History UsefulNotes / NationalRail

22nd Dec '17 2:08:11 AM GojiBiscuits
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* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock in 1989. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded.

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* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock in 1989.from 1989 to 1992. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded.
22nd Dec '17 2:06:52 AM GojiBiscuits
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to:

* On the UsefulNotes/IsleOfWight, there's a quirky set of trains that aren't seen anywhere else on the Network, and are ''the'' oldest class of trains still in use on the mainline to date. These are the '''Class 483'''s, a class of EMUs that were constructed by renovating old 1938 London Underground stock in 1989. The main reason why these trains still rumble reliably down the line from Ryde to Shanklin is that they can fit through a tunnel in Ryde that has a raised track bed to avoid being flooded.
22nd Dec '17 2:02:22 AM GojiBiscuits
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* Mark 3 based multiple units, such as the Class 442 Wessex Electrics... currently used on Gatwick Express services from Victoria, which they are pretty unsuitable for (Southern is getting new trains to replace them)

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* Mark 3 based multiple units, 3-based units such as the Class 442 Wessex Electrics... currently Electrics, formerly used on the London - Brighton line as part of the Gatwick Express services from Victoria, which they are pretty unsuitable for (Southern is getting new service. These trains are the fastest third-rail electric trains in the world, and are set to replace them)return to the Portsmouth Direct Line in 2018 after being relieved of their duties on the London - Brighton line.
28th Nov '17 6:32:57 PM nombretomado
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* London Moorgate: Has 10 platforms, but 5-6 are disused following the withdrawal of Thameslink services from Farringdon when platform extension there severed the line, which is now used for storage. Of the rest, LondonUnderground operates from 1-4 and 7-8, with the only National Rail services being from platforms 9-10, with Great Northern operating full size dual-voltage trains using third rail up to Finsbury Park on what was a branch of the Northern Line until 1975, where it was the site of the worst peace time disaster in the network's history, after a train failed to stop at Platform 9 and ploughed into the end wall of the tunnel beyond, killing 43 people - the precise reason the driver failed to stop remains unknown. These two platforms (and indeed, the rest of the branch) are still laid out in their 1990s appearance under the British Rail [=Network SouthEast=] brand and are currently served by trains built in the mid-1970s.

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* London Moorgate: Has 10 platforms, but 5-6 are disused following the withdrawal of Thameslink services from Farringdon when platform extension there severed the line, which is now used for storage. Of the rest, LondonUnderground UsefulNotes/LondonUnderground operates from 1-4 and 7-8, with the only National Rail services being from platforms 9-10, with Great Northern operating full size dual-voltage trains using third rail up to Finsbury Park on what was a branch of the Northern Line until 1975, where it was the site of the worst peace time disaster in the network's history, after a train failed to stop at Platform 9 and ploughed into the end wall of the tunnel beyond, killing 43 people - the precise reason the driver failed to stop remains unknown. These two platforms (and indeed, the rest of the branch) are still laid out in their 1990s appearance under the British Rail [=Network SouthEast=] brand and are currently served by trains built in the mid-1970s.
8th Aug '17 9:20:46 AM Voodoo
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British Railways operated a [[SchizoTech collection of rolling stock]] from Victorian-era six-wheelers and locomotives still eking out an existance on branch lines to the top-link express locomotives of the big four and their predecessors, their own advanced designs and the harbingers of modernisation such as the electric blue and bespeedwhiskered Deltic prototype and GWR railcars. The late '50s to early '60s were probably the golden age of [[RailEnthusiast trainspotting]] as a result.

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British Railways operated a [[SchizoTech collection of rolling stock]] from Victorian-era six-wheelers and locomotives still eking out an existance on branch lines lines[[note]]At least partially due to the disruption of the Second World War, which probably kept many older designs that would otherwise have been scrapped around for at least a decade past their intended replacement dates[[/note]] to the top-link express locomotives of the big four and their predecessors, their own advanced designs and the harbingers of modernisation such as the electric blue and bespeedwhiskered Deltic prototype and GWR railcars. The late '50s to early '60s were probably the golden age of [[RailEnthusiast trainspotting]] as a result.
3rd Aug '17 2:43:59 PM Voodoo
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Linked to all of this is the very active 'heritage' railway scene in the UK, which got started in the 1960s as BR removed steam from the main line and Beeching was removing lines from the passenger maps. A good number of old locomotives were saved from scrapping by a Barry Island owner who decided it made more economic sense to sell them to the preservation movement than cut them up. Many of these run on (mostly) single-track heritage lines that are reopened passenger lines, where they have been joined by ex-BR locomotives and some Diesel Multiple Units, but there are companies that do fairly expensive steam tours on the mainline, something guaranteed to make regular users gawp in amazement.

