History UsefulNotes / TheEighties

16th Sep '16 1:43:32 PM FF32
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** Anime and manga were first introduced to the world on a wide scale as something other than adapted "kid stuff," including what was widely recognized as the first mature dramatic animated film, ''Anime/{{Akira}}'', and of course, {{hentai}}. Japanese companies widely owned entertainment as well, from TV and music including Sony having bought out Columbia Pictures (having been spun off into it's own company by Coca-Cola after a number of high-profile flops), and purchasing record labels globally as well.

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** Anime and manga were first introduced to the world on a wide scale as something other than adapted "kid stuff," including what was widely recognized as the first mature dramatic animated film, ''Anime/{{Akira}}'', ''Manga/{{Akira}}'', and of course, {{hentai}}. Japanese companies widely owned entertainment as well, from TV and music including Sony having bought out Columbia Pictures (having been spun off into it's own company by Coca-Cola after a number of high-profile flops), and purchasing record labels globally as well.
28th Apr '16 4:39:01 PM momotaro
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** Computers like the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair_8800 Altair]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80 TRS-80]] were available in kit form. However they were the province of hobbyists. They pioneered DIY computers, and with the TRS-80, portable computers. Laptops and DIY computers we know today would only takeoff in the next decade.
17th Jan '16 8:19:35 PM nombretomado
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* In live theater, the 1980s was the decade of the "megamusical" -- lavish productions with premises ranging from whimsical (''{{Cats}}'', ''StarlightExpress'') to highly dramatic (''Theatre/LesMiserables''), but all marked by scores that mixed pop sounds with "traditional" and operatic styles and a tendency towards BIG emotions and BIG showstoppers. The theatrical equivalents of the SummerBlockbuster, and often regarded with just as much disdain by professional critics, SceneryPorn and CostumePorn were the order of the day in these shows. Many were the musical work of British composer AndrewLloydWebber, and most premiered in London's West End before launching sister productions in New York City and elsewhere. Lloyd Webber's career and the megamusical as a whole reached a peak with 1986's ''ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', with the media hype surrounding the show's Broadway debut in 1988 comparable to that of any Hollywood blockbuster of the era.

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* In live theater, the 1980s was the decade of the "megamusical" -- lavish productions with premises ranging from whimsical (''{{Cats}}'', ''StarlightExpress'') (''Theatre/{{Cats}}'', ''Theatre/StarlightExpress'') to highly dramatic (''Theatre/LesMiserables''), but all marked by scores that mixed pop sounds with "traditional" and operatic styles and a tendency towards BIG emotions and BIG showstoppers. The theatrical equivalents of the SummerBlockbuster, and often regarded with just as much disdain by professional critics, SceneryPorn and CostumePorn were the order of the day in these shows. Many were the musical work of British composer AndrewLloydWebber, and most premiered in London's West End before launching sister productions in New York City and elsewhere. Lloyd Webber's career and the megamusical as a whole reached a peak with 1986's ''ThePhantomOfTheOpera'', with the media hype surrounding the show's Broadway debut in 1988 comparable to that of any Hollywood blockbuster of the era.
26th Nov '15 8:19:30 PM nombretomado
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* Series also started experimenting with settings -- no longer were the standard dramas and comedies confined to the three biggest cities. ''Series/EightIsEnough'' was set in Sacramento, for example, while DuelingShow ''Series/{{Family}}'' was set in Pasadena. Later on, UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC and SanFrancisco became very popular in this respect.

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* Series also started experimenting with settings -- no longer were the standard dramas and comedies confined to the three biggest cities. ''Series/EightIsEnough'' was set in Sacramento, for example, while DuelingShow ''Series/{{Family}}'' was set in Pasadena. Later on, UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC and SanFrancisco UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco became very popular in this respect.
14th Oct '15 12:50:55 PM Lequinni
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* The fast food expansion finally was felt outside of USA, with many chains arriving to relatively virgin markets in South America and Asia.



* Latin-American countries were another thing completely. Most countries were in a "One song by local artist for one from foreign ones" model of protectionism, which created small musical ecosystems whose artists rarely crossed over frontiers. No artist really believed they could make it on the American market, so the idea of "crossover" didn't really exist, or just was limited to playing in either a neighboring country or making it on Mexico, the biggest market at the time. Most of the music done at the time were done in the style of American pop music, just blander. There were also the beginning of a trend of covers from American or European songs done by local artists in other styles, like Ballads by Celine Dion or Dolly Parton covered by Dominican band Las Chicas del Can as dominican merengue. Salsa musicians softened their sound, and an style named "Salsa Erotica", with quite risque lyrics soon emerged.
** In the early '80s, this mentality was common in Canada too, by no means a Latin-American country. Though there were a few Canadian acts who made it in the US, like Bryan Adams and later the aforementioned Celine Dion, much of the material you'd hear on Canadian radio circa 1984 never made its way to the US. Artists like Corey Hart and Men Without Hats are seen as one-hit wonders now, but had many hits in Canada at the time (and in Hart's case "Sunglasses at Night" was almost the least of them); the now-forgotten Platinum Blonde were as big in their native country as Duran Duran at the time.

to:

* Latin-American countries were another thing completely. Most countries were in a "One song by local artist for one from foreign ones" model of protectionism, which created small musical ecosystems whose artists rarely crossed over frontiers. No artist really believed they could make it on the American market, so the idea of "crossover" didn't really exist, or just was limited to playing in either a neighboring country or making it on Mexico, the biggest market at the time. Most of the music done at the time were done in the style of American pop music, just blander. There were also the beginning apex of a the trend of covers from American or European songs done by local artists in other styles, like Ballads by Celine Dion or Dolly Parton covered by Dominican band Las Chicas del Can as dominican merengue. Salsa musicians softened their sound, and an style named "Salsa Erotica", with quite risque lyrics soon emerged.
**
emerged. In the Caribbean, Dominican Merengue reigned supreme, with Wilfrido Vargas and Juan Luis Guerra as the kings genre. Spain managed to send some of their budding pop-rock artists to its former colonies, with some success. And the Rock En Español scene, while still semi-isolated to their respective countries was brewing and maturating quickly, specially in Argentina.
*
In the early '80s, this the aforementioned protectionist mentality was common in Canada too, by no means a Latin-American country. Though there were a few Canadian acts who made it in the US, like Bryan Adams and later the aforementioned Celine Dion, much of the material you'd hear on Canadian radio circa 1984 never made its way to the US. Artists like Corey Hart and Men Without Hats are seen as one-hit wonders now, but had many hits in Canada at the time (and in Hart's case "Sunglasses at Night" was almost the least of them); the now-forgotten Platinum Blonde were as big in their native country as Duran Duran at the time.
1st Oct '15 8:57:30 AM DDRMASTERM
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* There was, frankly, a lot to fear in the '80s. The US was still at war, and getting nuked was a frighteningly plausible possibility. A string of post-apocalyptic movies, like ''Film/TheDayAfter'', ''Film/{{Testament}}'' and ''Film/{{Threads}}'', helped keep the fear bubbling. The Chernobyl meltdown made people queasy about even peaceful applications of nuclear technology.

to:

* There was, frankly, a lot to fear in the '80s. The US was still at war, and getting nuked was a frighteningly plausible possibility. A string of post-apocalyptic movies, like ''Film/TheDayAfter'', ''Film/{{Testament}}'' and ''Film/{{Threads}}'', helped keep the fear bubbling. The Chernobyl {{UsefulNotes/Chernobyl}} meltdown made people queasy about even peaceful applications of nuclear technology.
25th Jul '15 8:16:34 PM nombretomado
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* MichaelJackson immortalized himself as the King of Pop during this time, scoring hits such as "Billie Jean", "Thriller", and "Beat It".
* Prince, a flamboyantly dressed pop-rock-funk-musician who got his career jumpstarted in the late 1970's finally rose to prominence with his smash hit album Purple Rain and the slightly bad movie of the same name. Unlike Michael Jackson however, by 1985 he had lost his third wheel due to his increasingly varied musical preferences and by the early 90's he was demoted to slight obscurity at the same time Michael's career fell tumbling after.

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* MichaelJackson Music/MichaelJackson immortalized himself as the King of Pop during this time, scoring hits such as "Billie Jean", "Thriller", and "Beat It".
* Prince, Music/{{Prince}}, a flamboyantly dressed pop-rock-funk-musician who got his career jumpstarted in the late 1970's finally rose to prominence with his smash hit album Purple Rain and the slightly bad movie of the same name. Unlike Michael Jackson however, by 1985 he had lost his third wheel due to his increasingly varied musical preferences and by the early 90's he was demoted to slight obscurity at the same time Michael's career fell tumbling after.
6th Jul '15 10:52:35 PM snoopdoggydre
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Added DiffLines:

* Prince, a flamboyantly dressed pop-rock-funk-musician who got his career jumpstarted in the late 1970's finally rose to prominence with his smash hit album Purple Rain and the slightly bad movie of the same name. Unlike Michael Jackson however, by 1985 he had lost his third wheel due to his increasingly varied musical preferences and by the early 90's he was demoted to slight obscurity at the same time Michael's career fell tumbling after.
25th Jun '15 7:09:43 AM Morgenthaler
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* There was, frankly, a lot to fear in the '80s. The US was still at war, and getting nuked was a frighteningly plausible possibility. A string of post-apocalyptic movies, like ''TheDayAfter'', ''Film/{{Testament}}'' and ''{{Threads}}'', helped keep the fear bubbling. The Chernobyl meltdown made people queasy about even peaceful applications of nuclear technology.

to:

* There was, frankly, a lot to fear in the '80s. The US was still at war, and getting nuked was a frighteningly plausible possibility. A string of post-apocalyptic movies, like ''TheDayAfter'', ''Film/TheDayAfter'', ''Film/{{Testament}}'' and ''{{Threads}}'', ''Film/{{Threads}}'', helped keep the fear bubbling. The Chernobyl meltdown made people queasy about even peaceful applications of nuclear technology.
16th Jan '15 2:37:09 PM themisterfree
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** Anime and manga were first introduced to the world on a wide scale as something other than adapted "kid stuff," including what was widely recognized as the first mature dramatic animated film, ''Anime/{{Akira}}'', and of course, {{hentai}}. Japanese companies widely owned entertainment as well, from TV and music including Sony having bought out CBS, opening its own movie studio and record labels globally as well.

to:

** Anime and manga were first introduced to the world on a wide scale as something other than adapted "kid stuff," including what was widely recognized as the first mature dramatic animated film, ''Anime/{{Akira}}'', and of course, {{hentai}}. Japanese companies widely owned entertainment as well, from TV and music including Sony having bought out CBS, opening its Columbia Pictures (having been spun off into it's own movie studio company by Coca-Cola after a number of high-profile flops), and purchasing record labels globally as well.
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