History UsefulNotes / Poland

15th Jul '17 9:53:17 AM nombretomado
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In the years preceding the war, the Polish government tried to balance itself between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler had made the loss of territory (which in his mind included the land that Germans had settled in the Partitions and Dissolution of the Commonwealth) after UsefulNotes/WorldWarI to new Eastern European nations such as Czechoslovakia and Poland a campaign priority. To this end Piłsudski had signed Non-Aggression Pacts with the Soviet Union (1932) and Nazi Germany (1934) for pragmatic reasons to stave off a potential invasion from either power. With his death in 1935, the situation began to change. Hitler started to be even more brazen in violating the Versailles agreement about rearmament and the League of Nations, France and Britain were reluctant and intimidated to step in and rein in Germany. The Polish foreign policy greatly relied on Western allies to rein in one or both of its neighbours. This already tense situation was upset by the Sudetenland crisis, where Hitler made a play for the German majority regions in the Czech Republic and diplomats in France, England and the Soviet Union discussed their options, with the Soviet Union advocating military defense of Czechoslovakia (as per one of its committments to the new nation) but requesting passage of its troops through Polish territory in order to enforce it, a condition that Poland was categorical in its refusal. The Polish government eventually sided with Germany's partition of Czechoslovakia claiming the territory of Zaolzie (which had a Polish plurality[[note]]Poland and Czechoslavakia fought a war over it in 1919[[/note]]) as well as Czech Teschen, which was invaded by the Polish Army in 1938 and ceded to Poland after they issued an ultimatum to the government.[[note]]After WorldWarII, Teschen was ceded to Soviet Czechoslovakia and is presently part of the Czech Republic.[[/note]]

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In the years preceding the war, the Polish government tried to balance itself between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. UsefulNotes/AdolfHitler had made the loss of territory (which in his mind included the land that Germans had settled in the Partitions and Dissolution of the Commonwealth) after UsefulNotes/WorldWarI to new Eastern European nations such as Czechoslovakia and Poland a campaign priority. To this end Piłsudski had signed Non-Aggression Pacts with the Soviet Union (1932) and Nazi Germany (1934) for pragmatic reasons to stave off a potential invasion from either power. With his death in 1935, the situation began to change. Hitler started to be even more brazen in violating the Versailles agreement about rearmament and the League of Nations, France and Britain were reluctant and intimidated to step in and rein in Germany. The Polish foreign policy greatly relied on Western allies to rein in one or both of its neighbours. This already tense situation was upset by the Sudetenland crisis, where Hitler made a play for the German majority regions in the Czech Republic and diplomats in France, England and the Soviet Union discussed their options, with the Soviet Union advocating military defense of Czechoslovakia (as per one of its committments to the new nation) but requesting passage of its troops through Polish territory in order to enforce it, a condition that Poland was categorical in its refusal. The Polish government eventually sided with Germany's partition of Czechoslovakia claiming the territory of Zaolzie (which had a Polish plurality[[note]]Poland and Czechoslavakia fought a war over it in 1919[[/note]]) as well as Czech Teschen, which was invaded by the Polish Army in 1938 and ceded to Poland after they issued an ultimatum to the government.[[note]]After WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Teschen was ceded to Soviet Czechoslovakia and is presently part of the Czech Republic.[[/note]]
11th Jul '17 5:56:35 AM Josef5678
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** A Polish accent sounds nothing like a Russian one. Conversely, this leads to an effect in that nobody who speaks English as their native language has any idea what a Polish accent even sounds like. Anyone can imagine and attempt speaking a stereotypical German accent, a Russian one, a French one, an Italian one, a Japanese one, a generic African accent conflating various local languages, but a Polish one? It will just draw a blank. This is why [[Creator/TommyWiseau Tommy Wiseau's]] speech has [[WhatTheHellIsThatAccent baffled people worldwide in regards to his nationality for years]], even giving them the impression that he's an alien or a vampire.

to:

** A Polish accent sounds nothing like a Russian one. Conversely, this leads to an effect in that nobody who speaks English as their native language has any idea what a Polish accent even sounds like. Anyone can imagine and attempt speaking a stereotypical German accent, a Russian one, a French one, an Italian one, a Japanese one, a generic African accent conflating various local languages, but a Polish one? It will just draw a blank. This is why [[Creator/TommyWiseau Tommy Wiseau's]] Creator/TommyWiseau's speech has [[WhatTheHellIsThatAccent baffled people worldwide in regards to his nationality for years]], even giving them the impression that he's an alien or a vampire.
9th Jul '17 3:28:32 AM Jan_z_Michal
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** Tomasz (''Thomas''): Tomek, Tomuś (sickeningly cute), Tomaszek (sickeningly annoying)



There are middle names in Poland but, unlike in the East Slavic countries, these are optional and are one hundred per cent dependant on the parents' decision rather than their own names.

