History UsefulNotes / Poland

20th Apr '18 3:13:32 AM Veanne
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Fun fact - foreign names (or regular names in their Anglicised forms) are considered the height of cheapest snobbery. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are in use, they are also punchline of jokes about the lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma. If you absolutely must give your Polish character a Celtic name, Brygida (Bridget) and Artur (Arthur) are old and established enough not to carry the stigma and are the best choices, although Brygida is rather rare.

to:

Fun fact - foreign names (or regular names in their Anglicised forms) are considered the height of cheapest snobbery. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are in use, they are also punchline of jokes about the lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma. [[note]]PlayedForLaughs in the urban fantasy novel ''Podatek'', where being named "Pamela" drove a girl [[TheSociopath mad]] enough that she is now the chief enforcer of the magical mafia, whose mood has two settings: EmotionlessGirl and the one that magicks you into next Tuesday. And even the boss of said mafia is careful to call her by her chosen nickname, "Czarna Kasieńka" (Black Katie).[[/note]] If you absolutely must give your Polish character a Celtic name, Brygida (Bridget) and Artur (Arthur) are old and established enough not to carry the stigma and are the best choices, although Brygida is rather rare.
5th Mar '18 1:41:45 AM Janko_Walski
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* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. For worse, as it created a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and was partly responsible for more than one suicidal, pointless uprising. On the other hand, it kept Poles together under the foregin rule and helped their culture perservere despite Russian and German efforts to erase it.

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* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. For worse, as it created a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and was partly responsible for more than one suicidal, pointless uprising. On the other hand, it kept Poles together under the foregin rule and helped their culture perservere despite Russian and German efforts to erase it.
3rd Mar '18 11:10:13 AM nombretomado
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** UsefulNotes/TheTeutonicKnights are bad, UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan is good[[note]]for his stance against USSR[[/note]], Piłsudski is a hero and don't call him a dictator, even if he was one. Poland had a historically close relationship with the UnitedStates after the fall of communism and one of her most loyal allies. Poles are, on the whole, less turned off by hawkish American politicians than the rest of Europe, and several Polish intellectuals eagerly supported the Iraq War.

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** UsefulNotes/TheTeutonicKnights are bad, UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan is good[[note]]for his stance against USSR[[/note]], Piłsudski is a hero and don't call him a dictator, even if he was one. Poland had a historically close relationship with the UnitedStates UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates after the fall of communism and one of her most loyal allies. Poles are, on the whole, less turned off by hawkish American politicians than the rest of Europe, and several Polish intellectuals eagerly supported the Iraq War.
28th Feb '18 9:31:40 AM Ernei
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* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. Mostly for worse, creating a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and being directly responsible for more than one suicidal, pointless uprising, further glorified into "true patriotism". On the other hand, it kept the Poles together under the foreginreign and helped their culture perservere despite Russian and German efforts to erase it.

to:

* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. Mostly for For worse, creating as it created a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and being directly was partly responsible for more than one suicidal, pointless uprising, further glorified into "true patriotism". uprising. On the other hand, it kept the Poles together under the foreginreign foregin rule and helped their culture perservere despite Russian and German efforts to erase it.
28th Feb '18 9:27:42 AM Ernei
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* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. Mostly for worse, creating a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and being directly responsible for more than one suicidal, pointless uprising, further glorified into "true patriotism". Nowdays it's almost entirely associated with being TooDumbToLive and making Poles even more bitter.

to:

* DoomedMoralVictor: After the partiations of Poland, this stance was turned into the cornerstone of Polish culture, for better or worse. Mostly for worse, creating a lot of inferiority complexes, fatalistic attitude and being directly responsible for more than one suicidal, pointless uprising, further glorified into "true patriotism". Nowdays it's almost entirely associated with being TooDumbToLive and making On the other hand, it kept the Poles even more bitter.together under the foreginreign and helped their culture perservere despite Russian and German efforts to erase it.
24th Feb '18 2:21:46 PM nombretomado
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Generally speaking, these dimunitives bear a strong resemblance to those used in [[RussianNamingConvention Russia]] but they're not used just ''as'' extensively and most of the time they seem to share a much closer bond with their original forms. The most cryptic it can get is the rare and optional ocassions when some of the initial and middle vowels are omitted (i.e. ''Helena'' turns into ''Ela'' and ''Małgorzata'' becomes ''Gosia'') and the Russian level of obtuse (such as ''Sasha'' being dimunitive to ''Alexander'' or ''Alexandra'') is largely avoided.

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Generally speaking, these dimunitives bear a strong resemblance to those used in [[RussianNamingConvention [[UsefulNotes/RussianNamingConvention Russia]] but they're not used just ''as'' extensively and most of the time they seem to share a much closer bond with their original forms. The most cryptic it can get is the rare and optional ocassions when some of the initial and middle vowels are omitted (i.e. ''Helena'' turns into ''Ela'' and ''Małgorzata'' becomes ''Gosia'') and the Russian level of obtuse (such as ''Sasha'' being dimunitive to ''Alexander'' or ''Alexandra'') is largely avoided.
17th Feb '18 1:47:58 AM nombretomado
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Immigrants (and there were immigrants to UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth, from Germany, Scotland and further) brought their own names, which were later polonised in spelling, if needed: a German calling himself "[[ADogNamedDog Deutscher]]" might be known as Dajczer to his neighbours. [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Irena Adler]] is a perfectly plausible name for a singer from Warsaw. Lithuanian names have a very distinctive sound, like Daszuta or Żyłajtys [[note]] Modern Lithuanians tend to use their own versions of some names, like Mickevičius for Mickiewicz - he was their poet, too. Don't be confused[[/note]]. Some of these names are not inflected (e.g. Adler), some are - if in doubt, ask. PolishJews were forced into adopting surnames by the [[UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} partitioning]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} powers]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Austria}} in XIX century]] -- these were mostly the fruit of some clerk's "creativity", but in a pinch, Ashkenazi stereotypes like "-berg" or "-stein" are perfectly acceptable (polonised or not). From the newer history, in the parts of Poland gained from WorldWarII (Western Pomerania and Lower Silesia) there are lots of people of [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian]] origin, due to forced deportations after the war. Their surnames sound very similar to those originally Polish, but some suffixes (like -enko or -uk), as well as sound changes that occured at the stage of East-West Slavic division (g-h, v-b etc.) sound distinctly Ukrainian to native speakers.

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Immigrants (and there were immigrants to UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth, from Germany, Scotland and further) brought their own names, which were later polonised in spelling, if needed: a German calling himself "[[ADogNamedDog Deutscher]]" might be known as Dajczer to his neighbours. [[Franchise/SherlockHolmes Irena Adler]] is a perfectly plausible name for a singer from Warsaw. Lithuanian names have a very distinctive sound, like Daszuta or Żyłajtys [[note]] Modern Lithuanians tend to use their own versions of some names, like Mickevičius for Mickiewicz - he was their poet, too. Don't be confused[[/note]]. Some of these names are not inflected (e.g. Adler), some are - if in doubt, ask. PolishJews UsefulNotes/PolishJews were forced into adopting surnames by the [[UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} partitioning]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} powers]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Austria}} in XIX century]] -- these were mostly the fruit of some clerk's "creativity", but in a pinch, Ashkenazi stereotypes like "-berg" or "-stein" are perfectly acceptable (polonised or not). From the newer history, in the parts of Poland gained from WorldWarII (Western Pomerania and Lower Silesia) there are lots of people of [[UsefulNotes/{{Ukraine}} Ukrainian]] origin, due to forced deportations after the war. Their surnames sound very similar to those originally Polish, but some suffixes (like -enko or -uk), as well as sound changes that occured at the stage of East-West Slavic division (g-h, v-b etc.) sound distinctly Ukrainian to native speakers.
11th Feb '18 7:47:21 PM nombretomado
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As for Krystyna - if you're her school colleague (modern speaker) you'll probably call her Krystyna (or Krysia) Kowalik. Older people, though (very old or very tongue-in-cheek) would know her as Krystyna Kowalikówna, which is the leftover of old {{patronymic}} forms. Panna (miss) Krystyna Kowalikówna. Surnames ending with a vowel gain an -anka instead (eg. the daughter of mr. Skarga would be miss Skarżanka). Now you're ready to understand the joke in which the doctor says to a young woman: "Mrs. Kowalikowa, I have good news." and she replies "I'm Kowalikówna." "In that case, [[ButICantBePregnant I have bad news.]]" (Nobody said it was a good joke).

to:

