History UsefulNotes / TheAmericanCivilWar

9th Oct '17 1:21:02 AM EvilKid
Is there an issue? Send a Message
8th Oct '17 6:03:43 AM Statzkeen
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A big one by the South that was incredibly ballsy, and also failed miserably - they essentially ''embargoed themselves'' hoping that the European powers (especially Britain) would badly miss Southern exports, particularly cotton. It made some slight progress towards its intended goal, but mostly it just pissed the British off, in addition to depriving the fledgling CSA of badly-needed wealth at a time with the USA's blockade was still mostly ineffective.

to:

** A big one by the South that was incredibly ballsy, and also failed miserably - they essentially ''embargoed themselves'' hoping figuring that the European powers (especially Britain) would badly miss Southern exports, particularly cotton.exports (particularly cotton), become convinced of their need to ensure continuing trade with the South, and thus join the war to ensure the South would survive. It made some slight progress towards its intended goal, but mostly it just pissed the British off, in addition to depriving the fledgling CSA of badly-needed wealth at a time with the USA's blockade was still mostly ineffective.
8th Oct '17 6:02:33 AM Statzkeen
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A big one by the South that was incredibly ballsy, and also failed miserably - they essentially ''embargoed themselves'' hoping that the European powers (especially Britain) would badly miss Southern exports, particularly cotton. It made some slight progress towards its intended goal, but mostly it just pissed the British off, in addition to depriving the fledgling CSA of badly-needed wealth at a time with the USA's blockade was still mostly ineffective.



** The Union on the whole was led by a diverse group of individuals, factions and interests. While they were fighting the Confederates, that did not mean they were anti-racist or total abolitionists. Northern soldiers were not above raping slave women they found in plantations. William Sherman was quite skeptical of race equality and his initial attempt to distribute southern land to slaves who had followed the army during his March to Georgia was a pragmatic rather than humanitarian gesture. Ulysses Grant was more of an abolitionist than Sherman, but even that took time and even then his notorious [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Order_No._11_(1862) General Order 11]] to expel Jews from their homes (which Lincoln repealed a few weeks later) is not one of his finest moments.

to:

** The Union on the whole was led by a diverse group of individuals, factions and interests. While they were fighting the Confederates, that did not mean they were anti-racist or total abolitionists. Northern soldiers were not above raping slave women they found in plantations. William Sherman was quite skeptical of race equality and - his initial attempt to distribute southern land to slaves who had followed the army during his March to Georgia was a pragmatic rather than humanitarian gesture.gesture. Also, although it wouldn't become apparently until after the war, Sherman had a particular vitriol towards Native Americans. Ulysses Grant was more of an abolitionist than Sherman, but even that took time and even then his notorious [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Order_No._11_(1862) General Order 11]] to expel Jews from their homes (which Lincoln repealed a few weeks later) is not one of his finest moments.



** In fairness, this is all with hindsight. For the first two years of the conflict, there was actually a real chance that France and/or Britain might intervene: France for political reasons (Napoleon III’s France had just set up a puppet state in Mexico that the Union did not like, and thus wanted the U.S. weakened to lessen the threat to it) and Great Britain for economic and political reasons (a huge chunk of her industry was in textiles, and Lord Palmerston was an influential and jingoistic nutjob). They also disapproved of their ships being impressed by the Union and the Union’s treatment of Confederate diplomats. Britain didn’t intervene ultimately because a war would have been expensive and (deeply) unpopular, not to mention the fact that they disliked the idea of helping Imperial France (who might even have taken the chance to ally with the USA and declare war on Britain in return for the former’s recognition of French-backed-Mexico) and were pissed at the Rebels’ laidback and somewhat arrogant diplomatic overtures (the aforementioned “King Cotton” mentality). Indirect intervention or even simple gun-running was ruled out pretty early on when the USA declared that any kind of British support for the Confederates would mean war. While the world’s only superpower didn’t exactly fear wars with second-rate powers like Spain or the USA, ever since her defeat in the Hundred Years’ War Britain has — unlike certain other countries ([[CoughSnarkCough *cough*FRANCE*cough*]]) — never been fond of pointless (and expensive!) wars. That’s ‘Perfidious Albion’ for you.

to:

** In fairness, this is all with hindsight. For the first two years of the conflict, there was actually a real chance that France and/or Britain might intervene: France for political reasons (Napoleon III’s France had just set up a puppet state in Mexico that the Union did not like, and thus wanted the U.S. weakened to lessen the threat to it) and Great Britain for economic and political reasons (a huge chunk of her industry was in textiles, and Lord Palmerston was an influential and jingoistic nutjob). They also disapproved of their ships being impressed by the Union and the Union’s treatment of Confederate diplomats. Britain didn’t intervene ultimately because a war would have been expensive and (deeply) unpopular, not to mention the fact that they disliked the idea of helping Imperial France (who might even have taken the chance to ally with the USA and declare war on Britain in return for the former’s recognition of French-backed-Mexico) and were pissed at the Rebels’ laidback and somewhat arrogant diplomatic overtures (the aforementioned “King Cotton” mentality). Indirect intervention or even simple gun-running was ruled out pretty early on when the USA declared that any kind of British support for the Confederates would mean war. While the world’s only superpower didn’t exactly fear wars with second-rate powers like Spain or the USA, ever since her defeat in the Hundred Years’ War Britain has — unlike certain other countries ([[CoughSnarkCough *cough*FRANCE*cough*]]) — never been fond of pointless (and expensive!) wars. That’s ‘Perfidious Albion’ for you.
2nd Oct '17 3:13:53 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message
2nd Oct '17 3:12:38 PM jamespolk
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Based on a real incident. The movie ''The Great Locomotive Chase'' is a decently accurate retelling (from the Union side).
%%* ''Andersonville''

to:

** Based on InspiredBy a real incident. The movie ''The Great Locomotive Chase'' is a decently accurate retelling of said real incident (from the Union side).
%%* ''Andersonville''* ''Film/ATimeOutOfWar'': Oscar-winning short film in which three pickets, two Union and one Confederate, declare a truce to go fishing in the river.
25th Sep '17 12:46:57 PM DocJamore
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ElvesVersusDwarves: The agricultural, slaving South vs the urban, industrial North.
21st Sep '17 5:12:21 AM Ohio9
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Though it remained in the Union, the state of Maryland presented a very significant problem for the North. Maryland was a slave state and less then 2% of the population had voted for Lincoln in 1860. As such, it was rife with pro-confederate sympathy and its close proximity to the capitol made it a significant threat. Lincoln had to sneak through Baltimore in the middle of the night on his way to Washington in February of 1861 in response to a suspected murder plot. During the war, Lincoln often resorted to harsh anti-democratic measures to stamp out any threat of secession, such as suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus, shutting down several newspapers critical of the war, and jailing several prominent Maryland politicians, most notably the mayor of Baltimore. This would be him into conflict with Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney, a Maryland native. In 1865 Lincoln would die at the hands of a Maryland man, John Booth.

to:

** Though it remained in the Union, the state of Maryland presented a very significant problem for the North. Maryland was a slave state and less then 2% of the population had voted for Lincoln in 1860. As such, it was rife with pro-confederate sympathy and its close proximity to the capitol made it a significant threat. Lincoln had to sneak through Baltimore in the middle of the night on his way to Washington in February of 1861 in response to a suspected murder plot. During the war, Lincoln often resorted to harsh anti-democratic measures to stamp out any threat of secession, such as suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus, shutting down several newspapers critical of the war, and jailing several prominent Maryland politicians, most notably the mayor of Baltimore. This would be him into conflict with Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney, a Maryland native. All throughout the early years of the war, Maryland would see a series of violent clashes between Unionists and Confederate sympathizers, as well as a few with federal troops. In 1865 Lincoln would die at the hands of a Maryland man, John Booth.
21st Sep '17 4:52:52 AM Ohio9
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney, who authored the infamous ''Drett Scott'' ruling upholding the constitutionality of slavery, died on October 12, 1864, the same day his home state of Maryland abolished slavery.
21st Sep '17 4:47:53 AM Ohio9
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Though it remained in the Union, the state of Maryland presented a very significant problem for the North. Maryland was a slave state and less then 2% of the population had voted for Lincoln in 1860. As such, it was rife with pro-confederate sympathy and its close proximity to the capitol made it a significant threat. Lincoln had to sneak through Baltimore in the middle of the night on his way to Washington in February of 1861 in response to a suspected murder plot. During the war, Lincoln often resorted to harsh anti-democratic measures to stamp out any threat of secession, such as suspending the Writ of Habeas Corpus, shutting down several newspapers critical of the war, and jailing several prominent Maryland politicians, most notably the mayor of Baltimore. This would be him into conflict with Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney, a Maryland native. In 1865 Lincoln would die at the hands of a Maryland man, John Booth.
19th Sep '17 7:02:04 PM penguinist
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A few other prominent examples: On the Confederate side, General John C. Pemberton from Philadelphia, Grant's opponent during the siege of Vicksburg, and if you count border-staters, Senator and General John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky (he certainly was branded a traitor by several of his former colleagues in the Capitol during the war). On the Union side, Senator UsefulNotes/AndrewJohnson of Tennessee (Lincoln's second vice-president), Admiral David G. Farragut of Tennessee, and General John Gibbon of North Carolina and the Iron Brigade (his father was a slaveholder and three brothers and two brothers-in-law of his served in the Confederate army).
** "War Democrats", i. e. Democratic politicians and supporters who supported the Northern war effort and thus the Lincoln administration were often regarded as this by those Democrats who continued to fight the Republicans tooth and nail and were sympathetic to the Confederacy. One of the most prominent examples is Lincoln's second secretary of war, Edwin M. Stanton, who had already served in the last cabinet of Lincoln's Democratic predecessor UsefulNotes/JamesBuchanan. The most extreme example perhaps is Benjamin Butler, a South-friendly Democrat from Massachusetts who supported first the nomination of Kentuckyan James C. Breckinridge (who eventually became the Southern Democratic candidate) and then that of Jefferson Davis at the 1860 national convention. After the war began, he not only became a Union general, but also came up with the legal loophole of liberating slaves under the rationale that they were "contraband of war" and in 1862 as commanding officer in New Orleans raised some of the first black units in the Union Army. Naturally, he became one of the most reviled men not only in the South, but also among the majority of Northern Democrats.

to:

** A few other prominent examples: On the Confederate side, General John C. Pemberton from Philadelphia, Grant's opponent during the siege of Vicksburg, and if you count border-staters, Senator Senator, Vice-President, and General John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky (he certainly was branded a traitor by several of his former colleagues in the Capitol during the war).war); even though he was a Virginian, given his position one might also include ''former US President'' JohnTyler. On the Union side, Senator UsefulNotes/AndrewJohnson of Tennessee (Lincoln's second vice-president), Admiral David G. Farragut of Tennessee, and General John Gibbon of North Carolina and the Iron Brigade (his father was a slaveholder and three brothers and two brothers-in-law of his served in the Confederate army).
** "War Democrats", i. e. Democratic politicians and supporters who supported the Northern war effort and thus the Lincoln administration were often regarded as this by those Democrats who continued to fight the Republicans tooth and nail and were sympathetic to the Confederacy. One of the most prominent examples is Lincoln's second secretary of war, Edwin M. Stanton, who had already served in the last cabinet of Lincoln's Democratic predecessor UsefulNotes/JamesBuchanan. The most extreme example perhaps is Benjamin Butler, a South-friendly Democrat from Massachusetts who supported first the nomination of Kentuckyan James the aforementioned Kentuckian John C. Breckinridge (who eventually became the Southern Democratic candidate) and then that of Jefferson Davis at the 1860 national convention. After the war began, he not only became a Union general, but also came up with the legal loophole of liberating slaves under the rationale that they were "contraband of war" and in 1862 as commanding officer in New Orleans raised some of the first black units in the Union Army. Naturally, he became one of the most reviled men not only in the South, but also among the majority of Northern Democrats.



** Similarly Antietam/Sharpsburg and Perryville/Murfreesboro (Union/Confederate).

to:

** Similarly Antietam/Sharpsburg and Perryville/Murfreesboro Stones River/Murfreesboro (Union/Confederate).
This list shows the last 10 events of 832. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheAmericanCivilWar