History UsefulNotes / TheAmericanCivilWar

23rd Jun '18 11:05:10 AM costanton11
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* TheStarscream:
** Joseph Hooker went out of his way to undermine Ambrose Burnside after the Battle of Fredericksburg, organizing a letter-writing campaign among his fellow officers requesting Burnside's removal, while talking himself up as a replacement. Burnside wasn't happy about this, and basically demanded that Lincoln dismiss either him or Hooker. Unfortunately for Burnside, Lincoln chose Hooker.
*** Burnside knew that he wasn't suited to command an Army and only took the job because he knew someone less qualified and less competent would be placed in charge. As a Corps commander he was fairly solid.
** During the Confederate Army of Tennessee's Atlanta campaign, General John Bell Hood wrote numerous letters to the government in Richmond criticizing the performance of Army Commander Joseph E. Johnston, often bypassing official channels in the process. President Davis then sent General Braxton Bragg to assess the situation, and upon meeting with Bragg, Hood denounced Johnston, accusing him of cowardice and incompetence. These efforts would ultimately pay off as Davis wound up replacing Johnston with Hood, one of the most controversial acts done by Davis during the entire war.



%%* StoneWall: The partial {{Trope Namer|s}} himself.
21st Jun '18 6:43:25 PM costanton11
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** {{Jerkass}}: John Pope was universally despised while commanding the Union Army of Virginia. His own soldiers resented his endless boasting (his introductory address bragged about his service in Missouri, “where we have always seen the backs of our enemies”), the Confederates his tactics which loosely prefigured Sherman’s ‘total war’ measures. Alpheus Williams, one of Pope’s division commanders, wrote that “he had not a friend in his command from the smallest drummer boy to the highest general officer.” Even Robert E. Lee, who treated most Union commanders as {{Worthy Opponent}}s, hated Pope, called him a miscreant, and demanded that Stonewall Jackson “suppress him.”

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** {{Jerkass}}: John Pope was universally despised while commanding the Union Army of Virginia. His own soldiers resented his endless boasting (his introductory address bragged about his service in Missouri, “where we have always seen the backs of our enemies”), the Confederates his tactics which loosely prefigured Sherman’s ‘total war’ measures. Alpheus Williams, one of Pope’s division commanders, wrote that “he had not a friend in his command from the smallest drummer boy to the highest general officer.” Even Robert E. Lee, who treated most Union commanders as {{Worthy Opponent}}s, hated Pope, called him a miscreant, and demanded that Stonewall Jackson “suppress him.”
20th Jun '18 12:19:10 PM EDP
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* The Italian comic ''Lilith'', has a time-traveling protagonist, and one of her adventures was during the Civil War, where she interrupts the Lawrence Massacre by killing "Bloody Bill" Anderson (that she had been there to kill to begin with), Quantrill, his lieutenant George Todd, and many other raiders.

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* The protagonist of the Italian comic ''Lilith'', has ''Lilith'' [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong travels through time to prevent an apocalyptic future]] by destroying a time-traveling protagonist, parasyte before [[PatientZero the first bearer of any contagion line]] can infect others, killing them in the process, and one of her adventures was during the Civil War, where she interrupts the Lawrence Massacre by killing first hosts happened to be "Bloody Bill" Anderson (that Anderson, chief of a Jayhawker band allied with Quantrill's Raiders. She found him at the Lawrence massacre... And then she had been there to kill to begin with), Quantrill, his lieutenant George Todd, and many other raiders.
annihilated Quantrill's Raiders.
20th Jun '18 12:14:33 PM EDP
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to:

* The Italian comic ''Lilith'', has a time-traveling protagonist, and one of her adventures was during the Civil War, where she interrupts the Lawrence Massacre by killing "Bloody Bill" Anderson (that she had been there to kill to begin with), Quantrill, his lieutenant George Todd, and many other raiders.
20th Jun '18 12:06:23 PM EDP
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* There's two Italian ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse stories set in this period, "Donald and the Wind of the South" (an AffectionateParody of ''Literature/GoneWithTheWind'') and "Donald Duck, Hero of Duckburg" a WholeStoryFlashback where Donald tells his nephews of how his great-grandfather (after which he was apparently named) had a decisive role in liberating Duckburg from the Confederates (heavily damaging Fort Duckburg in the process. Fittingly for [[ConflictingLoyalties the family issues]] of this war, Gilles Maurice's Duck Family Tree lists the Hero of Duckburg as a cousin of the Confederate-aligned Donald Butler from "Wind of the South", the latter's mother being the sister of the former's father.

