History UsefulNotes / CollegiateAmericanFootballConferences

8th Jul '16 1:01:29 AM KYCubbie
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** Coastal Carolina will leave the FCS Big South after 2015–16 and go up to FBS. They will spend 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, and join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible); however, how the teams are selected and where the game will be played will be determined at a later date.

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** Coastal Carolina will leave left the FCS Big South after 2015–16 and to go up to FBS. They will spend 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, and join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible); however, how the teams are selected and where the game will be played will be determined at a later date.



** BYU[[note]]Brigham Young[[/note]] — The flagship school of the [[UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}} LDS Church]], whose members are often called "Mormons", BYU only became a football independent in 2011. It had previously been a member of several Western-based conferences, most recently the WAC and then the MW. BYU left the MW largely over TV issues. The school has its own cable network, but the MW did not allow it to air any games. The problem for BYU was that it was getting only $2 million a year from the conference's own (now-defunct) cable network. With its built-in LDS following, BYU felt that it could make far more money as an independent. The school then placed most of its non-football sports in the West Coast Conference, a league that doesn't play football.[[note]]Perhaps more significantly from BYU's point of view, the WCC is made up of private, faith-based schools, and most significantly does not schedule any sporting events on Sunday. Not playing on Sunday is '''''VERY''''' SeriousBusiness for BYU—the NCAA now has standing contingency plans for its championship events to accommodate BYU's refusal to play on Sunday. (At least once in the past, the NCAA has had to make such arrangements on the fly.)[[/note]]

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** BYU[[note]]Brigham Young[[/note]] — The flagship school of the [[UsefulNotes/{{Mormonism}} LDS Church]], whose members are often called "Mormons", BYU only became a football independent in 2011. It had previously been a member of several Western-based conferences, most recently the WAC and then the MW. BYU left the MW largely over TV issues. The school has its own cable network, but the MW did not allow it to air any games. The problem for BYU was that it was getting only $2 million a year from the conference's own (now-defunct) cable network. With its built-in LDS following, BYU felt that it could make far more money as an independent. The school then placed most of its non-football sports in the West Coast Conference, a league that doesn't play football.[[note]]Perhaps more significantly from BYU's point of view, the WCC is made up of private, faith-based schools, and most significantly does not schedule any sporting events on Sunday. Not playing on Sunday is '''''VERY''''' SeriousBusiness for BYU—the NCAA now has standing contingency plans for its championship events to accommodate BYU's refusal to play on Sunday. (At least once in the past, the NCAA has had to make such arrangements on the fly. To be fair, the NCAA has such contingency plans for any school with religious convictions that prohibit play on a certain day of the week, with BYU simply being by far the highest-profile example.)[[/note]]
8th Jul '16 12:56:13 AM KYCubbie
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** The Big Ten is also known for having very strong academic prowess across the board. They're not UsefulNotes/IvyLeague (by definition, since the Ivy League is a separate athletic conference), but all its members (including Maryland and Rutgers) except Nebraska are members of the Association of American Universities (and Nebraska does have that academic caliber — it used to be an AAU member before the organization de-emphasized agriculture and didn't count its off-campus medical center). Additionally, they are all members of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, designed to facilitate sharing of academic resources among members. All 14 schools are joined in this by the University of Chicago — this is a holdover from when [=UChicago=] was a full member of the conference; it withdrew from the sports element in 1946, when its sports teams were rather crappy (they still are, and now compete in NCAA Division III, in which athletic scholarships are not allowed), and were replaced in the lineup by Michigan State (which was expanding and improving rapidly at the time, and funnily enough taking a fair number of Chicago grads to teach) in 1950.

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** The Big Ten is also known for having very strong academic prowess across the board. They're not UsefulNotes/IvyLeague (by definition, since the Ivy League is a separate athletic conference), but all its members (including Maryland and Rutgers) except Nebraska are members of the Association of American Universities (and Nebraska does have that academic caliber — it used to be an AAU member before the organization de-emphasized agriculture and didn't count its off-campus medical center). Additionally, they are all members of the Big Ten Academic Alliance[[note]](known as the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, Cooperation until 2016)[[/note]], designed to facilitate sharing of academic resources among members. All 14 schools are joined in this by the University of Chicago — this is a holdover from when [=UChicago=] was a full member of the conference; it withdrew from the sports element in 1946, when its sports teams were rather crappy (they still are, and now compete in NCAA Division III, in which athletic scholarships are not allowed), and were replaced in the lineup by Michigan State (which was expanding and improving rapidly at the time, and funnily enough taking a fair number of Chicago grads to teach) in 1950.
9th Jun '16 6:11:23 PM Gsueagle31049
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** In March 2016, the full member Sun Belt schools unanimously decided to drop Idaho and New Mexico State from its football membership after the 2017 season. A few months later, Idaho announced that it would return to FCS football in its current all-sports home of the Big Sky Conference, becoming the first school ever to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS. New Mexico State, however, decided to remain in the FBS, taking its chances as an independent again after 2017.
** Coastal Carolina will leave the FCS Big South after 2015–16 and go up to FBS. They will spend 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, and join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues.

