History UsefulNotes / NationalRail

19th Sep '16 11:30:26 AM Exxolon
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- --

to:

\n - --* ''Series/OhDoctorBeeching'' is named after and set during the titular Doctor's review of the railways.

''Mind the gap between the end of these useful notes and the navigation links below please''
17th Sep '16 5:23:05 PM Arch9enius
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British Railways operated a [[SchizoTech collection of rolling stock]] from Victorian-era six-wheelers and locomotives still eking out an existance on branch lines to the top-link express locomotives of the big four and their predecessors, their own advanced designs and the harbingers of modernisation such as the electric blue and bespeedwhiskered Deltic prototype and GWR railcars. The late '50s to early '60s were probably the golden age of [[RailEnthusiast trainspotting]] as a result.



British Railways operated a [[SchizoTech collection of rolling stock]] from Victorian-era six-wheelers and locomotives still eking out an existance on branch lines to the top-link express locomotives of the big four and their predecessors, their own advanced designs and the harbingers of modernisation such as the electric blue and bespeedwhiskered Deltic prototype and GWR railcars. The late '50s to early '60s were probably the golden age of [[RailEnthusiast trainspotting]] as a result.
12th Sep '16 6:24:58 PM Arch9enius
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British Railways operated a [[SchizoTech collection of rolling stock]] from Victorian-era six-wheelers and locomotives still eking out an existance on branch lines to the top-link express locomotives of the big four and their predecessors, their own advanced designs and the harbingers of modernisation such as the electric blue and bespeedwhiskered Deltic prototype and GWR railcars. The late '50s to early '60s were probably the golden age of [[RailEnthusiast trainspotting]] as a result.



It was also thought that passenger numbers were in decline or would remain stagnant at best. In reality whilst the percentage of people chosing rail over other forms of transport has not changed, the population has, and passenger numbers have increased appropriatly. The network now carries more people now than in the late 19th c. when it had a monopoly.



* London Marylebone. Only six platforms, it provides Chiltern Railways' all-diesel services along the Chiltern Main Line to Birmingham and beyond - it is the only non-electrified London terminus. It was the historic terminus of the Great Central Railway (GCR), which was built to European loading gauge standards and in anticipation of a connection to the Channel Tunnel that never came to fruition. The GCR was closed under Dr. Beeching's "axe", although some of it is now a heritage route.

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* London Marylebone. Only six platforms, it provides Chiltern Railways' all-diesel services along the Chiltern Main Line to Birmingham and beyond - it is the only non-electrified London terminus. It was the historic terminus of the Great Central Railway (GCR), which was built to European loading gauge standards and in anticipation of a connection to the Channel Tunnel that never came to fruition. The GCR was closed under Dr. Beeching's "axe", although some of it is now a heritage route. British Rail coopted the ornate hotel at 222 Marylebone Road as their corporate headqurters.



Most of the trains in regular service the network now have automatic doors, while the rest have doors that are locked remotely pre-departure and can be opened only after arrival. Bizarrely, to leave a non-retrofitted Mk3 carriage[[note]]still the most common type on long-distance services[[/note]]you must open the window, lean out of it, and use the door handle on the outside - much to the confusion of uninformed tourists. Not counting the Eurostar trains, the fastest ones on the network are the Class 91 "Intercity 225" loco-hauled trains found on the East Coast Main Line, the Class 390 "Pendolino" units on the West Coast Main Line, and fastest of all (at 140mph top speed) Southeastern's Class 395 "[[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High-Speed]]" or "Javelin" trains, which partly use domestic sections of Eurostar track with overhead wiring, and partly third-rail commuter lines at slower speeds.

to:

Most of the trains in regular service the network now have automatic doors, while the rest have doors that are locked remotely pre-departure and can be opened only after arrival. Bizarrely, to leave a non-retrofitted Mk3 carriage[[note]]still the most common type on long-distance services[[/note]]you must open the window, lean out of it, and use the door handle on the outside - much to the confusion of uninformed tourists. Not counting the Eurostar trains, the fastest ones on the network are the InterCity 125, the current confirmed record holder as the fastest diesel-powered train at 148 mph (238 km/h), the Class 91 "Intercity 225" loco-hauled trains found on the East Coast Main Line, the Class 390 "Pendolino" units on the West Coast Main Line, and fastest of all (at 140mph top speed) Southeastern's Class 395 "[[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High-Speed]]" or "Javelin" trains, which partly use domestic sections of Eurostar track with overhead wiring, and partly third-rail commuter lines at slower speeds.



* Class 43 (HST) power car - the world's fastest diesel locomotive, the 'Intercity 125' (always operated as two power cars with a number, varying between franchise, of Mark 3 coaches between them) is nearing the end of its life, but is still very common, especially on the Great Western line.

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* Class 43 (HST) power car - the world's fastest diesel locomotive, the 'Intercity 125' (always operated as two power cars with a number, varying between franchise, of Mark 3 coaches between them) is nearing the end of its life, life despite new engines, but is still very common, especially on the Great Western line.



* Class 37: A diesel locomotive built for BR in the 1960s, many of these still run over both Network Rail and Heritage lines. Known to Rail Enthusiasts as "tractors" due to the distinctive sound of their engines.

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* Class 37: A diesel locomotive built for BR in the 1960s, many of these still run over both Network Rail and Heritage lines. They have a low axle load, meaning high route availability. Known to Rail Enthusiasts as "tractors" due to the distinctive sound of their engines.



* Class 66: A version of an American (EMD) design, these are nicknamed 'Sheds', because, well, they look like one. Very distinctive shapes, due to the pointed roof and large windows. Carry a number of liveries, including Freightliner, EWS, GBRF, Railfreight Services and DB Schenker.
* Class 70: Another recent US-designed locomotive (GE this time), these are operated by Freightliner and Colas Rail.
* Class 90: Electric locomotive powered by overhead wires and operated by several companies.


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* Class 66: A version of an American (EMD) design, these are nicknamed 'Sheds', because, well, they look like one. Very distinctive shapes, due to the pointed roof corrugated sides and large windows.windows. Also notable at their introduction for hardly ever breaking down. Carry a number of liveries, including Freightliner, EWS, GBRF, Railfreight Services and DB Schenker.
* Class 70: Another recent US-designed locomotive (GE this time), these are operated by Freightliner and Colas Rail.
Rail. Some were built in Turkey.
* Class 90: Electric locomotive powered by overhead wires and operated by several companies.

companies. A late British Rail era replacement for [[EveryCarIsAPinto several electric locomotives of the 80-series]]. They have cabs similar to a class 91 but not as pointy, and weren't as fast (110 mph).




* Class 55 'Deltic' - known for their distinctive sound from their two-stroke engine, these diesels were a major improvement in East Coast performance; they were clocking 100mph regularly from 1963. After their replacement by the HST, six have preserved and still do railtours.

to:

* Class 55 'Deltic' - known for their distinctive sound from their pair of two-stroke engine, engines, these diesels were a major improvement in East Coast performance; they were clocking 100mph regularly from 1963. After their replacement by the HST, six have preserved and still do railtours.



* Britain has historically the most heavily restricted 'loading gauge' to rail width in the world, which basically means that the trains tend to be less wide and less tall than those on the continent; this can cause issues when shipping freight between countries and indeed the first Eurostar trains, the Class 373, are slightly smaller versions of the TGV designed for use on British lines in the south of England that the service ran through until the opening of [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed 1]]. Running Eurostars beyond London as was initially planned is much complicated by that fact and the rise of low cost airlines has all but guaranteed no such service at least until the opening of High Speed 2. This has also precluded the widespread adoption (or indeed much adoption at all) of double-decker trains, the only example being the two 4DD [=EMUs=] built for the Southern Railway in 1949; they weren't very successful, but stayed in service until 1971, well into the BR era.
* The standard platform height is 915mm (give or take 25mm) compared with the much lower heights in many other countries - you will only have to make one step up to the train when boarding as opposed to the two or three elsewhere.

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* Britain has historically the most heavily restricted 'loading gauge' to rail width in the world, which basically means that the trains tend to be less wide and less tall than those on the continent; this can cause issues when shipping freight between countries and indeed the first Eurostar trains, the Class 373, are slightly smaller versions of the TGV designed for use on British lines in the south of England that the service ran through until the opening of [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed 1]]. Running Eurostars beyond London as was initially planned is much complicated by that fact and the rise of low cost airlines has all but guaranteed no such service at least until the opening of High Speed 2. This has also precluded the widespread adoption (or indeed much adoption at all) of double-decker trains, the only example being the two 4DD [=EMUs=] built for the Southern Railway in 1949; they weren't very successful, and weren't really double deckers, but stayed in service until 1971, well into the BR era.
* The standard platform height is 915mm (give or take 25mm) compared with the much lower heights in many other countries - you will only have to make one step up to the train when boarding as opposed to the two or three elsewhere.
elsewhere. The platform also impinges on the loading gauge, making British rolling stock use taller wheels and frames then those on the continent.
10th Sep '16 1:08:23 AM Morgenthaler
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->''The supply of [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire an Empire]]''
->''Where [[BadassBoast the sun never set.]]''
->''[[TheRemnant Which is now deep in darkness,]]''
->''[[HopeSpot But there railway's there yet.]]''

to:

->''The supply of [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishEmpire an Empire]]''
Empire''
->''Where [[BadassBoast the sun never set.]]''
->''[[TheRemnant Which
''
->''Which
is now deep in darkness,]]''
->''[[HopeSpot But
darkness,''
->''But
there railway's there yet.]]''''
10th Sep '16 1:07:58 AM Morgenthaler
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All these stations, again, are in [[OneLondonThirtyThreeBoroughs Central London]]. Paddington, Marylebone, Charing Cross, and Victoria are in the City of Westminster; Euston, St. Pancras, and King's Cross are in the Borough of Camden; Liverpool Street, Fenchurch Street, Cannon Street, and Blackfriars are in the City; London Bridge is in Southwark; and Waterloo is in Lambeth.

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All these stations, again, are in [[OneLondonThirtyThreeBoroughs [[UsefulNotes/OneLondonThirtyThreeBoroughs Central London]]. Paddington, Marylebone, Charing Cross, and Victoria are in the City of Westminster; Euston, St. Pancras, and King's Cross are in the Borough of Camden; Liverpool Street, Fenchurch Street, Cannon Street, and Blackfriars are in the City; London Bridge is in Southwark; and Waterloo is in Lambeth.
6th Sep '16 3:23:36 AM SilentHunterUK
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The British railway system also has the distinction of hosting the world's most scenic railway journey, as voted by the travel magazine ''Wanderlust''. The West Highland line, which links Glasgow to the highland port towns of Oban and Mallaig, has held the title for three years, beating the Trans-Siberian Railway and the Cuzco-Macchu Picchu line in Peru. It passes over Rannoch Moor and the Glenfinnan viaduct, where HarryPotter was attacked by Dementors. In summer, part of the route is covered by regular steam trains marketed as "The Jacobite".

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The British railway system also has the distinction of hosting the world's most scenic railway journey, as voted by the travel magazine ''Wanderlust''. The West Highland line, which links Glasgow to the highland port towns of Oban and Mallaig, has held the title for three years, beating the Trans-Siberian Railway and the Cuzco-Macchu Picchu line in Peru. It passes over Rannoch Moor and the Glenfinnan viaduct, where HarryPotter was attacked by Dementors. In summer, part of the route from Fort William (sleeper trains run from London Euston) to Mallaig is covered by regular steam trains marketed as "The Jacobite".
Jacobite" and which sell a large array of Potter merchandise.



* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern.

to:

* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world.world, but takes a long while to get around. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern. Thameslink services between Bedford and Brighton call at the lower level station, designated Platforms A and B to avoid confusion.



* London Liverpool Street. Used to be grimy and confusing to get around due to its split-level concourse, but was completely refurbished in the early 1980s and is now bright, airy and spacious... except for platforms 11-18. Home of the Abellio Greater Anglia services to the Anglia region, the network was formerly known as "one" (sic), which led to jokes, like "The eleven twenty-one one service". Or confusion, as in "[[WhosOnFirst The 1120 "one" service...]]"

to:

