History UsefulNotes / Florida

17th Aug '16 6:06:18 PM LaptopGuy
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** '''Jacksonville:''' Located in the northeast corner of the state about twenty miles from the Georgia border, this is the most populous city in the state and the ''largest'' city in the contiguous United States... by land area, that is.[[note]] The five largest cities in the United States by land area are all in UsefulNotes/{{Alaska}}. From largest to smallest, they are Yakutat, Sitka, Juneau, Wrangell, and Anchorage. The state's most populous city by far is Anchorage, to give you an idea of what this statistic means.[[/note]] Its metropolitan area, however, is only the fourth most populated (behind South Florida, Tampa Bay, and Orlando); the reason the city proper's population is so high is because it covers almost the entire county around it. It's home to two major naval bases, a seaport, and the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball Jacksonville Jaguars NFL team.]] There is also a Minor League baseball team, The Jacksonville Suns, who are affiliated with the Miami Marlins. The city is also a melting pot of sorts, it has the tenth largest Muslim population in the country and is home to many Asian, Hispanic, African, and European immigrants.

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** '''Jacksonville:''' Located in the northeast corner of the state about twenty miles from the Georgia border, this is the most populous city in the state and the ''largest'' city in the contiguous United States... by land area, that is.[[note]] The five largest cities in the United States by land area are all in UsefulNotes/{{Alaska}}. From largest to smallest, they are Yakutat, Sitka, Juneau, Wrangell, and Anchorage. The state's most populous city by far is Anchorage, to give you an idea of what this statistic means.[[/note]] Its metropolitan area, however, is only the fourth most populated (behind South Florida, Tampa Bay, and Orlando); the reason the city proper's population is so high is because it covers almost the entire county around it.it, and the metro area doesn't go much further than that. It's home to two major naval bases, a seaport, and the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball Jacksonville Jaguars NFL team.]] There is also a Minor League baseball team, The Jacksonville Suns, who are affiliated with the Miami Marlins. The city is also a melting pot of sorts, it has the tenth largest Muslim population in the country and is home to many Asian, Hispanic, African, and European immigrants.



* '''South Florida:''' The "tri-county" area,[[note]]Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach[[/note]] is by far the most heavily populated region of the state, and the eighth-largest metropolitan area in the US and the largest located wholly within the South outside of Texas. Once you get south of Tampa, the climate turns steadily more tropical and the terrain steadily more swampy. The Everglades once covered most of South Florida, but now... not so much. Still nice beaches on the coast, but not much to see inland unless you really want to see a giant, shallow lake with a name that hardly anyone can spell correctly for some odd reason[[note]]It's spelled "Lake Okeechobee".[[/note]], or miles and miles of swampland and/or sugar cane fields. On the coast, it's pretty much continuous urban sprawl from Jupiter to Homestead for about 100 miles -- but never more than 20 miles to the west, making it the longest and narrowest metropolitan area in the United States. Although some inhabitants in the cities north of Miami will proudly label themselves as being part of the "Metro Miami area", for others it will be a major BerserkButton to be considered "Miamians", so one should exercise caution and generally use the more neutral "South Florida" term to refer to the region as a whole.\\\

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* '''South Florida:''' The "tri-county" area,[[note]]Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach[[/note]] is by far the most heavily populated region of the state, and the eighth-largest metropolitan area in the US and the largest located wholly within the South outside of Texas.Texas (although by certain definitions it's also below Atlanta). Once you get south of Tampa, the climate turns steadily more tropical and the terrain steadily more swampy. The Everglades once covered most of South Florida, but now... not so much. Still nice beaches on the coast, but not much to see inland unless you really want to see a giant, shallow lake with a name that hardly anyone can spell correctly for some odd reason[[note]]It's spelled "Lake Okeechobee".[[/note]], or miles and miles of swampland and/or sugar cane fields. On the coast, it's pretty much continuous urban sprawl from Jupiter to Homestead for about 100 miles -- but never more than 20 miles to the west, making it the longest and narrowest metropolitan area in the United States. Although some inhabitants in the cities north of Miami will proudly label themselves as being part of the "Metro Miami area", for others it will be a major BerserkButton to be considered "Miamians", so one should exercise caution and generally use the more neutral "South Florida" term to refer to the region as a whole.\\\