to:

** In March 2016, the full member Sun Belt schools unanimously decided to drop Idaho and New Mexico State from its football membership after the 2017 season. A few months later, Idaho announced that it would return to FCS football in its current all-sports home of the Big Sky Conference, becoming the first school ever to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS. New Mexico State, however, decided to remain in the FBS, taking its chances FBS as an independent again after 2017.
program.
** Coastal Carolina will leave the FCS Big South after 2015–16 and go up to FBS. They will spend 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, and join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible); however, how the teams are selected and where the game will be played will be determined at a later date.
13th May '16 5:19:16 PM Gsueagle31049
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** In March 2016, the full member Sun Belt schools unanimously decided to drop Idaho and New Mexico State from its football membership after the 2017 season. A few months later, Idaho announced that it would return to FCS football in its current all-sports home of the Big Sky Conference, becoming the first school ever to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS.

to:

** In March 2016, the full member Sun Belt schools unanimously decided to drop Idaho and New Mexico State from its football membership after the 2017 season. A few months later, Idaho announced that it would return to FCS football in its current all-sports home of the Big Sky Conference, becoming the first school ever to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS. New Mexico State, however, decided to remain in the FBS, taking its chances as an independent again after 2017.
30th Apr '16 12:48:40 AM KYCubbie
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** Idaho rejoined the Big Sky in 2014 (after an 18-year absence), but without its football team, which (as mentioned above) returned to the Sun Belt; however, after the Sun Belt decided to drop Idaho after 2017, the school decided to take up the Big Sky's standing invitation to return its football team to that league. The Vandals will become the first team to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS.

to:

** Idaho rejoined the Big Sky in 2014 (after an 18-year absence), but without its football team, which (as mentioned above) returned to the Sun Belt; however, after the Sun Belt decided to drop Idaho after 2017, the school decided to take up the Big Sky's standing invitation to return its football team to that league. The Vandals will become the first team to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS.
30th Apr '16 12:47:23 AM KYCubbie
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** In March 2016, the full member Sun Belt schools unanimously decided to drop Idaho and New Mexico State from its football membership after the 2017 season.

to:

** In March 2016, the full member Sun Belt schools unanimously decided to drop Idaho and New Mexico State from its football membership after the 2017 season. A few months later, Idaho announced that it would return to FCS football in its current all-sports home of the Big Sky Conference, becoming the first school ever to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS.



** Idaho rejoined the Big Sky in 2014 (after an 18-year absence), but without its football team, which (as mentioned above) returned to the Sun Belt; however, after the Sun Belt decided to drop Idaho after 2017, the Vandals football team could end up playing in the Big Sky rather than taking their chances as an FBS independent again. The Vandals have a standing invitation to return to Big Sky football.

to:

