History UsefulNotes / LatinLanguage

27th Sep '17 11:18:14 AM Kelothan
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A popular ancient language considered dead because nobody is born with it it as a native language. Latin was the language of AncientRome, the Catholic Church, government, law, trade, taxonomy, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] Creator/JohnCleese. It was the source language for the entire Romance Language family, its children being Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and around 25 rarer languages[[note]] including Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Genoese, Guernésiais, Jèrriais, Ladino, Ladin, Lombard, Mirandese, Moldovan, Occitan, Piedmontese, Romansh, Sardinian, Sicilian, Venetian, and Walloon[[/note]]. It also inserted its influence into many other languages, even those outside of its immediate family, most notably English (which is a West Germanic language, therefore closely related to Dutch and German), but acquired a dose of Latin thanks to the medieval conquest by the Normans who brought with them the Latin-influenced French, and this Latin influence to the English vocabulary has been augmented ''[[SelfDemonstratingArticle in extremis]]'' through the education and utility of Latin in the Renaissance and Enlightenment as the language of Science, Intellectualism, Law, ''et cetera''.

to:

A popular ancient language considered dead because nobody is born with it it as a native language. Latin was the language of AncientRome, the Catholic Church, government, law, trade, taxonomy, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] Creator/JohnCleese. It was the source language for the entire Romance Language family, its children being Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and around 25 rarer languages[[note]] including Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Genoese, Guernésiais, Jèrriais, Ladino, Ladin, Lombard, Mirandese, Moldovan, Occitan, Piedmontese, Romansh, Sardinian, Sicilian, Venetian, and Walloon[[/note]]. It also inserted its influence into many other languages, even those outside of its immediate family, most notably English (which English, which is a West Germanic language, therefore language (therefore closely related to Dutch and German), but acquired a dose of Latin thanks to the medieval conquest by the Normans who brought with them the Latin-influenced French, and this Latin influence to the English vocabulary has been augmented ''[[SelfDemonstratingArticle in extremis]]'' through the education and utility of Latin in the Renaissance and Enlightenment as the language of Science, Intellectualism, Law, ''et cetera''.
18th Sep '17 11:34:54 AM Malady
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-->--Famous adage from the [[CambridgeLatinCourse Cambridge Latin Course textbooks]]

to:

-->--Famous adage from the [[CambridgeLatinCourse Cambridge Latin Course textbooks]]
''Literature/CambridgeLatinCourse'' textbooks



During the medieval period, the lower vernacular forms of Latin mutated away from the base language and became the Romance languages. Latin was still used by the church, intellectuals, governments, nobility, and businesses. It was also a language of international communication, [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage although thanks to linguistic drift and differences in pronunciation, this did not always work.]] The Church, possessing the only sort of even rudimentary educational system, used Latin for everything. However, over time the Church Latin came to differ greatly from the Classical Latin. Church Latin dropped much of the subjunctive mood, allowed purpose and result infinitives, introduced the soft c and g sounds and the v sound, removed much of the more esoteric grammar, and corrupted much of the vocabulary. The result was a language that differs significantly from Classical Latin, known as Ecclesiastical Latin, the kind most used in modern OminousLatinChanting because it did sound more familiar and less awkward (e.g., Classical Latin always pronounced V as U or W, "vita" would have been "wita" and "Veni Vidi Vici" would have been Weni Widi Wiki", see LatinPronunciationGuide).

to:

During the medieval period, the lower vernacular forms of Latin mutated away from the base language and became the Romance languages. Latin was still used by the church, intellectuals, governments, nobility, and businesses. It was also a language of international communication, [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage although thanks to linguistic drift and differences in pronunciation, this did not always work.]] The Church, possessing the only sort of even rudimentary educational system, used Latin for everything. However, over time the Church Latin came to differ greatly from the Classical Latin. Church Latin dropped much of the subjunctive mood, allowed purpose and result infinitives, introduced the soft c and g sounds and the v sound, removed much of the more esoteric grammar, and corrupted much of the vocabulary. The result was a language that differs significantly from Classical Latin, known as Ecclesiastical Latin, the kind most used in modern OminousLatinChanting because it did sound more familiar and less awkward (e.g., Classical Latin always pronounced V as U or W, "vita" would have been "wita" and "Veni Vidi Vici" would have been Weni Widi Wiki", see LatinPronunciationGuide).
UsefulNotes/LatinPronunciationGuide).
17th Sep '17 1:31:51 PM nombretomado
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Verb conjugation is absolutely everything when it comes to determining the meaning and target of a verb. Conjugation refers to the different endings that can be thrown onto verbs. They determine tense, number, person, voice, and mood. There are either 4 or 5 verb conjugations depending on whom you ask[[labelnote:Explanation]]In the past, and in the commonly-used Literature/EcceRomani instructional book series, there were 5 conjugations because there was both a regular Third Conjugation and a variant called Third -io. In most sources since then, this conjugation variant is assimilated into the Fourth Conjugation.[[/labelnote]]. There are then [[HowDoIUsedTense 6 tenses]], 2 numbers, 3 persons, 2 voices, and 2 moods. These do not stack together, so you have to learn use different variants for each different combination of tense, number, person, voice, and mood. For a typical verb, this is going to come out to a total of approximately 120 variants before parts, infinitives, absolutes, gerunds, and gerundives.

