History UsefulNotes / SouthKoreansWithMarines

20th Jan '17 10:57:19 PM karstovich2
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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.

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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, of (''[[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea ahem]]''), has no nukes, and (being a geographically small country with precisely one military enemy worth talking about) its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.
8th Jan '17 12:18:01 PM Morgenthaler
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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.

to:

The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during WorldWar2 UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.
8th Nov '16 6:16:25 PM Morgenthaler
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The TropeNamer, the ROKMAR, although theoretically under the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, operates as a distinct arm of the military of South Korea. It has a {{Badass}} reputation; during the [[UsefulNotes/KoreanWar Korean]] and [[UsefulNotes/VietnamWar Vietnam]] Wars, they were so successful in fishing out North Korean and Vietcong guerrillas that they earned the nickname "Ghost-Catching Marines." One example in Korea is that a squad of ROK Marines had almost decimated an entire North Korean ''battalion''. In Vietnam, the Vietcong and the NVA dreaded fighting Korean Marines; one battle involved 300 South Koreans successfully fending off an entire North Vietnamese brigade with minimal casualties. They were famous for their special style of combat, and ROK commandos sometimes killed Vietcong with karate chops in close-up fights. By comparison, American soldiers in Vietnam had a lower kill ratio than the Koreans, serving only to further their reputation as badasses around the world.

to:

The TropeNamer, the ROKMAR, although theoretically under the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, operates as a distinct arm of the military of South Korea. It has a {{Badass}} badass reputation; during the [[UsefulNotes/KoreanWar Korean]] and [[UsefulNotes/VietnamWar Vietnam]] Wars, they were so successful in fishing out North Korean and Vietcong guerrillas that they earned the nickname "Ghost-Catching Marines." One example in Korea is that a squad of ROK Marines had almost decimated an entire North Korean ''battalion''. In Vietnam, the Vietcong and the NVA dreaded fighting Korean Marines; one battle involved 300 South Koreans successfully fending off an entire North Vietnamese brigade with minimal casualties. They were famous for their special style of combat, and ROK commandos sometimes killed Vietcong with karate chops in close-up fights. By comparison, American soldiers in Vietnam had a lower kill ratio than the Koreans, serving only to further their reputation as badasses around the world.
20th Oct '16 9:52:23 AM Morgenthaler
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<<|ForcesWithFirepower|>>
<<|UsefulNotes/SouthKorea|>>

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<<|ForcesWithFirepower|>>
<<|UsefulNotes/SouthKorea|>>
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20th Oct '16 9:49:37 AM Morgenthaler
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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.

to:

The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[KatanasOfTheRisingSun [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.
20th Jul '16 8:36:12 PM Beatlemania
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The CFC arrangement has caused resentment in South Koreans because the officer who would lead their armies to war answers to the Pentagon, not Seoul. This put the United States in a unpopular position when it was perceived to be supporting South Korea's [[TheSpyMaster intelligence chief]] and strongman, Lt General Chun Doo-hwan, during the 1980 crackdown at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwangju_massacre Gwangju]].

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The CFC arrangement has caused resentment in South Koreans because the officer who would lead their armies to war answers to the Pentagon, not Seoul.UsefulNotes/{{Seoul}}. This put the United States in a unpopular position when it was perceived to be supporting South Korea's [[TheSpyMaster intelligence chief]] and strongman, Lt General Chun Doo-hwan, during the 1980 crackdown at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwangju_massacre Gwangju]].
23rd Nov '15 11:30:25 PM jormis29
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* South Korean soldiers appear in the Seoul mission in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory''. Notably, they are just as hostile to Sam as North Korean soldiers are, if only because a guy in a full black suit with guns and tools strapped all over sneaking around an active warzone would look pretty suspicious to anyone.

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* South Korean soldiers appear in the Seoul mission in ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory''.''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory''. Notably, they are just as hostile to Sam as North Korean soldiers are, if only because a guy in a full black suit with guns and tools strapped all over sneaking around an active warzone would look pretty suspicious to anyone.
19th Aug '15 12:59:28 AM SL
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In the event of war on the Korean Peninsula (most likely the Korean War unpausing), the defense of South Korea would be coordinated from CFC, meaning that all South Korean forces will be commanded by an American officer. UNC still exists as an entity devoid of muscle but it could be [[GondorCallsForAid reactivated]] in the event other countries wish to commit their forces to help in the defense of South Korea.

The CFC arrangement has caused resentment in South Koreans because foreign officer would be commanding their military. This put the United States in a unpopular position when it was perceived to be supporting South Korea's [[TheSpyMaster intelligence chief]] and strongman, Lt General Chun Doo-hwan, during the 1980 crackdown at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwangju_massacre Gwangju]].

to:

In the event of war on the Korean Peninsula (most likely the Korean War unpausing), the defense of South Korea would be coordinated from CFC, meaning that all South Korean forces will be commanded by an American officer. UNC still exists to this day but as an entity devoid of muscle but it could be [[GondorCallsForAid reactivated]] in the event other countries wish to commit their forces to help in the defense of South Korea.Korea. Components of UNC remain functional such as UNC Rear based at Yokota airbase, Japan. It is through the UNC where member countries send troops to train with South Korean forces.

The CFC arrangement has caused resentment in South Koreans because foreign the officer who would be commanding lead their military.armies to war answers to the Pentagon, not Seoul. This put the United States in a unpopular position when it was perceived to be supporting South Korea's [[TheSpyMaster intelligence chief]] and strongman, Lt General Chun Doo-hwan, during the 1980 crackdown at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwangju_massacre Gwangju]].



There has been recent debate within South Korea about whether total OPCON in time of war should be transferred back to the ROK entirely. The government of Park Geun-hye postponed a decision on the matter which was due at the end of 2014. The debate is contentious, but it is substantially less acrimonious than it has been in past years, in large part because of the increasingly positive opinion the Korean public has for the US (as recently as the early 2000s, (South) Korean public opinion consistently hovered in the 60-70% ''anti''-US range, while at present that's almost reversed and South Koreans are among the most pro-American people in East Asia, although not ''quite'' so much as the Filipinos and--oddly--the Vietnamese).

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There has been recent debate within South Korea about Korea, whether it should retain total OPCON in time the event of war should be transferred back to on the ROK entirely.Korean Peninsular, thus ending the need for CFC. The government of Park Geun-hye postponed a decision on the matter which was due at the end of 2014. The debate is contentious, but it is substantially less acrimonious than it has been in past years, in large part because of the increasingly positive opinion the Korean public has for the US (as recently as the early 2000s, (South) Korean public opinion consistently hovered in the 60-70% ''anti''-US range, while at present that's almost reversed and South Koreans are among the most pro-American people in East Asia, although not ''quite'' so much as the Filipinos and--oddly--the Vietnamese).
19th Jul '15 9:59:16 PM karstovich2
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There has been recent debate within South Korea about whether total OPCON in time of war should be transferred back to the ROK entirely. The government of Park Geun-hye postponed a decision on the matter which was due at the end of 2014. The debate is contentious, but it is substantially less acrimonious than it has been in past years, in large part because of the increasingly positive opinion the Korean public has for the US (as recently as the early 2000s, (South) Korean public opinion consistently hovered in the 60-70% ''anti''-US range, while at present that's reversed).

to:

There has been recent debate within South Korea about whether total OPCON in time of war should be transferred back to the ROK entirely. The government of Park Geun-hye postponed a decision on the matter which was due at the end of 2014. The debate is contentious, but it is substantially less acrimonious than it has been in past years, in large part because of the increasingly positive opinion the Korean public has for the US (as recently as the early 2000s, (South) Korean public opinion consistently hovered in the 60-70% ''anti''-US range, while at present that's reversed).
almost reversed and South Koreans are among the most pro-American people in East Asia, although not ''quite'' so much as the Filipinos and--oddly--the Vietnamese).
19th Jul '15 9:58:17 PM karstovich2
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In the event of war on the Korean Peninsular (most likely the Korean War unpausing), the defence of South Korea would be coordinated from CFC, meaning that all South Korean forces will be commanded by an American officer. UNC still exists as an entity devoid of muscle but it could be [[GondorCallsForAid reactivated]] in the event other countries wish to commit their forces to help in the defence of South Korea.

to:

In the event of war on the Korean Peninsular Peninsula (most likely the Korean War unpausing), the defence defense of South Korea would be coordinated from CFC, meaning that all South Korean forces will be commanded by an American officer. UNC still exists as an entity devoid of muscle but it could be [[GondorCallsForAid reactivated]] in the event other countries wish to commit their forces to help in the defence defense of South Korea.



There has been recent debate within South Korea about whether total OPCON in time of war should be transferred back to the ROK entirely. The government of Park Geun-hye postponed a decision on the matter which was due at the end of 2014.

to:

There has been recent debate within South Korea about whether total OPCON in time of war should be transferred back to the ROK entirely. The government of Park Geun-hye postponed a decision on the matter which was due at the end of 2014.
2014. The debate is contentious, but it is substantially less acrimonious than it has been in past years, in large part because of the increasingly positive opinion the Korean public has for the US (as recently as the early 2000s, (South) Korean public opinion consistently hovered in the 60-70% ''anti''-US range, while at present that's reversed).
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