History UsefulNotes / GaulsWithGrenades

16th Mar '16 11:24:36 PM StevieC
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Added DiffLines:

One of the Foreign Legion's more high-profile missions today is as security-detail at the European Space Agency's Kourou Launch Complex in French Guiana, launch-site of the Ariane rockets.
21st Nov '15 12:03:12 AM h27kim
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* This is because the mon signifies monsieur (mister) rather than the possessive mon (my). It is an honorific. Napoleon, however, had little respect for the French navy, mostly because of Trafalgar defeat, and denied them that honor.

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* This is because the mon signifies monsieur (mister) ("mister," or, more literally, "my lord") rather than the possessive mon (my). It is an honorific. Napoleon, however, had little respect for the French navy, mostly because of Trafalgar defeat, and denied them that honor.
29th Sep '15 6:30:48 PM demonfiren
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Historically, the Legion's promise of a new identity attracted many criminals and other shady elements (including, in the aftermath of WorldWarII, some ''[[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany captured Waffen-SS soldiers]]'' who were given the option to enlist to avoid execution). Today the Legion is considered a highly prestigious elite combat unit, and so there are rigorous background checks, so this isn't necessarily true anymore. While they offer a new identity, you can still be pursued for [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SerialKiller blood]] or [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil "mores"]] crimes.

to:

Historically, the Legion's promise of a new identity attracted many criminals and other shady elements (including, in the aftermath of WorldWarII, some ''[[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany captured Waffen-SS soldiers]]'' who were given the option to enlist to avoid execution). Today the Legion is considered a highly prestigious elite combat unit, and so there are rigorous background checks, so this isn't necessarily true anymore. While they offer a new identity, you can still be pursued for [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SerialKiller [[SerialKiller blood]] or [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil "mores"]] crimes.
29th Sep '15 6:29:57 PM demonfiren
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''[[BadassArmy The Foreign Legion]]''

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''[[BadassArmy ''[[LegionOfLostSouls The Foreign Legion]]''
13th Sep '15 1:55:19 PM AllenbysEyes
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* Jean Larteguy's novels, ''The Centurions'' and ''The Praetorians'', depict a squad of French paratroops serving in Indochina, Algeria and the Suez Crisis, chronicling their disillusionment with French politicians miring them in unwinnable wars. The main protagonist, Lt. Colonel Raspeguy, is [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed based on]] famous paratroop commander Marcel Bigeard. ''The Centurions'' [[TheFilmOfTheBook became a poorly-reviewed movie]], ''Lost Command'', starring Creator/AnthonyQuinn and Creator/AlainDelon.

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* Jean Larteguy's novels, ''The Centurions'' and ''The Praetorians'', depict a squad of French paratroops serving in Indochina, Algeria and the Suez Crisis, chronicling Crisis. The books chronicle their disillusionment with French politicians miring them in unwinnable wars.wars, culminating in several joining UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle's 1958 coup d'état. The main protagonist, Lt. Colonel Raspeguy, is [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed based on]] famous paratroop commander Marcel Bigeard. ''The Centurions'' [[TheFilmOfTheBook became a poorly-reviewed movie]], ''Lost Command'', starring Creator/AnthonyQuinn and Creator/AlainDelon.
13th Sep '15 1:52:25 PM AllenbysEyes
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to:

