History UsefulNotes / HongKong

20th Sep '16 6:15:46 AM fearlessnikki
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In non-Hong Kong fiction, the place features in the ''Film/JamesBond'' films ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'' and ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''[[note]]The original plot was supposed to center around the handover, but changed in case it became HarsherInHindsight; this original plot instead formed the basis of the 007 novel ''Literature/ZeroMinusTen''[[/note]], the novel of ''[[Literature/TheBourneSeries The Bourne Supremacy]]'' and quite a few other works.

to:

In non-Hong Kong fiction, the place features in the ''Film/JamesBond'' films ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'' and ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''[[note]]The original plot was supposed to center around the handover, but changed in case it became HarsherInHindsight; this original plot instead formed the basis of the 007 novel ''Literature/ZeroMinusTen''[[/note]], the novel of ''[[Literature/TheBourneSeries The Bourne Supremacy]]'' and quite a few other works. \n The films ''Film/ChungkingExpress'' and ''Film/AlreadyTomorrowInHongKong'' have been said to feature the city as [[SceneryPorn practically a supporting character]].
4th Apr '16 6:37:33 PM RisefromYourGrave
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* The Outlying Islands. A cluster of various islands of various sizes. The largest is Lantau. It is home to various beaches, a number of small towns, Hong Kong's small Disney theme-park and a giant statue of the Buddha. There are a number of monasteries, mostly Chinese or Tibetan Buddhist, but one Trappist (you don't hear a lot from them for obvious reasons). The famous Shaolin monks have a Kung Fu school but no monastery to current knowledge. Off the coasts of this island, one may see the Chinese White Dolphin, a species that has almost no skin pigmentation as an adult and as a result always looks white or pink. They are lively and will jump high, so tourists enjoy watching them. Also home of the Hong Kong International Airport.

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* The Outlying Islands. A cluster of various islands of various sizes. The largest is Lantau. It is home to various beaches, a number of small towns, Hong Kong's small Disney theme-park [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Disneyland park]] and a giant statue of the Buddha. There are a number of monasteries, mostly Chinese or Tibetan Buddhist, but one Trappist (you don't hear a lot from them for obvious reasons). The famous Shaolin monks have a Kung Fu school but no monastery to current knowledge. Off the coasts of this island, one may see the Chinese White Dolphin, a species that has almost no skin pigmentation as an adult and as a result always looks white or pink. They are lively and will jump high, so tourists enjoy watching them. Also home of the Hong Kong International Airport.
3rd Mar '16 2:14:33 PM BreadBull
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* Culture: A lot of people still hold a variety of traditional Chinese religious and mystical beliefs loosely linked to Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism, so one may regularly see people burning incense, paper effigies of luxury goods and bundles of "Hell Money" for their departed relatives, shrines to various local gods are often in evidence (Kuan Yin, goddess of mercy and Kuan-Ti god of war and upholder of justice are popular, so is the sea goddess A-Ma in fishing villages). Many people worry about the Feng Shui (pronounced "Fung Shoy", not "Fung Shway", by the way; Hong Kong is one of the two places in the world--Macau being the other--where [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Cantonese]] is the official language) of their buildings etc. Politically, Hong Kong is often characterized as being relatively classical liberal or libertarian (i.e. small and non-interventionist government), and this is true for the international sectors of the economy. The domestic economy, however, is quite heavily cartelized by a small number of [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections well-connected]] government-favored [[MegaCorp corporations]] (see Joe Studwell's ''Asian Godfathers'' for more), thus making Hong Kong a ''mixed economy'' with significant levels of mercantilist/corporatist statism. Rallies and demonstrations are pretty rare nowadays, riots rarer still. Most people speak Guongdungwa (Cantonese), although more and more are learning the official Putonghua (Mandarin), including the entire younger generation. You can generally get by in English, anyhow, but don't expect to hear clearly through the accent and the infamously atrocious grammar.

to:

* Culture: A lot of people still hold a variety of traditional Chinese religious and mystical beliefs loosely linked to Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism, so one may regularly see people burning incense, paper effigies of luxury goods and bundles of "Hell Money" for their departed relatives, shrines to various local gods are often in evidence (Kuan Yin, goddess of mercy and Kuan-Ti god of war and upholder of justice are popular, so is the sea goddess A-Ma in fishing villages). Many people worry about the Feng Shui (pronounced "Fung Shoy", not "Fung Shway", by the way; Hong Kong is one of the two places in the world--Macau being the other--where [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Cantonese]] is the official language) of their buildings etc. Politically, Hong Kong is often characterized as being relatively classical liberal or libertarian (i.e. small and non-interventionist government), and this is true for the international sectors of the economy. The domestic economy, however, is quite heavily cartelized by a small number of [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections well-connected]] government-favored [[MegaCorp corporations]] (see Joe Studwell's ''Asian Godfathers'' for more), thus making Hong Kong a ''mixed economy'' with significant levels of mercantilist/corporatist statism. Rallies and demonstrations are pretty rare nowadays, riots rarer still. Hong Kong has three official languages: Guangdonghua (Cantonese), Putonghua (Mandarin Chinese) and English. Most people speak Guongdungwa (Cantonese), Cantonese, although more and more people are also learning the official language language of China, Putonghua (Mandarin), including the entire younger generation. (Mandarin). You can generally get by in English, anyhow, but don't expect to hear clearly through the accent and the infamously atrocious grammar.
3rd Mar '16 2:05:06 PM BreadBull
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* The New Territories: These are the areas north of Kowloon which the British leased from China for 99 years. The lease ran out in 1997, at which point it would not have been practical to hang on to Hong Kong and Kowloon, so the Chinese got the whole lot back. This is a marked contrast to the Iron Lady's attitude to British Sovereignty elsewhere, hence the famous rhyming couplet: "You fought a war in the Falklands, in that you were so strong. On the other hand, how kind of you to give away Hong Kong". The New Territories include the various New Towns built to relieve urban congestion downtown. They also include much of the "wild" part of the SAR, infested with: poisonous snakes, pythons, harmless snakes, huge but harmless spiders, semi-wild cattle and water buffalo, semi-wild monkeys and wild boar, which allow for "wilderness" scenes even in such a small and urbanized country. Also present are many scattered villages, some still retaining old-fashioned tribal features such as village walls and most looking surprisingly poor.

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* The New Territories: These are the areas north of Kowloon which the British leased from China for 99 years. The lease ran out in 1997, at which point it would not have been practical to hang on to Hong Kong and Kowloon, so the Chinese got the whole lot back. This is a marked contrast to the Iron Lady's attitude to British Sovereignty elsewhere, hence the famous rhyming couplet: "You fought a war in the Falklands, in that you were so strong. On the other hand, how kind of you to give away Hong Kong". The New Territories include the various New Towns built to relieve urban congestion downtown. They also include much of the "wild" part of the SAR, infested with: poisonous snakes, pythons, harmless snakes, huge but harmless spiders, semi-wild cattle and water buffalo, semi-wild monkeys and wild boar, which allow for "wilderness" scenes even in such a small and urbanized country. (It should be noted that a significant portion of Hong Kong is protected nature preserve.) Also present are many scattered villages, some still retaining old-fashioned tribal features such as village walls and most looking surprisingly poor.
19th Aug '15 3:06:09 PM HeraldAlberich
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* Culture: A lot of people still hold a variety of traditional Chinese religious and mystical beliefs loosely linked to Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism, so one may regularly see people burning incense, paper effigies of luxury goods and bundles of "Hell Money" for their departed relatives, shrines to various local gods are often in evidence (Kuan Yin, goddess of mercy and Kuan-Ti god of war and upholder of justice are popular, so is the sea goddess A-Ma in fishing villages). Many people worry about the Feng Shui (pronounced "Fung Shoy", not "Fung Shway", by the way; Hong Kong is one of the two places in the world--Macau being the other--where [[ChineseDialectsAndAccents Cantonese]] is the official language) of their buildings etc. Politically, Hong Kong is often characterized as being relatively classical liberal or libertarian (i.e. small and non-interventionist government), and this is true for the international sectors of the economy. The domestic economy, however, is quite heavily cartelized by a small number of [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections well-connected]] government-favored [[MegaCorp corporations]] (see Joe Studwell's ''Asian Godfathers'' for more), thus making Hong Kong a ''mixed economy'' with significant levels of mercantilist/corporatist statism. Rallies and demonstrations are pretty rare nowadays, riots rarer still. Most people speak Guongdungwa (Cantonese), although more and more are learning the official Putonghua (Mandarin), including the entire younger generation. You can generally get by in English, anyhow, but don't expect to hear clearly through the accent and the infamously atrocious grammar.

to:

* Culture: A lot of people still hold a variety of traditional Chinese religious and mystical beliefs loosely linked to Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism, so one may regularly see people burning incense, paper effigies of luxury goods and bundles of "Hell Money" for their departed relatives, shrines to various local gods are often in evidence (Kuan Yin, goddess of mercy and Kuan-Ti god of war and upholder of justice are popular, so is the sea goddess A-Ma in fishing villages). Many people worry about the Feng Shui (pronounced "Fung Shoy", not "Fung Shway", by the way; Hong Kong is one of the two places in the world--Macau being the other--where [[ChineseDialectsAndAccents [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Cantonese]] is the official language) of their buildings etc. Politically, Hong Kong is often characterized as being relatively classical liberal or libertarian (i.e. small and non-interventionist government), and this is true for the international sectors of the economy. The domestic economy, however, is quite heavily cartelized by a small number of [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections well-connected]] government-favored [[MegaCorp corporations]] (see Joe Studwell's ''Asian Godfathers'' for more), thus making Hong Kong a ''mixed economy'' with significant levels of mercantilist/corporatist statism. Rallies and demonstrations are pretty rare nowadays, riots rarer still. Most people speak Guongdungwa (Cantonese), although more and more are learning the official Putonghua (Mandarin), including the entire younger generation. You can generally get by in English, anyhow, but don't expect to hear clearly through the accent and the infamously atrocious grammar.
10th Apr '15 11:53:39 AM erforce
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[[caption-width-right:329:The place you shot up a good chunk of if you played SleepingDogs.]]

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[[caption-width-right:329:The place you shot up a good chunk of if you played SleepingDogs.''VideoGame/SleepingDogs''.]]
5th Sep '14 11:34:33 AM erforce
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In non-Hong Kong fiction, the place features in the ''Film/JamesBond'' films ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'' and ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''[[note]]The original plot was supposed to center around the handover, but changed in case it became HarsherInHindsight; this original plot instead formed the basis of the 007 novel ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_Minus_Ten Zero Minus Ten]]''[[/note]], the novel of ''[[Literature/TheBourneSeries The Bourne Supremacy]]'' and quite a few other works.

to:

In non-Hong Kong fiction, the place features in the ''Film/JamesBond'' films ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'' and ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''[[note]]The original plot was supposed to center around the handover, but changed in case it became HarsherInHindsight; this original plot instead formed the basis of the 007 novel ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_Minus_Ten Zero Minus Ten]]''[[/note]], ''Literature/ZeroMinusTen''[[/note]], the novel of ''[[Literature/TheBourneSeries The Bourne Supremacy]]'' and quite a few other works.
25th Mar '14 10:34:22 AM erforce
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The city is highly notable for its film industry, especially in the martial arts area; giving us BruceLee, ChowYunFat, DonnieYen, and JackieChan, among many others. For example, the film ''The Departed'' is directly inspired by the ''InfernalAffairs'' trilogy. HeroicBloodshed films (especially those made by JohnWoo) also heavily influenced worldwide action cinema.

In non-Hong Kong fiction, the place features in the Film/JamesBond films ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'' and ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''[[note]]The original plot was supposed to center around the handover, but changed in case it became HarsherInHindsight; this original plot instead formed the basis of the 007 novel ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_Minus_Ten Zero Minus Ten]]''[[/note]], the novel of ''[[Literature/TheBourneSeries The Bourne Supremacy]]'' and quite a few other works.

to:

The city is highly notable for its film industry, especially in the martial arts area; giving us BruceLee, ChowYunFat, DonnieYen, Creator/BruceLee, Creator/ChowYunFat, Creator/DonnieYen, and JackieChan, Creator/JackieChan, among many others. For example, the film ''The Departed'' ''Film/TheDeparted'' is directly inspired by the ''InfernalAffairs'' ''Film/InfernalAffairs'' trilogy. HeroicBloodshed films (especially those made by JohnWoo) also heavily influenced worldwide action cinema.

In non-Hong Kong fiction, the place features in the Film/JamesBond ''Film/JamesBond'' films ''Film/TheManWithTheGoldenGun'' and ''Film/TomorrowNeverDies''[[note]]The original plot was supposed to center around the handover, but changed in case it became HarsherInHindsight; this original plot instead formed the basis of the 007 novel ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_Minus_Ten Zero Minus Ten]]''[[/note]], the novel of ''[[Literature/TheBourneSeries The Bourne Supremacy]]'' and quite a few other works.



* Urban Environment: As the areas of Hong Kong are small and the hills make parts unsuitable for building, most people live in tower blocks. Corridors are tiled and some individual flats have steel security gates (the new private residential buildings have none, unless you install one yourself), as a result coming home to a Hong Kong flat is like the opening sequence of ''{{Porridge}}'': echoing footfalls, jingling keys and clanging metal bars. Smaller villages have little three-storey buildings which are a lot nicer. The juxtaposition of rich and poor is amazing: a multi-million-dollar mansion may be just up the road from a huddle of corrugated iron squatter huts that look as if they are held together with snot and toothpaste. The Peninsular Hotel, the poshest place in town (JamesBond slept there in ''Film/DieAnotherDay'', almost certainly with someone else) is literally just across the road from Chunking Mansions, Kowloon's most notorious slum. Some of the older residential buildings have shacks built on their roofs which are inhabited by poorer families. Due to the lack of urban planning in the earlier days, a lot of juxtapositions like these tend to happen. For example, a cramped street in Yau Ma Tei has a Jockey Club betting station, a Hong Kong style cafe, a lightning shop and a coffin shop right next to each other, all under very old, 7-8 storey residential buildings. On Temple Street, while one section does sell Buddhist religions records and it is famous for palm-readers and fortune tellers, a significant part of it also sells sex toys. Right in front of a public library, which in turn is next to the death certificate registration center, and there's a brothel quite nearby too.

to:

* Urban Environment: As the areas of Hong Kong are small and the hills make parts unsuitable for building, most people live in tower blocks. Corridors are tiled and some individual flats have steel security gates (the new private residential buildings have none, unless you install one yourself), as a result coming home to a Hong Kong flat is like the opening sequence of ''{{Porridge}}'': echoing footfalls, jingling keys and clanging metal bars. Smaller villages have little three-storey buildings which are a lot nicer. The juxtaposition of rich and poor is amazing: a multi-million-dollar mansion may be just up the road from a huddle of corrugated iron squatter huts that look as if they are held together with snot and toothpaste. The Peninsular Hotel, the poshest place in town (JamesBond (Film/JamesBond slept there in ''Film/DieAnotherDay'', almost certainly with someone else) is literally just across the road from Chunking Mansions, Kowloon's most notorious slum. Some of the older residential buildings have shacks built on their roofs which are inhabited by poorer families. Due to the lack of urban planning in the earlier days, a lot of juxtapositions like these tend to happen. For example, a cramped street in Yau Ma Tei has a Jockey Club betting station, a Hong Kong style cafe, a lightning shop and a coffin shop right next to each other, all under very old, 7-8 storey residential buildings. On Temple Street, while one section does sell Buddhist religions records and it is famous for palm-readers and fortune tellers, a significant part of it also sells sex toys. Right in front of a public library, which in turn is next to the death certificate registration center, and there's a brothel quite nearby too.
25th Dec '13 11:13:35 PM karstovich2
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* Transport: As most people live in tower blocks and there are few parking places, many families have no cars so public transport is very important. It includes the trams on Hong Kong side, a tram-train light rail system called the LRT in parts of the New Territories (it would be a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karlsruhe_model Karlsruhe system]] if the territories were big enough, which they aren't), and a huge number of double-decker buses and minibuses plying their trade all over the SAR. The MTR is an underground rail network whose speed, cleanliness and reliability would shame the [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London Tube]], the UsefulNotes/NewYorkSubway or UsefulNotes/LeMetropolitain. The company recently took over the Kowloon-Canton Railway and so now handles the above-ground trains also. Rickshaws are a thing of the past now: the last few in town stand forlorn by the Star Ferry pier, for sale to anyone who wants one as a curiosity. Indeed, transportation is very convenient in general - there are a lot of buses and light buses (coming in green and red varieties - the former has fixed stops and the latter doesn't).

to:

* Transport: As most people live in tower blocks and there are few parking places, many families have no cars so public transport is very important. It includes the trams on Hong Kong side, a tram-train light rail system called the LRT in parts of the New Territories (it would be a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karlsruhe_model Karlsruhe system]] if the territories were big enough, which they aren't), Territories, and a huge number of double-decker buses and minibuses plying their trade all over the SAR. The MTR is an underground rail network whose speed, cleanliness and reliability would shame the [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London Tube]], the UsefulNotes/NewYorkSubway or UsefulNotes/LeMetropolitain. The company recently took over the Kowloon-Canton Railway and so now handles the above-ground trains also. Rickshaws are a thing of the past now: the last few in town stand forlorn by the Star Ferry pier, for sale to anyone who wants one as a curiosity. Indeed, transportation is very convenient in general - there are a lot of buses and light buses (coming in green and red varieties - the former has fixed stops and the latter doesn't).
25th Dec '13 11:12:15 PM karstovich2
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* Transport: As most people live in tower blocks and there are few parking places, many families have no cars so public transport is very important. It includes the trams on Hong Kong side, a light-rail-cum-tram called the LRT in parts of the New Territories and a huge number of double-decker buses and minibuses plying their trade all over the SAR. The MTR is an underground rail network whose speed, cleanliness and reliability would shame the [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London Tube]], the UsefulNotes/NewYorkSubway or UsefulNotes/LeMetropolitain. The company recently took over the Kowloon-Canton Railway and so now handles the above-ground trains also. Rickshaws are a thing of the past now: the last few in town stand forlorn by the Star Ferry pier, for sale to anyone who wants one as a curiosity. Indeed, transportation is very convenient in general - there are a lot of buses and light buses (coming in green and red varieties - the former has fixed stops and the latter doesn't).

to:

* Transport: As most people live in tower blocks and there are few parking places, many families have no cars so public transport is very important. It includes the trams on Hong Kong side, a light-rail-cum-tram tram-train light rail system called the LRT in parts of the New Territories (it would be a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karlsruhe_model Karlsruhe system]] if the territories were big enough, which they aren't), and a huge number of double-decker buses and minibuses plying their trade all over the SAR. The MTR is an underground rail network whose speed, cleanliness and reliability would shame the [[UsefulNotes/TheLondonUnderground London Tube]], the UsefulNotes/NewYorkSubway or UsefulNotes/LeMetropolitain. The company recently took over the Kowloon-Canton Railway and so now handles the above-ground trains also. Rickshaws are a thing of the past now: the last few in town stand forlorn by the Star Ferry pier, for sale to anyone who wants one as a curiosity. Indeed, transportation is very convenient in general - there are a lot of buses and light buses (coming in green and red varieties - the former has fixed stops and the latter doesn't).
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