History UsefulNotes / TheAmericanCivilWar

23rd Aug '16 8:36:58 PM Hewhoarisesinmight
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** Most of Robert E. Lee's early victories could be chalked up to repeated use of Batman Gambits. Lee was able to make highly risky maneuvers and gain the upper hand from a position of weakness because he could predict what the various Union commanders’ behavior would be (Pope would hastily pursue any flanking attempt, [=McClellan=] would be overly cautious, etc.). Meade succeeded at Gettysburg partly because he didn’t do what Lee predicted and hoped for, which was to rush in to attack Lee’s army to drive it out of Northern territory. Instead, he found a good defensive position and stuck with it.

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** Most of Robert E. Lee's early victories could be chalked up to repeated use of Batman Gambits. Lee was able to make highly risky maneuvers and gain the upper hand from a position of weakness because he could predict what the various Union commanders’ behavior would be (Pope would hastily pursue any flanking attempt, [=McClellan=] would be overly cautious, etc.). Meade succeeded at Gettysburg partly because he didn’t do what Lee predicted and hoped for, which was to rush in to attack Lee’s army to drive it out of Northern territory. Instead, he found a good defensive position and stuck with it.



** Almost every other attempted bayonet charge failed, often with horrendous casualties, because a bayonet charge only works when the other side is either out of ammunition or too close to effectively return fire.
22nd Aug '16 6:01:33 PM kouta
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* BigBookOfWar: ''Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics for the Exercise and Manoeuvres of Troops When Acting as Light Infantry or Riflemen'' (1855) by William J. Hardee (a.k.a ''Hardee's Tactics''), the best-known drill manual for both sides of the Civil War.

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* BigBookOfWar: ''Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics for the Exercise and Manoeuvres of Troops When Acting as Light Infantry or Riflemen'' (1855) by William J. Hardee (a.k.a ''Hardee's Tactics''), the best-known most widely used drill manual for by both sides of the Civil War.


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** Back then literacy was not universal. The Union and Confederate armies were quite literate and had a lot of private soldiers who had enough basic literacy to read the Bible and write letters home. Officers were expected to be much more educated.
20th Aug '16 10:39:51 PM BrainSewage
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* CloudCuckooLander: Confederate General Richard S. Ewell. Historian Larry Tagg describes him thus: " He had a habit of muttering odd remarks in the middle of normal conversation...He could be spectacularly, blisteringly profane. He was so nervous and fidgety he could not sleep in a normal position, and spent nights curled around a camp stool. He had convinced himself that he had some mysterious internal "disease," and so subsisted almost entirely on frumenty, a dish of hulled wheat boiled in milk and sweetened with sugar. A 'compound of anomalies' was how one friend summed him up."

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* CloudCuckooLander: Confederate General Richard S. Ewell. Historian Larry Tagg describes him thus: thus:
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" He had a habit of muttering odd remarks in the middle of normal conversation...He could be spectacularly, blisteringly profane. He was so nervous and fidgety he could not sleep in a normal position, and spent nights curled around a camp stool. He had convinced himself that he had some mysterious internal "disease," and so subsisted almost entirely on frumenty, a dish of hulled wheat boiled in milk and sweetened with sugar. A 'compound of anomalies' was how one friend summed him up."
20th Aug '16 10:38:56 PM BrainSewage
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* CloudCuckooLander: Confederate General Richard S. Ewell. Historian Larry Tagg describes him thus: " He had a habit of muttering odd remarks in the middle of normal conversation...He could be spectacularly, blisteringly profane. He was so nervous and fidgety he could not sleep in a normal position, and spent nights curled around a camp stool. He had convinced himself that he had some mysterious internal "disease," and so subsisted almost entirely on frumenty, a dish of hulled wheat boiled in milk and sweetened with sugar. A 'compound of anomalies' was how one friend summed him up."



* OnlySaneMan: Sherman was the only major officer at the beginning of the war [[CassandraTruth to realize the fight would be long and bloody]], and when he went public with that sentiment he was deemed mad. It didn’t help that he suffered a HeroicBSOD early on and had to take some time off.

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* OnlySaneMan: Sherman was the only major officer at the beginning of the war [[CassandraTruth to realize the fight would be long and bloody]], and when he went public with that sentiment he was deemed mad. It didn’t didn’t help that he suffered a HeroicBSOD early on and had to take some time off.
4th Aug '16 3:31:19 PM Narsil
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* Government soldiers and politicians are thuggish and venal. If motivation is brought up, they are likely to wonder why they are in the army, and why there is even a war going on. The Black soldiers are the exception, since they know ''exactly'' what they are fighting for, and — conscious of the good example they must set — act with the utmost discipline and valor.

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* Government Union soldiers and politicians are thuggish and venal. If motivation is brought up, they are likely to wonder why they are in the army, and why there is even a war going on. The Black soldiers are the exception, since they know ''exactly'' what they are fighting for, and — conscious of the good example they must set — act with the utmost discipline and valor.