** Idaho rejoined the Big Sky in 2014 (after an 18-year absence), but without its football team, which (as mentioned above) returned to the Sun Belt; however, after the Sun Belt decided to drop Idaho after 2017, the Vandals football team could end school decided to take up playing in the Big Sky rather than taking their chances as an FBS independent again. The Vandals have a Sky's standing invitation to return its football team to Big Sky football.that league. The Vandals will become the first team to voluntarily drop from FBS to FCS.
23rd Mar '16 11:40:52 AM penguinist
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* ''Pac-12'' [Arizona, Arizona State, California[[note]]Cal-Berkeley[[/note]], Colorado, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, USC[[note]]Southern California[[/note]], UCLA, Utah, Washington, Washington State]: Another "Power Five" league, this one consists of Western US schools and is also tied to the Rose Bowl. Several of these teams have incredibly storied histories, though the one most likely to be known by the casual fan right now is USC, which is well-known for both currently being one of the more dominant teams and for landing in hot water for allegedly paying players. Oregon has also grabbed a lot of attention in recent years for playing the best football in school history[[note]] Including a ridiculously fast-paced offense; they basically spend the whole game as if they're in a 2-minute drill.[[/note]] and perhaps even more so for their flashy uniforms that ''[[UnlimitedWardrobe are different for each game]].''[[note]]Famed shoe company & sports outfitter Nike is headquartered in Oregon and a major sponsor of the team, providing the uniforms for free. Its co-founder Phil Knight is an Oregon alum as well, and has pumped ''hundreds of millions'' of his own money into the school's sports facilities.[[/note]] Known as the Pac-10 until Utah and Colorado joined in 2011. Before that, they were the Pac-8 until Arizona and Arizona State joined in 1978, thus making the name a geographic ArtifactTitle. Like the Big Ten, the Pac-12 is well-known for being both an athletically competent and academically prestigious conference (with the 4 California schools regularly being ranked in the Top 25 universities in the country). It also refers to itself as the "Conference of Champions", stressing the strengths of its schools' athletics well beyond just football. Of particular note are UCLA, Stanford, and USC, all of which have ''[[OverNineThousand at least 100]]'' national team championships.[[note]]Fun fact respecting UCLA: UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson attended UCLA and played baseball, football, and basketball ''and'' ran track for the Bruins; he was actually most promising at ''football'', where he was part of UCLA's 6-0-4 1939 team, before the war started and eventually led him to baseball and the Dodgers.[[/note]]
* ''Southeastern Conference (SEC)'' [Alabama, Arkansas, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU[[note]]Louisiana State[[/note]], Mississippi, Mississippi State, Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Vanderbilt]: Yet another "Power Five" league (the last of the five), this one with a decades-long tie to the Sugar Bowl. The premier conference of the American DeepSouth, a lot of these teams are historical powerhouses — Florida has been one of the most dominant teams of late, and Alabama won three national championships in four seasons from 2009 to 2012. LSU and Auburn have also been quite dominant in recent years. Alabama-Auburn is considered one of the greatest rivalries in the sport, as Georgia-Florida, whose Halloween weekend game is nicknamed "The World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party". The SEC was the first conference to split into divisions ("East" and "West" in its case) and hold a conference championship game between the top teams of each division, becoming the TropeCodifier for all subsequent conferences to do so. This was implemented in 1992, after the additions of Arkansas and South Carolina made it impractical for all teams in the conference to play each other every year (doing so would have allowed only one non-conference game per season). Observers often consider this the strongest league, and it had held a monopoly on the national championship in recent years until Florida State came back from an 18-point deficit to beat Auburn in the 2013 title game. In the BCS era, SEC schools were 9-2 in the championship game; the other loss was due to a matchup of two SEC members. From the 2006 to 2012 seasons, every BCS champion was an SEC team. Its fans are not reluctant to point this out. At great length.[[note]]Except for [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg Kentucky fans]], who care much more about basketball.[[/note]] The conference gets a lot of games televised, especially on CBS, with whom it has an extraordinarily lucrative contract. Texas A&M and Missouri joined in 2012, bringing the conference to a massive 14 teams... which has the unfortunate side effect that SEC players can go their entire college career without ever facing some cross-division teams.[[note]]Each team plays all six other teams in its division and one designated cross-division rival every year, plus one other cross-division game per year on a rotating basis. Some fans have speculated that the SEC might expand the conference schedule to 9 games, but nothing has come of this so far.[[/note]]

