History UsefulNotes / RMSTitanic

26th Sep '16 1:50:50 PM passivesmoking
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* FaceDeathWithDignity:

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* FaceDeathWithDignity:FaceDeathWithDignity: The Titanic offered a wealth of examples:



** And there is the famed story of Benjamin Guggenheim and his valet, the former of whom famously told a steward: "We are dressed in our best, and are prepared to go down as gentlemen.[[note]] (but we would like a brandy! (this is from Creator/JamesCameron's film; it's unknown if he actually said it) [[/note]]"
** And who could forget the brave Wallace Heartly and ''Titanic'' 's band? The men who played cheerful music throughout the sinking to help maintain calm, and at the end played a simple hymn[[note]]The playing of a hymn, often claimed to be Nearer My God To Thee, is heavily disputed and contradicted by Marconi operator Harold Bride. What's not in dispute is they went beyond the call of their duty[[/note]] as an instrumental prayer for those in the boats, and the ones left behind.

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** And there is the famed story of Benjamin Guggenheim, who when he realised that escape was no longer an option returned to his cabin to change into his finest clothing. He handed a note to a survivor that stated, "Dressed in our best, going down like gentlemen". Guggenheim and his valet, valet Victor Giglio were last seen seated in deck chairs in the former of whom famously told Staircase sipping brandy and [[OneLastSmoke smoking cigars]].
** John Jacob Astor helped his pregnant young wife into
a steward: lifeboat, but was denied entry himself. He simply stood back, lit a cigarette and waved goodbye.
** The Strauses: Ida was granted a seat in a lifeboat, but the officer in charge initially refused Isidor entry. This prompted Ida to give her seat up to remain with her husband. The officer relented and said that nobody would really object "an elderly gentleman" like Isidor taking a seat in the lifeboat, but he insisted that he would not leave the ship before the other men. Isidor tried to convince Ida to get back on the lifeboat, but she only responded,
"We are dressed have lived together for many years. Where you go, I go." They both perished in our best, the sinking.
** A notorious subversion is J. Bruce Ismay, owner of the White Star Line, who climbed aboard a lifeboat
and are prepared to go down survived. He was pilloried for his actions which were seen as gentlemen.[[note]] (but we would like a brandy! (this is from Creator/JamesCameron's film; it's unknown if an act of [[DirtyCoward supreme cowardice]] (though he actually said it) [[/note]]"
** And who could forget
got in the brave Wallace Heartly lifeboat after he had helped with the loading and ''Titanic'' 's band? The men who played cheerful music throughout lowering of several others and only when he was sure that no women were in the sinking to help maintain calm, vicinity) and at the end played a simple hymn[[note]]The playing of a hymn, often claimed to be Nearer My God To Thee, is heavily disputed and contradicted by he was never welcome in polite society again.
** Senior
Marconi Operator Jack Phillips stayed at his post and continued to key out his distress call even as the fading power made the radio inoperable. The (equally heroic but somewhat more fortunate) junior operator Harold Bride. What's not in dispute is they went beyond Bride had this to say about him:
---> The water was pretty close up to
the call of their duty[[/note]] as an instrumental prayer boat deck. There was a great scramble aft and how poor Phillips worked through it I'll never know. I learned to love him that night, I suddenly felt for him a great reverence. To see him there, sticking to his work while everyone else was raging about, I'll never live to forget the work Phillips did in those last 15 minutes.
** The ship's Musicians played music to calm the passengers as the life boats were loaded and didn't stop until they had died. One eyewitness account said:
--->Many brave things were done that night, but none were more brave than those done by men playing minute after minute as the ship settled quietly lower and lower
in the boats, sea. The music they played served alike as their own immortal requiem and their right to be recalled on the ones left behind.scrolls of undying fame.
26th Sep '16 1:37:36 PM passivesmoking
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* LegendFadesToMyth: On account of the very confused nature of the tragedy itself and the media storm that occurred afterwards, there's a lot of myths and disputed facts surrounding the sinking, and nobody agrees on exactly what happened. Titanic had it all- conflicting witnesses, later embellishments, people not seeing the whole picture, and just plain mistakes.

