History UsefulNotes / IrishNames

10th Jul '16 6:41:09 AM VampireBuddha
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While most people in UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} today speak English, Irish (a member in the Goidelic branch of the Insular Celtic languages, closely related to Manx and Scottish Gaelic, and less closely to Breton, Cornish and Welsh) is spoken as an everyday language in some areas and as a name source among those who otherwise speak English. Written Irish uses a version of the Latin alphabet like English, but the similarities end there--the correspondence between Irish spelling and Irish pronunciation is quite different from the correspondence between English spelling and English pronunciation. Eighteen letters plus vowel acute accents [´] (the ''fada'') are used to write native words, the same letters as the English alphabet minus j, k, q, v, w, x, y and z. Lenited letters were traditionally represented by a dot [˙] above, but now a lenited letter is followed by "h" in modern printed Irish. In addition Irish was never standardised, leading to a wide variation in spelling for names pronounced the same way.

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While most people in UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} today speak English, Irish (a member in the Goidelic branch of the Insular Celtic languages, closely related to Manx and Scottish Gaelic, and less closely to Breton, Cornish and Welsh) is spoken as an everyday language in some areas and as a name source among those who otherwise speak English. Written Irish uses a version of the Latin alphabet like English, but the similarities end there--the correspondence between Irish spelling and Irish pronunciation is quite different from the correspondence between English spelling and English pronunciation. Eighteen letters plus vowel acute accents [´] (the ''fada'') are used to write native words, the same letters as the English alphabet minus j, k, q, v, w, x, y and z. Lenited letters were traditionally represented by a dot [˙] above, but now a lenited letter is followed by "h" in modern printed Irish. In addition Irish was never standardised, not standardised until the 1930s, leading to a wide variation in spelling for names pronounced the same way.
24th Mar '16 2:11:22 PM nombretomado
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* '''Deirdre''' (deer-dra'), not "deer-dree" as in [[CoronationStreet Hunt-Langton-Barlow-Rachid-Barlow]]. Listen to how Lady Deirdre Skye of ''SidMeiersAlphaCentauri'' pronounces her name (although somewhat confusingly, she's supposed to be a Scot--who speaks in a highly [[BritishAccents RP-ified accent]]).

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* '''Deirdre''' (deer-dra'), not "deer-dree" as in [[CoronationStreet [[Series/CoronationStreet Hunt-Langton-Barlow-Rachid-Barlow]]. Listen to how Lady Deirdre Skye of ''SidMeiersAlphaCentauri'' pronounces her name (although somewhat confusingly, she's supposed to be a Scot--who speaks in a highly [[BritishAccents RP-ified accent]]).
13th Jan '16 4:38:40 AM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:328:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ireland_flag_3355.png]]

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[[quoteright:328:http://static.[[quoteright:272:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/ireland_flag_3355.png]]
13th Jan '16 4:38:21 AM Morgenthaler
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* '''Eoghan''' (Owen) Literally means 'born of the yew' but associated with the English "Eugene" (recently seen as a pronunciation joke in the film ''LeapYear''.)

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* '''Eoghan''' (Owen) Literally means 'born of the yew' but associated with the English "Eugene" (recently seen as a pronunciation joke in the film ''LeapYear''.''Film/LeapYear''.)
28th Oct '15 12:27:54 AM KYCubbie
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* '''Séamus'''/'''Séamas''' (Shay-muss). For example, Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney. The chances of an Irish character having this name are pretty high (as it's the local version of James),[[note]]Hence the [[TheMagnificent title]] of King [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart James II and VII]], Séamus an Chaca (Séamus the [[PrecisionFStrike Shit]], for abandoning his Irish Catholic supporters.[[/note]] note ''Franchise/HarryPotter''. The classic American [[Main/{{PrivateDetective}} Private Detective]] is sometimes called a "Shamus".

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* '''Séamus'''/'''Séamas''' (Shay-muss). For example, Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney. Wrestling/{{WWE}} has a more phonetically spelled version in Wrestling/{{Sheamus}}[[note]]real name Stephen Farrelly[[/note]]. The chances of an Irish character having this name are pretty high (as it's the local version of James),[[note]]Hence the [[TheMagnificent title]] of King [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart James II and VII]], Séamus an Chaca (Séamus the [[PrecisionFStrike Shit]], for abandoning his Irish Catholic supporters.[[/note]] note ''Franchise/HarryPotter''. The classic American [[Main/{{PrivateDetective}} Private Detective]] is sometimes called a "Shamus".
28th Oct '15 12:22:07 AM KYCubbie
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* '''Colm''' (Kol-um), means "dove". As in [[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Meaney]], Feore, [[Theatre/LesMiserables Wilkinson]] and [[Music/MyBloodyValentine Ó Cíosóig]] (good luck pronouncing that last one). Anglicized as "Callum", as in [[DeadLikeMe Blue]]. "Callum" is more frequent in Scotland, and "Colm" is predominant in Ireland.

