History UsefulNotes / Kotobagari

6th Nov '16 11:40:10 AM wootzits
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* In the original manga of ''KeroroGunsou'', the aliens called Earth "Pokopen," which was a derogatory word that the Japanese used for China during the Sino-Japanese Wars. (Yes, it's a deliberate TakeThat.) However, Japanese broadcast authorities won't let people use the word, so we get "Pekopon" instead. Some dubs change it back to "Pokopen".

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* In the original manga of ''KeroroGunsou'', ''Manga/SgtFrog'', the aliens called Earth "Pokopen," which was a derogatory word that the Japanese used for China during the Sino-Japanese Wars. (Yes, it's a deliberate TakeThat.) However, Japanese broadcast authorities won't let people use the word, so we get "Pekopon" instead. Some dubs change it back to "Pokopen".
18th Jun '16 11:46:20 PM nombretomado
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* ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'', set in a fantasy-world take on feudal Japan crossbred with warring-states China, has the lowest social class as "eta". One wonders how they would handle that in a Japanese printing.

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* ''LegendOfTheFiveRings'', ''TabletopGame/LegendOfTheFiveRings'', set in a fantasy-world take on feudal Japan crossbred with warring-states China, has the lowest social class as "eta". One wonders how they would handle that in a Japanese printing.



* ''VampireTheRequiem'' has the Burakumin bloodline - and lately, the word "burakumin" has been deemed offensive as well, at least according to TheOtherWiki. The bloodline originated within the mortal burakumin, and their bloodline weakness is that it's much harder for them to gain respect (the Status Merit, no matter what it's status in, is twice as expensive).

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* ''VampireTheRequiem'' ''TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem'' has the Burakumin bloodline - and lately, the word "burakumin" has been deemed offensive as well, at least according to TheOtherWiki. The bloodline originated within the mortal burakumin, and their bloodline weakness is that it's much harder for them to gain respect (the Status Merit, no matter what it's status in, is twice as expensive).
1st Dec '15 9:52:31 PM PadurKaril
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Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language "Alphabet".

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Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Korean Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language "Alphabet".
1st Nov '15 12:15:36 PM TomSFox
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Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language the "Alphabet".

In short, this is Japan's version of "Political Correctness". It's disturbingly common when the subjects of Japan's WorldWarII atrocities and its discriminated minorities comes up.

to:

Sometimes, kotobagari leads to confusing terminology. NHK, the Japanese Broadcasting Company, runs a Korean language study program, but the language is called "Hangul" to avoid being politically incorrect. This is a result of both the North and South Korean governments demanding that the program be called by the name of one country. North Korea wanted the show to be called "Chosŏn language", taken from its full name, ''Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin Konghwaguk'' (Democratic People's Republic of Korea). South Korea wanted "Kankoku language", from the Korean name of ''Daehan Minguk'' "Republic of Korea" (the characters would be pronounced "Daikan Minkoku'' in Japanese; literally translated, "The Greater Han Popular State"). As a compromise, "Hangul" was selected, but this has led to the inappropriate usage of the term "Hangul" to refer to the Korean language. Which is like calling the English language the "Alphabet".

In short, this is Japan's version of "Political Correctness". It's disturbingly common when the subjects of Japan's WorldWarII atrocities and its discriminated minorities comes come up.
25th Sep '14 10:10:43 PM Elusivehawk
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Now ''youmuin'' is considered demeaning, so there is a shift towards using ''koumuin'' ("school task member") or ''kanrisagyouin'' ("maintenance member") instead. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pinker Linguist Stephen Pinker]] calls this shift the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism_treadmill#Euphemism_treadmill euphemism treadmill]]. This tends to give rise to {{Unusual Euphemism}}s

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Now ''youmuin'' is considered demeaning, so there is a shift towards using ''koumuin'' ("school task member") or ''kanrisagyouin'' ("maintenance member") instead. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Pinker Linguist Stephen Pinker]] calls this shift the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphemism_treadmill#Euphemism_treadmill org/wiki/Euphemism#Evolution euphemism treadmill]]. This tends to give rise to {{Unusual Euphemism}}s
12th Jun '14 8:54:46 PM RevolutionStone
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* Generally, explicit references to drugs ''by name'' or explicitly describing how to use them are prohibited. VisualKei bands, whose lyrics often reference drugs, have come up with a variety of strategies ranging from RefugeInAudacity to being the RulesLawyer, to use said lyrics or song titles. A couple of famous examples are Music/BuckTick's ''Speed,'' originally named ''Acid,'' but changed around so it could technically refer to "speed" in the sense of motion as opposed to the drug speed, with the line about popping a pill being censored in the official lyrics and only mouthed by Atsushi as he sings it, and Music/DirEnGrey's ''Egnirys Cimredopyh'' (read it backwards...).

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* Generally, explicit references to drugs other than alcohol or tobacco ''by name'' or explicitly describing how to use them are prohibited. VisualKei bands, whose lyrics often reference drugs, have come up with a variety of strategies ranging from RefugeInAudacity to being the RulesLawyer, to use said lyrics or song titles. A couple of famous examples are Music/BuckTick's ''Speed,'' originally named ''Acid,'' but changed around so it could technically refer to "speed" in the sense of motion as opposed to the drug speed, with the line about popping a pill being censored in the official lyrics and only mouthed by Atsushi as he sings it, and Music/DirEnGrey's ''Egnirys Cimredopyh'' (read it backwards...).
11th Jun '14 6:12:11 PM RevolutionStone
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A variant, as mentioned below, generally prohibits mentioning actual illegal drugs (or legal but restricted drugs) by name and/or explicitly describing how to use them. Some common ways around this include the common appearance of the FantasticDrug (in anime, manga, live action TV, literature, and the like), invoking AndSomeOtherStuff or other ways of vaguely describing the use, or other means of [[RulesLawyer rules lawyering]], though some references to actual drugs and their use ''do'' get through - usually if sufficient RefugeInAudacity is applied. Unfortunately, this also applies to journalistic reporting - all drugs are often referred to as "stimulant drugs," "narcotics," or similar, which leads to a lack of clarity and a fertile breeding ground for rumors.

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A variant, as mentioned below, generally prohibits mentioning actual illegal drugs (or legal but restricted drugs) by name and/or explicitly describing how to use them. Some common ways around this include the common appearance of the FantasticDrug (in anime, manga, live action TV, literature, and the like), invoking AndSomeOtherStuff or other ways of vaguely describing the use, or other means of [[RulesLawyer rules lawyering]], though some references to actual drugs and their use ''do'' get through - usually if sufficient RefugeInAudacity is applied. Unfortunately, this also applies to journalistic reporting or educational material - all drugs are often referred to as "stimulant drugs," "narcotics," or similar, which leads to a lack of clarity and a fertile breeding ground for rumors.
rumors, and very little publication/distribution of UsefulNotes/HarmReduction material related to drugs in Japan.
11th Jun '14 6:09:28 PM RevolutionStone
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Added DiffLines:

A variant, as mentioned below, generally prohibits mentioning actual illegal drugs (or legal but restricted drugs) by name and/or explicitly describing how to use them. Some common ways around this include the common appearance of the FantasticDrug (in anime, manga, live action TV, literature, and the like), invoking AndSomeOtherStuff or other ways of vaguely describing the use, or other means of [[RulesLawyer rules lawyering]], though some references to actual drugs and their use ''do'' get through - usually if sufficient RefugeInAudacity is applied. Unfortunately, this also applies to journalistic reporting - all drugs are often referred to as "stimulant drugs," "narcotics," or similar, which leads to a lack of clarity and a fertile breeding ground for rumors.
11th Jun '14 6:00:43 PM RevolutionStone
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to:

* Generally, explicit references to drugs ''by name'' or explicitly describing how to use them are prohibited. VisualKei bands, whose lyrics often reference drugs, have come up with a variety of strategies ranging from RefugeInAudacity to being the RulesLawyer, to use said lyrics or song titles. A couple of famous examples are Music/BuckTick's ''Speed,'' originally named ''Acid,'' but changed around so it could technically refer to "speed" in the sense of motion as opposed to the drug speed, with the line about popping a pill being censored in the official lyrics and only mouthed by Atsushi as he sings it, and Music/DirEnGrey's ''Egnirys Cimredopyh'' (read it backwards...).
1st Aug '13 3:12:24 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ''TheSimpsons'' -- sort of inverted and PlayedForLaughs. When they go to Japan Bart uses the neutral "gaikokujin", but in the subtitles it's translated "foreign devils" [[hottip:*: which is actually a standard translation of a Cantonese racial epithet, Gwei Lo, not Japanese]] .
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<<|UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}|>>
<<|LanguageTropes|>>
<<|TropeNamesFromTheJapanese|>>

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* ''TheSimpsons'' -- sort of inverted and PlayedForLaughs. When they go to Japan Bart uses the neutral "gaikokujin", but in the subtitles it's translated "foreign devils" [[hottip:*: [[note]] which is actually a standard translation of a Cantonese racial epithet, Gwei Lo, not Japanese]] .
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<<|{{Dialogue}}|>>
<<|IndexOverdosed|>>
<<|UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}|>>
<<|LanguageTropes|>>
<<|TropeNamesFromTheJapanese|>>
Japanese[[/note]] .
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