History UsefulNotes / LocalStars

30th May '16 5:01:25 PM Marlfox24
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An orange ([=K1V=]) star and among the closest systems likely to have a habitable planet. (The only closer one is Alpha Centauri). There may be a brown dwarf or a very dim red dwarf orbiting it widely. May have planets a lot of astronomical attention in that field looks over here, as do searches for intelligent alien life of the "point a radio telescope at it and see if we hear anything" variety. NASA has marked them as #9 for their planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.

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An orange ([=K1V=]) star and among the closest systems likely to have a habitable planet. (The only closer one is Alpha Centauri). There may be a brown dwarf or a very dim red dwarf orbiting it widely. May have planets a lot of astronomical attention in that field looks over here, as do searches for intelligent alien life of the "point a radio telescope at it and see if we hear anything" variety. NASA has marked them as #9 for their planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.
variety.



The closest solitary Sun-like star to us, so appears a lot in fiction, and is #3 on the list for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission. Can be seen in the northern sky as a third-magnitude star it's clearly visible but you'll probably only notice it specifically if you're looking for it. It's only about half as luminous as the Sun, despite being in the same spectral class - Tau Ceti is a [=G9V=], Sol is a [=G2V=]. Tau Ceti also has only about 30% as high a concentration of heavy elements as the sun does; presumably the planets orbiting it are equally low in heavy elements.

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The closest solitary Sun-like star to us, so appears a lot in fiction, and is #3 on the list for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.fiction. Can be seen in the northern sky as a third-magnitude star it's clearly visible but you'll probably only notice it specifically if you're looking for it. It's only about half as luminous as the Sun, despite being in the same spectral class - Tau Ceti is a [=G9V=], Sol is a [=G2V=]. Tau Ceti also has only about 30% as high a concentration of heavy elements as the sun does; presumably the planets orbiting it are equally low in heavy elements.



Triple system with a main orange ([=K1V=]), a white dwarf (DA) and red dwarf ([=M5V=]). #10 on the list for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.

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Triple system with a main orange ([=K1V=]), a white dwarf (DA) and red dwarf ([=M5V=]). #10 on the list for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.
([=M5V=]).



A yellow G class, very similar to our Sun. Has an orange [=K7V=] companion, Eta Cassiopeiae B, which is a likely candidate for Earthlike planets, too. The distance between the two stars is 77 au, which is more than enough for both stars to have full planet systems with terrestrials and gas giants. Larger-than-Jupiter gas giants and brown dwarfs, though, are highly unlikely, since they would be already detected. #4 on the list for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.

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A yellow G class, very similar to our Sun. Has an orange [=K7V=] companion, Eta Cassiopeiae B, which is a likely candidate for Earthlike planets, too. The distance between the two stars is 77 au, which is more than enough for both stars to have full planet systems with terrestrials and gas giants. Larger-than-Jupiter gas giants and brown dwarfs, though, are highly unlikely, since they would be already detected. #4 on the list for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.
detected.



Another yellow subgiant ([=G2IV=]), similar to Delta Pavonis. A large, four times the mass of Jupiter, gas giant is suspected in a roughly 8 AU orbit. In our skies looks like the brightest star near the South Pole. It's #5 on NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.

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Another yellow subgiant ([=G2IV=]), similar to Delta Pavonis. A large, four times the mass of Jupiter, gas giant is suspected in a roughly 8 AU orbit. In our skies looks like the brightest star near the South Pole. It's #5 on NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.
Pole.



A yellow-white (F6) star in Orion, three times as bright as the Sun. Some kind of substellar companion is detected, which could be a large gas giant planet (or several) or a brown dwarf, with an approximate semimajor axis of 5.2 AU. This star is largely forgotten by science fiction, but scores a #7 on the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder list.

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A yellow-white (F6) star in Orion, three times as bright as the Sun. Some kind of substellar companion is detected, which could be a large gas giant planet (or several) or a brown dwarf, with an approximate semimajor axis of 5.2 AU. This star is largely forgotten by science fiction, but scores a #7 on the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder list.
AU.



A binary dwarf star in Cancer; the primary star, 55 Cancri A, is a class [=G8V=] yellow dwarf, and notable for having the third-biggest known solar system (after ours, of course, and Gliese 581's), with 5 planets. 55 Cancri f is the most interesting of these, as it orbits entirely within 55 Cancri A's habitable zone (in fact, it is the first planet discovered to do so). 55 Cancri f is itself a gas giant roughly half the mass of Saturn, but if it is anything like our gas giants, it will have a veritable swarm of moons, some of which may be conducive to life, and so 55 Cancri A has the #63 slot for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission. A radio message has been beamed to this star's vicinity; it will arrive in 2044.

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A binary dwarf star in Cancer; the primary star, 55 Cancri A, is a class [=G8V=] yellow dwarf, and notable for having the third-biggest known solar system (after ours, of course, and Gliese 581's), with 5 planets. 55 Cancri f is the most interesting of these, as it orbits entirely within 55 Cancri A's habitable zone (in fact, it is the first planet discovered to do so). 55 Cancri f is itself a gas giant roughly half the mass of Saturn, but if it is anything like our gas giants, it will have a veritable swarm of moons, some of which may be conducive to life, and so 55 Cancri A has the #63 slot for NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder mission.life. A radio message has been beamed to this star's vicinity; it will arrive in 2044.
28th May '16 7:22:34 PM Doug86
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* Fomalhaut is the closest star to one of the collapsars used for FasterThanLightTravel in TheForeverWar.

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* Fomalhaut is the closest star to one of the collapsars used for FasterThanLightTravel in TheForeverWar.''Literature/TheForeverWar''.
6th Apr '16 4:41:19 AM AnotherGuy
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* According to ''[[Film/{{Aliens}}]]'', the gender of the people who live there doesn't have an impact on sexual preference for marines.

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* According to ''[[Film/{{Aliens}}]]'', ''Film/{{Aliens}}'', the gender of the people who live there doesn't have an impact on sexual preference for marines.
6th Apr '16 4:40:57 AM AnotherGuy
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* According to ''[[Film/{{Aliens}}]]'', the gender of the people who live there doesn't have an impact on sexual preference for marines.
1st Apr '16 1:04:14 AM harharhar
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%%''WISE 08550714 (7.2 ly)''

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%%''WISE !!''WISE 08550714 (7.2 5 ly)''
A brown dwarf who not only has the third-highest proper motion of all observed stars (behind the aforementioned Barnard's Star and a more-distant [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kapteyn%27s_Star Kapteyn's Star]]), but is the coldest 'star' currently known (observational estimates puts its ''maximum'' temperature at a mere 260 K/−13 °C/8 °F, ''lower than water's freezing point!'')
29th Mar '16 1:54:25 PM AnotherGuy
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* Appears as the destination of the ''Film/EventHorizon'', the first [[FasterThanLightTravel faster than light]] ship.

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* Appears as the destination of the * In ''Film/EventHorizon'', it's the first [[FasterThanLightTravel faster than light]] ship.
destination to test out the new gravity drive. Things [[GoneHorriblyWrong go horribly wrong]].



* In ''Film/EventHorizon'', it's the destination to test out the new gravity drive. Things [[GoneHorriblyWrong go horribly wrong]].

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* In ''Film/EventHorizon'', it's the destination to test out the new gravity drive. Things [[GoneHorriblyWrong go horribly wrong]].
29th Mar '16 1:53:38 PM AnotherGuy
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* In ''Film/EventHorizon'', it's the destination to test out the new gravity drive. Things [[GoneHorriblyWrong go horribly wrong]].
29th Mar '16 1:49:38 PM AnotherGuy
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A binary system, with a white main star ([=A0V=]) and a white dwarf secondary. The primary star is the brightest star in the night sky and the CanisMajor of Canis Major, so to speak. As such, it played a big role in ancient calendars. UrbanLegend attaches this to the "dog days" of late August/September--the Greeks thought that when Sirius was close to the sun in summer, it added its light and heat to the body.

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A binary system, with a white main star ([=A0V=]) and a white dwarf secondary. [[note]]It's easy to find. Find Orion's belt, and use it like an arrow pointing left. That bright, ''bright'' blue star it "points" to is Sirius.[[/note]] The primary star is the brightest star in the night sky and the CanisMajor of Canis Major, so to speak. As such, it played a big role in ancient calendars. UrbanLegend attaches this to the "dog days" of late August/September--the Greeks thought that when Sirius was close to the sun in summer, it added its light and heat to the body.
20th Jan '16 3:30:45 PM tracer
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An orange star, quite bright for its class (K2). Notable in that it has a binary pair of magenta-ish T2 brown dwarfs as companions. The binary pair orbits Epsilon Indi with a wide separation (over 1000 AU) and itself is fairly close (2,5 AU). Like Epsilon Eridani, this is a very young system, less than a quarter the Sun's age, but not THAT young: the primordial planetesimal mess is already sorted out into neat little planetary orbits, and life may be already starting to evolve.

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An orange star, quite bright for its class (K2). Notable in that it has a binary pair of magenta-ish T2 brown dwarfs as companions. The binary pair orbits Epsilon Indi with a wide separation (over 1000 AU) and itself is 1500 AU); the two brown dwarfs themselves orbit each other fairly close (2,5 (2.1 AU). The primary ''might'' also be orbited by a Jupiter+ sized planet at 6.5 AU.

Like Epsilon Eridani, this is a very young system, less than a quarter the Sun's age, but not THAT young: the primordial planetesimal mess is already sorted out into neat little planetary orbits, and life may be already starting to evolve.
20th Jan '16 3:16:01 PM tracer
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Alpha Centauri B has one confirmed planet, Alpha Centauri Bb. It is Earth-sized (about 1.13 times the mass of the Earth) and orbits only a scant 6 million kilometers from B, giving it an orbital period that lasts a mere three-and-a-quarter ''days''. It is also, most likely, tidally locked, so one half of the planet is a molten sea of lava, and the other is a huge icecap.

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In 2012, it was announced that a planet had been discovered orbiting Alpha Centauri B has one confirmed planet, Alpha Centauri Bb. B. It is was Earth-sized (about 1.13 times the mass of the Earth) and orbits orbited only a scant 6 million kilometers from B, giving it an orbital period that lasts lasted a mere three-and-a-quarter ''days''. It is (It would also, most likely, be tidally locked, so one half of the planet is a molten sea of lava, and the other is a huge icecap.
icecap.) Sadly, it appears that this announcement was [[http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronomy/2016/01/20/alpha_centauri_planet_is_almost_certainly_not_real.html premature]].
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