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* '''Colm''' (Kol-um), means "dove". As in [[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Meaney]], Feore, [[Film/BonCopBadCop Feore]], [[Theatre/LesMiserables Wilkinson]] and [[Music/MyBloodyValentine Ó Cíosóig]] (good luck pronouncing that last one). Anglicized as "Callum", as in [[DeadLikeMe Blue]]. "Callum" is more frequent in Scotland, and "Colm" is predominant in Ireland.
2nd Oct '15 9:43:45 AM moloch
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** There's a common and persistent belief that '''[[{{Metroid}} Samus]]''' [[{{Metroid}} Aran]]'s first name is a feminine variation on this name. It's not true in real life[[labelnote:*]] Her name is apparently based on Pelé's real name, ''Arantes''[[/labelnote]] (but may well be true in-universe and is surprisingly fitting given that Séamus means "one who conquers/supplants".)

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** There's a common and persistent belief myth that '''[[{{Metroid}} Samus]]''' [[{{Metroid}} Aran]]'s first name is a feminine variation on this name. It's not true in real life[[labelnote:*]] Her name is apparently based on Pelé's real name, ''Arantes''[[/labelnote]] surname, ''Arantes'' and the mistaken impression his first name was something like "Samus".[[/labelnote]] (but may well be true in-universe and is surprisingly fitting given that Séamus means "one who conquers/supplants".)



* '''Seosamh''' (show-iv) is "Joseph".

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* '''Seosamh''' (show-iv) (shows-iv) is "Joseph".
2nd Oct '15 9:40:29 AM moloch
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** There's a common and persistent belief that [[{{Metroid}} '''Samus''' Aran]]'s first name is a feminine variation on this name. It's not true in real life[[labelnote:*]] Her name is apparently based on Pelé's real name, ''Arantes''[[/labelnote]] (but may well be true in-universe and is surprisingly fitting given that Séamus means "one who conquers/supplants".)

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** There's a common and persistent belief that '''[[{{Metroid}} Samus]]''' [[{{Metroid}} '''Samus''' Aran]]'s first name is a feminine variation on this name. It's not true in real life[[labelnote:*]] Her name is apparently based on Pelé's real name, ''Arantes''[[/labelnote]] (but may well be true in-universe and is surprisingly fitting given that Séamus means "one who conquers/supplants".)
2nd Oct '15 9:39:44 AM moloch
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** Speaking of which, there's apparently a feminine variation, '''Samus'''. [[{{Metroid}} You may have heard it before]].
* '''Seán''' (shawn), now a very common name in English-speaking countries (albeit without the accent). Anglicised as Shaun or Shawn. Another form of "John" or perhaps the French equivalent "Jean".

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** Speaking of which, there's apparently There's a feminine variation, '''Samus'''. common and persistent belief that [[{{Metroid}} You '''Samus''' Aran]]'s first name is a feminine variation on this name. It's not true in real life[[labelnote:*]] Her name is apparently based on Pelé's real name, ''Arantes''[[/labelnote]] (but may have heard it before]].
well be true in-universe and is surprisingly fitting given that Séamus means "one who conquers/supplants".)
* '''Seán''' (shawn), now a very common name in English-speaking countries (albeit without the accent). Anglicised as Shaun or Shawn. Another form of "John" or perhaps (probably via the French equivalent "Jean"."Jean", unlike "Eoin").
15th Sep '15 3:12:48 AM Fallingwater
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* '''Siobhán''' (Shuh-vawn) Joan/Jane/Jeanne/Johanna. A butchered versoin of the name has become somewhat popular in America, pronunced as spelt (See-O-bhan). It's become well enough known that when one contestnt on ''Series/AmericanIdol'' was named Siobhan, even though ''she'' pronunced her name correctly, Ryan Seacrest, and radio hosts, still pronunced it phonetically.

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* '''Siobhán''' (Shuh-vawn) Joan/Jane/Jeanne/Johanna. A butchered versoin version of the name has become somewhat popular in America, pronunced as spelt (See-O-bhan). It's become well enough known that when one contestnt contestant on ''Series/AmericanIdol'' was named Siobhan, even though ''she'' pronunced her name correctly, Ryan Seacrest, Seacrest and the radio hosts, hosts still pronunced it phonetically.
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