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* There's two Italian ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse stories set in this period, "Donald and the Wind of the South" (an AffectionateParody of ''Literature/GoneWithTheWind'') and "Donald Duck, Hero of Duckburg" a WholeStoryFlashback WholeEpisodeFlashback where Donald tells his nephews of how his great-grandfather (after which he was apparently named) had a decisive role in liberating Duckburg from the Confederates (heavily damaging Fort Duckburg in the process.process), for which he was decorated with the Medal of Honor. Fittingly for [[ConflictingLoyalties the family issues]] of this war, Gilles Maurice's Duck Family Tree lists the Hero of Duckburg as a cousin of the Confederate-aligned Donald Butler from "Wind of the South", the latter's mother being the sister of the former's father.
17th Jun '18 6:18:36 AM Ohio9
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Added DiffLines:

** Probably the most notable example on the Union side was General James Ledlie, who sent his division into combat at the Battle of Crater with no real battle plan, while he remained safely behind Union lines drinking liquor. More then 5,000 of his troops were casualties and he was soon dismissed from service for his dereliction of duty.
15th Jun '18 8:56:12 PM costanton11
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* TokenGoodTeammate: The bulk of the North was every bit as racist as the South, and even several abolitionist groups did ''not'' preach racial ''equality''. That being said, there were exceptions.
** Union General [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rufus_Saxton Rufus Saxton]] was a ''fanatical'' abolitionist and civil rights activist. He even helped create the 1st South Carolina Volunteers--one of the first black regiments in the Union Army--specifically because he wanted to show everybody that black soldiers were just as good as white ones. After the war, he tried to help freed slaves settle in lands confiscated from white landowners in the Sea Islands, but Andrew Johnson put a stop to it, much to Saxton's disgust.
** Congressman Thaddeus Stevens, [[JerkassWithAHeartOfGold though rude and foul-mouthed]], was vehemently opposed to slavery and spent long hours arguing for the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. He was also a fervent supporter of granting civil rights to African Americans, but he faced severe opposition from [[ObstructiveBureaucrat President Johnson]] and others who felt he was being too extreme, though it didn't stop him from [[{{Determinator}} fighting tooth and nail to crush the power of slave-holders and give all African Americans the same rights as white people.]] For over a century, he was [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade demonized]] by the public for his egalitarian views and his desire to punish the Confederacy for its actions. Nowadays, he gets the acclaim he deserves, and historians tend to acknowledge that the Confederacy deserved what he wanted to inflict upon it.
** Benjamin Wade, leader of the Radical Republicans, argued not only for abolition and civil rights for African Americans, but also for voting rights for women. Previously, he had argued viciously against the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, and basically any other bill that could potentially strengthen the position of slave states. Unfortunately for him, his radical behavior made him something of a BlackSheep amongst the Senate, to the point of making enemies with even his fellow radicals, and he eventually lost his chair in the Senate.
15th Jun '18 3:44:08 PM costanton11
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* WrongGenreSavvy: Most of the commanding officers on both sides of the War were trained in the experience the smaller scale, limited wars of the American Revolution, Indian Wars, and Mexican war. They had no experience leading anything larger than what Europeans would call a division, so when both sides had to raise, supply, coordinate, and maneuver multiple field armies numbering in the hundreds of thousands, they faced a very steep learning curve.
11th Jun '18 5:15:33 PM Jhonny
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* CivilWar: The big one every US citizen knows about. Although "civil war" might be something of a misnomer[[note]]The technical definition of civil war can be boiled down to "[[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/civil%20war a war between opposing groups of citizens in the same country]]." Multiple southern states had already committed to secession before war was officially declared and had banded together to form the Confederacy, a separate country entirely from the US, even if the legitimacy of it was disputed[[/note]]. As a result, it is also known by the technically more accurate title "The War Between the States."

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* CivilWar: The big one every US citizen knows about. Although "civil war" might be something of a misnomer[[note]]The technical definition of civil war can be boiled down to "[[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/civil%20war a war between opposing groups of citizens in the same country]]." Multiple southern states had already committed to secession before war was officially declared and had banded together to form the Confederacy, in their view a separate country entirely from the US, even if the legitimacy of it was disputed[[/note]]. As a result, it is also known by the technically more accurate title "The War Between "War of Secession" as the States."secession was ultimately unsuccessful the Northern view that secession had never "actually" happened prevailed, but historiography would likely use terms like "War of Independence" had Secession stuck.
10th Jun '18 5:33:45 PM Prometheus117
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* CivilWar: The big one every US citizen knows about. Although "civil war" might be something of a misnomer[[note]]The technical definition of civil war can be boiled down to "[[https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/civil%20war a war between opposing groups of citizens in the same country]]." Multiple southern states had already committed to secession before war was officially declared and had banded together to form the Confederacy, a separate country entirely from the US, even if the legitimacy of it was disputed[[/note]]. As a result, it is also known by the technically more accurate title "The War Between the States."



* IHaveManyNames: Guess which war?

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* IHaveManyNames: Guess which war?war? The two most enduring and "official" names are "The America Civil War" and "The War Between the States", but plenty of other names have cropped up over the years, such as "The Second American Revolution", "The War of Northern/Yankee Aggression", "The War of Southern Aggression", "War of Separation/Secession"...
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheAmericanCivilWar