History UsefulNotes / CollegiateAmericanFootballConferences

19th Sep '17 12:20:45 PM KYCubbie
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** Wichita State became The American's first full but non-football member in 2017. This gives the league 12 members on its non-football side to go along with its 12 football members. The arrival of the Shockers also gives a major boost to the league's profile in men's basketball.

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** Wichita State became The American's first full but non-football member in 2017. This gives 2017, giving the league 12 members on its non-football side to go along with its 12 football members. The arrival of the Shockers also gives a major boost to boosted the league's profile in men's basketball.



* ''Mountain West (MW)'' [[[MilitaryAcademy Air Force]], Boise State, Colorado State, Fresno State, Hawaii (football only), Nevada, New Mexico, San Diego State, San Jose State, UNLV[[note]]Nevada-UsefulNotes/LasVegas[[/note]], Utah State, Wyoming]: Formed in 1999 by a group of 8 disgruntled Western Athletic Conference schools unhappy with the arrangement of the WAC's "super-conference" alignment. Today, it is arguably the most competitive "Group of Five" conference, though ironically it has absorbed other former WAC schools during the realignment shake-ups of the 2000s and 2010s (the most recent being San Jose State and Utah State, joining in 2013).
* ''Pac-12'' [Arizona, Arizona State, California[[note]]Cal-Berkeley[[/note]], Colorado, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, USC[[note]]Southern California[[/note]], UCLA[[note]]University of California, Los Angeles[[/note]], Utah, Washington, Washington State]: Another "Power Five" league, this one consists of Western US schools and is also tied to the Rose Bowl. Several of these teams have incredibly storied histories, though the one most likely to be known by the casual fan right now is USC, which is well-known for both currently being one of the more dominant teams and for landing in hot water for allegedly paying players. Oregon has also grabbed a lot of attention in recent years for playing the best football in school history[[note]] Including a ridiculously fast-paced offense; they basically spend the whole game as if they're in a 2-minute drill.[[/note]] and perhaps even more so for their flashy uniforms that ''[[UnlimitedWardrobe are different for each game]].''[[note]]Famed shoe company & sports outfitter Nike is headquartered in Oregon and a major sponsor of the team, providing the uniforms for free. Its co-founder Phil Knight is an Oregon alum as well, and has pumped ''hundreds of millions'' of his own money into the school's sports facilities.[[/note]] Known as the Pac-10 until Utah and Colorado joined in 2011. Before that, they were the Pac-8 until Arizona and Arizona State joined in 1978, thus making the name a geographic ArtifactTitle. Like the Big Ten, the Pac-12 is well-known for being both an athletically competent and academically prestigious conference (with the 4 California schools regularly being ranked in the Top 25 universities in the country). It also refers to itself as the "Conference of Champions", stressing the strengths of its schools' athletics well beyond just football. Of particular note are UCLA, Stanford, and USC, all of which have ''[[OverNineThousand at least 100]]'' national team championships.[[note]]Fun fact regarding UCLA: UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson attended UCLA and played baseball, football, and basketball ''and'' ran track for the Bruins; he was actually most promising at ''football'', where he was part of UCLA's 6-0-4 1939 team, before the war started and eventually led him to baseball and the Dodgers.[[/note]]