* London Moorgate: Has 10 platforms, but 5-6 are disused following the withdrawal of Thameslink services from Farringdon when platform extension there severed the line, which is now used for storage. Of the rest, LondonUnderground operates from 1-4 and 7-8, with the only National Rail services being from platforms 9-10, with Great Northern operating full size dual-voltage trains using third rail up to Finsbury Park on what was a branch of the Northern Line until 1975, where it was the site of the worst peace time disaster in the network's history, after a train failed to stop at Platform 9 and ploughed into the end wall of the tunnel beyond, killing 43 people - the precise reason the driver failed to stop remains unknown. These two platforms (and indeed, the rest of the branch) are still laid out in their 1990s appearance under the British Rail [=Network SouthEast=] brand and are currently served by trains built in the mid-1970s.
* London Liverpool Street. Used to be grimy and confusing to get around due to its split-level concourse, but was completely refurbished in the early 1980s and is now bright, airy and spacious... except for platforms 11-18. Home of the Abellio Greater Anglia services to the Anglia region, the network was formerly known as "one" (sic), which led to jokes, like "The eleven twenty-one one service". Or confusion, as in "[[WhosOnFirst The 1120 "one" service...]]"]]". It is now also served by London Overground and [=TfL Rail=] suburban services; the latter being the beta version of the Elizabeth Line aka Crossrail 1 running to Shenfield.



** The Broadgate shopping centre next door sits on the site of the former Broad Street terminus, closed in 1986.



* London Fenchurch Street. Has a graceful curved pediment above the main entrance. Only four platforms and home to c2c, the rebranded LTS Rail. The London, Tilbury and Southend Line, formerly dubbed "The Misery Line", a moniker it has now lost after new trains were introduced (the Class 312 slam door trains were not nice at all). Fairly nice station- just make sure you go out the right exit if you're transferring to Tower Hill. The only London terminus with no directly-linked tube station, although Aldgate and Tower Hill are quite close.

to:

* London Fenchurch Street. Has a graceful curved pediment above the main entrance. Only four platforms and home to c2c, the rebranded LTS Rail. The London, Tilbury and Southend Line, formerly dubbed "The Misery Line", a moniker it has now lost after new trains were introduced (the Class 312 slam door trains were not nice at all). Fairly nice station- station - just make sure you go out the right exit (the one from the middle of the platforms) if you're transferring to Tower Hill. The only London terminus with no directly-linked tube station, although Aldgate and Tower Hill are quite close.



* London Bridge (always called that, since it's the actual name of the nearby bridge). The main part of the station is a terminus, but some lines run past it and on to Waterloo East and Charing Cross, or to Cannon Street, or to Blackfriars, St. Pancras and beyond on the Thameslink line. Trivia: the station is right next to London's tallest building (as of 2014), the Shard.

to:

* London Bridge (always called that, since it's the actual name of the nearby bridge). The main part of the station is a terminus, but some lines run past it and on to Waterloo East and Charing Cross, or to Cannon Street, or to Blackfriars, St. Pancras and beyond on the Thameslink line. Trivia: the station is right next to London's tallest building (as of 2014), the Shard. Currently undergoing a major refurbishment with a huge new concourse having just opened.
31st Aug '16 9:05:32 AM Jhonny
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* Britain has historically the most heavily restricted 'loading gauge' to rail width in the world, which basically means that the trains tend to be less wide and less tall than those on the continent; this can cause issues when shipping freight between countries and indeed the first Eurostar trains, the Class 373, are slightly smaller versions of the TGV designed for use on British lines in the south of England that the service ran through until the opening of [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed 1]]. This has also precluded the widespread adoption (or indeed much adoption at all) of double-decker trains, the only example being the two 4DD [=EMUs=] built for the Southern Railway in 1949; they weren't very successful, but stayed in service until 1971, well into the BR era.

to:

* Britain has historically the most heavily restricted 'loading gauge' to rail width in the world, which basically means that the trains tend to be less wide and less tall than those on the continent; this can cause issues when shipping freight between countries and indeed the first Eurostar trains, the Class 373, are slightly smaller versions of the TGV designed for use on British lines in the south of England that the service ran through until the opening of [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed 1]]. Running Eurostars beyond London as was initially planned is much complicated by that fact and the rise of low cost airlines has all but guaranteed no such service at least until the opening of High Speed 2. This has also precluded the widespread adoption (or indeed much adoption at all) of double-decker trains, the only example being the two 4DD [=EMUs=] built for the Southern Railway in 1949; they weren't very successful, but stayed in service until 1971, well into the BR era.
31st Aug '16 9:03:34 AM Jhonny
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* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the [[UsefulNotes|HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern.

to:

* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the [[UsefulNotes|HighSpeedRail [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern.
31st Aug '16 3:42:29 AM lcmortensen
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* The Class 350 'Desiro' and 390 'Pendolino' Electric Multiple Units. Very common on the WCML; the 350s are commuters and operated by London Midland Trains and the 390s are express units and operated by Virgin Trains. Both of these can easily hit 125 miles per hour and have very smooth rides. In fact, the Pendolinos are so incredibly fast that station announcers warn those on the platform to stay back from the edge as these go rocketing through.

