History UsefulNotes / ImperialGermany

23rd Aug '16 10:38:24 PM somerandomdude
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Imperial Germany has relatively few fans today, but it's generally agreed that they deserve some credit for not being the Nazis - though they were still rather unpleasant, what with doing things like their genocide of the Herero people in German South-West Africa. UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill, writing in ''The Gathering Storm'' in 1948 concluded that Germany (and the world) would have been far better off keeping the Hohenzollerns under a true constitutional monarchy than the troubled republic of UsefulNotes/WeimarGermany, and a lot of facts seem to stand up for this. Wilhelm II, despite remaining a reactionary, intolerant, and somewhat bonkers gentleman till the end, strongly condemned the violent Nazi persecution of Jews (despite being viciously anti-Semitic himself), and he died in 1941 some months before Germany invaded the Soviet Union and began exterminating her civilians. Monarchism was strong in the UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic but today very few people support monarchism.

to:

Imperial Germany has relatively few fans today, but it's generally agreed that they deserve some credit for not being the Nazis - though they were still rather unpleasant, what with doing things like their genocide of the Herero people in German South-West Africa.Africa[[note]]Then again, their European rivals could hardly be said to better in this regard, nor could [[UsefulNotes/NativeAmericans the United States]][[/note]]. UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill, writing in ''The Gathering Storm'' in 1948 concluded that Germany (and the world) would have been far better off keeping the Hohenzollerns under a true constitutional monarchy than the troubled republic of UsefulNotes/WeimarGermany, and a lot of facts seem to stand up for this. Wilhelm II, despite remaining a reactionary, intolerant, and somewhat bonkers gentleman till the end, strongly condemned the violent Nazi persecution of Jews (despite being viciously anti-Semitic himself), and he died in 1941 some months before Germany invaded the Soviet Union and began exterminating her civilians. Monarchism was strong in the UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic but today very few people support monarchism.
18th Aug '16 10:51:55 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*These were actually just some of the better known entries in what was known as "invasion literature"; an extremely popular form of speculative fiction envisioning future wars and invasions of the British Isles by foreign powers. Sometimes the foe was the Russians, French, or even the Chinese, but between the end of the Franco-Prussian War and into the First World War, by far the most common variation of this theme in Britain was works envisioning an attack by the Germans. Many authors tried to scare their readers with lurid depictions of a hypothetical future in which Britain suffered a Prussian-style DayOfTheJackboot. The genre was so popular that several jingoistic German writers also fantasized about conquering Britain thusly (such as the 1915 German novel "Hindenburgs Einmarsch in London.")
17th Aug '16 11:06:36 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

-->"Zis chust arrived for you, Herr Baron."
-->"Okay, who's ze vise guy?"
*In one of his rambling senile stories, Grandpa Simpson declares that at one point the word "Dicketty" had replaced "twenty," because Kaiser Wilhelm II had stolen the word, and he chased him to get it back before giving up after "dicketty-six miles."
17th Aug '16 10:59:26 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The subject matter of the absurdly over-the-top Alternate History Wank German book series ''Kaiserfront 1949'' and its sequel series ''Kaiserfront 1953''.

to:

* The subject matter of the absurdly over-the-top Alternate History Wank AlternateHistoryWank German book series ''Kaiserfront 1949'' and its sequel series ''Kaiserfront 1953''.
17th Aug '16 10:54:19 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[AC:{{Comic Books}}]]
*DC Comics' "Enemy Ace" series, created by Joe Kubert in the 1960s and running into the 70s, depicts the adventures of the Richtofen-esque German air ace Hans Von Hammer. It was notable for being the first war-themed comic strip to depict the point of view of "the enemy", and its treatment of war as a morally ambiguous and bleak enterprise channeled popular sentiments in Vietnam-era America.
* The Marvel comics villain Baron Blood, an English aristocrat turned vampire, gets his start working for the Kaiser's Germany during the First World War.



* HPLovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. Set in 1917, it concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.
* AleisterCrowley's novel "Moonchild," written in 1917 and published in 1923, is set shortly before and during the First World War. It depicts the Germans and their Central Power allies as obtaining the assistance of a group of black magicians who are the rivals of the white magicians who serve as the protagonists.

to:

* HPLovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. Set in 1917, it concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship HMHS Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.
* AleisterCrowley's novel "Moonchild," written in 1917 and published in 1923, is set shortly before and during the First World War. It depicts the Germans and their Central Power allies as obtaining the assistance of a group of black magicians who are the rivals of the white magicians who serve as the protagonists. protagonists.
* The popular long-running pulp series "G8 And His Battle Aces" (which ran in the 1930s and 40s and depicted the adventures of an American aviator/spy in World War One) depicts the German Empire as standard comic book style villains. Their ranks include the deranged Herr Doktor Krueger, the somewhat proto-Dr. Doom Steel Mask, and the hulking green-skinned pre-Hulk mutant Grun. The schemes and technologies whipped up by the Kaiser's stable of mad scientists throughout the series range from death rays to murderous plant gas and everything in between.
17th Aug '16 10:41:19 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HPLovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. It concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.

to:

* HPLovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. It Set in 1917, it concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.
17th Aug '16 10:39:32 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* H.P.Lovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. It concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.

to:

* H.P.Lovecraft's HPLovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. It concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.




to:

* "Toy Soldiers: War Chest", in which one can witness the quite unique spectacle of a miniature Kaiser Wilhelm II, leading a German army complete with machine guns, biplanes, stormtroopers, flamethrowers and A-7 tanks, taking on armies of space marines and fairies.
17th Aug '16 10:33:42 PM m.crumpet
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

*H.P.Lovecraft's 1920 story "The Temple", an example of some of the rather rabidly jingoistic material Lovecraft wrote during and after the First World War. It concerns the crew of a U-boat in the Imperial Navy sinking a British freighter and murdering the survivors (perhaps a reference to the RealLife incident in 1918 where the Canadian hospital ship Llandovery Castle was torpedoed by a U-boat and its survivors machine-gunned in their lifeboats.) This being a Lovecraft story, the crew gradually kill each other off being driven mad by the supernatural force emanating from the sunken ruins of Atlantis in the waters far below them. The story relies heavily on the rabidly anti-German sentiment that was widely pervasive in the Allied countries during and shortly after the war, portraying the Germans as arrogant, casually brutal and fully convinced of their own superiority.
*AleisterCrowley's novel "Moonchild," written in 1917 and published in 1923, is set shortly before and during the First World War. It depicts the Germans and their Central Power allies as obtaining the assistance of a group of black magicians who are the rivals of the white magicians who serve as the protagonists.
9th Aug '16 5:23:38 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MagnificentBastard: OttoVonBismarck.

to:

* MagnificentBastard: OttoVonBismarck.UsefulNotes/OttoVonBismarck.



* {{Prussia}}: But of course.
30th Jul '16 12:37:17 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Debatable; Fischer and Mommsen are today no longer considered the be all and end all. Well, just consider Clark's 'The Sleepwalkers'. As for the genocide, it is hard to find a European, or indeed a greater power in this period not commiting war crimes or genocide, so to use this as a way to prove the Sonderweg is highly dubious.
This list shows the last 10 events of 184. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.ImperialGermany