History UsefulNotes / Motorsports

5th Sep '15 4:27:22 PM nombretomado
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{{NASCAR}}

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{{NASCAR}}
UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}}



Stock car racing is the most well-known form of auto racing [[OnlyInAmerica in America]], where the highest-level sanctioning body is {{NASCAR}}. Stock car racing is named because, initially, the cars were the same cars that were sold to everyone on the market ("stock"). As any fan can tell you though, as time went on, the cars became less and less "stock," and by the 2000s, the manufacturer decals (and likely not even those) [[ArtifactTitle were possibly the only thing "stock" left.]]

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Stock car racing is the most well-known form of auto racing [[OnlyInAmerica in America]], where the highest-level sanctioning body is {{NASCAR}}.UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}}. Stock car racing is named because, initially, the cars were the same cars that were sold to everyone on the market ("stock"). As any fan can tell you though, as time went on, the cars became less and less "stock," and by the 2000s, the manufacturer decals (and likely not even those) [[ArtifactTitle were possibly the only thing "stock" left.]]



Notable North American endurance races include the Rolex 24 at Daytona[[note]]yes, [[{{NASCAR}} that Daytona]], although they utilize a special infield road course that primarily diverges from the oval just past pit road before rejoining at the entrance to turn one[[/note]] and the 12 Hours of Sebring, which both race under the Tudor UsefulNotes/UnitedSportsCarChampionship banner in 2014, after several years of being administrated by rival sports car racing bodies - the Rolex Sports Car Series for Daytona and the American Le Mans Series for Sebring.

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Notable North American endurance races include the Rolex 24 at Daytona[[note]]yes, [[{{NASCAR}} [[UsefulNotes/{{NASCAR}} that Daytona]], although they utilize a special infield road course that primarily diverges from the oval just past pit road before rejoining at the entrance to turn one[[/note]] and the 12 Hours of Sebring, which both race under the Tudor UsefulNotes/UnitedSportsCarChampionship banner in 2014, after several years of being administrated by rival sports car racing bodies - the Rolex Sports Car Series for Daytona and the American Le Mans Series for Sebring.
29th Jun '15 1:15:24 PM Morgenthaler
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[[DaysOfThunder DO NOT HIT IT.]] In fact, don't even pass it without authorisation; the whole point is that you're supposed to go as slow as it is. (If somehow the safety car is wrecked, this rule may be waived. This HAS happened!)

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[[DaysOfThunder [[Film/DaysOfThunder DO NOT HIT IT.]] In fact, don't even pass it without authorisation; the whole point is that you're supposed to go as slow as it is. (If somehow the safety car is wrecked, this rule may be waived. This HAS happened!)
20th Jun '15 6:07:36 PM nombretomado
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IndyCar

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IndyCar
UsefulNotes/IndyCar



Open-wheel racing is the most well-known form of auto racing worldwide, and sanctioning bodies include UsefulNotes/FormulaOne and IndyCar. It is so named since the cars have no fenders, and the wheels are "open."

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Open-wheel racing is the most well-known form of auto racing worldwide, and sanctioning bodies include UsefulNotes/FormulaOne and IndyCar.UsefulNotes/IndyCar. It is so named since the cars have no fenders, and the wheels are "open."
20th May '15 6:24:55 PM nombretomado
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FormulaOne

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FormulaOne
UsefulNotes/FormulaOne



Open-wheel racing is the most well-known form of auto racing worldwide, and sanctioning bodies include FormulaOne and IndyCar. It is so named since the cars have no fenders, and the wheels are "open."

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Open-wheel racing is the most well-known form of auto racing worldwide, and sanctioning bodies include FormulaOne UsefulNotes/FormulaOne and IndyCar. It is so named since the cars have no fenders, and the wheels are "open."



* YELLOW: Caution. Something's wrong. Don't race; just proceed calmly, and no passing for position (unless the other guy just can't keep up at the reduced pace). Some racing bodies (FormulaOne being the most notable) will have these in sections for minor incidents, a 'local caution' or 'local yellow', with a green flag waving past the point to signal all's well. More severe incidents can cause a 'full course caution', or more often 'safety car' period: the entire track is put under caution conditions and a safety car is sent out to set the pace. Most oval tracks don't bother with 'local' cautions; NASCAR doesn't bother with them even on their road courses. In these cases, all cautions are run behind a pace car.

