History UsefulNotes / Moscow

10th Jun '17 9:59:08 AM permeakra
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If the Internet is anything to go by, Moscow seems to be [[TheScrappy increasingly disliked]] by the rest of Russia (some people going as far as half-jokingly proposing to split the country into two parts - Moscow and everything else, or "get rid of Moscow", or something like that). The main cause appears to be the perceived [[HolierThanThou arrogance]] of the city's inhabitants, their supposed ignorance regarding the rest of the country and rudeness towards any visitors to the city, as depicted in the jokes about "Ponaekhali" (which translates roughly to the disapproving "so many of you came here" - the supposedly typical answer of a Muscovite to people asking for directions, regardless of how polite and sensible that asking may have been). Whether this dislike actually has foundation is up for debate - and indeed, numerous debates ensue. Among the reasons for this attitude, it should also be noted that a lot of money made by selling other regions' oil goes to Moscow instead of those other regions, and the average Moscow salary is much higher than that of anywhere in the so-called "provinces" (i.e. any place that's neither Moscow nor St.Peterburg); those unfortunate facts do not help the city's reputation in the slightest.

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If the Internet is anything to go by, Moscow seems to be [[TheScrappy increasingly disliked]] by the rest of Russia (some people going as far as half-jokingly proposing to split the country into two parts - Moscow and everything else, or "get rid of Moscow", or something like that). The main cause appears to be the perceived [[HolierThanThou arrogance]] of the city's inhabitants, their supposed ignorance regarding the rest of the country and rudeness towards any visitors to the city, as depicted in the jokes about "Ponaekhali" (which translates roughly to the disapproving "so many of you came here" - the supposedly typical answer of a Muscovite to people asking for directions, regardless of how polite and sensible that asking may have been). Whether this dislike actually has foundation is up for debate - and indeed, numerous debates ensue. Among the reasons for this attitude, it should also be noted Many people in regions believe, that a lot of money made by selling resources from other regions' oil goes to regions are mostly accumulated in Moscow instead of those other regions, and the average many people in Moscow salary is much higher than believe that other regions are just populated by lazy idiots. The arcane trickery of anywhere in the so-called "provinces" (i.e. any place that's neither Moscow nor St.Peterburg); those unfortunate facts do not help the city's reputation in the slightest.
"tax optimization" employed by Russian companies makes it easy to find evidence for both opinions.
9th Jun '17 2:50:30 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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** New Ierusalim. An old, large churche/monastery complex initially built to be a replica of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Located in Istra (may be considered far suburb, as it is connected to Moscow proper with railway and buses)

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** New Ierusalim. An old, large churche/monastery church/monastery complex initially built to be a replica of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Located in Istra (may be considered far suburb, as it is connected to Moscow proper with railway and buses)



* The Moscow River, specifically "river trams".

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* The Moscow River, specifically "river trams". trams."



* Suburbs, divided into near suburbs that actually border Moscow and are divided from is only by MKAD (Khimki, Mytischi, Krasnogorsk, Balashikha, Reutov) and far suburbs that are separated from the city by a stretch of forest and villages and are usually reached by railroad or car(Korolev, Pushkino, Elektrostal, Serpuhov and so on).
** On each side, it is believed that there is no life on the other side. Note that Moscow follows the Old World class distinction between suburb and downtown; the center of the city is glamorous and posh, the outskirts are middle-class and some of the suburbs should be more properly described as slums.

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* Suburbs, divided into near suburbs that actually border Moscow and are divided from is only by MKAD (Khimki, Mytischi, Krasnogorsk, Balashikha, Reutov) and far suburbs that are separated from the city by a stretch of forest and villages and are usually reached by railroad or car(Korolev, car (Korolev, Pushkino, Elektrostal, Serpuhov and so on).
** On each side, it is believed that there is no life on the other side. Note that Moscow follows the Old World class distinction between suburb and downtown; the center of the city is glamorous and posh, the outskirts are middle-class middle class and some of the suburbs should be more properly described as slums.



Moscow is a mostly round city, so its internal divisions are organised by several concentric beltways. At the very centre lie the Kremlin, Red Square and the ancient neighbourhood of Kitay-gorod (in modern Russian it means "Chinatown", but it got that name long before Russians started calling China "Kitay", so it has no connection to the Chinese diaspora; in Old Russian, Kitai-Gorod stood for Basket-town, since the walls were originally made of baskets filled with clay). The beltways that surround it are the incomplete Boulevard Ring (the innermost), the Garden Ring, the 3rd Ring Road and the MKAD (the outermost). When people say "central Moscow" they usually mean "within the Garden Ring". The areas between it and the 3rd ring, as well as some areas to the latter's immediate north, are mostly old industrial neighbourhoods, while most of the neighbourhoods between the 3rd ring and the MKAD are residential. A fourth ring road, between the 3rd and the MKAD was in plans, but the project was abandoned in favor of building several chords that are in pre-building state now. The next ring is so-known Small Moscow Ring is roughly 50 km ring road in far Moscow suburbs. Moscow, however, is split with railways and rivers along radii, so the picture is not so beautiful. Until 1984 the MKAD was the city border, but then Moscow annexed several towns on the outside. Despite that the MKAD still serves as a cultural border between Moscow and its suburbs, and Muscovites are often stereotyped to believe that all of Russia beyond the MKAD is complete wilderness, except for the aforementioned Rublevo-Uspenskoe and St. Petersburg (though St. Pete, as the joke goes, is too cold, wet and dull to have much of a life there).

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Moscow is a mostly round city, so its internal divisions are organised by several concentric beltways. At the very centre lie the Kremlin, Red Square and the ancient neighbourhood of Kitay-gorod (in modern Russian it means "Chinatown", "Chinatown," but it got that name long before Russians started calling China "Kitay", "Kitay," so it has no connection to the Chinese diaspora; in Old Russian, Kitai-Gorod stood for Basket-town, since the walls were originally made of baskets filled with clay). The beltways that surround it are the incomplete Boulevard Ring (the innermost), the Garden Ring, the 3rd Ring Road and the MKAD (the outermost). When people say "central Moscow" they usually mean "within the Garden Ring". Ring." The areas between it and the 3rd ring, as well as some areas to the latter's immediate north, are mostly old industrial neighbourhoods, while most of the neighbourhoods between the 3rd ring and the MKAD are residential. A fourth ring road, between the 3rd and the MKAD was in plans, but the project was abandoned in favor of building several chords that are in pre-building state now. The next ring is so-known Small Moscow Ring is roughly 50 km ring road in far Moscow suburbs. Moscow, however, is split with railways and rivers along radii, so the picture is not so beautiful. Until 1984 the MKAD was the city border, but then Moscow annexed several towns on the outside. Despite that the MKAD still serves as a cultural border between Moscow and its suburbs, and Muscovites are often stereotyped to believe that all of Russia beyond the MKAD is complete wilderness, except for the aforementioned Rublevo-Uspenskoe and St. Petersburg (though St. Pete, as the joke goes, is too cold, wet and dull to have much of a life there).
9th Jun '17 2:48:44 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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* Churches and monasteries. Again, a lot of them, mostly orthodox christians, but there are muslim, catholic and some others if you care to find.

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* Churches and monasteries. Again, a lot of them, mostly orthodox christians, Orthodox Christians, but there are muslim, catholic Muslim, Catholic, and some others if you care to find.
9th Jun '17 2:46:16 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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* The cathedrals: less famous than St.Basil's, the numerous cathedrals of the Kremlin are older and more important. They house the crypts of various grand princes and tsars of Russia, and metropolitans and patriarchs of the Russian Orthodox Church.

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* The cathedrals: less famous than St. Basil's, the numerous cathedrals of the Kremlin are older and more important. They house the crypts of various grand princes and tsars of Russia, and metropolitans and patriarchs of the Russian Orthodox Church.
16th May '17 9:33:31 AM nombretomado
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In TsaristRussia, Moscow was ruled by a mayor or governor appointed by the tsar. In the SovietUnion era, Moscow was ruled by the First Secretary of the Moscow Communist Party and the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Moscow City Council. The Moscow secretary was the most powerful local politician in the USSR, and both Khrushchev and Yeltsin held this post. Now, in TheNewRussia, Moscow is led by a mayor again, albeit one with the powers of a governor; Moscow and St. Petersburg are both "Federal Cities" having the same status as other "federal subjects" of Russia. (Having a mayor have the same powers as a governor is common for city-states within a federation; the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland Germans have this arrangement]] with Berlin, Hamburg, and Bremen, and the Austrians have it with Vienna). What's strange here is that Moscow has a mayor with the powers of a governor, and St.Petersburg has a governor, despite the otherwise identical federal status of the cities.

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In TsaristRussia, UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia, Moscow was ruled by a mayor or governor appointed by the tsar. In the SovietUnion era, Moscow was ruled by the First Secretary of the Moscow Communist Party and the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Moscow City Council. The Moscow secretary was the most powerful local politician in the USSR, and both Khrushchev and Yeltsin held this post. Now, in TheNewRussia, Moscow is led by a mayor again, albeit one with the powers of a governor; Moscow and St. Petersburg are both "Federal Cities" having the same status as other "federal subjects" of Russia. (Having a mayor have the same powers as a governor is common for city-states within a federation; the [[TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland Germans have this arrangement]] with Berlin, Hamburg, and Bremen, and the Austrians have it with Vienna). What's strange here is that Moscow has a mayor with the powers of a governor, and St.Petersburg has a governor, despite the otherwise identical federal status of the cities.
31st Aug '16 10:44:49 AM permeakra
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* Shukhovskaya (this means "engineered by Shukhov") television tower -- known for its unique design. It still looks futuristic despite being constructed in 1922.

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* Shukhovskaya (this means "engineered by Shukhov") television tower -- known for its unique design. It still looks futuristic despite being constructed in 1922. Currently under sluggish renovation for unknown time.
31st Aug '16 4:01:22 AM aurora369
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Moscow is a mostly round city, so its internal divisions are organised by several concentric beltways. At the very centre lie the Kremlin, Red Square and the ancient neighbourhood of Kitay-gorod (in modern Russian it means "Chinatown", but it got that name long before Russians started calling China "Kitay", so it has no connection to the Chinese diaspora; in Old Russian, Kitai-Gorod stood for Basket-town, since the walls were originally made of baskets filled with clay). The beltways that surround it are the incomplete Boulevard Ring (the innermost), the Garden Ring, the 3rd Ring Road and the MKAD (the outermost). When people say "central Moscow" they usually mean "within the Garden Ring". The areas between it and the 3rd ring, as well as some areas to the latter's immediate north, are mostly old industrial neighbourhoods, while most of the neighbourhoods between the 3rd ring and the MKAD are residential. A fourth ring road, between the 3rd and the MKAD was in plans, but the project was abandoned in favor of building several chords that are in pre-building state now. The next ring is so-known Small Moscow Ring is roughly 50 km ring road in far Moscow suburbs. Moscow, however, is split with railways and rivers along radii, so the picture is not so beautiful. Until 1984 the MKAD was the city border, but then Moscow annexed several towns on the outside. Despite that the MKAD still serves as a cultural border between Moscow and its suburbs, and Muscovites are often stereotyped to believe that all of Russia beyond the MKAD is complete wilderness, except for the aforementioned Rublevo-Uspenskoe and St. Petersburg.

to:

Moscow is a mostly round city, so its internal divisions are organised by several concentric beltways. At the very centre lie the Kremlin, Red Square and the ancient neighbourhood of Kitay-gorod (in modern Russian it means "Chinatown", but it got that name long before Russians started calling China "Kitay", so it has no connection to the Chinese diaspora; in Old Russian, Kitai-Gorod stood for Basket-town, since the walls were originally made of baskets filled with clay). The beltways that surround it are the incomplete Boulevard Ring (the innermost), the Garden Ring, the 3rd Ring Road and the MKAD (the outermost). When people say "central Moscow" they usually mean "within the Garden Ring". The areas between it and the 3rd ring, as well as some areas to the latter's immediate north, are mostly old industrial neighbourhoods, while most of the neighbourhoods between the 3rd ring and the MKAD are residential. A fourth ring road, between the 3rd and the MKAD was in plans, but the project was abandoned in favor of building several chords that are in pre-building state now. The next ring is so-known Small Moscow Ring is roughly 50 km ring road in far Moscow suburbs. Moscow, however, is split with railways and rivers along radii, so the picture is not so beautiful. Until 1984 the MKAD was the city border, but then Moscow annexed several towns on the outside. Despite that the MKAD still serves as a cultural border between Moscow and its suburbs, and Muscovites are often stereotyped to believe that all of Russia beyond the MKAD is complete wilderness, except for the aforementioned Rublevo-Uspenskoe and St. Petersburg.Petersburg (though St. Pete, as the joke goes, is too cold, wet and dull to have much of a life there).
4th Sep '15 7:57:50 PM nombretomado
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-->-'''NapoleonBonaparte'''. Things went downhill for him from here.

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-->-'''NapoleonBonaparte'''.-->-'''UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte'''. Things went downhill for him from here.
27th May '15 2:14:31 AM aurora369
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* The Kremlin Wall Necropolis: is considered part of the Kremlin despite being outside of its walls. It is a bizarre open-air crypt where the remains of famous Communists were entombed in stone. Joseph Stalin's tomb is located here.
* Lenin's Mausoleum: also outside of the Kremlin but often conflated with it, this is a ziggurat-like tomb with Vladimir Lenin mummified and put on display.
12th Mar '15 9:02:19 PM jormis29
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* Even Russian movies sometimes have to double Moscow when the setting is "Old Moscow", which could mean either Soviet Moscow before WorldWarII, Imperial Moscow before [[RedOctober the Revolution]], or wooden Moscow before the Empire. [[TheCityFormerlyKnownAs St. Petersburg]] is most commonly used for the first two, while the third is usually doubled by one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Ring_of_Russia Golden Ring cities]].

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* Even Russian movies sometimes have to double Moscow when the setting is "Old Moscow", which could mean either Soviet Moscow before WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Imperial Moscow before [[RedOctober [[UsefulNotes/RedOctober the Revolution]], or wooden Moscow before the Empire. [[TheCityFormerlyKnownAs St. Petersburg]] is most commonly used for the first two, while the third is usually doubled by one of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Ring_of_Russia Golden Ring cities]].
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