to:

Verb conjugation is absolutely everything when it comes to determining the meaning and target of a verb. Conjugation refers to the different endings that can be thrown onto verbs. They determine tense, number, person, voice, and mood. There are either 4 or 5 verb conjugations depending on whom you ask[[labelnote:Explanation]]In the past, and in the commonly-used Literature/EcceRomani instructional book series, there were 5 conjugations because there was both a regular Third Conjugation and a variant called Third -io. In most sources since then, this conjugation variant is assimilated into the Fourth Conjugation.[[/labelnote]]. There are then [[HowDoIUsedTense [[UsefulNotes/HowDoIUsedTense 6 tenses]], 2 numbers, 3 persons, 2 voices, and 2 moods. These do not stack together, so you have to learn use different variants for each different combination of tense, number, person, voice, and mood. For a typical verb, this is going to come out to a total of approximately 120 variants before parts, infinitives, absolutes, gerunds, and gerundives.
25th Jun '17 11:11:40 AM nombretomado
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During the Renaissance and early modern period, Latin was used as the origin of a lot of scientific and legal jargon, and Classical Latin was celebrated and taught to those of power, intellect and money. Thus the association that SmartPeopleKnowLatin. This trend halted in the United States in the period following WorldWarTwo. Now, unfortunately, the language is in decline. In public schools, there are both increasingly fewer Latin teachers and ever fewer people who want to take Latin. And of those, the attrition rates are growing ever higher; a notable exception is Italy, where Latin is a compulsory subject in the vast majority of high schools (such as the Liceo Classico, Liceo Scientifico and Liceo Linguistico). As a result many Italian students are familiar with the language, but even there Latin studies are increansingly neglected in favour of more practical subjects. Elsewhere, Latin still survives in places that do classical education, like Saint John's College, as well as in established private schools for the gentry, which are the only places where Ancient Greek survives.

to:

During the Renaissance and early modern period, Latin was used as the origin of a lot of scientific and legal jargon, and Classical Latin was celebrated and taught to those of power, intellect and money. Thus the association that SmartPeopleKnowLatin. This trend halted in the United States in the period following WorldWarTwo.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. Now, unfortunately, the language is in decline. In public schools, there are both increasingly fewer Latin teachers and ever fewer people who want to take Latin. And of those, the attrition rates are growing ever higher; a notable exception is Italy, where Latin is a compulsory subject in the vast majority of high schools (such as the Liceo Classico, Liceo Scientifico and Liceo Linguistico). As a result many Italian students are familiar with the language, but even there Latin studies are increansingly neglected in favour of more practical subjects. Elsewhere, Latin still survives in places that do classical education, like Saint John's College, as well as in established private schools for the gentry, which are the only places where Ancient Greek survives.
27th Aug '16 9:24:32 AM Dravencour
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-->-- Famous adage of embattled Latin students. [[labelnote:translation]]"Latin language is dead, as dead as it can be. First it killed Romans and now it's killing me."[[/labelnote]]

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-->-- Famous adage of embattled Latin students. [[labelnote:translation]]"Latin language is dead, as dead as it can be. First it killed the Romans and now it's killing me."[[/labelnote]]
19th Jul '15 7:18:12 AM leraluna
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During the Renaissance and early modern period, Latin was used as the origin of a lot of scientific and legal jargon, and Classical Latin was celebrated and taught to those of power, intellect and money. Thus the association that SmartPeopleKnowLatin. This trend halted in the United States in the period following WorldWarTwo. Now, unfortunately, the language is in decline. In public schools, there are both increasingly fewer Latin teachers and ever fewer people who want to take Latin. And of those, the attrition rates are growing ever higher; a notable exception is Italy, where Latin is a compulsory subject in the vast majority of high schools (such as the Liceo Classico, Liceo Scientifico and Liceo Linguistico), and as a result many Italian students are familiar with the language. Elsewhere, Latin still survives in places that do classical education, like Saint John's College, as well as in established private schools for the gentry, which are the only places where Ancient Greek survives.

to:

During the Renaissance and early modern period, Latin was used as the origin of a lot of scientific and legal jargon, and Classical Latin was celebrated and taught to those of power, intellect and money. Thus the association that SmartPeopleKnowLatin. This trend halted in the United States in the period following WorldWarTwo. Now, unfortunately, the language is in decline. In public schools, there are both increasingly fewer Latin teachers and ever fewer people who want to take Latin. And of those, the attrition rates are growing ever higher; a notable exception is Italy, where Latin is a compulsory subject in the vast majority of high schools (such as the Liceo Classico, Liceo Scientifico and Liceo Linguistico), and as Linguistico). As a result many Italian students are familiar with the language.language, but even there Latin studies are increansingly neglected in favour of more practical subjects. Elsewhere, Latin still survives in places that do classical education, like Saint John's College, as well as in established private schools for the gentry, which are the only places where Ancient Greek survives.
29th May '15 6:11:08 AM demonfiren
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Added DiffLines:

21st Dec '14 10:41:32 AM BrendanDRizzo
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A popular ancient language considered dead because nobody is born with it it as a native language. Latin was the language of AncientRome, the Catholic Church, government, law, trade, taxonomy, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] Creator/JohnCleese. It was the source language for the entire Romance Language family, its children being Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and around 25 rarer languages[[note]] including Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Genoese, Guernésiais, Jèrriais, Ladino, Ladin, Lombard, Mirandese, Moldovan, Occitan, Piedmontese, Romansh, Sardinian, Sicilian, Venetian, and Walloon[[/note]]. It also inserted its influence into many other languages, even those outside of its immediate family, most notably English (which is a West Germanic language, therefore closely related to Dutch and German), but acquired a dose of Latin thanks to the medieval conquest by the Normans who brought with them the Latin-influenced French, and this Latin influence to the English vocabulary has been augmented in extremis through the education and utility of Latin in the Renaissance and Enlightenment as the language of Science, Intellectualism, Law, ''et cetera''.

to:

A popular ancient language considered dead because nobody is born with it it as a native language. Latin was the language of AncientRome, the Catholic Church, government, law, trade, taxonomy, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] Creator/JohnCleese. It was the source language for the entire Romance Language family, its children being Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and around 25 rarer languages[[note]] including Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Genoese, Guernésiais, Jèrriais, Ladino, Ladin, Lombard, Mirandese, Moldovan, Occitan, Piedmontese, Romansh, Sardinian, Sicilian, Venetian, and Walloon[[/note]]. It also inserted its influence into many other languages, even those outside of its immediate family, most notably English (which is a West Germanic language, therefore closely related to Dutch and German), but acquired a dose of Latin thanks to the medieval conquest by the Normans who brought with them the Latin-influenced French, and this Latin influence to the English vocabulary has been augmented ''[[SelfDemonstratingArticle in extremis extremis]]'' through the education and utility of Latin in the Renaissance and Enlightenment as the language of Science, Intellectualism, Law, ''et cetera''.
13th Jun '14 11:54:25 PM TriumphForks
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A popular ancient language considered dead because nobody is born with it it as a native language. Latin was the language of AncientRome, the Catholic Church, government, law, trade, taxonomy, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] Creator/JohnCleese. It was the source language for the entire Romance Language family, its children being Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, and Romanian. It also inserted its influence into many other languages, even those outside of its immediate family, most notably English (which is a West Germanic language, therefore closely related to Dutch and German), but acquired a dose of Latin thanks to the medieval conquest by the Normans who brought with them the Latin-influenced French, and this Latin influence to the English vocabulary has been augmented in extremis through the education and utility of Latin in the Renaissance and Enlightenment as the language of Science, Intellectualism, Law, ''et cetera''.

to:

A popular ancient language considered dead because nobody is born with it it as a native language. Latin was the language of AncientRome, the Catholic Church, government, law, trade, taxonomy, [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and]] Creator/JohnCleese. It was the source language for the entire Romance Language family, its children being Italian, Spanish, French, Portuguese, Romanian, and Romanian.around 25 rarer languages[[note]] including Aragonese, Aranese, Aromanian, Asturian, Catalan, Corsican, Friulian, Galician, Gallo, Genoese, Guernésiais, Jèrriais, Ladino, Ladin, Lombard, Mirandese, Moldovan, Occitan, Piedmontese, Romansh, Sardinian, Sicilian, Venetian, and Walloon[[/note]]. It also inserted its influence into many other languages, even those outside of its immediate family, most notably English (which is a West Germanic language, therefore closely related to Dutch and German), but acquired a dose of Latin thanks to the medieval conquest by the Normans who brought with them the Latin-influenced French, and this Latin influence to the English vocabulary has been augmented in extremis through the education and utility of Latin in the Renaissance and Enlightenment as the language of Science, Intellectualism, Law, ''et cetera''.
18th May '14 8:44:30 PM AnoBakaDesu
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