** The rebels planned to raise regiments of African slaves; the war ended before they actually did it. One Confederate commented on the irony: “If they do not fight well, we are lost. If they do, our country is built on a lie.”
** There were also ethnic-European (chiefly Irish) regiments from every Confederate state fighting for the United States. Ironically, ‘hillbilly’ stereotypes in movies and TV (including Granny Clampett from ''Series/TheBeverlyHillbillies'') are often portrayed as Confederate diehards. In reality, Appalachia was strongly pro-government during the Civil War ([[RebelliousRebel West Virginia so much so that they formed their own state]]) and many regions suffered retaliation from the Confederacy.
*** The reason Appalachia (especially West Virginia) was so strongly pro-Union was that the mountainous topography separated them from the government seats, prevented them from using plantations as means of income, and meant most trade and transportation came from Northern states such as Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Maryland. Therefore, those areas didn’t have as strong a loyalty to the state’s governments when they seceded. The economic and social differences in West Virginia were so great that they had pushed to form their own state as early as 1820; Virginia’s secession just gave them an opportune vacant seat to take advantage of.
*** There were also religious differences at work (Presbyterian and Baptist backwaters vs. Episcopalian Tidewater), class differences (wealthy plantation families vs. impoverished, disenfranchised mountain folk), even ethnic differences (Scots-Irish hillbillies vs. Anglo plantation aristocrats) all contributing to the animosity. A century and a half later the differences have not all been forgotten, either.
31st Jul '16 7:04:46 PM Fireblood
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* ''Film/FreeStateOfJones'': The film's starting point is the Battle of Corinth in 1862 when it was becoming clear the Confederacy's chances of victory were low. It extends into the post-war Reconstruction period as well.
30th Jul '16 10:09:03 AM dizzletron
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Current estimates are that about 2% of the country’s population was killed, a scale of suffering unknown to the Anglosphere since the UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar (which killed 7%) but which put the relative and absolute suffering quite comfortably below that of the Qing Empire’s Taiping Rebellion (which killed 5%). At least 620,000 soldiers died in the American Civil War[[note]]Some estimates have put it around 750,000 and even as high as 850,000, but we like to be cautious.[[/note]] — more armed forces dead than in every other war the U.S. has fought ''put together'' … and does not include civilian deaths, which came out to another 41,000, for a total of over 660,000 dead of a combined population around 34 million.[[note]]Over half, possibly as much as two-thirds, were actually killed by disease and post-injury infection rather than in battle — in particular, treatments for gangrene were not developed until shortly ''after'' the war.[[/note]] More U.S. citizens died in 1864 than during [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI The Hundred Days’ Offensive]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII “Operation Overlord”]], or any of the anti-partisan operations of ‘UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror.’ The dead for the three-day Battle of UsefulNotes/{{Gettysburg}} almost equal the Americans killed in the ''entire'' [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar Vietnam War]]. The destruction and loss of life were immense, even ‘medieval’;[[note]]Informed readers can put away the tissues; we only use the word in the (totally inaccurate, as well you know) HollywoodHistory sense of medieval conflict, i.e. large-scale and barbaric.[[/note]] it was like something out of Homer, the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, or contemporary China.

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Current estimates are that about 2% of the country’s population was killed, a scale of suffering unknown to the Anglosphere since the UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar (which killed 7%) but which put the relative and absolute suffering quite comfortably below that of the Qing Empire’s Taiping Rebellion (which killed 5%). At least 620,000 soldiers died in the American Civil War[[note]]Some estimates have put it around 750,000 and even as high as 850,000, but we like to be cautious.[[/note]] — more armed forces dead than in every other war the U.S. has fought ''put together'' … and does not include civilian deaths, which came out to another 41,000, for a total of over 660,000 dead of a combined population around 34 million.[[note]]Over half, possibly as much as two-thirds, were actually killed by disease and post-injury infection rather than in battle — in particular, treatments for gangrene were not developed until shortly ''after'' the war.[[/note]] More U.S. citizens died in 1864 than during [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI The Hundred Days’ Offensive]], [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII “Operation Overlord”]], or any of the anti-partisan operations of ‘UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror.’ The dead for the three-day Battle of UsefulNotes/{{Gettysburg}} almost equal the Americans killed in the ''entire'' [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar Vietnam War]]. The destruction and loss of life were immense, even ‘medieval’;[[note]]Informed readers can put away the tissues; we only use the word in the (totally inaccurate, as well you know) HollywoodHistory sense of medieval conflict, i.e. large-scale and barbaric.[[/note]] it was like something out of Homer, the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, or contemporary China.
27th Jul '16 11:45:01 PM kouta
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Added DiffLines:

*** The crew of that ship only gave up the fight when they had reliable newspaper reports of the Confederate defeat and then surrendered in a British port after being chased half way around the world by the American Navy. They were quite justifiably afraid that the US would have all of them hung as pirates.
27th Jul '16 10:52:40 PM kouta
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Added DiffLines:

** Burnside knew that he wasn't suited to command an Army and only took the job because he knew someone less qualified and less competent would be placed in charge. As a Corps commander he was fairly solid.
27th Jul '16 9:23:42 PM kouta
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** There's also the less well known Siege of Port Hudson, Louisana. It started four days after the Siege of Vicksburg and ended on July 9, 1863 (five days after Vicksburg ended). It's the longest seige in US military history, by one day. After Franklin Gardner surrendered to Nathaniel Banks the Union controlled the entire Mississippi River and the Confederacy was effectively cut in two.

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** There's also the less well known Siege of Port Hudson, Louisana.Louisiana. It started four days after the Siege of Vicksburg and ended on July 9, 1863 (five days after Vicksburg ended). It's the longest seige siege in US military history, by one day. After Franklin Gardner surrendered to Nathaniel Banks the Union controlled the entire Mississippi River and the Confederacy was effectively cut in two.
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