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* ''Pac-12'' [Arizona, Arizona State, California[[note]]Cal-Berkeley[[/note]], Colorado, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, USC[[note]]Southern California[[/note]], UCLA, UCLA[[note]]University of California-Los Angeles[[/note]], Utah, Washington, Washington State]: Another "Power Five" league, this one consists of Western US schools and is also tied to the Rose Bowl. Several of these teams have incredibly storied histories, though the one most likely to be known by the casual fan right now is USC, which is well-known for both currently being one of the more dominant teams and for landing in hot water for allegedly paying players. Oregon has also grabbed a lot of attention in recent years for playing the best football in school history[[note]] Including a ridiculously fast-paced offense; they basically spend the whole game as if they're in a 2-minute drill.[[/note]] and perhaps even more so for their flashy uniforms that ''[[UnlimitedWardrobe are different for each game]].''[[note]]Famed shoe company & sports outfitter Nike is headquartered in Oregon and a major sponsor of the team, providing the uniforms for free. Its co-founder Phil Knight is an Oregon alum as well, and has pumped ''hundreds of millions'' of his own money into the school's sports facilities.[[/note]] Known as the Pac-10 until Utah and Colorado joined in 2011. Before that, they were the Pac-8 until Arizona and Arizona State joined in 1978, thus making the name a geographic ArtifactTitle. Like the Big Ten, the Pac-12 is well-known for being both an athletically competent and academically prestigious conference (with the 4 California schools regularly being ranked in the Top 25 universities in the country). It also refers to itself as the "Conference of Champions", stressing the strengths of its schools' athletics well beyond just football. Of particular note are UCLA, Stanford, and USC, all of which have ''[[OverNineThousand at least 100]]'' national team championships.[[note]]Fun fact respecting UCLA: UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson attended UCLA and played baseball, football, and basketball ''and'' ran track for the Bruins; he was actually most promising at ''football'', where he was part of UCLA's 6-0-4 1939 team, before the war started and eventually led him to baseball and the Dodgers.[[/note]]
* ''Southeastern Conference (SEC)'' [Alabama, Arkansas, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU[[note]]Louisiana State[[/note]], Mississippi, State University, not that they answer to it (see Mississippi State, State below)[[/note]], [[InsistentTerminology Ole Miss]] [[note]]not "Mississippi"[[/note]], Mississippi State[[note]]or "State", since LSU only ever uses the acronym and State is oddly enough the only other 'X State University' in the conference[[/note]], Missouri, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas A&M, Vanderbilt]: Yet another "Power Five" league (the last of the five), this one with a decades-long tie to the Sugar Bowl. The premier conference of the American DeepSouth, a lot of these teams are historical powerhouses — Florida has been one of the most dominant teams of late, and Alabama won three national championships in four seasons from 2009 to 2012. LSU and Auburn have also been quite dominant in recent years. Alabama-Auburn is considered one of the greatest rivalries in the sport, as Georgia-Florida, whose Halloween weekend game is nicknamed "The World's Largest Outdoor Cocktail Party". The SEC was the first conference to split into divisions ("East" and "West" in its case) and hold a conference championship game between the top teams of each division, becoming the TropeCodifier for all subsequent conferences to do so. This was implemented in 1992, after the additions of Arkansas and South Carolina made it impractical for all teams in the conference to play each other every year (doing so would have allowed only one non-conference game per season). Observers often consider this the strongest league, and it had held a monopoly on the national championship in recent years until Florida State came back from an 18-point deficit to beat Auburn in the 2013 title game. In the BCS era, SEC schools were 9-2 in the championship game; the other loss was due to a matchup of two SEC members. From the 2006 to 2012 seasons, every BCS champion was an SEC team. Its fans are not reluctant to point this out. At great length.[[note]]Except for [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg Kentucky fans]], who care much more about basketball.[[/note]] The conference gets a lot of games televised, especially on CBS, with whom it has an extraordinarily lucrative contract. Texas A&M and Missouri joined in 2012, bringing the conference to a massive 14 teams... which has the unfortunate side effect that SEC players can go their entire college career without ever facing some cross-division teams.[[note]]Each team plays all six other teams in its division and one designated cross-division rival every year, plus one other cross-division game per year on a rotating basis. Some fans have speculated that the SEC might expand the conference schedule to 9 games, but nothing has come of this so far.[[/note]]
18th Mar '16 10:30:19 PM KYCubbie
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* ''Big South Conference'' [Charleston Southern, Gardner–Webb, Kennesaw State (football only), Liberty, Monmouth (football only), Presbyterian]: Began in 1983 as a non-football league, and did not sponsor football until 2002. Has usually had one or two good teams with a bunch of bottom-feeders, with some combination of Stony Brook, Liberty, and Coastal Carolina typically among the good teams. Of these three, only Liberty has yet to announce an exit; Stony Brook moved its football team to the CAA (below), and Coastal Carolina left after the 2015–16 season to go up to FBS. The Chanticleers will join the Sun Belt Conference for non-football sports and play the first year of its transition as an FCS independent in 2016, then join Sun Belt football in 2017.

to:

* ''Big South Conference'' [Charleston Southern, Gardner–Webb, Kennesaw State (football only), Liberty, Monmouth (football only), Presbyterian]: Began in 1983 as a non-football league, and did not sponsor football until 2002. Has usually had one or two good teams with a bunch of bottom-feeders, with some combination of Stony Brook, Liberty, and Coastal Carolina typically among the good teams. Of these three, only Liberty has yet to announce an exit; Stony Brook moved its football team to the CAA (below), and Coastal Carolina left after the 2015–16 season to go up to FBS. The Chanticleers will join the Sun Belt Conference for non-football sports and play the first year of its their transition as an FCS independent in 2016, then join Sun Belt football in 2017.
18th Mar '16 9:15:27 AM KYCubbie
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** The Sun Belt also has two non-football members in Arkansas-Little Rock and UT Arlington.

