History UsefulNotes / SouthKoreansWithMarines

27th May '17 2:00:21 PM nombretomado
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The TropeNamer, the ROKMAR, although theoretically under the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, operates as a distinct arm of the military of South Korea. It has a badass reputation; during the [[UsefulNotes/KoreanWar Korean]] and [[UsefulNotes/VietnamWar Vietnam]] Wars, they were so successful in fishing out North Korean and Vietcong guerrillas that they earned the nickname "Ghost-Catching Marines." One example in Korea is that a squad of ROK Marines had almost decimated an entire North Korean ''battalion''. In Vietnam, the Vietcong and the NVA dreaded fighting Korean Marines; one battle involved 300 South Koreans successfully fending off an entire North Vietnamese brigade with minimal casualties. They were famous for their special style of combat, and ROK commandos sometimes killed Vietcong with karate chops in close-up fights. By comparison, American soldiers in Vietnam had a lower kill ratio than the Koreans, serving only to further their reputation as badasses around the world.

to:

The TropeNamer, the ROKMAR, although theoretically under the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, operates as a distinct arm of the military of South Korea. It has a badass reputation; during the [[UsefulNotes/KoreanWar Korean]] and [[UsefulNotes/VietnamWar [[UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar Vietnam]] Wars, they were so successful in fishing out North Korean and Vietcong guerrillas that they earned the nickname "Ghost-Catching Marines." One example in Korea is that a squad of ROK Marines had almost decimated an entire North Korean ''battalion''. In Vietnam, the Vietcong and the NVA dreaded fighting Korean Marines; one battle involved 300 South Koreans successfully fending off an entire North Vietnamese brigade with minimal casualties. They were famous for their special style of combat, and ROK commandos sometimes killed Vietcong with karate chops in close-up fights. By comparison, American soldiers in Vietnam had a lower kill ratio than the Koreans, serving only to further their reputation as badasses around the world.
27th May '17 2:00:14 PM nombretomado
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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of (''[[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea ahem]]''), has no nukes, and (being a geographically small country with precisely one military enemy worth talking about) its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.

to:

The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of (''[[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea ahem]]''), has no nukes, and (being a geographically small country with precisely one military enemy worth talking about) its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.
7th May '17 5:32:30 PM nombretomado
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[[StealthPun Despite the title]], has nothing to do with South Korea's use of ''other'' [[{{Starcraft}} Marines]].

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[[StealthPun Despite the title]], has nothing to do with South Korea's use of ''other'' [[{{Starcraft}} [[VideoGame/StarCraft Marines]].
29th Apr '17 7:56:20 AM SSgt_LuLZ
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheFrontLine'' features a South Korean company during the closing weeks of the Korean War.


Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}'', the Mobile Exo-Force of the Korean Army (a.k.a, MEKA) is a division created by the ROK Army as a response to the [[RobotWar Omnic Crisis]]. [[GamerGirl D.Va]] is one such member and a playable character.
25th Feb '17 2:01:23 PM nombretomado
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25th Feb '17 2:01:21 PM nombretomado
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The Republic of Korea Armed Forces was founded in 1948 in response to North Korean attacks leading to the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar. Most of the army at that time was more like a gendarmerie than a full army; when the North rolled its troops across the South, they curbstomped South Korea, until the United States decided to step in (and for a while afterward); the ROKAF later TookALevelInBadass, but a [[{{ChineseWithChopperSupport}} Chinese]] [[strike:mercenary]] voluntary army was sent by Mao Zedong, partly to help Kim Il-sung, partly because Mao feared China would be attacked by the U.S. via Manchuria and partly because Mao wanted to avoid having northern China flooded with North Korean refugees; a grinding war ensued until 1953, ending with Korea still being divided into two.

to:

The Republic of Korea Armed Forces was founded in 1948 in response to North Korean attacks leading to the UsefulNotes/KoreanWar. Most of the army at that time was more like a gendarmerie than a full army; when the North rolled its troops across the South, they curbstomped South Korea, until the United States decided to step in (and for a while afterward); the ROKAF later TookALevelInBadass, but a [[{{ChineseWithChopperSupport}} [[ChineseWithChopperSupport Chinese]] [[strike:mercenary]] voluntary army was sent by Mao Zedong, partly to help Kim Il-sung, partly because Mao feared China would be attacked by the U.S. via Manchuria and partly because Mao wanted to avoid having northern China flooded with North Korean refugees; a grinding war ensued until 1953, ending with Korea still being divided into two.



* The DaleBrown novel ''Battle Born'', involving a Second Korean War.

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* The DaleBrown Creator/DaleBrown novel ''Battle Born'', involving a Second Korean War.
20th Jan '17 10:57:19 PM karstovich2
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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.

to:

The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, of (''[[UsefulNotes/NorthKorea ahem]]''), has no nukes, and (being a geographically small country with precisely one military enemy worth talking about) its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.
8th Jan '17 12:18:01 PM Morgenthaler
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The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.

to:

The South Korean Armed Forces is modeled after the way the U.S. military worked between the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Act_of_1947 National Security Act of 1947]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldwater%E2%80%93Nichols_Act Goldwater-Nichols Act]] of 1986; this means that while the chain of command runs from the President through the Minister of National Defense, advised by career military Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Joint Chiefs are also in the operational chain of command of their respective branches, rather than serving as advisors with command running directly from the civilian officials to combatant commands. This difference is rendered irrelevant by the nature of South Korea's defense needs: the U.S. has a combatant command for each theater of operations plus one each for special forces, nuclear weapons, and logistics. However, South Korea only has one theater of operations to speak of, has no nukes, and its special forces and logistics needs don't require a top-level command, so the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs is basically the commander for the country's lone combatant command. Also borrowed from the YanksWithTanks is the presence of a quasi-independent Marine Corps theoretically subordinate to the Navy but really an elite combined-arms fourth branch of the military. In addition to the US influence, however, because a large number of combat-experienced Koreans who served in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese armed forces]] during WorldWar2 UsefulNotes/WorldWar2 played an instrumental role in setting up South Korean military in the beginning, there was a distinctive Japanese flavor in its early days. This was often remarked on by the Vietnamese during the VietnamWar, to whom South Koreans (who sent a sizable contingent to support US in that conflict) looked like a SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute to the Japanese whom they had to deal with a couple of decades before. Furthermore, since many of these Korean veterans of Japanese military had often fought against Leftist Korean guerrillas as Japanese soldiers, this often becomes a point of controversy in South Korean politics.
8th Nov '16 6:16:25 PM Morgenthaler
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The TropeNamer, the ROKMAR, although theoretically under the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, operates as a distinct arm of the military of South Korea. It has a {{Badass}} reputation; during the [[UsefulNotes/KoreanWar Korean]] and [[UsefulNotes/VietnamWar Vietnam]] Wars, they were so successful in fishing out North Korean and Vietcong guerrillas that they earned the nickname "Ghost-Catching Marines." One example in Korea is that a squad of ROK Marines had almost decimated an entire North Korean ''battalion''. In Vietnam, the Vietcong and the NVA dreaded fighting Korean Marines; one battle involved 300 South Koreans successfully fending off an entire North Vietnamese brigade with minimal casualties. They were famous for their special style of combat, and ROK commandos sometimes killed Vietcong with karate chops in close-up fights. By comparison, American soldiers in Vietnam had a lower kill ratio than the Koreans, serving only to further their reputation as badasses around the world.

to:

The TropeNamer, the ROKMAR, although theoretically under the direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, operates as a distinct arm of the military of South Korea. It has a {{Badass}} badass reputation; during the [[UsefulNotes/KoreanWar Korean]] and [[UsefulNotes/VietnamWar Vietnam]] Wars, they were so successful in fishing out North Korean and Vietcong guerrillas that they earned the nickname "Ghost-Catching Marines." One example in Korea is that a squad of ROK Marines had almost decimated an entire North Korean ''battalion''. In Vietnam, the Vietcong and the NVA dreaded fighting Korean Marines; one battle involved 300 South Koreans successfully fending off an entire North Vietnamese brigade with minimal casualties. They were famous for their special style of combat, and ROK commandos sometimes killed Vietcong with karate chops in close-up fights. By comparison, American soldiers in Vietnam had a lower kill ratio than the Koreans, serving only to further their reputation as badasses around the world.
20th Oct '16 9:52:23 AM Morgenthaler
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<<|ForcesWithFirepower|>>
<<|UsefulNotes/SouthKorea|>>

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