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* YELLOW: Caution. Something's wrong. Don't race; just proceed calmly, and no passing for position (unless the other guy just can't keep up at the reduced pace). Some racing bodies (FormulaOne (UsefulNotes/FormulaOne being the most notable) will have these in sections for minor incidents, a 'local caution' or 'local yellow', with a green flag waving past the point to signal all's well. More severe incidents can cause a 'full course caution', or more often 'safety car' period: the entire track is put under caution conditions and a safety car is sent out to set the pace. Most oval tracks don't bother with 'local' cautions; NASCAR doesn't bother with them even on their road courses. In these cases, all cautions are run behind a pace car.
4th Jan '15 9:12:59 PM Qaianna
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Most racers don't like being passed. Basically, this means putting your car so it ... blocks another. This can be dangerous; Carl Edwards tried this twice in the final lap of a race in 2009. He got away with one move. The second, Brad Keselowski was already at his fender. Edwards's car ended up in the catch fence. (The fence ABOVE the retaining wall.) NASCAR lets nature enforce blocking restrictions (as mentioned); other leagues may prohibit it (to avoid things like that).

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Most racers don't like being passed. Basically, this means putting your car so it ... blocks another. This can be dangerous; Carl Edwards tried this twice in the final lap of a race in 2009. He got away with one move. The second, Brad Keselowski was already at his fender. Edwards's car ended up in the catch fence. (The fence ABOVE the retaining wall.) NASCAR lets nature enforce blocking restrictions (as mentioned); other leagues may prohibit it (to avoid things like that).that).

!!Safety Car / Pace Car

As noted above, sometimes the entire field needs to be slowed down in order to safely clear something from the track, but the race itself doesn't need to be outright suspended or stopped. For these full-course cautions, a safety car (or, typically for stock car racing, a pace car) will be sent out, lights flashing, to set the proper slow pace.

[[DaysOfThunder DO NOT HIT IT.]] In fact, don't even pass it without authorisation; the whole point is that you're supposed to go as slow as it is. (If somehow the safety car is wrecked, this rule may be waived. This HAS happened!)
25th Oct '14 3:36:38 PM JamesShade
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Added DiffLines:

Of course, track conditions and tire composition can affect whether one line or another is even viable for racing. For instance, NASCAR's oldest track, Martinsville Speedway, has turns that are banked at 12 degress, which is relatively flat by their standards, and are extremely tight, in much the same way as "hairpin" turns at road courses. Naturally, many drivers approach these turns in the same manner as a hairpin, trying to outbrake their competition going into the turns, something that's more effective on the bottom. Additionally, tire wear at Martinsville tends to take the form of "marbles", large pieces of rubber that sit loosely on the track instead of being matted in like the smaller pieces that allow for increased grip during the course of the race. These pieces collect on the outer grooves, and when they adhere to the tires, they cause the cars to lose grip, which forces a driver to slow down even more or risk spinning out. Because of these two factors, the bottom lane is the only viable lane at Martinsville, and to some degree or another most other flat tracks that NASCAR runs at.
10th Oct '14 4:20:49 PM JamesShade
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A blanket way of covering courses that have a bare indication of where the racing surface is.

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A blanket way of covering courses that have a bare indication of where the racing surface is.
is. These can range from "short course" setups that are just one to two miles in length (such as those found in the Lucas Oil Off-Road Racing Series, which races primarily in the U.S. Southwest and Pacific Northwest) to rally courses that are thousands of miles long, meant to be run over the course of days.
10th Oct '14 4:16:11 PM JamesShade
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Naturally, some folks just can't make do with an oval. Daytona International Speedway is one of the better known ''tri-ovals''; one side of the oval has a little kink in it, making it resemble a triangle.

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Naturally, some folks just can't make do with an oval. Daytona International Speedway is one of the better known ''tri-ovals''; one side of the oval has a little kink in it, making it resemble a triangle.
triangle. This came about because Big Bill France, NASCAR's founder and the designer of Daytona (and its sister track Talladega, the next best known tri-oval) wanted a frontstretch design that would improve line of sight for fans so those at the edges of the grandstands wouldn't have to crane their necks so much as the cars ran around the track.
4th Oct '14 5:13:43 PM JamesShade
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* UsefulNotes/WorldRallyChampionship

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* UsefulNotes/WorldRallyChampionship
4th Oct '14 5:13:27 PM JamesShade
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-->UsefulNotes/WorldRallyChampionship

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-->UsefulNotes/WorldRallyChampionship
* UsefulNotes/WorldRallyChampionship
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