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* LegendFadesToMyth: On account of the very confused nature of the tragedy itself and the media storm that occurred afterwards, there's a lot of myths and disputed facts surrounding the sinking, and nobody agrees on exactly what happened. Titanic had it all- conflicting witnesses, later embellishments, people not seeing the whole picture, and just plain mistakes. mistakes, not to mention good old fashioned fabrication. Several newspapers simply started making stories up when the scant information that existed in the period between the sinking and Carpathia's arrival in New York dried up, one paper printed "eyewitness accounts" that claimed passengers saw the ice berg an hour before the collision, that the ship almost capsized from the force of the collision, that the boilers exploded, flinging screaming passengers into the sea, etc etc... While most of the more outrageous stories were quickly debunked, some stories that have no real basis in fact no doubt survive to this day and are accepted as true because there isn't anybody left to assert otherwise.
26th Sep '16 1:02:53 PM passivesmoking
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*** More specifically, Titanic was divided into multiple watertight compartments, and was designed to float with one (or even several) flooded, and most accidents wouldn't flood many compartments (the ''Olympic'', which had the same compartments as the ''Titanic'', once survived a head-on collision with a navy vessel). The iceberg ripped small holes into ''six'' of the ''Titanic'''s compartments, at which point it became a ForegoneConclusion that she was going down.

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*** More specifically, Titanic was divided into multiple watertight compartments, and was designed to float with one (or even several) flooded, and most accidents wouldn't flood many compartments (the ''Olympic'', which had the same compartments as the ''Titanic'', once survived being T-boned by HMS Hawke, a head-on collision with a navy vessel).ship designed to ram and sink enemy shipping, which opened two adjacent compartments to flooding). The iceberg ripped small holes into ''six'' of the ''Titanic'''s compartments, at which point it became a ForegoneConclusion that she was going down.
8th Sep '16 8:19:46 AM AnonFangeekGirl
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** Edward Smith of the ''Titanic'', an old school sea captain with an exemplary performance record with a good relationship with his crew. However, he would be forever stained, fairly or unfairly, as a reckless bungler who drove his ship into danger, resulting in a horrific end for over 1500 people on board, including himself.
** Stanley Lord of the ''Californian'', who was apparently a callous tyrant of a captain who intimidated his crew into fearful complacency. He's the one who made the very bad decision to ignore the distress rockets that turned out to be from the ''Titanic'', whether out of sheer laziness or, as some have suggested, thinking the ship he could see was a smaller 'mystery ship' (although it actually was the ''Titanic'', which, because of unusual atmospheric conditions, looked like a 400 foot ship five miles away instead of the 800 foot ship ten miles away that it really was). Thus he ended up as maritime history's poster boy for BystanderSyndrome, no matter how much he insisted for the rest of his life that he had done nothing wrong.
** Arthur Rostron of the ''Carpathia'', who was by comparison the ideal British captain. He was firm, on amiable terms with his crew and passengers as well as being decisive, courageous and efficient in his command. Those were qualities dearly needed as the Captain who was the first to race to the ''Titanic'' on that horrible night of April 15, 1912. The quality of his captaincy can be summarised by the simple fact that when initially informed of the news by his wireless operator, Rostron reeled off a huge list of things he thought needed to happen (Plot a course to the Titanic, Get the engines up and running, divert every last scrap of steam away from services such as hot water supply to the engines for extra speed, rig up lighting, rope ladders, cargo nets, etc along the side of the ship for rescue operations, prepare the saloons as makeshift triage areas, have hot drinks and brandy ready for survivors, swing the boats out in preparation for rescue operations, wake up the off-duty lookouts to provide an additional watch on the ship's prow, etc), and only after reeling off these orders did he then ask his wireless operator to go back and confirm what he had heard. The praise he received for his actions that night is well deserved.

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** Edward Smith of the ''Titanic'', an ''Titanic''. A well-accredited old school sea captain with an exemplary performance record with a good relationship with his crew. However, he would be forever stained, captain, often given at least some of the blame for the ''Titanic'''s accident, fairly or unfairly, as a reckless bungler who drove his ship into danger, resulting unfairly. He died in a horrific end for over 1500 people on board, including himself.
the sinking.
** Stanley Lord of the ''Californian'', who was apparently a callous tyrant of a captain who intimidated his crew into fearful complacency. He's currently the one who made the very bad decision to ignore the distress rockets that turned out to be from the ''Titanic'', whether out of sheer laziness or, as some have suggested, thinking the ship he could see was a smaller 'mystery ship' (although it actually was the ''Titanic'', which, because of unusual atmospheric conditions, looked like a 400 foot ship five miles away instead of the 800 foot ship ten miles away that it really was). Thus he ended up as maritime history's poster boy for BystanderSyndrome, no matter how much since it was he insisted for who made the rest of his life that he had done nothing wrong.
choice to ignore the ''Titanic'''s distress rockets.
** Arthur Rostron of the ''Carpathia'', who was by comparison the ideal British captain. He was firm, on amiable terms with his crew and passengers acclaimed as well as being decisive, courageous and efficient in his command. Those were qualities dearly needed as the Captain who a hero because he was the first one to race eventually come to the ''Titanic'' on that horrible night of April 15, 1912. The quality of his captaincy can be summarised by the simple fact that when initially informed of the news by his wireless operator, Rostron reeled off a huge list of things he thought needed to happen (Plot a course to the Titanic, Get the engines up and running, divert every last scrap of steam away from services such as hot water supply to the engines for extra speed, rig up lighting, rope ladders, cargo nets, etc along the side of the ship for rescue operations, prepare the saloons as makeshift triage areas, have hot drinks and brandy ready for survivors, swing the boats out in preparation for rescue operations, wake up the off-duty lookouts to provide an additional watch on the ship's prow, etc), and only after reeling off these orders did he then ask his wireless operator to go back and confirm what he had heard. The praise he received for his actions that night is well deserved. ''Titanic'''s rescue.
31st Aug '16 6:32:53 AM aksnitd
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* CherryTapping: The iceberg damage. For decades the accepted wisdom was that only a massive can-opener type gash 300 feet long could have done ''Titanic'' in, even after the wreck was discovered and the hull outside boiler rooms 5 and 6 showed a slit formed by buckled plates. It wouldn't be until 1996 that, with the use of sonar, it was confirmed beyond a shadow of a doubt, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Titanic_side_plan_annotated_English.png that six tiny slits as wide as your finger]], formed as the rivets snapped and buckled hull plates separated, were all that were needed to lay ''Titanic'' low.

to:

* CherryTapping: The iceberg damage. For decades the accepted wisdom was that only a massive can-opener type gash 300 feet long could have done ''Titanic'' in, even after the wreck was discovered and the hull outside boiler rooms 5 and 6 showed a slit formed by buckled plates. It wouldn't be until 1996 that, with the use of sonar, it was confirmed beyond a shadow of a doubt, [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5d/Titanic_side_plan_annotated_English.png that six tiny slits as wide as your finger]], an adult's hand]], formed as the rivets snapped and buckled hull plates separated, were all that were needed to lay ''Titanic'' low.
29th Aug '16 10:23:31 AM LtFedora
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* ''Titanic: Honor and Glory'': An upcoming video game due for release in 2017. An Oxford graduate is accused of a crime he didn't commit and flees aboard the first ship out of Southampton, the ''Titanic''.

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* ''Titanic: Honor and Glory'': An upcoming video game due for release in 2017. An Oxford graduate is accused of a crime he didn't commit and flees aboard the first ship out of Southampton, the ''Titanic''. When it starts sinking, he only has less than three hours to solve the case and clear his name.
20th Aug '16 10:52:03 AM YT45
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The officer on duty on the bridge, First Officer Murdoch, saw the iceberg too, and ordered "Hard to Starboard" (technically to Port, or a Left Turn, but ''Titanic'' used tiller commands and so the directions were reversed), and ordered all of the engines full astern.

However, in the heat of the moment, Murdoch forgot a vital factor in ''Titanic'''s turning ability: The turbine could not go in reverse, so in a full-astern order it, and the center propeller directly in front of the rudder, simply stopped, and with the two wing propellers turning in reverse, the water flow over the rudder was greatly reduced, rendering the rudder practically useless. He likely ordered it to reduce speed in case they could not turn in time[[note]]The iceberg was sighted a quarter of a mile away and it took thirty seconds for the full tiller command to be implemented.[[/note]], but it has been speculated that had Murdoch ordered only the port engine reversed, or simply left the engines alone, ''Titanic'' could have either missed the iceberg entirely, or collided with greatly reduced damage. But what was done was done, and less than forty seconds later, ''Titanic'' hit the iceberg.

to:

The officer on duty on the bridge, First Officer Murdoch, saw the iceberg too, and ordered "Hard to Starboard" (technically to Port, or a Left Turn, but ''Titanic'' used tiller commands and so the directions were reversed), and ordered all of the engines full astern.

astern. Murdoch then ordered the turn reversed and engines stopped, bringing the bow back towards the iceberg. While seemingly counterintuitive, this order, known as "porting around," was the standard collision-avoidance maneuver, reducing the ship's speed while swinging the stern away from the hazard. Simply turning away could mean presenting the ship's entire side to be ripped open as her existing momentum carried her outside of the ordered turn.

However, in the heat of the moment, Murdoch forgot a vital factor in ''Titanic'''s turning ability: The turbine could not go in reverse, so in a full-astern order it, and the center propeller directly in front of the rudder, simply stopped, and with the two wing propellers turning in reverse, the water flow over the rudder was greatly reduced, rendering the rudder practically useless. He likely ordered it to reduce speed in case they could not turn in time[[note]]The iceberg was sighted a quarter of a mile away and it took thirty seconds for the full tiller command to be implemented.[[/note]], but it has been speculated by some that had Murdoch ordered only the port engine reversed, or simply left the engines alone, ''Titanic'' could have either missed the iceberg entirely, or collided with greatly reduced damage.damage. This is disputed, and porting around was the standard collision-avoidance action for a reason. But what was done was done, and less than forty seconds later, ''Titanic'' hit the iceberg.
14th Aug '16 9:53:53 AM LtFedora
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And at the helm, was Captain E.J. Smith, "The Millionaire's Captain," and White Star's favorite officer, who took out every new ship of the line on her maiden voyage for the past decade and a half. At the age of 63, Smith planned to retire. If not after this voyage on ''Titanic'', then certainly after ''Britannic'''s in the spring of 1915. While the majority of the crew were hired at Southampton in the days prior to the voyage, which was a common practice at the time, Smith's officers were a handpicked collection of White Star's best.

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And at the helm, was Captain E.J. Smith, "The Millionaire's Captain," and White Star's favorite officer, who took out every new ship of the line on her maiden voyage for the past decade and a half. At the age of 63, Smith planned to retire. If not after this voyage on ''Titanic'', then certainly after ''Britannic'''s in the spring of 1915. While the majority of the crew were hired at Southampton in the days prior to the voyage, which was a common practice at the time, Smith's officers were a handpicked collection of White Star's best. For three days, the maiden voyage was calm and without incident.
11th Aug '16 8:32:15 AM LtFedora
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* DrivenToSuicide: Several survivors reported that an officer shot himself just before the final plunge. Some believe this was Captain Smith while others, including several adaptations, depict William Murdoch as doing so. There's little evidence to corroborate who did this, if anyone, and Murdoch's family and hometown are adamant that he died a hero.

to:

* DrivenToSuicide: Several survivors reported that an officer shot himself just before the final plunge. Some believe this was Captain Smith while others, including several adaptations, adaptations depict William Murdoch as doing so. There's little evidence to corroborate who did this, if anyone, and Murdoch's family and hometown are adamant that he died a hero.
7th Aug '16 7:06:34 PM LtFedora
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Added DiffLines:

* DrivenToSuicide: Several survivors reported that an officer shot himself just before the final plunge. Some believe this was Captain Smith while others, including several adaptations, depict William Murdoch as doing so. There's little evidence to corroborate who did this, if anyone, and Murdoch's family and hometown are adamant that he died a hero.
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