History UsefulNotes / TheAmericanCivilWar

6th Aug '17 1:41:20 PM GarrulousTiger
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--> '''Sherman:''' We cannot change the hearts of these people of the South, but we can make war so terrible and make them so sick of war that generations will pass away before they again appeal to it.
3rd Aug '17 9:57:09 PM Ohio9
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* TooDumbToLive: The Confederacy thought [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotton_diplomacy pissing off the British]] was the best way to make them sympathetic to their cause.

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* TooDumbToLive: TooDumbToLive:
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The Confederacy thought [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotton_diplomacy pissing off the British]] was the best way to make them sympathetic to their cause.cause.
** At the Battle of Bull run, many civilians came out to watch the fighting as if it was a sporting event. This resulted in several prominent citizens being captured by the Confederates after the Union Army was routed, most notably U. S. Congressman Alfred Ely. Needless to say, after this event the practice of civilians coming out to watch Civil War battles was largely discontinued.
27th Jul '17 9:52:28 AM Ohio9
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* DeadpanSnarker: Lincoln! After he appointed Joe Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac, he learned that Hooker had said the country needed a dictator. Lincoln responded by writing Hooker a letter in which he said, “What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.” He also spurred the overly-cautious General [=McClellan=] by telling him, “If you are not using the army, I would like to borrow it for a while.”

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* DeadpanSnarker: DeadpanSnarker:
**
Lincoln! After he appointed Joe Hooker to command of the Army of the Potomac, he learned that Hooker had said the country needed a dictator. Lincoln responded by writing Hooker a letter in which he said, “What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.” He also spurred the overly-cautious General [=McClellan=] by telling him, “If you are not using the army, I would like to borrow it for a while.”
25th Jul '17 3:02:15 PM Ohio9
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** The Battle of Cold Harbor: Lee's last great victory of the war and Grant's most brutal defeat. In a series of direct assaults against well fortified positions, the Union army took 12,738 casualties while the South lost only 5,287. In his 1885 memoirs, Grant said "I have always regretted that the last assault at Cold Harbor was ever made...No advantage whatever was gained to compensate for the heavy loss we sustained."
25th Jul '17 2:03:35 AM Ohio9
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** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. It exempted the Confederate state of Tennessee, which by this time was mostly controlled by the Union and under a recognized Union government. Further exemptions included the 48 Virginia counties at the time in the process of forming the state of West Virginia, as well as some territory in Louisiana under Union control, including the city of New Orleans. In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that the Proclamation was not a law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the authority to apply it to states still loyal to the Union or places no longer in rebellion due to Union occupation.

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** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. It exempted the Confederate state of Tennessee, which by this time was mostly controlled by the Union and under a recognized Union government. Further exemptions included the 48 Virginia counties at the time in the process of forming the state of West Virginia, as well as some territory in Louisiana under Union control, including the city of New Orleans. Secretary of State William Seward commented, "We show our sympathy with slavery by emancipating slaves where we cannot reach them and holding them in bondage where we can set them free." In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that the Proclamation was not a law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the authority to apply it to states still loyal to the Union or places no longer in rebellion due to Union occupation.
25th Jul '17 1:58:39 AM Ohio9
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** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. It also exempted the Confederate state of Tennessee, which by this time was mostly controlled by the Union and under a recognized Union government. In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that it was not a law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the authority to apply it to states still loyal to the Union.

to:

** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. It also exempted the Confederate state of Tennessee, which by this time was mostly controlled by the Union and under a recognized Union government. government. Further exemptions included the 48 Virginia counties at the time in the process of forming the state of West Virginia, as well as some territory in Louisiana under Union control, including the city of New Orleans. In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that it the Proclamation was not a law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the authority to apply it to states still loyal to the Union.Union or places no longer in rebellion due to Union occupation.
25th Jul '17 1:51:27 AM Ohio9
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** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that it was not a law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the authority to apply it to states still loyal to the Union.

to:

** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. It also exempted the Confederate state of Tennessee, which by this time was mostly controlled by the Union and under a recognized Union government. In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that it was not a law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the authority to apply it to states still loyal to the Union.
25th Jul '17 1:36:49 AM Ohio9
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** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. So it essentially was only in effect in a place where the government had no ability to enforce it.

