that eventually cooled, congealed, and settled into the moon's current nearly-circular orbit. However, a recent comparison of the Earth-moon titanium isotope ratio has [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/26/moon-formation-theory-new-study_n_1380127.html thrown this model into question]].

to:

Currently, our best guess at how such a humongous companion came into existence is that a UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}-sized planetesimal struck the Earth early in its formation period, which knocked loose a huge chunk of material that eventually cooled, congealed, and settled into the moon's current nearly-circular orbit. However, New discoveries confirm this theories, as scientists have found that the Moon was tidally locked only a recent comparison hundred days after the collision, "baking" one side of the Earth-moon titanium isotope ratio has [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/26/moon-formation-theory-new-study_n_1380127.html thrown this model into question]].
Moon, and the other side thickening from the vaporized crust, explaining the odd crust dichotomy of the satellite. Even more amazingly, the "strange lights" that have been seen in the last few decades are probable indication that the Moon's core is NotQuiteDead, such as the flashes of light from Aristarchus, one of the ancient lunar volcanoes. In reality, instead of being UFO's, it's actually heated expulsion of dust from the Moon's crust.
19th Jul '16 3:20:32 PM TimeLordVictorious
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[caption-width-right:250:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon You should kill us all on sight!]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:250:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon You should kill us all on sight!]]
sight!]]]]
19th Jul '16 3:20:22 PM TimeLordVictorious
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[caption-width-right:250:Kinda looks like ''ComicStrip/LittleOrphanAnnie'', doesn't it?]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:250:Kinda looks like ''ComicStrip/LittleOrphanAnnie'', doesn't it?]]
[[caption-width-right:250:[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E2DayOfTheMoon You should kill us all on sight!]]
20th Jun '16 5:03:29 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* In the 2007 ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "Smith and Jones", an entire hospital is teleported to the moon by SpacePolice hunting an alien fugitive. The Doctor and Martha Jones meet and become a team in the confusion.
6th May '16 10:08:56 AM AnotherGuy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


{{UsefulNotes/Earth}}'s only--or at least, only significant--natural satellite.

to:

{{UsefulNotes/Earth}}'s only--or at least, only significant--natural satellite.
satellite. While it's referred to as [[SpellMyNameWithAThe the Moon]], it's referred to its Roman name, '''Luna''', when differentiating it with the other satellites in the Solar System. It has been named Selene, Cynthia, and Diane by the Roman and Greek ancients as well. Of course, this is where the word "lunar" comes from, as well as the Greek prefix seleno- (e.g selenophobia, fear of the moon.)
21st Feb '16 5:59:43 PM harharhar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Sadly, the moon will not be with us forever. Those same tidal forces that pull on the Earth's oceans and locked the same face of the moon toward the Earth are also, very slowly, widening the moon's orbit. [[note]]Currently, every year the moon is about 2 inches farther away than the year prior.[[/note]] In a short time (on a geological scale, at least), the moon will be too far away to cause total solar eclipses. [[note]]Which actually results in a interesting phenomenon: we are currently in a phase of the moon's orbital life that results in the moon ''just'' being able to cover up the sun during an eclipse. For the dinosaurs, though, the moon would've completely blocked out the sun easily.[[/note]] Eventually, it will be far enough away to leave Earth orbit entirely, and wander through space just like in ''Series/{{Space 1999}}'', though by the time that would actually happen, the Sun will have expanded into a red giant and engulfed the Earth already[[note]]However, the tides caused by the moon are slowing down Earth's rotation and in theory in the far future our planet could end instead being tidally locked to the moon. After this happened, it has been proposed that tides caused by the Sun could cause the moon to approach again -very slowly- to our planet, until it got [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roche_limit so close]] that was destroyed by Earth's gravity becoming a ring system similar to Saturn's one but much smaller and denser. Note that those points are just academical, since it's unlikely both the Earth and the moon will survive Sun's expansion into a red giant and they'd take place in a far longer timescale.[[/note]]


Added DiffLines:

Sadly, the moon will not be with us forever. Those same tidal forces that pull on the Earth's oceans and locked the same face of the moon toward the Earth are also, very slowly, widening the moon's orbit. [[note]]Currently, every year the moon is about 2 inches farther away than the year prior.[[/note]] In a short time (on a geological scale, at least), the moon will be too far away to cause total solar eclipses. [[note]]Which actually results in a interesting phenomenon: we are currently in a phase of the moon's orbital life that results in the moon ''just'' being able to cover up the sun during an eclipse. For the dinosaurs, though, the moon would've completely blocked out the sun easily.[[/note]] Eventually, it will be far enough away to leave Earth orbit entirely, and wander through space just like in ''Series/{{Space 1999}}'', though by the time that would actually happen, the Sun will have expanded into a red giant and engulfed the Earth already[[note]]However, the tides caused by the moon are slowing down Earth's rotation and in theory in the far future our planet could end instead being tidally locked to the moon. After this happened, it has been proposed that tides caused by the Sun could cause the moon to approach again -very slowly- to our planet, until it got [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roche_limit so close]] that was destroyed by Earth's gravity becoming a ring system similar to Saturn's one but much smaller and denser. Note that those points are just academical, since it's unlikely both the Earth and the moon will survive Sun's expansion into a red giant and they'd take place in a far longer timescale.[[/note]]
17th Jan '16 3:02:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* At the beginning of ''StarControlII'' the quest you must do in order to have Commander Hayes and the Earth Starbase in your side is to deal with a base left in the Moon by the Ur-Quan Hierarchy. Once you go there, and especially when you find Fwiffo, you'll find Hayes' reports were ''very'' inaccurate.

to:

* At the beginning of ''StarControlII'' ''VideoGame/StarControlII'' the quest you must do in order to have Commander Hayes and the Earth Starbase in your side is to deal with a base left in the Moon by the Ur-Quan Hierarchy. Once you go there, and especially when you find Fwiffo, you'll find Hayes' reports were ''very'' inaccurate.
This list shows the last 10 events of 77. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheMoon