History UsefulNotes / Socialism

12th Aug '17 7:24:46 PM TristanJeremiah
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* Eugene V. Debs

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* Eugene V. DebsUsefulNotes/EugeneDebs
15th Jul '17 10:38:54 AM nombretomado
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** Stalinism is characterized by harsh ruthless pragmatism, firm discipline, collectivization and mass indutrialization, strict control by party on all levers of government and society (Executive, Military, Judiciary, Press) and central authority, [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans all to better achieve the highly utopian socialist ideal of course]]. Socially, Stalin's isolationism, led to [[FullCircleRevolution revival of some of Russian traditions and a reversal of many of Lenin's social policies]], finally manifesting itself in the CultOfPersonality and mass PropagandaMachine and during WorldWarII, a revival of Russian Patriotism and the Orthodox Church. Internationally, its foreign policy was inconsistent. Initially moderate compared to Lenin's and Trotsky's who both advocated world revolution, it later encouraged rapprochement between China's KMT and CCP, tried to form an early coalition against Hitler with France and England, supported the Spanish Republic against Franco, and forming a Popular Front between Communists and other social democrat and left parties, and yet on the eve of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, it stunned everyone with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact between the USSR and Nazi Germany. Early observers such as Creator/GeorgeOrwell, contend that Stalinism is essentially a twisted mirror of capitalism, since it entrenched in power the bourgeois intellectuals just as firmly as capitalism entrenched the robber-baron, the monarch, and the aristocrat, often with even greater brutality. Later observers, with access to Russian archives, see Stalin as a strongman who revived, preserved and deepened Russia's client-patronage system from the Russian Empire and a state-builder in the mode of Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great.

to:

** Stalinism is characterized by harsh ruthless pragmatism, firm discipline, collectivization and mass indutrialization, strict control by party on all levers of government and society (Executive, Military, Judiciary, Press) and central authority, [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans all to better achieve the highly utopian socialist ideal of course]]. Socially, Stalin's isolationism, led to [[FullCircleRevolution revival of some of Russian traditions and a reversal of many of Lenin's social policies]], finally manifesting itself in the CultOfPersonality and mass PropagandaMachine and during WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, a revival of Russian Patriotism and the Orthodox Church. Internationally, its foreign policy was inconsistent. Initially moderate compared to Lenin's and Trotsky's who both advocated world revolution, it later encouraged rapprochement between China's KMT and CCP, tried to form an early coalition against Hitler with France and England, supported the Spanish Republic against Franco, and forming a Popular Front between Communists and other social democrat and left parties, and yet on the eve of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, it stunned everyone with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact between the USSR and Nazi Germany. Early observers such as Creator/GeorgeOrwell, contend that Stalinism is essentially a twisted mirror of capitalism, since it entrenched in power the bourgeois intellectuals just as firmly as capitalism entrenched the robber-baron, the monarch, and the aristocrat, often with even greater brutality. Later observers, with access to Russian archives, see Stalin as a strongman who revived, preserved and deepened Russia's client-patronage system from the Russian Empire and a state-builder in the mode of Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great.
8th Jul '17 10:36:39 AM nombretomado
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Socialism is a political ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century, with roots in philosophers from UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. Creator/KarlMarx is usually seen as the major theorist but he was merely one theorist among many and he codified and developed pre-existing ideas rather than create it out of whole cloth. To give a complete definition here is almost impossible, as, like most [[UsefulNotes/{{Political Ideologies}} political ideologies]], it has many internal divisions and national variations as a result of pragmatic accommodations and {{Realpolitik}}. TheOtherWiki defines it as "an economic system characterised by social ownership of the means of production and co-operative management of the economy", as opposed to the present capitalist system, whereby the means of production are owned by private individuals. There is no consensus on how social ownership is to be brought about or, once brought about, how it is to be managed; for this reason, this page also describes anti-capitalist anarchism and communism.

to:

Socialism is a political ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century, with roots in philosophers from UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. Creator/KarlMarx is usually seen as the major theorist but he was merely one theorist among many and he codified and developed pre-existing ideas rather than create it out of whole cloth. To give a complete definition here is almost impossible, as, like most [[UsefulNotes/{{Political Ideologies}} political ideologies]], it has many internal divisions and national variations as a result of pragmatic accommodations and {{Realpolitik}}. TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki defines it as "an economic system characterised by social ownership of the means of production and co-operative management of the economy", as opposed to the present capitalist system, whereby the means of production are owned by private individuals. There is no consensus on how social ownership is to be brought about or, once brought about, how it is to be managed; for this reason, this page also describes anti-capitalist anarchism and communism.
18th Jun '17 3:06:09 PM JulianLapostat
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If a car salesman in a capitalist society has ten customers who demand a certain model, but only nine such cars, he can demand higher prices. Not everyone considers the free market fair, and those who lose out are often the ones in the most disadvantaged socioeconomic positions, but [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts this is the way it works in capitalism]]. Now in planned economies prices are fixed by the state, so this way doesn't exist for those selling products. So how would they solve this dilemma? This joke explains it:

A woman applies for a job in a state-run shop. The responsible manager asks her:
--> "Are you married?"
--> "Yes."
--> "How many children do you have?"
--> "Three."
--> "Are your parents and parents-in-law still alive?"
--> "Yes."
--> "Do you and your husband have siblings?"
--> "I have four of them, he has five."
--> "Sorry, then we can't give you the job."
--> Woman: "But why?"
--> Manager: "See, we actually have to sell ''some'' wares over the counter!"

While the car salesman could no longer jack up the prices of his wares, he still had only nine cars to sell to the ten demanding customers. Theoretically this should have lead to to the cars being sold to the first nine customers who enters the shop, or the nine people whom the bureaucracy have determined have "the greatest need" for them. But what was often the actual case was that without the ability to make the costumers compete with their wallets, the salesmen would favor the customers he had connections with, or [[CorruptBureaucrat trade under the table]] for other 'goods and services', typically favours, instead, and the cars would go to the people with the influence he could take advantage of. In short: since (regular) money doesn't matter, the wares will go to [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections those who have the best connections to those selling it, or those whom the sellers can gain favors from.]]

Furthermore, the inefficiencies of the Soviet economy and the priority heavy industry took over consumer goods often meant that there were far from enough of even basic products to meet needs and demand; There weren't 'nine cars', but more like four or five, with the rest of the applicants being put on a waiting list that often took years to process. In the latter days of the Soviet Union people had to waste hours of their life standing in a queue to get produce before it ran out for the people who came late. Which was even worse in places where bread was sold in one store, milk in a second one and meat in a third one, [[{{Irony}} for practicality]]. Of course, if you were lucky enough to own hard currency like American dollars or [[UsefulNotes/WestGermany West German marks]], this didn't apply. Which led to another joke that Communism and Capitalism are really NotSoDifferent, because in both systems you can get everything if you only have [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney enough dollars]].[[/folder]]

to:

If a car salesman in a capitalist society has ten customers who demand a certain model, but only nine such cars, he can demand higher prices. Not everyone considers the free market fair, and those who lose out are often the ones in the most disadvantaged socioeconomic positions, but [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts this is the way it works in capitalism]]. Now in planned economies prices are fixed by the state, so this way doesn't exist for those selling products. So how would they solve this dilemma? This joke explains it:

A woman applies for a job in a state-run shop. The responsible manager asks her:
--> "Are you married?"
--> "Yes."
--> "How many children do you have?"
--> "Three."
--> "Are your parents and parents-in-law still alive?"
--> "Yes."
--> "Do you and your husband have siblings?"
--> "I have four of them, he has five."
--> "Sorry, then we can't give you the job."
--> Woman: "But why?"
--> Manager: "See, we actually have to sell ''some'' wares over the counter!"

While the car salesman could no longer jack up the prices of his wares, he still had only nine cars to sell to the ten demanding customers. Theoretically this should have lead to to the cars being sold to the first nine customers who enters the shop, or the nine people whom the bureaucracy have determined have "the greatest need" for them. But what was often the actual case was that without the ability to make the costumers compete with their wallets, the salesmen would favor the customers he had connections with, or [[CorruptBureaucrat trade under the table]] for other 'goods and services', typically favours, instead, and the cars would go to the people with the influence he could take advantage of.
In short: since (regular) money doesn't matter, the wares will go to [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections those who have the best connections to those selling it, or those whom the sellers can gain favors from.]]

Furthermore, the inefficiencies of the Soviet economy and the priority heavy industry took over consumer goods
it.]] This was quite often meant that there were far from enough of even basic products to meet needs the case, and demand; There weren't 'nine cars', but more like four or five, with the rest of the applicants being put on a waiting list that often took years to process. In the latter days of the Soviet Union people had would have to waste hours of their life standing in a queue to get produce before it ran out for the people who came late.queue. Which was even worse in places where bread was sold in one store, milk in a second one and meat in a third one, [[{{Irony}} for practicality]]. Of course, if you were lucky enough to own hard currency like American dollars or [[UsefulNotes/WestGermany West German marks]], this didn't apply. Which led to another joke that Communism and Capitalism are really NotSoDifferent, because in both systems you can get everything if you only have [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney enough dollars]].[[/folder]]
10th Jun '17 7:12:39 AM WikiGuardianAngel
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If a car salesman in a capitalist society has ten customers who demand a certain model, but only nine such cars, he can demand higher prices. Not everyone considers this fair, but this is the way it works in capitalism. Now in planned economies prices are fixed by the state, so this way doesn't exist for those selling products. So how would they solve this dilemma? This joke explains it:

to:

If a car salesman in a capitalist society has ten customers who demand a certain model, but only nine such cars, he can demand higher prices. Not everyone considers this the free market fair, and those who lose out are often the ones in the most disadvantaged socioeconomic positions, but [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts this is the way it works in capitalism.capitalism]]. Now in planned economies prices are fixed by the state, so this way doesn't exist for those selling products. So how would they solve this dilemma? This joke explains it:



In short: since (regular) money doesn't matter, the wares will go to [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections those who have the best connections to those selling it.]] This was quite often the case, and people would have to waste hours of their life standing in a queue. Which was even worse in places where bread was sold in one store, milk in a second one and meat in a third one, [[{{Irony}} for practicality]]. Of course, if you were lucky enough to own hard currency like American dollars or [[UsefulNotes/WestGermany West German marks]], this didn't apply. Which led to another joke that Communism and Capitalism are really NotSoDifferent, because in both systems you can get everything if you only have [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney enough dollars]].[[/folder]]

to:

While the car salesman could no longer jack up the prices of his wares, he still had only nine cars to sell to the ten demanding customers. Theoretically this should have lead to to the cars being sold to the first nine customers who enters the shop, or the nine people whom the bureaucracy have determined have "the greatest need" for them. But what was often the actual case was that without the ability to make the costumers compete with their wallets, the salesmen would favor the customers he had connections with, or [[CorruptBureaucrat trade under the table]] for other 'goods and services', typically favours, instead, and the cars would go to the people with the influence he could take advantage of. In short: since (regular) money doesn't matter, the wares will go to [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections those who have the best connections to those selling it.]] This was quite it, or those whom the sellers can gain favors from.]]

Furthermore, the inefficiencies of the Soviet economy and the priority heavy industry took over consumer goods
often meant that there were far from enough of even basic products to meet needs and demand; There weren't 'nine cars', but more like four or five, with the case, and rest of the applicants being put on a waiting list that often took years to process. In the latter days of the Soviet Union people would have had to waste hours of their life standing in a queue.queue to get produce before it ran out for the people who came late. Which was even worse in places where bread was sold in one store, milk in a second one and meat in a third one, [[{{Irony}} for practicality]]. Of course, if you were lucky enough to own hard currency like American dollars or [[UsefulNotes/WestGermany West German marks]], this didn't apply. Which led to another joke that Communism and Capitalism are really NotSoDifferent, because in both systems you can get everything if you only have [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney enough dollars]].[[/folder]]
20th May '17 4:40:29 PM TristanJeremiah
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* '''Democratic Socialism''': Social democracy is a more moderate kind of socialism that seeks to use democratic rather than revolutionary means to achieve its goals. It advocates policies such as full employment and the right to work, the welfare state, and ensuring some equality of outcome through redistribution of wealth. Examples of this form include Postwar Consensus politics in Britain and the Nordic model in Scandinavia. The main difference with State Socialism is that, while the values of Socialism are there, modern Social Democracy actually has no interest in reforming Capitalism into Socialism but rather updating and modifying the Capitalist model to create a more equitable society, making its status as a ''Socialist'' ideology hotly debated. Worth noting that in Europe, where it is most popular, Social Democracy parties independent of the major Socialists groups still caucus with those socialists in domestic legislatures, and are usually members of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance_of_Socialists_and_Democrats Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats]], which is itself under the blanket of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_of_European_Socialists Party of European Socialists]] in the European Parliament. Worldwide, they also typically belong to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_International Socialist International]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance Progressive Alliance]]. Most modern socialist parties in practice adhere to some version of social democracy while in power, keeping some form of market economy. Still, how "socialist" social democracy actually is is controversial with more radical socialists, especially after the neoliberal, pro-deregulation, pro-austerity turn social democratic parties have taken since the '80s.

to:

* '''Democratic Socialism''': '''Social Democracy''': [[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with Democratic Socialism]], which is a Socialist system with Democracy, Social democracy Democracy is a more moderate kind of stepping stone to socialism that seeks to use democratic rather than revolutionary means to achieve its goals. It advocates policies such as full employment and the right to work, the welfare state, and ensuring some equality of outcome through redistribution of wealth. Examples of this form include Postwar Consensus politics in Britain and the Nordic model in Scandinavia. The main difference with State Socialism is that, while the values of Socialism are there, modern Social Democracy actually has no interest in reforming Capitalism into Socialism but rather updating and modifying the Capitalist model to create a more equitable society, making its status as a ''Socialist'' ideology hotly debated. Worth noting that in Europe, where it is most popular, Social Democracy parties independent of the major Socialists groups still caucus with those socialists in domestic legislatures, and are usually members of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance_of_Socialists_and_Democrats Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats]], which is itself under the blanket of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_of_European_Socialists Party of European Socialists]] in the European Parliament. Worldwide, they also typically belong to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_International Socialist International]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance Progressive Alliance]]. Most modern socialist parties in practice adhere to some version of social democracy while in power, keeping some form of market economy. Still, how "socialist" social democracy actually is is controversial with more radical socialists, especially after the neoliberal, pro-deregulation, pro-austerity turn social democratic parties have taken since the '80s.
20th May '17 4:34:56 PM TristanJeremiah
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* '''Social Democracy''': Social democracy is a more moderate kind of socialism that seeks to use democratic rather than revolutionary means to achieve its goals. It advocates policies such as full employment and the right to work, the welfare state, and ensuring some equality of outcome through redistribution of wealth. Examples of this form include Postwar Consensus politics in Britain and the Nordic model in Scandinavia. The main difference with State Socialism is that, while the values of Socialism are there, modern Social Democracy actually has no interest in reforming Capitalism into Socialism but rather updating and modifying the Capitalist model to create a more equitable society, making its status as a ''Socialist'' ideology hotly debated. Worth noting that in Europe, where it is most popular, Social Democracy parties independent of the major Socialists groups still caucus with those socialists in domestic legislatures, and are usually members of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance_of_Socialists_and_Democrats Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats]], which is itself under the blanket of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_of_European_Socialists Party of European Socialists]] in the European Parliament. Worldwide, they also typically belong to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_International Socialist International]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance Progressive Alliance]]. Most modern socialist parties in practice adhere to some version of social democracy while in power, keeping some form of market economy. Still, how "socialist" social democracy actually is is controversial with more radical socialists, especially after the neoliberal, pro-deregulation, pro-austerity turn social democratic parties have taken since the '80s.

to:

* '''Social Democracy''': '''Democratic Socialism''': Social democracy is a more moderate kind of socialism that seeks to use democratic rather than revolutionary means to achieve its goals. It advocates policies such as full employment and the right to work, the welfare state, and ensuring some equality of outcome through redistribution of wealth. Examples of this form include Postwar Consensus politics in Britain and the Nordic model in Scandinavia. The main difference with State Socialism is that, while the values of Socialism are there, modern Social Democracy actually has no interest in reforming Capitalism into Socialism but rather updating and modifying the Capitalist model to create a more equitable society, making its status as a ''Socialist'' ideology hotly debated. Worth noting that in Europe, where it is most popular, Social Democracy parties independent of the major Socialists groups still caucus with those socialists in domestic legislatures, and are usually members of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance_of_Socialists_and_Democrats Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats]], which is itself under the blanket of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_of_European_Socialists Party of European Socialists]] in the European Parliament. Worldwide, they also typically belong to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_International Socialist International]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance Progressive Alliance]]. Most modern socialist parties in practice adhere to some version of social democracy while in power, keeping some form of market economy. Still, how "socialist" social democracy actually is is controversial with more radical socialists, especially after the neoliberal, pro-deregulation, pro-austerity turn social democratic parties have taken since the '80s.
20th May '17 4:31:16 PM TristanJeremiah
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Socialism is a political ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century, with roots in philosophers from UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. Creator/KarlMarx is usually seen as the major theorist but he was merely one theorist among many and he codified and developed pre-existing ideas rather than create it out of whole cloth. To give a complete definition here is almost impossible, as, like most political ideologies, it has many internal divisions and national variations as a result of pragmatic accommodations and {{Realpolitik}}. TheOtherWiki defines it as "an economic system characterised by social ownership of the means of production and co-operative management of the economy", as opposed to the present capitalist system, whereby the means of production are owned by private individuals. There is no consensus on how social ownership is to be brought about or, once brought about, how it is to be managed; for this reason, this page also describes anti-capitalist anarchism and communism.

to:

Socialism is a political ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century, with roots in philosophers from UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. Creator/KarlMarx is usually seen as the major theorist but he was merely one theorist among many and he codified and developed pre-existing ideas rather than create it out of whole cloth. To give a complete definition here is almost impossible, as, like most [[UsefulNotes/{{Political Ideologies}} political ideologies, ideologies]], it has many internal divisions and national variations as a result of pragmatic accommodations and {{Realpolitik}}. TheOtherWiki defines it as "an economic system characterised by social ownership of the means of production and co-operative management of the economy", as opposed to the present capitalist system, whereby the means of production are owned by private individuals. There is no consensus on how social ownership is to be brought about or, once brought about, how it is to be managed; for this reason, this page also describes anti-capitalist anarchism and communism.
6th Jan '17 12:06:25 PM Chytus
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Socialism is a political ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century, with roots in philosophers from UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. Creator/KarlMarx is usually seen as the major theorist but he was merely one theorist among many and he codified and developed pre-existing ideas rather than create it out of whole cloth. To give a complete definition here is almost impossible, as, like most political ideologies, it has many internal divisions and national variations as a result of pragmatic accomodations and {{Realpolitik}}. TheOtherWiki defines it as "an economic system characterised by social ownership of the means of production and co-operative management of the economy", as opposed to the present capitalist system, whereby the means of production are owned by private individuals. There is no consensus on how social ownership is to be brought about or, once brought about, how it is to be managed; for this reason, this page also describes anti-capitalist anarchism and communism.

!!'''Revolutionary or Democratic?'''

to:

Socialism is a political ideology that began to develop in the nineteenth century, with roots in philosophers from UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. Creator/KarlMarx is usually seen as the major theorist but he was merely one theorist among many and he codified and developed pre-existing ideas rather than create it out of whole cloth. To give a complete definition here is almost impossible, as, like most political ideologies, it has many internal divisions and national variations as a result of pragmatic accomodations accommodations and {{Realpolitik}}. TheOtherWiki defines it as "an economic system characterised by social ownership of the means of production and co-operative management of the economy", as opposed to the present capitalist system, whereby the means of production are owned by private individuals. There is no consensus on how social ownership is to be brought about or, once brought about, how it is to be managed; for this reason, this page also describes anti-capitalist anarchism and communism.

!!'''Revolutionary [[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Revolutionary
or Democratic?'''
Democratic?]]



Though flippant, this neatly encapsulates the difference, which comes down to whether or not one should try to bring apart socialism by changing the system from within or without. Democratic movements, such as the British Labour Party, the German SPD and ''Die Linke'', and others, seek[[note]]Or have sought in the past.[[/note]] to bring about socialism through participating in the existing democratic structures of the capitalist state; ie, by demonstrating in order to get political rights if you don't already have them, and then fighting elections and winning them. Revolutionary movements, on the other hand, hold that "bourgeois democracy" is not actually anything of the kind[[note]]Lenin famously called parliaments "the talking-shops of the bourgeoisie"; a more modern critique would focus on organizations such as the IMF, World Bank, or ECB, which, though unelected, wield colossal power.[[/note]], and so ''real'' change can only be secured by coercion. This does not necessarily mean violent coercion; anarchism in particular often advocates non-violent revolutionary means (though violence is still favoured by many), such as general strikes (where everyone stops working until they get what they want) or other direct - though pacifistic - action, such as sit-ins or occupations.

to:

Though flippant, this neatly encapsulates the difference, which comes down to whether or not one should try to bring apart socialism by changing the system from within or without. Democratic movements, such as the British Labour Party, the German SPD and ''Die Linke'', and others, seek[[note]]Or have sought in the past.[[/note]] to bring about socialism through participating in the existing democratic structures of the capitalist state; ie, i.e., by demonstrating in order to get political rights if you don't already have them, and then fighting elections and winning them. Revolutionary movements, on the other hand, hold that "bourgeois democracy" is not actually anything of the kind[[note]]Lenin famously called parliaments "the talking-shops of the bourgeoisie"; a more modern critique would focus on organizations such as the IMF, World Bank, or ECB, which, though unelected, wield colossal power.[[/note]], and so ''real'' change can only be secured by coercion. This does not necessarily mean violent coercion; anarchism in particular often advocates non-violent revolutionary means (though violence is still favoured by many), such as general strikes (where everyone stops working until they get what they want) or other direct - though pacifistic - action, such as sit-ins or occupations.



!!'''(Some) Tenets of (Some) Socialists'''

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!!'''(Some) [[/folder]]
[[folder:(Some)
Tenets of (Some) Socialists'''
Socialists]]



There are several political claims that generally qualify as socialist. One does not necessarily have to believe in all of them to be a socialist and some are disputed among socialists as to the actual prominence of them (eg. class analysis). Nor does believing in them necessarily make one a socialist either.

to:

There are several political claims that generally qualify as socialist. One does not necessarily have to believe in all of them to be a socialist and some are disputed among socialists as to the actual prominence of them (eg.(e.g. class analysis). Nor does believing in them necessarily make one a socialist either.



9. '''Social Ownership of the Means of Production''': Marx, writing at the time of the Industrial Revolution, argued that the injustice of capitalism stemmed from the anti-social minority ownership of the means of production. ''Very'' simplified: Why is it fair that the workers do all the work, but the bourgeois get the profits just because they own the factories? Socialists seek to alleviate this claimed injustice either through social mobility, redistributive taxation, and increased workers' participation with social democracy, or expropriation (violent or otherwise) with other strands. The ultimate end is collective ownership of the means of production; such as through a bureacratic state (Soviet Communism) or associations of free producers (Marx himself, anarchism).

to:

9. '''Social Ownership of the Means of Production''': Marx, writing at the time of the Industrial Revolution, argued that the injustice of capitalism stemmed from the anti-social minority ownership of the means of production. ''Very'' simplified: Why is it fair that the workers do all the work, but the bourgeois get the profits just because they own the factories? Socialists seek to alleviate this claimed injustice either through social mobility, redistributive taxation, and increased workers' participation with social democracy, or expropriation (violent or otherwise) with other strands. The ultimate end is collective ownership of the means of production; such as through a bureacratic bureaucratic state (Soviet Communism) or associations of free producers (Marx himself, anarchism).



!!'''Types of Socialism'''

to:

!!'''Types [[/folder]]
[[folder:Types
of Socialism'''
Socialism]]



Here are the [[LaconicWiki laconic versions]] of various types of Socialism. It's important to remember that while there is broad agreement among socialists that capitalism is bad and should be either abolished or at least moderated, there is little else universally agreed upon by them. The {{flame war}}s that erupt over the existence of money, the usefulness of reformism vs. revolution and the proper role of the state in guiding the development of a socialist society are not worth getting into here. It's enough to know that there are [[BrokenBase deep conflicts between different schools of thought]] and that [[WeAreStrugglingTogether at times it seems they can't cooperate on anything]].

to:

Here are the [[LaconicWiki laconic versions]] versions of various types of Socialism. It's important to remember that while there is broad agreement among socialists that capitalism is bad and should be either abolished or at least moderated, there is little else universally agreed upon by them. The {{flame war}}s that erupt over the existence of money, the usefulness of reformism vs. revolution and the proper role of the state in guiding the development of a socialist society are not worth getting into here. It's enough to know that there are [[BrokenBase deep conflicts between different schools of thought]] and that [[WeAreStrugglingTogether at times it seems they can't cooperate on anything]].



* '''Social Democracy''': Social democracy is a more moderate kind of socialism that seeks to use democratic rather than revolutionary means to achieve its goals. It advocates policies such as full employment and the right to work, the welfare state, and ensuring some equality of outcome through redistribution of wealth. Examples of this form include Postwar Consensus politics in Britain and the Nordic model in Scandinavia. The main difference with State Socialism is that, while the values of Socialism are there, modern Social Democracy actually has no interest in reforming Capitalism into Socialism but rather updating and modifying the Capitalist model to create a more equitable society, making its status as a ''Socialist'' ideology hotly debated. Worth noting that in Europe, where it is most popular, Social Democracy parties independent of the major Socialists groups still caucus with those socialists in domestic legislatures, and are usually members of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance_of_Socialists_and_Democrats Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats]], which is itself under the blanket of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_of_European_Socialists Party of European Socialists]] in the European Parliament. Worldwide, they also typically belong to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_International Socialist International]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance Progressive Alliance]]. Most modern socialist parties in practice adhere to some version of social democracy while in power, keeping some form of market economy. Still, how "socialist" social democracy acutally is is controversial with more radical socialists, especially after the neoliberal, pro-deregulation, pro-austerity turn social democratic parties have taken since the '80s.

to:

* '''Social Democracy''': Social democracy is a more moderate kind of socialism that seeks to use democratic rather than revolutionary means to achieve its goals. It advocates policies such as full employment and the right to work, the welfare state, and ensuring some equality of outcome through redistribution of wealth. Examples of this form include Postwar Consensus politics in Britain and the Nordic model in Scandinavia. The main difference with State Socialism is that, while the values of Socialism are there, modern Social Democracy actually has no interest in reforming Capitalism into Socialism but rather updating and modifying the Capitalist model to create a more equitable society, making its status as a ''Socialist'' ideology hotly debated. Worth noting that in Europe, where it is most popular, Social Democracy parties independent of the major Socialists groups still caucus with those socialists in domestic legislatures, and are usually members of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance_of_Socialists_and_Democrats Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats]], which is itself under the blanket of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Party_of_European_Socialists Party of European Socialists]] in the European Parliament. Worldwide, they also typically belong to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socialist_International Socialist International]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Progressive_Alliance Progressive Alliance]]. Most modern socialist parties in practice adhere to some version of social democracy while in power, keeping some form of market economy. Still, how "socialist" social democracy acutally actually is is controversial with more radical socialists, especially after the neoliberal, pro-deregulation, pro-austerity turn social democratic parties have taken since the '80s.



!!'''Marxism and Communism'''

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!!'''Marxism [[/folder]]
[[folder:Marxism
and Communism'''
Communism]]



* '''Stalinism''': As mentioned above, it is under Stalin that some of Lenin's ideas and practices ([[TheThemeParkVersion but ''not'' all of them]]) were codified as Marxist-Leninism and that became the official ideology of the USSR. In the eyes of the internationalist communist movement, Stalinism was continuous with Leninism and initially it was. In his early years before he consolidated his authority, Stalin continued the NEP, maintained Lenin's progressive social policies and tended to lean to passive-aggressive bullying and exile of opponents over outright murder. Stalinism eventually evolved into a separate ideology by the late-20s and early 30s. He relied upon the idea of the vanguard party, and Lenin's legacy, for its legitimacy but backtracked heavily from world revolution, and followed a foreign policy of self-interest, referred to as "Socialism in One Country". This idea much criticized by UsefulNotes/LeonTrotsky and several others since it was an even further departure from Marx and Engels than Lenin's vanguard party. Finally, Stalinism made its grand debut with forced collectivization and mass industrialization, leading to brutal land seizures, liquidation and pruges of kulaks, wreckers, dissenters, oppositionists, Red Army militia, potential Fifth Columnists which ultimately exacerbated a drought and grain shortage into the deadly famine in 1933-34 and the Great Purges, which killed over 3 Million people (Famine) and nearly 800,000 (Purges), with further millions imprisoned for forced labour in TheGulag, where a million more would die (mostly as a result of wartime shortages).
** Stalinism is characterized by harsh ruthless pragmatism, firm discipline, collectivization and mass indutrialization, strict control by party on all levers of government and society (Executive, Military, Judiciary, Press) and central authority, [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans all to better achieve the highly utopian socialist ideal of course]]. Socially, Stalin's isolationism, led to [[FullCircleRevolution revival of some of Russian traditions and a reversal of many of Lenin's social policies]], finally manifesting itself in the CultOfPersonality and mass PropagandaMachine and during WorldWarII, a revival of Russian Patriotism and the Orthodox Church. Internationally, its foreign policy was inconsistent. Initially moderate compared to Lenin's and Trotsky's who both advocated world revolution, it later encouraged rapprochement between China's KMT and CCP, tried to form an early coalition against Hitler with France and England, supported the Spanish Republic against Franco, and forming a Popular Front between Communists and other social democrat and left parties, and yet on the eve of WorldWarII, it stunned everyone with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact between the USSR and Nazi Germany. Early observers such as Creator/GeorgeOrwell, contend that Stalinism is essentially a twisted mirror of capitalism, since it entrenched in power the bourgeois intellectuals just as firmly as capitalism entrenched the robber-baron, the monarch, and the aristocrat, often with even greater brutality. Later observers, with access to Russian archives, see Stalin as a strongman who revived, preserved and deepened Russia's client-patronage system from the Russian Empire and a state-builder in the mode of Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great.

to:

* '''Stalinism''': As mentioned above, it is under Stalin that some of Lenin's ideas and practices ([[TheThemeParkVersion but ''not'' all of them]]) were codified as Marxist-Leninism and that became the official ideology of the USSR. In the eyes of the internationalist communist movement, Stalinism was continuous with Leninism and initially it was. In his early years before he consolidated his authority, Stalin continued the NEP, maintained Lenin's progressive social policies and tended to lean to passive-aggressive bullying and exile of opponents over outright murder. Stalinism eventually evolved into a separate ideology by the late-20s and early 30s. He relied upon the idea of the vanguard party, and Lenin's legacy, for its legitimacy but backtracked heavily from world revolution, and followed a foreign policy of self-interest, referred to as "Socialism in One Country". This idea much criticized by UsefulNotes/LeonTrotsky and several others since it was an even further departure from Marx and Engels than Lenin's vanguard party. Finally, Stalinism made its grand debut with forced collectivization and mass industrialization, leading to brutal land seizures, liquidation and pruges purges of kulaks, wreckers, dissenters, oppositionists, Red Army militia, potential Fifth Columnists which ultimately exacerbated a drought and grain shortage into the deadly famine in 1933-34 and the Great Purges, which killed over 3 Million people (Famine) and nearly 800,000 (Purges), with further millions imprisoned for forced labour in TheGulag, where a million more would die (mostly as a result of wartime shortages).
** Stalinism is characterized by harsh ruthless pragmatism, firm discipline, collectivization and mass indutrialization, strict control by party on all levers of government and society (Executive, Military, Judiciary, Press) and central authority, [[UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans all to better achieve the highly utopian socialist ideal of course]]. Socially, Stalin's isolationism, led to [[FullCircleRevolution revival of some of Russian traditions and a reversal of many of Lenin's social policies]], finally manifesting itself in the CultOfPersonality and mass PropagandaMachine and during WorldWarII, a revival of Russian Patriotism and the Orthodox Church. Internationally, its foreign policy was inconsistent. Initially moderate compared to Lenin's and Trotsky's who both advocated world revolution, it later encouraged rapprochement between China's KMT and CCP, tried to form an early coalition against Hitler with France and England, supported the Spanish Republic against Franco, and forming a Popular Front between Communists and other social democrat and left parties, and yet on the eve of WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, it stunned everyone with the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact between the USSR and Nazi Germany. Early observers such as Creator/GeorgeOrwell, contend that Stalinism is essentially a twisted mirror of capitalism, since it entrenched in power the bourgeois intellectuals just as firmly as capitalism entrenched the robber-baron, the monarch, and the aristocrat, often with even greater brutality. Later observers, with access to Russian archives, see Stalin as a strongman who revived, preserved and deepened Russia's client-patronage system from the Russian Empire and a state-builder in the mode of Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great.



!!'''Anti-Capitalist Anarchism'''

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!!'''Anti-Capitalist Anarchism'''
[[/folder]]
[[folder:Anti-Capitalist Anarchism]]



!!'''Not Socialist'''

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!!'''Not Socialist'''
[[/folder]]
[[folder:Not Socialist]]



[[/folder]]



This section has been folderized for your convenience by the Provisional Executive Design Bureau for Revolutionary Folder Control.



There's of course the Communist bloc (which later had [[WeAreStrugglingTogether internal splits]], but we digress): The [[SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]], and later RedChina and their various satellites in Eastern Europe and the Third World. It took off [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober in 1917 with the October Revolution]] and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp mostly ended in 1989]], after Gorbachev started reforms of the sclerotic system that had become necessary after the armament race drove the Soviet Union into bankruptcy.

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There's of course the Communist bloc (which later had [[WeAreStrugglingTogether internal splits]], but we digress): The [[SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]], and later RedChina and their various satellites in Eastern Europe and the Third World. It took off [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober in 1917 with the October Revolution]] and [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp mostly ended in 1989]], after Gorbachev started reforms of the sclerotic system that had become necessary after the armament race drove the Soviet Union into bankruptcy.



For the next thirty years, both left and right and Britain believed in broadly social democratic policies toward the economy, employment, trade unions, welfare, and foreign affairs. However, in 1979, MargaretThatcher came to power and dismantled it, instituting a policy of monetarism, de-industrialization, interests-based foreign policy, and deregulation in its place, the so-called "neo-liberal consensus". The reasons for the collapse of the consensus are still hotly debated. Right-wing critics argue that socialist trade unions prevented British industry from retaining its competitiveness in the globalizing world. Left-wing ones argue that a lack of investment, right-wing ideological bias against state-owned industry (brought about by the rise of Austrian economics in the Tory Party from 1970), and malevolent class warfare on the right's part were to blame for trade union militancy, which ultimately turned the wider public against it.

Substantial nostalgia exists for the post-war consensus in Britain; when MargaretThatcher died, her end was met with partying in many of the formerly industrial regions of the UK, and employment in the UK has never been higher than in 1974, just as the consensus reached its apogee. Similarly, inequality has increased massively since the advent of the Thatcher government in '79 and remains both high and rising. [[/folder]]

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For the next thirty years, both left and right and Britain believed in broadly social democratic policies toward the economy, employment, trade unions, welfare, and foreign affairs. However, in 1979, MargaretThatcher UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher came to power and dismantled it, instituting a policy of monetarism, de-industrialization, interests-based foreign policy, and deregulation in its place, the so-called "neo-liberal consensus". The reasons for the collapse of the consensus are still hotly debated. Right-wing critics argue that socialist trade unions prevented British industry from retaining its competitiveness in the globalizing world. Left-wing ones argue that a lack of investment, right-wing ideological bias against state-owned industry (brought about by the rise of Austrian economics in the Tory Party from 1970), and malevolent class warfare on the right's part were to blame for trade union militancy, which ultimately turned the wider public against it.

Substantial nostalgia exists for the post-war consensus in Britain; when MargaretThatcher UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher died, her end was met with partying in many of the formerly industrial regions of the UK, and employment in the UK has never been higher than in 1974, just as the consensus reached its apogee. Similarly, inequality has increased massively since the advent of the Thatcher government in '79 and remains both high and rising. [[/folder]]



!!'''Some Famous Socialists:'''

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!!'''Some [[folder:Some Famous Socialists:'''
Socialists]]



* TheRulersOfNorthKorea

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* TheRulersOfNorthKoreaUsefulNotes/TheRulersOfNorthKorea


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
10th Nov '16 9:35:44 PM LoungingInTheLobe
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* UsefulNotes/JesusChrist (if you believe the Christian Socialists)

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* UsefulNotes/JesusChrist (if you believe the Christian Socialists) Socialists and that such a figure actually existed)
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