History UsefulNotes / TheAmericanCivilWar

18th Feb '17 7:12:18 AM Ohio9
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* ReportsOfMyDeathWereGreatlyExaggerated: During the 1864 Siege of Petersburg, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlin, famous for leading a heroic stand at Gettysburg, was severely wounded when a bullet passed through both hips and tore through his groin. Doctors predicted his wound was fatal, and he was "posthumously" promoted to Major General. Newspapers in his home state of Maine ran obituaries about his supposed death. The doctor's diagnosis turned out to be accurate, but the predicted timing was not. Chamberlin did die from his wound, but not for another 50 years, in 1914. He was the last recorded civil war veteran to die from battle wounds.

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* ReportsOfMyDeathWereGreatlyExaggerated: During the 1864 Siege of Petersburg, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlin, famous for leading a heroic stand at Gettysburg, was severely wounded when a bullet passed through both hips and tore through his groin. Doctors predicted his wound was fatal, and he was "posthumously" promoted to Major Brigadier General. Newspapers in his home state of Maine ran obituaries about his supposed death. The doctor's diagnosis turned out to be accurate, but the predicted timing was not. Chamberlin did die from his wound, but not for another 50 years, in 1914. He was the last recorded civil war veteran to die from battle wounds.
18th Feb '17 6:59:28 AM Ohio9
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* ReportsOfMyDeathWereGreatlyExaggerated: During the 1864 Battle of Petersburg, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlin, famous for leading a heroic stand at Gettysburg, was severely wounded when a bullet passed through both hips and tore through his groin. Doctors predicted his wound was fatal, and he was "posthumously" promoted to Major General. Newspapers in his home state of Main ran obituaries about his supposed death. The doctor's diagnosis turned out to be accurate, but the predicted timing was not. Chamberlin did die from his wound, but not for another 50 years, in 1914. He was the last recorded civil war veteran to die from battle wounds.

to:

* ReportsOfMyDeathWereGreatlyExaggerated: During the 1864 Battle Siege of Petersburg, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlin, famous for leading a heroic stand at Gettysburg, was severely wounded when a bullet passed through both hips and tore through his groin. Doctors predicted his wound was fatal, and he was "posthumously" promoted to Major General. Newspapers in his home state of Main Maine ran obituaries about his supposed death. The doctor's diagnosis turned out to be accurate, but the predicted timing was not. Chamberlin did die from his wound, but not for another 50 years, in 1914. He was the last recorded civil war veteran to die from battle wounds.
18th Feb '17 6:56:35 AM Ohio9
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* ReportsOfMyDeathWereGreatlyExaggerated: During the 1864 Battle of Petersburg, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlin, famous for leading a heroic stand at Gettysburg, was severely wounded when a bullet passed through both hips and tore through his groin. Doctors predicted his wound was fatal, and he was "posthumously" promoted to Major General. Newspapers in his home state of Main ran obituaries about his supposed death. The doctor's diagnosis turned out to be accurate, but the predicted timing was not. Chamberlin did die from his wound, but not for another 50 years, in 1914. He was the last recorded civil war veteran to die from battle wounds.
12th Feb '17 6:17:55 PM Ohio9
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** J.E.B. Stuart was mortally wounded personally leading Confederate cavalry at the 1864 Battle of Yellow Tavern, ironically during a Union retreat. As his lines started to waver against a Union charge, Stuart personally rode into the thick of his battle, firing pistol into the Federal ranks and attempting to rally his men. Confederate re-enforcements soon compelled the Union forces to retreat, but during this event, dismounted Union private John Huff turned and shot Stuart with a single shot from his revolver before rejoining the ranks in retreat. Stuart was taken to Richmond and died the following day.

to:

** J.E.B. Stuart was mortally wounded personally leading Confederate cavalry at the 1864 Battle of Yellow Tavern, ironically during a Union retreat. As his lines started to waver against a Union charge, Stuart personally rode into the thick of his battle, firing pistol into the Federal ranks and attempting to rally his men. Confederate re-enforcements soon compelled the Union forces to retreat, but during this event, dismounted Union private John Huff turned and shot Stuart with a single shot from his revolver before rejoining the ranks in retreat. Stuart was taken to Richmond and died the following day. Huff would be killed in action 5 weeks later at the Battle of Haw's shop.
12th Feb '17 9:27:53 AM Ohio9
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** "I am going fast now; I am resigned; God's will be done." -- Confederate General J.E.B Stuart on his deathbed after being mortally wounded at the Battle of Yellow Tavern in May of 1864.
** "The flag! The flag! Oh, the flag!" -- Union General Gouverneur K. Warren on his deathbed in 1882.
12th Feb '17 9:10:13 AM Ohio9
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** J.E.B. Stuart was mortally wounded personally leading Confederate cavalry at the Battle of Yellow Tavern.

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** J.E.B. Stuart was mortally wounded personally leading Confederate cavalry at the 1864 Battle of Yellow Tavern.Tavern, ironically during a Union retreat. As his lines started to waver against a Union charge, Stuart personally rode into the thick of his battle, firing pistol into the Federal ranks and attempting to rally his men. Confederate re-enforcements soon compelled the Union forces to retreat, but during this event, dismounted Union private John Huff turned and shot Stuart with a single shot from his revolver before rejoining the ranks in retreat. Stuart was taken to Richmond and died the following day.
12th Feb '17 7:59:53 AM SteveMB
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* LaserGuidedKarma: In 1861, South Carolina led the southern states into secession, forming the Confederate States of America, and started the war with the attack on Fort Sumter. Four years later (in 1865), General Sherman’s army invaded South Carolina and [[DisproportionateRetribution burned the state capital, Columbia, to the ground]].

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* LaserGuidedKarma: LaserGuidedKarma:
**
In 1861, South Carolina led the southern states into secession, forming the Confederate States of America, and started the war with the attack on Fort Sumter. Four years later (in 1865), General Sherman’s army invaded South Carolina and [[DisproportionateRetribution burned the state capital, Columbia, to the ground]].ground]].
** Lincoln invoked the concept in his Second Inaugural Address:
--->Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman's two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said "the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether."
11th Feb '17 4:56:59 PM Xtifr
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* The Civil War has been a fertile ground for tabletop wargames. One of the very first commercial tabletop wargames was Avalon Hill's ''Gettysburg''. Hundreds have followed in it's wake.

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* The Civil War has been a fertile ground for tabletop wargames. One of the very first commercial tabletop wargames was Avalon Hill's Creator/AvalonHill's ''Gettysburg''. Hundreds have followed in it's wake.
4th Feb '17 6:38:24 AM ArtoriusRex
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This was the second [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution civil war in just a century]] to tear North America’s families, towns, and governments apart. Nationalism had truly developed since then and where before people had largely been torn between ideals, people were now divided just as much if not more by State and local loyalties, for ‘National’ nationalism (i.e. a federal-government-level "USA" national identity) had yet to supersede these. It was for their States and for Freedom that, as in the English Civil War, about 2–5% of the total population of the United States died and far more were left impoverished, displaced, maimed and traumatized. Again as in the Revolution, the victory of the government was almost guaranteed; but no world powers aided the unsympathetic cause of these rebels, who were left to face the far superior manpower, finance, and industry of the central government on their own. The result was almost inevitable; the whole affair appeared a very close-run thing, especially given the rebels’ early successes, but the U.S. Army learnt (however slowly) from its mistakes and made good on its material advantage, grinding the rebels down and eventually crushing them after four years of the bloodiest fighting North America has ever seen. The rebels — the Confederacy — still engender sympathy in certain states, generally those that rebelled and in some (but not all) border states (Delaware and most of Maryland, for instance, [[OldShame would prefer that you even forget that they were ever seen as Southern]],[[note]]Delaware in particular hates being reminded of this, and Delawareans (all five of them) like to distract people from this historical fact by stressing that when the NAACP ran its full-court press against racial segregation in schools in the series of cases that eventually led to ''Brown v. Board of Education'', the Delaware courts were the only state courts to agree that the practice was unconstitutional.[[/note]] while Kentuckians are perfectly comfortable as firm Southerners). Such people often prefer to think that the rebels fought for ‘Freedom from the Tyranny of Central Government’ more than ‘The Freedom to Own and Use People as They Saw Fit.’ This was the American Civil War, ''The War of the Rebellion'', the ''War Between the States'', the ''War of Southern Treason'', the ''War of Northern Aggression'',[[note]]Which is a strange name for the war considering that the Confederates ''fired the first shot'' in a blatantly aggressive move on Fort Sumter. But then, [[https://deadconfederates.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/googletrendswarofnorthernagression.png it is a comparatively new name, having only gained popularity since the 1950s]] - coincidentally when the CivilRightsMovement started making very successful traction. Make of that what you will.[[/note]] ''Lincoln’s War'', the ''Slaveholders’ Revolt'', ''The War for Southern Independence'' and the ''Late Unpleasantness'' — though rarely, if ever, referred to by any of those names while the war itself was being fought.[[note]]At the outset some Secessionists referred to their cause as the Second American Revolution, a term that would later be used by others for the entire era of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Outside the United States, the preferred term is usually American Civil War or, e. g. in France and Germany, (American) War of Secession.[[/note]] It was an era which pitted brother against brother, and where the armies of the Blue and the Gray shot cannons and Minié Balls at each other across smoke-filled battlefields.

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This was the second [[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution civil war in just a century]] to tear North America’s families, towns, and governments apart. Nationalism had truly developed since then and where before people had largely been torn between ideals, people were now divided just as much if not more by State and local loyalties, for ‘National’ nationalism (i.e. a federal-government-level "USA" national identity) had yet to supersede these. It was for their States and for Freedom that, as in the English Civil War, about 2–5% of the total population of the United States died and far more were left impoverished, displaced, maimed and traumatized. Again as in the Revolution, the victory of the government was almost guaranteed; but no world powers aided the unsympathetic cause of these rebels, who were left to face the far superior manpower, finance, and industry of the central government on their own. The result was almost inevitable; inevitable. While the whole affair appeared ''appeared'' a very close-run thing, especially given the rebels’ early successes, but the U.S. Army learnt learned (however slowly) from its mistakes and made good on its material advantage, grinding the rebels down and eventually crushing them after four years of the bloodiest fighting North America has ever seen. The rebels — the Confederacy — still engender sympathy in certain states, generally those that rebelled and in some (but not all) border states (Delaware and most of Maryland, for instance, [[OldShame would prefer that you even forget that they were ever seen as Southern]],[[note]]Delaware in particular hates being reminded of this, and Delawareans (all five of them) like to distract people from this historical fact by stressing that when the NAACP ran its full-court press against racial segregation in schools in the series of cases that eventually led to ''Brown v. Board of Education'', the Delaware courts were the only state courts to agree that the practice was unconstitutional.[[/note]] while Kentuckians are perfectly comfortable as firm Southerners). Such people often prefer to think that the rebels fought for ‘Freedom from the Tyranny of Central Government’ more than ‘The Freedom to Own and Use People as They Saw Fit.’ This was the American Civil War, ''The War of the Rebellion'', the ''War Between the States'', the ''War of Southern Treason'', the ''War of Northern Aggression'',[[note]]Which is a strange name for the war considering that the Confederates ''fired the first shot'' in a blatantly aggressive move on Fort Sumter. But then, [[https://deadconfederates.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/googletrendswarofnorthernagression.png it is a comparatively new name, having only gained popularity since the 1950s]] - coincidentally when the CivilRightsMovement started making very successful traction. Make of that what you will.[[/note]] ''Lincoln’s War'', the ''Slaveholders’ Revolt'', ''The War for Southern Independence'' and the ''Late Unpleasantness'' — though rarely, if ever, referred to by any of those names while the war itself was being fought.[[note]]At the outset some Secessionists referred to their cause as the Second American Revolution, a term that would later be used by others for the entire era of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Outside the United States, the preferred term is usually American Civil War or, e. g. in France and Germany, (American) War of Secession.[[/note]] It was an era which pitted brother against brother, and where the armies of the Blue and the Gray shot cannons and Minié Balls at each other across smoke-filled battlefields.
30th Jan '17 9:34:19 AM Ohio9
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