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Fun fact - foreign names are considered either pompous or are associated with lower classes. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are ''somewhat'' popular (just don't expect them to be widespread), they are also punchline of jokes about lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma.

There are middle names in Poland but, unlike in the East Slavic countries, these are optional and are one hundred per cent dependant on the parents' decision rather than their own names.
names. This name will be present in all your documents: ID, registrations, deeds, diplomas and so on, even if it might be otherwise absent from your life. And if you happen to be Catholic (most Poles are), you end up picking by yourself your second (or third) name after a saint during confirmation, but that name exists only in Church documents. A common practical joke: adress mail with [[OverlyLongName all three names and surname, since it usually barely fits on the envelope]].
8th Jul '17 5:17:25 PM Jan_z_Michal
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In formal settings, only the base forms are used - you can call your friend "Janek", but his checks are always signed "Jan". [[note]] Some people try to use their informal names in formal settings, after the American convention of "Bill" or "Jack" but this sounds ridiculous, unless you're a rock star. That's all we'll say of the matter.[[/note]] There's a sketch in which part of the humour is derived from a grown ([[TheCasanova to maturity]]) guy [[InsistentTerminology insistently calling himself]] a "baby" name in a very inappropiate setting (courtroom). BetterThanItSounds.

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In formal settings, only the base forms are used - you can call your friend "Janek", but his checks are always signed "Jan". [[note]] Some [[note]]Some people try to use their informal names in formal settings, after the American convention of "Bill" or "Jack" but this sounds ridiculous, unless you're a rock star. That's all we'll say And rarely, but still parents can get creative (or cruel) and your name ''is'' a diminuitive, requiring constant corrections each time a clerk automatically fills some paper or form with formal version of the matter.said name.[[/note]] There's a sketch in which part of the humour is derived from a grown ([[TheCasanova to maturity]]) guy [[InsistentTerminology insistently calling himself]] a "baby" name in a very inappropiate setting (courtroom). BetterThanItSounds.
4th Jul '17 1:47:51 PM Jan_z_Michal
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[[caption-width-right:328: Poland's current map and borders, dating to 1945[[note]]See [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_Poland here]] for a quick snapshot of its territorial evolution[[/note]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:328: Poland's current map and borders, dating to 1945[[note]]See Europe's ButtMonkey[[note]]See [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_Poland here]] for a quick snapshot of its territorial evolution[[/note]]]]



Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Polska''), officially known today as the Republic of Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Rzeczpospolita Polska''). Located in the intersection of Central and Eastern Europe, which naturally made it take a major role in the history of Eastern Europe, not only in the history of its people but also that of Lithuania, Ukraine, Russia, Austria and Germany. It's quite impossible to understand those countries without reckoning with the important role played by Poland in their history. Like most of its neighbors, [[NewerThanTheyThink its history is actually quite young]], having been Christianized around 966 AD with the baptism of Mieszko I. From the 1300s to the late 1600s, Poland was ''the'' Great Power of Eastern Europe, but a series of shocking defeats in the very bloody and violent 17th Century, led it to decline in favour of first Sweden, then Russia, Prussia and Austria, and later UsefulNotes/NaziGermany and [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheUSSR the Soviet Union]], resulting in a ShockingDefeatLegacy of defeat, occupation, partition and dissolution, that gave it the reputation of being the picked-on kid with glasses of the European school playground for most of its history. Between the late 1700s-1945, its borders have been reduced, eaten away by neighbouring powers, then disappearing entirely, before reappearing again after more than a century. So let's launch into the history of Poland which is in turn a history of Eastern Europe, fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

to:

Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Polska''), officially known today as the Republic of Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Rzeczpospolita Polska''). Located in the intersection of Central and Eastern Europe, which naturally made it take a major role in the history of Eastern Europe, not only in the history of its people but also that of Lithuania, Ukraine, Russia, Austria and Germany. It's quite impossible to understand those countries without reckoning with the important role played by Poland in their history. Like most of its neighbors, [[NewerThanTheyThink its history is actually quite young]], having been Christianized around 966 AD with the baptism of Mieszko I. From the 1300s to the late 1600s, Poland was ''the'' Great Power of Eastern Europe, but a series of shocking defeats in the very bloody and violent 17th Century, led it to decline in favour of first Sweden, then Russia, Prussia and Austria, and later UsefulNotes/NaziGermany and [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheUSSR the Soviet Union]], resulting in a ShockingDefeatLegacy of defeat, occupation, partition and dissolution, that gave it the reputation of being the picked-on kid with glasses of the European school playground for most of its history. Between the late 1700s-1945, its Its borders have been reduced, eaten away by neighbouring powers, then constantly shifted over the centuries, expanding and contracting and for a long time, disappearing entirely, before reappearing again after more than a century.off the map entirely. So let's launch into the history of Poland which is in turn a history of Eastern Europe, fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.
4th Jul '17 12:24:10 PM JulianLapostat
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[[caption-width-right:328: Europe's ButtMonkey]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:328: Europe's ButtMonkey]]
Poland's current map and borders, dating to 1945[[note]]See [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_Poland here]] for a quick snapshot of its territorial evolution[[/note]]]]



Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Polska''), officially known today as the Republic of Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Rzeczpospolita Polska''). Located in the intersection of Central and Eastern Europe, which naturally made it the the picked-on kid with glasses of the European school playground for most of its history. Its borders have constantly shifted over the centuries, expanding and contracting and for a long time, disappearing off the map entirely. So let's launch into the history of Poland which is in turn a history of Eastern Europe, fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

to:

Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Polska''), officially known today as the Republic of Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Rzeczpospolita Polska''). Located in the intersection of Central and Eastern Europe, which naturally made it take a major role in the history of Eastern Europe, not only in the history of its people but also that of Lithuania, Ukraine, Russia, Austria and Germany. It's quite impossible to understand those countries without reckoning with the important role played by Poland in their history. Like most of its neighbors, [[NewerThanTheyThink its history is actually quite young]], having been Christianized around 966 AD with the baptism of Mieszko I. From the 1300s to the late 1600s, Poland was ''the'' Great Power of Eastern Europe, but a series of shocking defeats in the very bloody and violent 17th Century, led it to decline in favour of first Sweden, then Russia, Prussia and Austria, and later UsefulNotes/NaziGermany and [[UsefulNotes/HistoryOfTheUSSR the Soviet Union]], resulting in a ShockingDefeatLegacy of defeat, occupation, partition and dissolution, that gave it the reputation of being the picked-on kid with glasses of the European school playground for most of its history. Its Between the late 1700s-1945, its borders have constantly shifted over the centuries, expanding and contracting and for a long time, been reduced, eaten away by neighbouring powers, then disappearing off the map entirely.entirely, before reappearing again after more than a century. So let's launch into the history of Poland which is in turn a history of Eastern Europe, fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.
7th Jun '17 6:30:30 PM MaciekOst
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Added DiffLines:

** A Polish accent sounds nothing like a Russian one. Conversely, this leads to an effect in that nobody who speaks English as their native language has any idea what a Polish accent even sounds like. Anyone can imagine and attempt speaking a stereotypical German accent, a Russian one, a French one, an Italian one, a Japanese one, a generic African accent conflating various local languages, but a Polish one? It will just draw a blank. This is why [[Creator/TommyWiseau Tommy Wiseau's]] speech has [[WhatTheHellIsThatAccent baffled people worldwide in regards to his nationality for years]], even giving them the impression that he's an alien or a vampire.
29th May '17 4:09:41 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Polska''), officially known today as the Republic of Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Rzeczpospolita Polska''). Located in the intersection of Central and Eastern Europe, which naturally made it the the picked-on kid with glasses of the European school playground for most of its history. It's borders have constantly shifted over the centuries, expanding and contracting and for a long time, disappearing off the map entirely. So let's launch into the history of Poland which is in turn a history of Eastern Europe, fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

to:

Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Polska''), officially known today as the Republic of Poland ('''Polish:''' ''Rzeczpospolita Polska''). Located in the intersection of Central and Eastern Europe, which naturally made it the the picked-on kid with glasses of the European school playground for most of its history. It's Its borders have constantly shifted over the centuries, expanding and contracting and for a long time, disappearing off the map entirely. So let's launch into the history of Poland which is in turn a history of Eastern Europe, fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.
25th May '17 8:30:16 AM Marmozeta
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Poland lost a fifth of its population in the war -- ''seven million'' people in all, mostly civilians. Out of a pre-war Jewish population of 3.3 million, only 300,000 survived (Poland's Jewish population were Polish citizens; Israel did not exist until after the war). A contentious issue among Poles is the wartime anti-semitism.[[note]]Not to be mistaken for "collaboration with Nazism" -- this would be an abuse of the term.[[/note]] While Poland was formerly religiously tolerant, during the 19th Century, anti-semitism had risen among parts of Poland and in the inter-war years. It is known that anti-semitic massacres such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jedwabne_pogrom Jedwabne massacre]] were conducted by Polish peasants, many of whom accused Polish Jews of being collaborators with the Soviets, leading to a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Żydokomuna particularly nasty strain]] with, naturally, very little basis in reality. After the Holocaust, several Jews who returned home [[HappyEndingOverride became victims of reprisals]] from citizens who had bought their property and killed them for returning. The Communists for their part, were quite happy to publicize these incidents and associate its opponents and Home Army sympathizers with fascist collaborators, while erasing their involvement in the Katyn massacre. It must be noted that [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rescue_of_Jews_by_Poles_during_the_Holocaust 6620 Poles are considered Righteous Among the Nations]], more than any other European nation. This includes author Janusz Korczak and the Catholic priest Maximilien (Maksymilian) Kolbe among others.[[note]]As a finishing note, Poles are ''really'' cranky about the phrase "Polish death camps" -- they see it as highly offensive loaded words. Think of calling the 9/11 WTC strikes "the act of American terror". Or better yet: "Jewish death camps" -- technically true, if you are into sophistry, but turning the meaning on its head.[[/note]]

to:

Poland lost a fifth of its population in the war -- ''seven million'' people in all, mostly civilians. Out of a pre-war Jewish population of 3.3 million, only 300,000 survived (Poland's Jewish population were Polish citizens; Israel did not exist until after the war). A contentious issue among Poles is the wartime anti-semitism.[[note]]Not to be mistaken for "collaboration with Nazism" -- this would be an abuse of the term.[[/note]] While Poland was formerly religiously tolerant, during the 19th Century, anti-semitism had risen among parts of Poland and in the inter-war years. It is known that anti-semitic massacres such as the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jedwabne_pogrom Jedwabne massacre]] were conducted by Polish peasants, many of whom accused Polish Jews of being collaborators with the Soviets, leading to a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Żydokomuna particularly nasty strain]] with, naturally, very little basis in reality. After the Holocaust, several Jews who returned home [[HappyEndingOverride became victims of reprisals]] from citizens who had bought their property and killed them for returning. The Communists for their part, were quite happy to publicize these incidents and associate its opponents and Home Army sympathizers with fascist collaborators, while erasing their involvement in the Katyn massacre. It must be noted that [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rescue_of_Jews_by_Poles_during_the_Holocaust 6620 Poles are considered Righteous Among the Nations]], more than any other European nation. This includes author Janusz Korczak and the Catholic priest Maximilien (Maksymilian) Kolbe among others.[[note]]As a finishing note, Poles are ''really'' cranky about the phrase "Polish death camps" -- they see it as highly offensive loaded words. Think of calling the 9/11 WTC strikes "the act of American terror". Or better yet: "Jewish death camps" -- technically true, if you are into sophistry, but turning the meaning on its head.[[/note]]
24th May '17 3:00:31 PM Jan_z_Michal
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* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. Mostly for worse, creating a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and being directly responsible for more than one suicidal uprising, further glorified into "true patriotism". Nowdays it's almost entirely associated with being TooDumbToLive and making Poles even more bitter.

to:

* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. Mostly for worse, creating a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and being directly responsible for more than one suicidal suicidal, pointless uprising, further glorified into "true patriotism". Nowdays it's almost entirely associated with being TooDumbToLive and making Poles even more bitter.
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