And speaking of hurricanes, despite the recent tragedy of Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy fixing public awareness of hurricanes on New Orleans and New York, Florida is the United States' main punching bag for Mother Nature's fall mood swings. Until Katrina, Hurricane Andrew in 1992 was the costliest hurricane in American history, and take a wild guess what state it struck. In 2004, the year before Katrina (which did give Florida a glancing blow), Florida was hammered by not one, but '''''four''''' major hurricanes (Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne), with three of them directly hitting Orlando. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, seven of the ten costliest hurricanes in American history gave Florida at least a glancing blow. As a result, Floridians tend to be well-prepared to batten down the hatches and go without electrical power for a while when hurricane season starts up. The big negative: it's nigh-impossible to get homeowner's insurance in the state. It's usually not a concern for tourists, though, falling after the usual summer tourism season and before the fall snowbird migration.

However, not all of Florida's coastline is created equal in terms of vulnerability to hurricanes. One major exception to the rule is the Atlantic coast north of Cape Canaveral. While many storms brush close enough to the region to cause high surf and damage in coastal towns, only ''one'' major hurricane has made direct landfall [[http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/climo/images/strikes_egulf_mjr.jpg since 1900]] -- a consequence of geography (specifically, the indentation in the coastline) sheltering that area, along with coastal Georgia, from hurricanes by giving a very poor track towards landfall. Generally speaking, if a hurricane moves north of Cape Canaveral, it's gonna land up in North Carolina or the Northeast if it doesn't go out to sea. On the other hand, South Florida, followed by the Panhandle, get a disproportionate share of the hurricanes that do hit the state.

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And speaking of hurricanes, despite the recent tragedy of Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy fixing public awareness of hurricanes on New Orleans and New York, York/New Jersey, respectively, Florida is the United States' main punching bag for Mother Nature's fall mood swings. Until Katrina, Hurricane Andrew in 1992 was the costliest hurricane in American history, and take a wild guess what state it struck. In 2004, the year before Katrina (which did give Florida a glancing blow), Florida was hammered by not one, but '''''four''''' major hurricanes (Charley, Frances, Ivan and Jeanne), with three of them (all but Ivan) directly hitting Orlando. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, seven of the ten costliest hurricanes in American history gave Florida at least a glancing blow. As a result, Floridians tend to be well-prepared to batten down the hatches and go without electrical power for a while when hurricane season starts up. The big negative: it's nigh-impossible to get homeowner's insurance in the state. It's usually not a concern for tourists, though, falling after the usual summer tourism season and before the fall snowbird migration.

However, not all of Florida's coastline is created equal in terms of vulnerability to hurricanes. One major exception to the rule is the Atlantic coast north of Cape Canaveral. While many storms brush close enough to the region to cause high surf and damage in coastal towns, only ''one'' major hurricane has made direct landfall [[http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/climo/images/strikes_egulf_mjr.jpg since 1900]] -- Hurricane Dora of 1964 -- a consequence of geography (specifically, the indentation in the coastline) sheltering that area, along with coastal Georgia, from hurricanes by giving a very poor track towards landfall. Generally speaking, if a hurricane moves north of Cape Canaveral, it's gonna land up in North Carolina or the Northeast if it doesn't go out to sea. On the other hand, South Florida, followed by the Panhandle, get a disproportionate share of the hurricanes that do hit the state.
11th Aug '16 12:41:47 PM Morgenthaler
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Today, there are three distinct Floridas within the state's borders. Old Florida, a proud part of the DeepSouth, is in fact alive and well -- it just occupies inland and northern Florida as well as the panhandle, i.e. the parts of the state tourists don't see (outside of a few resort towns such as Panama City Beach). South Florida exchanged its man card and Southern credibility for lots of money, lots of sprawling suburbia, and lots of northerners (particularly East Coasters from states like New York and New Jersey). This region, especially around {{Miami}}, also hosts large communities of Caribbean immigrants and has a distinctly Latin tinge and a working knowledge of Spanish can be a big help (some ''70%'' of Miamians are Hispanic and over 70% of Miamians count a language other than English as their mother tongue: mostly Spanish, but a substantial number report Haitian Creole. It's the highest proportion in the country.). Central Florida, anchored by the Tampa Bay and Orlando metropolitan areas a.k.a the "I-4 Corridor"[[note]]Named after the interstate highway that connects the two cities[[/note]], serves as a bit of a middle ground between the two other regions and has more of a Midwestern atmosphere (owing in part to a large number of transplants from that region of the country). YouShouldKnowThisAlready, but tourism is Florida's biggest industry these days (but only just ahead of agriculture) and is, along with UsefulNotes/{{California}}, one of the classic spring break and summer vacation destinations in the United States. Agriculture and phosphate mining are also common, but again are parts of the state that tourists usually don't see.