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Linked to all of this is the very active 'heritage' railway scene in the UK, which got started in the 1960s as BR removed steam from the main line and Beeching was removing lines from the passenger maps. A good number of old locomotives were saved from scrapping by a Barry Island owner who decided it made more economic sense to sell them to the preservation movement [[note]]This was mainly due to the price of scrap metal being depressed as a result of mass engine scrapping and engine scrapping being labour intensive -- As a result, over 200 locomotives that should have been scrapped stayed in existence long enough for the emerging preservation movement to ultimately rescue them. The Barry survivors also are partially why Great Western locomotives are common in preservation and LNER locomotives are rare -- lots of GWR engines ended up at Barry, while hardly any LNER engines did.[[/note]] than cut them up. Many of these run on (mostly) single-track heritage lines that are reopened passenger lines, where they have been joined by ex-BR locomotives and some Diesel Multiple Units, but there are companies that do fairly expensive steam tours on the mainline, something guaranteed to make regular users gawp in amazement.
16th Jul '17 11:02:06 AM nombretomado
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* London Cannon Street - a commuter station serving the City of London (ie the financial district) with platforms extending onto the river. The original victorian concourse was replaced by a bland 1960s building, but the red brick walls and towers at the river end have been refurbished. The original arched glass roof over the platforms was removed during WW2 to protect it from bomb damage, and placed in storage in a safe location, which got bombed. Eventually the empty space was used for an office building which makes the station look, from the river side, as if a giant hovercraft is taking a dump in it. Trains using the station have to negotiate a tight curve around Southwark Cathedral, which causes a lot of wear and tear on the wheels.

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* London Cannon Street - a commuter station serving the City of London (ie the financial district) with platforms extending onto the river. The original victorian Victorian concourse was replaced by a bland 1960s building, but the red brick walls and towers at the river end have been refurbished. The original arched glass roof over the platforms was removed during WW2 [=WW2=] to protect it from bomb damage, and placed in storage in a safe location, which got bombed. Eventually the empty space was used for an office building which makes the station look, from the river side, as if a giant hovercraft is taking a dump in it. Trains using the station have to negotiate a tight curve around Southwark Cathedral, which causes a lot of wear and tear on the wheels.
5th Jul '17 5:10:23 AM Jhonny
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It was also thought that passenger numbers were in decline or would remain stagnant at best. In reality whilst the percentage of people chosing rail over other forms of transport has not changed, the population has, and passenger numbers have increased appropriatly. The network now carries more people now than in the late 19th c. when it had a monopoly.

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It was also thought that passenger numbers were in decline or would remain stagnant at best. In reality whilst the percentage of people chosing choosing rail over other forms of transport has not changed, the population has, has as has overall travel across all modes of transport, and passenger numbers have increased appropriatly.appropriately. The network now carries more people now than in the late 19th c. when it had a monopoly.
4th Jul '17 10:17:56 AM nombretomado
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In the late 1960s, British Rail bought the TOPS computer system from Southern Pacific to keep track of its rolling stock. They allocated numbers to their locos, ships (yes, they did own some ships through their Sealink ferry business) and multiple units in a numbering system that survives with some changes to this day - TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_locomotive_and_multiple_unit_numbering_and_classification more information]]. In addition, the Southern Region inherited a multiple unit system from the Southern Railway that still sort of survives today in unofficial form and you will generally hear the Southern classification used for these units in favour of the TOPS one.

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In the late 1960s, British Rail bought the TOPS computer system from Southern Pacific to keep track of its rolling stock. They allocated numbers to their locos, ships (yes, they did own some ships through their Sealink ferry business) and multiple units in a numbering system that survives with some changes to this day - TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki has [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Rail_locomotive_and_multiple_unit_numbering_and_classification more information]]. In addition, the Southern Region inherited a multiple unit system from the Southern Railway that still sort of survives today in unofficial form and you will generally hear the Southern classification used for these units in favour of the TOPS one.
24th Apr '17 7:43:01 PM nombretomado
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London has several major railway stations, referenced in media (there's even a case from the ''ThomasTheTankEngine'' where engines argue about which station is London, not realising they are all correct). In all, at least ''twelve'' stations in Central London open today can be counted as being "major" termini - rather more than the number in other large cities (for comparison, Paris has six, Berlin four, and New York two[[note]]Although the low number for New York can be attributed in part to the general decline of rail travel in the United States and in part to the American mania for "union stations" - that is, single stations to host multiple railroads (New York Penn presently plays host to three, even with the decline) - the fact that the rail-crazy Europeans also have fewer stations just goes to show how strange London is.[[/note]]). This is in large part because of the aforementioned bit with the large number of railway companies in Britain; each liked to operate its own smaller station rather than gather together in a few larger ones. So we now have twelve big stations. In clockwise order from the West direction, these are the current ones:

to:

London has several major railway stations, referenced in media (there's even a case from the ''ThomasTheTankEngine'' ''WesternAnimation/ThomasTheTankEngine'' where engines argue about which station is London, not realising they are all correct). In all, at least ''twelve'' stations in Central London open today can be counted as being "major" termini - rather more than the number in other large cities (for comparison, Paris has six, Berlin four, and New York two[[note]]Although the low number for New York can be attributed in part to the general decline of rail travel in the United States and in part to the American mania for "union stations" - that is, single stations to host multiple railroads (New York Penn presently plays host to three, even with the decline) - the fact that the rail-crazy Europeans also have fewer stations just goes to show how strange London is.[[/note]]). This is in large part because of the aforementioned bit with the large number of railway companies in Britain; each liked to operate its own smaller station rather than gather together in a few larger ones. So we now have twelve big stations. In clockwise order from the West direction, these are the current ones:
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