to:

* The Class 350 'Desiro' and 390 'Pendolino' Electric Multiple Units. Very common on the WCML; the 350s are commuters and operated by London Midland Trains and the 390s are express units and operated by Virgin Trains. Both of these can easily hit 125 miles per hour and have very smooth rides. In fact, the Pendolinos are so incredibly fast that station announcers warn those on the platform to stay back from the edge as these go rocketing through. Not be confused with the 'Pretendolino', which is a Class 90 electric locomotive and rake of Mark 3 carriages painted to look like a Pendolino.



* Class 90: Electrified by overhead wires and operated by several companies.


to:

* Class 90: Electrified Electric locomotive powered by overhead wires and operated by several companies.

17th Aug '16 12:54:20 PM Jhonny
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* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the High Speed services to Kent operated by Southeastern.

to:

* London St. Pancras International - so close to King's Cross it shares a Tube station (see next entry); it's also a hop, skip, and a jump from Euston (abut 10-15 minutes' walk down Euston Road, or just one stop on the [[UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground Tube]]). It is now the home of the Eurostar services (hence the "International"). Frankly, it needed some love and was refurbished as a result in the late 2000s/early 2010s to the point it is now considered one of the best stations in the world. Terminus of the Midland Main Line and [=InterCity=] services operated by East Midlands Trains, as well as the [[UsefulNotes|HighSpeedRail High Speed services services]] to Kent operated by Southeastern.



Most of the trains in regular service the network now have automatic doors, while the rest have doors that are locked remotely pre-departure and can be opened only after arrival. Bizarrely, to leave a non-retrofitted Mk3 carriage[[note]]still the most common type on long-distance services[[/note]]you must open the window, lean out of it, and use the door handle on the outside - much to the confusion of uninformed tourists. Not counting the Eurostar trains, the fastest ones on the network are the Class 91 "Intercity 225" loco-hauled trains found on the East Coast Main Line, the Class 390 "Pendolino" units on the West Coast Main Line, and fastest of all (at 140mph top speed) Southeastern's Class 395 "High-Speed" or "Javelin" trains, which partly use domestic sections of Eurostar track with overhead wiring, and partly third-rail commuter lines at slower speeds.

to:

Most of the trains in regular service the network now have automatic doors, while the rest have doors that are locked remotely pre-departure and can be opened only after arrival. Bizarrely, to leave a non-retrofitted Mk3 carriage[[note]]still the most common type on long-distance services[[/note]]you must open the window, lean out of it, and use the door handle on the outside - much to the confusion of uninformed tourists. Not counting the Eurostar trains, the fastest ones on the network are the Class 91 "Intercity 225" loco-hauled trains found on the East Coast Main Line, the Class 390 "Pendolino" units on the West Coast Main Line, and fastest of all (at 140mph top speed) Southeastern's Class 395 "High-Speed" "[[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High-Speed]]" or "Javelin" trains, which partly use domestic sections of Eurostar track with overhead wiring, and partly third-rail commuter lines at slower speeds.



* Britain has historically the most heavily restricted 'loading gauge' to rail width in the world, which basically means that the trains tend to be less wide and less tall than those on the continent; this can cause issues when shipping freight between countries and indeed the first Eurostar trains, the Class 373, are slightly smaller versions of the TGV designed for use on British lines in the south of England that the service ran through until the opening of High Speed 1. This has also precluded the widespread adoption (or indeed much adoption at all) of double-decker trains, the only example being the two 4DD [=EMUs=] built for the Southern Railway in 1949; they weren't very successful, but stayed in service until 1971, well into the BR era.

to:

* Britain has historically the most heavily restricted 'loading gauge' to rail width in the world, which basically means that the trains tend to be less wide and less tall than those on the continent; this can cause issues when shipping freight between countries and indeed the first Eurostar trains, the Class 373, are slightly smaller versions of the TGV designed for use on British lines in the south of England that the service ran through until the opening of [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail High Speed 1.1]]. This has also precluded the widespread adoption (or indeed much adoption at all) of double-decker trains, the only example being the two 4DD [=EMUs=] built for the Southern Railway in 1949; they weren't very successful, but stayed in service until 1971, well into the BR era.
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