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Today, there are three distinct Floridas within the state's borders. Old Florida, a proud part of the DeepSouth, is in fact alive and well -- it just occupies inland and northern Florida as well as the panhandle, i.e. the parts of the state tourists don't see (outside of a few resort towns such as Panama City Beach). South Florida exchanged its man card and Southern credibility for lots of money, lots of sprawling suburbia, and lots of northerners (particularly East Coasters from states like New York and New Jersey). This region, especially around {{Miami}}, UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}, also hosts large communities of Caribbean immigrants and has a distinctly Latin tinge and a working knowledge of Spanish can be a big help (some ''70%'' of Miamians are Hispanic and over 70% of Miamians count a language other than English as their mother tongue: mostly Spanish, but a substantial number report Haitian Creole. It's the highest proportion in the country.). Central Florida, anchored by the Tampa Bay and Orlando metropolitan areas a.k.a the "I-4 Corridor"[[note]]Named after the interstate highway that connects the two cities[[/note]], serves as a bit of a middle ground between the two other regions and has more of a Midwestern atmosphere (owing in part to a large number of transplants from that region of the country). YouShouldKnowThisAlready, but tourism is Florida's biggest industry these days (but only just ahead of agriculture) and is, along with UsefulNotes/{{California}}, one of the classic spring break and summer vacation destinations in the United States. Agriculture and phosphate mining are also common, but again are parts of the state that tourists usually don't see.
8th Jul '16 8:33:56 PM wittylibrarian
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** There is a rivalry sports-wise between Tampa and Orlando between their Arena Football teams - Storm vs. Predators - promoted as "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_on_I-4 The War on I-4]]". It's the biggest rivalry that Arena Football has.
*** The I-4 rivalry extends to Tampa Bay and Orlando fighting a war of community pride over which metro is the second-best behind the South Florida region. Orlando tends to pride itself over the parks and large-scale tech industries, while Tampa Bay promotes their Gulf Coast beaches and (slightly more successful) sports teams.
5th Jul '16 4:08:38 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* '''South Florida:''' The "tri-county" area,[[note]]Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach[[/note]] which is by far the most heavily populated region of the state. Once you get south of Tampa, the climate turns steadily more tropical and the terrain steadily more swampy. The Everglades once covered most of South Florida, but now... not so much. Still nice beaches on the coast, but not much to see inland unless you really want to see a giant, shallow lake with a name that hardly anyone can spell correctly for some odd reason[[note]]It's spelled "Lake Okeechobee".[[/note]], or miles and miles of swampland and/or sugar cane fields. UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} is of course in this region and, due to the large Latin American (primarily Cuban) community, knowing some Spanish helps. There's also pretty much continuous urban/suburban sprawl from Miami north for about 100 miles -- but never more than 20 miles to the west, making it the longest and narrowest metropolitan area in the United States. Other major cities include Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach.[[note]]Although some inhabitants in these cities will proudly label themselves as being part of the "Metro Miami area", for others it will be a major BerserkButton to be considered "Miamians" so one should exercise caution and generally use the more neutral "South Florida" term to refer to the region as a whole.[[/note]]
** Being the biggest metropolitan area of Florida, it is home to most of the state's pro-sports teams, including the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation NBA's]] Miami Heat, the [[UsefulNotes/NaiotnalFootballLeague NFL's]] Miami Dolphins, the [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams MLB's]] Miami Marlins, and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL's]] Florida Panthers.[[note]]Unfortunately, the latter two are generally considered to be the ButtMonkey of their respective leagues and in the Panthers' case, are so unpopular that many South Floridians are often unaware of their existence.[[/note]] [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball College football]] is also very popular in the area, with the University of Miami's Hurricanes being one of the state's three major historic powerhouses (along with the aforementioned University of Florida and Florida State University).
** In some parts of Miami, knowing Spanish is mandatory, and many of the signs are written in both English and Spanish. Occasionally by law. South Florida also has a growing Haitian and East Indian population, and there has been some friction between the Hispanic and Haitian groups, especially since the latter is growing following the massive Haitian earthquake.
** South Florida also had the third-largest Jewish population in the world, coming right after the BigApplesauce and UsefulNotes/{{Israel}}. Not all of them are {{Alter Kocker}}s, but some are - especially around South Beach and Boca Raton.

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* '''South Florida:''' The "tri-county" area,[[note]]Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach[[/note]] which is by far the most heavily populated region of the state.state, and the eighth-largest metropolitan area in the US and the largest located wholly within the South outside of Texas. Once you get south of Tampa, the climate turns steadily more tropical and the terrain steadily more swampy. The Everglades once covered most of South Florida, but now... not so much. Still nice beaches on the coast, but not much to see inland unless you really want to see a giant, shallow lake with a name that hardly anyone can spell correctly for some odd reason[[note]]It's spelled "Lake Okeechobee".[[/note]], or miles and miles of swampland and/or sugar cane fields. UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} is of course in this region and, due to On the large Latin American (primarily Cuban) community, knowing some Spanish helps. There's also coast, it's pretty much continuous urban/suburban urban sprawl from Miami north Jupiter to Homestead for about 100 miles -- but never more than 20 miles to the west, making it the longest and narrowest metropolitan area in the United States. Other major cities include Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach.[[note]]Although Although some inhabitants in these the cities north of Miami will proudly label themselves as being part of the "Metro Miami area", for others it will be a major BerserkButton to be considered "Miamians" "Miamians", so one should exercise caution and generally use the more neutral "South Florida" term to refer to the region as a whole.[[/note]]
**
\\\
Being the biggest metropolitan area of Florida, it is home to most of the state's pro-sports professional sports teams, including the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation NBA's]] Miami Heat, the [[UsefulNotes/NaiotnalFootballLeague NFL's]] Miami Dolphins, the [[UsefulNotes/MLBTeams MLB's]] Miami Marlins, and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague NHL's]] Florida Panthers.[[note]]Unfortunately, Panthers. While the former two teams are considered either powerhouses in their league (in the case of the Heat) or former powerhouses (in the case of the Dolphins, whose great era came in TheSeventies under head coach Don Shula), the latter two are generally considered to be the ButtMonkey {{Butt Monkey}}s of their respective leagues and in the Panthers' case, leagues. The Marlins are so unpopular that better known for their garish ballpark than anything, while many South Floridians are often unaware of their existence.[[/note]] the very existence of the Panthers. [[UsefulNotes/CollegiateAmericanFootball College football]] is also very popular in the area, with the University of Miami's Hurricanes being one of the state's three major historic powerhouses (along with the aforementioned University of Florida and Florida State University).
** In some parts of Miami, knowing Spanish is mandatory, and many of the signs are written in both English and Spanish. Occasionally by law.
University).\\\
South Florida is an exceptionally multicultural area. Many descendants of Cuban exiles live in the region, forming the core of a large Hispanic community, and the region also has a growing Haitian and East Indian population, and there population. There has been some friction between the Hispanic and Haitian groups, especially since the latter is growing following the massive Haitian earthquake.
** South Florida
earthquake. The area also had the third-largest Jewish population in the world, coming right after the BigApplesauce and UsefulNotes/{{Israel}}. Not all of them are {{Alter Kocker}}s, but some are - especially around South Beach and Boca Raton.Raton.
** '''UsefulNotes/{{Miami}}:''' The largest city in this region. Often called the financial capital of Latin America, serving as a gateway to the US for the Caribbean and South America due to both its geographical position and the aforementioned Latin American (primarily Cuban) community. As such, knowing Spanish is practically mandatory in many neighborhoods, both working-class and wealthy alike, and many of the signs are written in both English and Spanish. Sometimes by law. The exception is Little Haiti, where it's ''French'' (specifically French Creole) that's the mandatory second language.
** '''Miami Beach:''' Actually a separate city from Miami; whether or not you know this is a fairly good litmus test of how long you've lived in South Florida. It is the center of Florida's Jewish and LGBT communities, while the Art Deco Historic District on South Beach, the largest collection of Art Deco architecture in the world, has become a symbol of the region as a whole.
** '''Fort Lauderdale:''' The second major city in South Florida, Fort Lauderdale is a resort city north of Miami in Broward County. It used to be known as America's spring break capital, a tradition that started in the 1940s thanks to various swim teams from East Coast colleges coming to town for spring training before the rise of indoor swimming pools; the 1960 teen flick ''Where the Boys Are'' [[TheRedStapler all but cemented its position]] as ''the'' place where co-eds came to party. By the '80s, though, the locals were no longer amused by WackyFratboyHijinx, especially after [[http://lib.dr.iastate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4335&context=etd people started dying]], with the mayor going on ''Series/GoodMorningAmerica'' in 1985 to tell everyone that spring breakers were no longer welcome in the city (leading to the rise of Daytona Beach as the new spring break town). Fort Lauderdale went through a painful transition period in the late '80s and early '90s to wean itself off of spring break money, but since then, it's regained its stature as a major destination, this time for families and boaters. With the gentrification of Miami Beach, it's also started to grow into a second {{gayborhood}} for South Florida as LGBT people seek cheaper housing, especially around the suburbs of Wilton Manors and Oakland Park.
17th Jun '16 5:05:32 PM Doug86
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Really, "worthless backwater" aptly sums up most of Florida until just before the start of the 20th century, when the construction of the railroads led to increased trade (mostly citrus products, winter vegetables and cattle) with the North, and the cigar industry developed in Tampa. Following the UsefulNotes/SpanishAmericanWar, tourism really picked up, and thanks to the efforts of railroad builders and the mild nature of winter in the state, the first real estate boom led to the development of much of South Florida in the 1920's. Unfortunately, this initial housing boom turned out to be a bubble and its bursting by the end of the decade was on of the major factors leading to TheGreatDepression, which set the state back once again. Following the end of WorldWarII, however, the development of air conditioning, highways (in case you haven't realized it, Florida is a ''big'' state for folks traveling north or south), and a second real estate boom lead to Florida's transformation into the conglomeration of suburbs, beaches, and retirement homes it is today.