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** The Sun Belt also has two non-football members in Arkansas-Little Rock Little Rock[[note]]Arkansas–Little Rock[[/note]] and UT Arlington.
13th Mar '16 12:41:50 PM KYCubbie
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* ''Pac-12'' [Arizona, Arizona State, California[[note]]Cal-Berkeley[[/note]], Colorado, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, USC[[note]]Southern California[[/note]], UCLA, Utah, Washington, Washington State]: Another "Power Five" league, this one consists of Western US schools and is also tied to the Rose Bowl. Several of these teams have incredibly storied histories, though the one most likely to be known by the casual fan right now is USC, which is well-known for both currently being one of the more dominant teams and for landing in hot water for allegedly paying players. Oregon has also grabbed a lot of attention in recent years for playing the best football in school history[[note]] Including a ridiculously fast-paced offense; they basically spend the whole game as if they're in a 2-minute drill.[[/note]] and perhaps even more so for their flashy uniforms that ''[[UnlimitedWardrobe are different for each game]].''[[note]]Famed shoe company & sports outfitter Nike is headquartered in Oregon and a major sponsor of the team, providing the uniforms for free. Its co-founder Phil Knight is an Oregon alum as well, and has pumped ''hundreds of millions'' of his own money into the school's sports facilities.[[/note]] Known as the Pac-10 until Utah and Colorado joined in 2011. Before that, they were the Pac-8 until Arizona and Arizona State joined in 1978, thus making the name a geographic ArtifactTitle. Like the Big Ten, the Pac-12 is well-known for being both an athletically competent and academically prestigious conference (with the 4 California schools regularly being ranked in the Top 25 universities in the country). It also refers to itself as the "Conference of Champions", stressing the strengths of its schools' athletics well beyond just football. Of particular note are UCLA, Stanford, and USC, all of which have ''[[OverNineThousand at least 100]]'' national team championships.[[note]]Fun fact respecting UCLA: [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} Jackie Robinson]] attended UCLA and played baseball, football, and basketball ''and'' ran track for the Bruins; he was actually most promising at ''football'', where he was part of UCLA's 6-0-4 1939 team, before the war started and eventually led him to baseball and the Dodgers.[[/note]]

to:

* ''Pac-12'' [Arizona, Arizona State, California[[note]]Cal-Berkeley[[/note]], Colorado, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, USC[[note]]Southern California[[/note]], UCLA, Utah, Washington, Washington State]: Another "Power Five" league, this one consists of Western US schools and is also tied to the Rose Bowl. Several of these teams have incredibly storied histories, though the one most likely to be known by the casual fan right now is USC, which is well-known for both currently being one of the more dominant teams and for landing in hot water for allegedly paying players. Oregon has also grabbed a lot of attention in recent years for playing the best football in school history[[note]] Including a ridiculously fast-paced offense; they basically spend the whole game as if they're in a 2-minute drill.[[/note]] and perhaps even more so for their flashy uniforms that ''[[UnlimitedWardrobe are different for each game]].''[[note]]Famed shoe company & sports outfitter Nike is headquartered in Oregon and a major sponsor of the team, providing the uniforms for free. Its co-founder Phil Knight is an Oregon alum as well, and has pumped ''hundreds of millions'' of his own money into the school's sports facilities.[[/note]] Known as the Pac-10 until Utah and Colorado joined in 2011. Before that, they were the Pac-8 until Arizona and Arizona State joined in 1978, thus making the name a geographic ArtifactTitle. Like the Big Ten, the Pac-12 is well-known for being both an athletically competent and academically prestigious conference (with the 4 California schools regularly being ranked in the Top 25 universities in the country). It also refers to itself as the "Conference of Champions", stressing the strengths of its schools' athletics well beyond just football. Of particular note are UCLA, Stanford, and USC, all of which have ''[[OverNineThousand at least 100]]'' national team championships.[[note]]Fun fact respecting UCLA: [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} Jackie Robinson]] UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson attended UCLA and played baseball, football, and basketball ''and'' ran track for the Bruins; he was actually most promising at ''football'', where he was part of UCLA's 6-0-4 1939 team, before the war started and eventually led him to baseball and the Dodgers.[[/note]]
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