* Jean Larteguy's novels, ''The Centurions'' and ''The Praetorians'', depict a squad of French paratroops serving in Indochina, Algeria and the Suez Crisis, chronicling their disillusionment with French politicians miring them in unwinnable wars. The main protagonist, Lt. Colonel Raspeguy, is [[NoCelebritiesWereHarmed based on]] famous paratroop commander Marcel Bigeard. ''The Centurions'' [[TheFilmOfTheBook became a poorly-reviewed movie]], ''Lost Command'', starring Creator/AnthonyQuinn and Creator/AlainDelon.
16th Jul '15 2:32:49 AM jormis29
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* ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}} Codename 47'': 47's "fathers" were all soldiers in the Foreign Legion, with the exception Dr. Ort-Meyer.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Hitman}} Codename 47'': ''VideoGame/HitmanCodename47'': 47's "fathers" were all soldiers in the Foreign Legion, with the exception Dr. Ort-Meyer.
22nd May '15 11:12:32 AM ShinyTsukkomi
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Despite the CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys stereotype, France actually has a pretty good war record up until the 20th century. Whether ultimately winning the HundredYearsWar against England, fighting and winning against large coalitions under UsefulNotes/LouisXIV, providing naval aid and essential supplies to the colonial forces during the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution, defeating the rest of Europe in the French Revolutionary Wars, nearly ''conquering'' the rest of the continent in the Napoleonic Wars, or fighting toe to toe with the UsefulNotes/GermanEmpire during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, France has a remarkable military history that's only taken a beating due to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 (or so), their thrashing from the British in the Napoleonic Era, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and subsequent colonial defeats at the hands of countries like Algeria[[note]]sort of : after learning from their Indochinan mistakes in counter-insurgency, they were actually very effective against the FLN, which was crushed at the end of the war. But for that, they had to use [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone unsavoury tactics]], made even worse by the fact that many of the elite troops were former résistants. At the end, the military announced its victory to UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle, but added that if there wasn't a political solution, there would be a new war ten years later. So De Gaulle decided to [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere pull back the Army and give Algeria independence]]. Which was followed by massacres between Algerians and against French residents that made the entire war pale in comparison. So pretty much everyone considers it at least a total moral defeat.[[/note]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indochina Indochina]] (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos). It should be noted that France is the only other country besides the Mongol Empire to have actually captured Moscow in an invasion of Russia; the only difference being the Russians burned it to the ground rather than let the French take it. In the First World War, 1.5 million young French men were killed in battle. The Battle of France wasn't lost because of any lack of badass on the part of the French and British. It was lost due to serious strategic blunders on the part of the French generals.

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Despite the CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys stereotype, France actually has a pretty good war record up until the 20th century. Whether ultimately winning the HundredYearsWar UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar against England, fighting and winning against large coalitions under UsefulNotes/LouisXIV, providing naval aid and essential supplies to the colonial forces during the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution, defeating the rest of Europe in the French Revolutionary Wars, nearly ''conquering'' the rest of the continent in the Napoleonic Wars, or fighting toe to toe with the UsefulNotes/GermanEmpire during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, France has a remarkable military history that's only taken a beating due to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 (or so), their thrashing from the British in the Napoleonic Era, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and subsequent colonial defeats at the hands of countries like Algeria[[note]]sort of : after learning from their Indochinan mistakes in counter-insurgency, they were actually very effective against the FLN, which was crushed at the end of the war. But for that, they had to use [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone unsavoury tactics]], made even worse by the fact that many of the elite troops were former résistants. At the end, the military announced its victory to UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle, but added that if there wasn't a political solution, there would be a new war ten years later. So De Gaulle decided to [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere pull back the Army and give Algeria independence]]. Which was followed by massacres between Algerians and against French residents that made the entire war pale in comparison. So pretty much everyone considers it at least a total moral defeat.[[/note]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indochina Indochina]] (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos). It should be noted that France is the only other country besides the Mongol Empire to have actually captured Moscow in an invasion of Russia; the only difference being the Russians burned it to the ground rather than let the French take it. In the First World War, 1.5 million young French men were killed in battle. The Battle of France wasn't lost because of any lack of badass on the part of the French and British. It was lost due to serious strategic blunders on the part of the French generals.
16th Feb '15 12:42:57 PM Alceister
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The AMX-56 Leclerc is France's current main battle tank, made by Nexter of France, formerly GIAT. Developed in 1991, it replaced the AMX 30 from the Cold War. The Leclerc uses non-explosive reactive armor, as opposed to the explosive reactive armor found on most tanks. It carries a 120mm smoothbore cannon that can theoretically fire any NATO standard ammunition, but typically carries French-made ammo. While not having been combat proven yet, it is already well known for having ''excellent'' mobility (its unique armor gives it a weight a full 12 tons lighter than the M1A2 Abrams and 5 tons lighter than the Leopard 2A6, the most advanced iterations of its American and German counterparts, and allows for the best power-to-weight ratio of any main battle tank), but is the most expensive tank manufactured, with each unit costing ''three times as much'' as an [=M1A2=] Abrams.

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The AMX-56 Leclerc is France's current main battle tank, made by Nexter of France, formerly GIAT. Developed in 1991, it replaced the AMX 30 from the Cold War. The Leclerc uses non-explosive reactive armor, as opposed to the explosive reactive armor found on most tanks. It carries a 120mm smoothbore cannon that can theoretically fire any NATO standard ammunition, but typically carries French-made ammo. While not having been combat proven yet, it is already well known for having ''excellent'' mobility (its unique armor gives it a weight a full 12 tons lighter than the M1A2 [=M1A2=] Abrams and 5 tons lighter than the Leopard 2A6, the most advanced iterations of its American and German counterparts, and allows for the best power-to-weight ratio of any main battle tank), but is the most expensive tank manufactured, with each unit costing ''three times as much'' as an [=M1A2=] Abrams.
4th Feb '15 2:33:36 AM mvm900
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Despite the CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys stereotype, France actually has a pretty good war record. Whether ultimately winning the HundredYearsWar against England, fighting and winning against large coalitions under UsefulNotes/LouisXIV, providing naval aid and essential supplies to the colonial forces during the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution, defeating the rest of Europe in the French Revolutionary Wars, nearly ''conquering'' the rest of the continent in the Napoleonic Wars, or fighting toe to toe with the UsefulNotes/GermanEmpire during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, France has a remarkable military history that's only taken a beating due to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 (or so), their thrashing from the British in the Napoleonic Era, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and subsequent colonial defeats at the hands of countries like Algeria[[note]]sort of : after learning from their Indochinan mistakes in counter-insurgency, they were actually very effective against the FLN, which was crushed at the end of the war. But for that, they had to use [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone unsavoury tactics]], made even worse by the fact that many of the elite troops were former résistants. At the end, the military announced its victory to UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle, but added that if there wasn't a political solution, there would be a new war ten years later. So De Gaulle decided to [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere pull back the Army and give Algeria independence]]. Which was followed by massacres between Algerians and against French residents that made the entire war pale in comparison. So pretty much everyone considers it at least a total moral defeat.[[/note]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indochina Indochina]] (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos). It should be noted that France is the only other country besides the Mongol Empire to have actually captured Moscow in an invasion of Russia; the only difference being the Russians burned it to the ground rather than let the French take it. In the First World War, 1.5 million young French men were killed in battle. The Battle of France wasn't lost because of any lack of badass on the part of the French and British. It was lost due to serious strategic blunders on the part of the French generals.

to:

Despite the CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys stereotype, France actually has a pretty good war record.record up until the 20th century. Whether ultimately winning the HundredYearsWar against England, fighting and winning against large coalitions under UsefulNotes/LouisXIV, providing naval aid and essential supplies to the colonial forces during the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution, defeating the rest of Europe in the French Revolutionary Wars, nearly ''conquering'' the rest of the continent in the Napoleonic Wars, or fighting toe to toe with the UsefulNotes/GermanEmpire during UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, France has a remarkable military history that's only taken a beating due to the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 (or so), their thrashing from the British in the Napoleonic Era, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and subsequent colonial defeats at the hands of countries like Algeria[[note]]sort of : after learning from their Indochinan mistakes in counter-insurgency, they were actually very effective against the FLN, which was crushed at the end of the war. But for that, they had to use [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone unsavoury tactics]], made even worse by the fact that many of the elite troops were former résistants. At the end, the military announced its victory to UsefulNotes/CharlesDeGaulle, but added that if there wasn't a political solution, there would be a new war ten years later. So De Gaulle decided to [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere pull back the Army and give Algeria independence]]. Which was followed by massacres between Algerians and against French residents that made the entire war pale in comparison. So pretty much everyone considers it at least a total moral defeat.[[/note]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indochina Indochina]] (Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos). It should be noted that France is the only other country besides the Mongol Empire to have actually captured Moscow in an invasion of Russia; the only difference being the Russians burned it to the ground rather than let the French take it. In the First World War, 1.5 million young French men were killed in battle. The Battle of France wasn't lost because of any lack of badass on the part of the French and British. It was lost due to serious strategic blunders on the part of the French generals.
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