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Really, "worthless backwater" aptly sums up most of Florida until just before the start of the 20th century, when the construction of the railroads led to increased trade (mostly citrus products, winter vegetables and cattle) with the North, and the cigar industry developed in Tampa. Following the UsefulNotes/SpanishAmericanWar, tourism really picked up, and thanks to the efforts of railroad builders and the mild nature of winter in the state, the first real estate boom led to the development of much of South Florida in the 1920's. Unfortunately, this initial housing boom turned out to be a bubble and its bursting by the end of the decade was on of the major factors leading to TheGreatDepression, which set the state back once again. Following the end of WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, however, the development of air conditioning, highways (in case you haven't realized it, Florida is a ''big'' state for folks traveling north or south), and a second real estate boom lead to Florida's transformation into the conglomeration of suburbs, beaches, and retirement homes it is today.
24th Jan '16 11:53:31 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ItsAlwaysSpring: Either spring or summer. A common joke is that winter is the one time of year when not only is there ''nobody'' who's ashamed to say that they're from Florida, but in fact, they can't seem to stop bragging about it -- [[http://wp.patheos.com.s3.amazonaws.com/blogs/barefootandpregnant/files/2013/12/National-Hate-Florida-Day.jpg much to the envy]] of people in the rest of the country. The other 49 states get their revenge during hurricane season -- and even during the winter, they laugh whenever Floridians complain about temperatures falling below 60 degrees.
24th Dec '15 1:06:55 PM lakingsif
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The "Sunshine State" moniker is a half lie as most Floridians can tell you - the state's climate has a pronounced cycle of wet and dry seasons, with summer featuring near-daily thundershowers and winter, such as it is, being very dry. Convenient for northerners looking to escape the snow (now if only more of them would go back once they've forked over their money...), not so much for those looking for a semi-tropical vacation spent mainly on the beach. Get used to the water, because Florida is a very wet state: surrounded on three sides by water and filled with swamps, wetlands, and retention ponds. Tourists, take note: if you're here during the summer, keep an umbrella on hand. Brief but intense thundershowers with little warning are common. Florida is also ridiculously flat. The highest point of elevation, Britton Hill at 345 feet (105 m), is just that, a hill, and a rather unimpressive one; the ''lowest points'' of many states have higher elevations than Britton Hill.