As for Krystyna - if you're her school colleague (modern speaker) you'll probably call her Krystyna (or Krysia) Kowalik. Older people, though (very old or very tongue-in-cheek) would know her as Krystyna Kowalikówna, which is the leftover of old {{patronymic}} {{UsefulNotes/patronymic}} forms. Panna (miss) Krystyna Kowalikówna. Surnames ending with a vowel gain an -anka instead (eg. the daughter of mr. Skarga would be miss Skarżanka). Now you're ready to understand the joke in which the doctor says to a young woman: "Mrs. Kowalikowa, I have good news." and she replies "I'm Kowalikówna." "In that case, [[ButICantBePregnant I have bad news.]]" (Nobody said it was a good joke).
3rd Feb '18 7:02:13 AM Veanne
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Fun fact - foreign names (or regular names in their Anglicised forms) are considered the height of cheapest snobbery. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are in use, they are also punchline of jokes about the lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma. If you absolutely must give your Polish character a Celtic name, Brygida (Bridget) or Artur (Arthur) don't carry the stigma and are the best choices, although Brugida is rather rare.

to:

Fun fact - foreign names (or regular names in their Anglicised forms) are considered the height of cheapest snobbery. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are in use, they are also punchline of jokes about the lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma. If you absolutely must give your Polish character a Celtic name, Brygida (Bridget) or and Artur (Arthur) don't are old and established enough not to carry the stigma and are the best choices, although Brugida Brygida is rather rare.
3rd Feb '18 7:00:33 AM Veanne
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Fun fact - foreign names (or regular names in their Anglicised forms) are considered the height of cheapest snobbery. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are in use, they are also punchline of jokes about the lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma. If you absolutely must have a Celtic name for your Polish character, Brygida (Bridget) or Artur (Arthur) don't carry the and are the best choices.

to:

Fun fact - foreign names (or regular names in their Anglicised forms) are considered the height of cheapest snobbery. For example, while English names like Kevin, Jessica or Brian and their Polonised forms are in use, they are also punchline of jokes about the lowest of low and carry a hefty social stigma. If you absolutely must have a Celtic name for give your Polish character, character a Celtic name, Brygida (Bridget) or Artur (Arthur) don't carry the stigma and are the best choices.
choices, although Brugida is rather rare.



Anna, though - if you're feeling modern, call her Anna Kowalik. No problem. If she were the wife of Piotr Kowalski, she'd be called Anna Kowalsk'''a''' - adjective-like names inflect by gender (like adjectives). For more old fashioned speakers, though, Anna Kowalik is Anna Kowalik'''owa''' (compare the [[AncientRome Roman convention]] of ''Terentia Ciceronis'' - same thing). Some female writers from XIX and early XX century were known under their husbands' surnames, like Eliza Orzeszkowa (mr. Orzeszko obviously existed, but he died before his wife was famous and we don't tend to remember him otherwise). Others used their fathers' surnames (see below), or witty {{Nom De Plume}}s.

As for Krystyna - if you're her school colleague (modern speaker) you'll probably call her Krystyna (or Krysia) Kowalik. Older people, though (very old or very tongue-in-cheek) would know her as Krystyna Kowalikówna, which is the leftover of old {{patronymic}} forms. Panna (miss) Krystyna Kowalikówna. Now you're ready to understand the joke in which the doctor says to a young woman: "Mrs. Kowalikowa, I have good news." and she replies "I'm Kowalikówna." "In that case, [[ButICantBePregnant I have bad news.]]" (Nobody said it was a good joke).

to:

Anna, though - if you're feeling modern, call her Anna Kowalik. No problem. If she were the wife of Piotr Kowalski, she'd be called Anna Kowalsk'''a''' - adjective-like names inflect by gender (like adjectives). For more old fashioned speakers, though, Anna Kowalik is Anna Kowalik'''owa''' (compare the [[AncientRome Roman convention]] of ''Terentia Ciceronis'' - same thing).thing), and if her husband's surname ended with a vowel, she might be called Zarembina (that's the wife or mr. Zaremba). Some female writers from XIX and early XX century were known under their husbands' surnames, like Eliza Orzeszkowa (mr. Orzeszko obviously existed, but he died before his wife was famous and we don't tend to remember him otherwise). Others used their fathers' surnames (see below), or witty {{Nom De Plume}}s.

As for Krystyna - if you're her school colleague (modern speaker) you'll probably call her Krystyna (or Krysia) Kowalik. Older people, though (very old or very tongue-in-cheek) would know her as Krystyna Kowalikówna, which is the leftover of old {{patronymic}} forms. Panna (miss) Krystyna Kowalikówna. Surnames ending with a vowel gain an -anka instead (eg. the daughter of mr. Skarga would be miss Skarżanka). Now you're ready to understand the joke in which the doctor says to a young woman: "Mrs. Kowalikowa, I have good news." and she replies "I'm Kowalikówna." "In that case, [[ButICantBePregnant I have bad news.]]" (Nobody said it was a good joke).
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