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** Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 declared all slaves in the Confederate states free, but did not effect the status of slaves in the Union states at all. So In fairness to Lincoln, this could be justified on grounds that it essentially was only in effect in not a place where law passed by congress or a constitutional amendment, but an executive order issued under his war powers to suppress rebellions. As such, it could be argued he did not have the government had no ability authority to enforce it.apply it to states still loyal to the Union.
24th Jul '17 11:33:30 PM Ohio9
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* ColdSniper: There were several feats of notable marksmanship in the war, including the use of rifles fitted with early sniping scopes. So much so that the term ‘sharpshooter’ is often misattributed to the accurate Sharps rifle, which saw use in the war as a marksman’s rifle.[[note]]The earliest recorded use of the word is from 1802.[[/note]] Two entire Union regiments consisted of sharpshooters.

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* ColdSniper: There were several feats of notable marksmanship in the war, including the use of rifles fitted with early sniping scopes. So much so that the term ‘sharpshooter’ is often misattributed to the accurate Sharps rifle, which saw use in the war as a marksman’s rifle.[[note]]The earliest recorded use of the word is from 1802.[[/note]] Two entire Union regiments consisted of sharpshooters. The heavy use of sharpshooters and improved rifle technology would be a major factor in the high officer casualty rates on both sides


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* CurbStompBattle
** The Battle of Fredricksburg: One of the Union's most notorious defeats. Ambrose Burnside sent wave after wave of units against Robert Lee's well fortified army in direct frontal assaults that achieved nothing. By the time it was over, the North lost 12,653 casualties while the South lost only 4,201 (both sides also lost two generals each). After the battle, Pennsylvania governor Andrew Curtin took a tour of the field and then reported to Lincoln "It wasn't a battle, it was butchery". The ''Cincinnati Commercial'' stated "It can hardly be in human nature for men to show more valor or generals to manifest less judgment, than were perceptible on our side that day."
** The Second Battle of Fort Wagner: Despite a huge numerical advantage (5,000 troops and 6 warships vs 1,800 defenders in the fort), the Union's second attempt to take Fort Wagner near Charlston Harbor in 1863 was one of the most disastrous defeats of the war. The Union Army was repulsed with massive losses, taking 1,515 casualties and inflicting only 174. After this, the Union gave up trying to take the fort by direct assault, and eventually forced the Confederates to abandon it after a long siege.
** The Battle of Franklin: One of the South's most devastating losses. After a running series of battles in a failed attempt to get between John Schofield's 27,000 man force and George Thomas' Army of the Cumberland, Confederate General John Bell Hood found his Army of Tennessee facing Schofield's force that had entrenched itself around the town of Franklin. In a final desperate attempt to prevent Schofield from linking up with Thomas, Hood attempted to destroy Schofield's force through direct assault. The ensuing battle was an absolute massacre, as the Union forces were well fortified, roughly even in number to the attackers, and some of them were armed with deadly repeating rifles. By the end of the battle, the Confederate attackers suffered 6,252 casualties while inflicting only 2,326 on the Union. The leadership of the Army of Tennessee was devastated as well, as the casualties included 6 dead generals, 7 wounded generals, and 1 taken prisoner. Soon after the battle, Schofield's force completed the linkup with Thomas and effectively destroyed what remained of the Army of Tennessee at the Battle of Nashville, inflicting another 6,000 casualties with a loss of roughly 3,000.
24th Jul '17 11:02:39 PM Ohio9
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* ZergRush: Oh-so-regularly done, Oh-so-horribly ineffective.

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* ZergRush: Oh-so-regularly done, Oh-so-horribly ineffective. Some more infamous examples include the Battle of Fredricksburg (Union), the second battle of Fort Wagner (Union), Battle of Cold Harbor (Union), Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg (Confederate) and the Battle of Franklin (Confederate)
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