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The "Sunshine State" moniker is a half lie as most Floridians can tell you - the state's climate has a pronounced cycle of wet and dry seasons, with summer featuring near-daily thundershowers and winter, such as it is, being very dry. Convenient for northerners looking to escape the snow (now if only more of them would go back once they've forked over their money...), not so much for those looking for a semi-tropical vacation spent mainly on the beach. Get used to the water, because Florida is a very wet state: surrounded on three sides by water and filled with swamps, wetlands, and retention ponds. Tourists, take note: if you're here during the summer, keep an umbrella on hand. Brief but intense thundershowers with little warning are common. Florida is also ridiculously flat. The highest point of elevation, Britton Hill at 345 feet (105 m), is just that, a hill, and a rather unimpressive one; the ''lowest points'' of many states have higher elevations than Britton Hill.
Hill[[note]]Though technically the highest point of elevation is a roller coaster in Orlando that protrudes nearly 200 metres above sea level[[/note]].
11th Dec '15 8:59:42 PM wittylibrarian
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** '''Lakeland''': Caught in-between the I-4 corridor of Tampa and Orlando, this minor metro isn't as well-known as either city but is one of the regional growth areas due to its proximity to both. There's a local gag that the newest state university Florida Poly Tech will eventually become the downtown center of Orlampa, the mega-metropolis that will form from Tampa and Orlando merging.
11th Dec '15 8:52:55 PM wittylibrarian
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** The Hooters chain started in Clearwater.
5th Dec '15 8:08:35 PM SilentCriticism
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On the western side of the bay on the Pinellas Peninsula is the city of St. Petersburg. Together with Southwest Florida, this is the part with the really nice, "world's best" competition winning beaches, not that anyone outside of St. Petersburg remembers it. The most famous landmark is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunshine_Skyway_Bridge Sunshine Skyway Bridge]], which you've probably seen in a hundred car commercials. It also has [[http://thedali.org/ The Dalí Musuem]], the largest collection of Salvador Dalí pieces outside of Spain. The museum is home to 7 out of 18 the masterworks. North of St. Petersburg is the city of Clearwater, best known for being the headquarters of the ChurchOfHappyology at the Fort Harrison Hotel, now known as Flag Land Base. They tried to [[http://www.antisectes.net/sp-times-scientology-special-report-pulitzer-price.pdf take over the town]] in the '70s, which the ''St. Petersburg Times'' (now the ''Tampa Bay Times'', which operates the fact-checking website [=PolitiFact=]) exposed in a series of Pulitzer-winning articles, and their economic influence in the town is still controversial.

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On the western side of the bay on the Pinellas Peninsula is the city of St. Petersburg. Together with Southwest Florida, this is the part with the really nice, "world's best" competition winning beaches, not that anyone outside of St. Petersburg remembers it. The most famous landmark is the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunshine_Skyway_Bridge Sunshine Skyway Bridge]], which you've probably seen in a hundred car commercials. It also has [[http://thedali.org/ The Dalí Musuem]], Museum]], the largest collection of Salvador Dalí pieces outside of Spain. The museum is home to 7 out of 18 the masterworks. North of St. Petersburg is the city of Clearwater, best known for being the headquarters of the ChurchOfHappyology at the Fort Harrison Hotel, now known as Flag Land Base. They tried to [[http://www.antisectes.net/sp-times-scientology-special-report-pulitzer-price.pdf take over the town]] in the '70s, which the ''St. Petersburg Times'' (now the ''Tampa Bay Times'', which operates the fact-checking website [=PolitiFact=]) exposed in a series of Pulitzer-winning articles, and their economic influence in the town is still controversial.
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