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* ''Mountain West (MW)'' [[[MilitaryAcademy Air Force]], Boise State, Colorado State, Fresno State, Hawaii (football only), Nevada, New Mexico, San Diego State, San Jose State, UNLV[[note]]Nevada-UsefulNotes/LasVegas[[/note]], Utah State, Wyoming]: Formed in 1999 by a group of 8 disgruntled Western Athletic Conference schools unhappy with the arrangement of the WAC's "super-conference" alignment. Today, it is arguably the most competitive "Group of Five" conference, though ironically it has absorbed other former WAC schools during the realignment shake-ups shakeups of the 2000s and 2010s (the most recent being San Jose State and Utah State, joining in 2013).
* ''Pac-12'' [Arizona, Arizona State, California[[note]]Cal-Berkeley[[/note]], Colorado, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, USC[[note]]Southern California[[/note]], UCLA[[note]]University of California, Los Angeles[[/note]], Utah, Washington, Washington State]: Another "Power Five" league, this one consists of Western US schools and is also tied to the Rose Bowl. Several of these teams have incredibly storied histories, though the one most likely to be known by the casual fan right now is USC, which is well-known for both currently being one of the more dominant teams and for landing in hot water for allegedly paying players. Oregon has also grabbed a lot of attention in recent years for playing the best football in school history[[note]] Including a ridiculously fast-paced offense; they basically spend the whole game as if they're in a 2-minute drill.[[/note]] and perhaps even more so for their flashy uniforms that ''[[UnlimitedWardrobe are different for each game]].''[[note]]Famed shoe company & sports outfitter Nike is headquartered in Oregon and a major sponsor of the team, providing the uniforms for free. Its co-founder Phil Knight is an Oregon alum as well, and has pumped ''hundreds of millions'' of his own money into the school's sports facilities.[[/note]] Known as the Pac-10 until Utah and Colorado joined in 2011. Before that, they were the Pac-8 until Arizona and Arizona State joined in 1978, thus making the name a geographic ArtifactTitle. Like the Big Ten, the Pac-12 is well-known for being both an athletically competent and academically prestigious conference (with the 4 California schools regularly being ranked in the Top 25 universities in the country). It also refers to itself as the "Conference of Champions", stressing the strengths of its schools' athletics well beyond just football. Of particular note are UCLA, Stanford, and USC, all of which have ''[[OverNineThousand at least over 100]]'' national team championships.[[note]]Fun fact regarding UCLA: UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson attended UCLA and played baseball, football, and basketball ''and'' ran track for the Bruins; he was actually most promising at ''football'', where he was part of UCLA's 6-0-4 1939 team, before the war started and eventually led him to baseball and the Dodgers.[[/note]]
7th Sep '17 12:34:16 PM KYCubbie
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* ''Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC)'' [Bethune–Cookman, Delaware State, Florida A&M, Hampton, Howard, Morgan State, Norfolk State, North Carolina A&T, North Carolina Central, Savannah State, South Carolina State]: Formed in 1970, it is a conference of historically black colleges and universities ([=HBCUs=]). Like the MAC and Sun Belt in FBS, has done little of note, and the colleges are often scheduled as easy wins. Savannah State, in particular, has been criticized for regularly agreeing to play in vastly one-sided games against power house schools, where they inevitably [[CurbStompBattle lose by over 70 or 80 points]]. Due to a distinct lack of success in the FCS playoffs, it decided in 2015 to not participate in the playoffs (for the second time in the FCS era), opting instead for a postseason game between its champion and the SWAC (below) champion (also for the second time). On a happier note, the MEAC was involved in the biggest point-spread upset in NCAA football history in 2017, when Howard won at [[UsefulNotes/LasVegas UNLV]] as a 45.5-point underdog.

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* ''Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC)'' [Bethune–Cookman, Delaware State, Florida A&M, Hampton, Howard, Morgan State, Norfolk State, North Carolina A&T, North Carolina Central, Savannah State, South Carolina State]: Formed in 1970, it is a conference of historically black colleges and universities ([=HBCUs=]). Like the MAC and Sun Belt in FBS, has done little of note, and the colleges are often scheduled as easy wins. Savannah State, in particular, has been criticized for regularly agreeing to play in vastly one-sided games against power house schools, where they inevitably [[CurbStompBattle lose by over 70 or 80 points]]. Due to a distinct lack of success in the FCS playoffs, it decided in 2015 to not participate in the playoffs (for the second time in the FCS era), opting instead for a postseason game between its champion and the SWAC (below) champion (also for the second time). On a happier note, the MEAC was involved in the biggest point-spread upset in NCAA football history in 2017, when Howard won at [[UsefulNotes/LasVegas UNLV]] as a 45.5-point 45-point underdog.
6th Sep '17 11:52:34 PM KYCubbie
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* ''Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC)'' [Illinois State, Indiana State, Missouri State, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, South Dakota, South Dakota State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Youngstown State]: One of two football-only leagues in FCS, with a history that is, to say the least, a ContinuitySnarl. While the MVFC claims 1985 as its founding date, its history can be traced through two branches dating back as far as 1907, and involves four other conferences, one of them a women's sports league. ''[[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer Seriously.]]'' Nonetheless, it's at or near the top of the FCS pecking order, and its top teams are often competitive with the bottom half or so of FBS. North Dakota State won five straight FCS titles from 2011 to 2015, and has beaten an FBS team in each season since 2010—except in 2015, when the FBS caught a break by none of its members scheduling NDSU, and 2017, when the FBS [[GenreSavvy apparently caught on to the trend]] and [[SarcasmMode ducked the Bison again]]. The most recent, in 2016, was also the most recent FCS win over a ranked FBS team, with the Bison going into Iowa and taking the Hawkeyes down.

to:

* ''Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC)'' [Illinois State, Indiana State, Missouri State, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, South Dakota, South Dakota State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Youngstown State]: One of two football-only leagues in FCS, with a history that is, to say the least, a ContinuitySnarl. While the MVFC claims 1985 as its founding date, its history can be traced through two branches dating back as far as 1907, and involves four other conferences, one of them a women's sports league. ''[[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer ''[[SincerityMode Seriously.]]'' Nonetheless, it's at or near the top of the FCS pecking order, and its top teams are often competitive with the bottom half or so of FBS. North Dakota State won five straight FCS titles from 2011 to 2015, and has beaten an FBS team in each season since 2010—except in 2015, when the FBS caught a break by none of its members scheduling NDSU, and 2017, when the FBS [[GenreSavvy apparently caught on to the trend]] and [[SarcasmMode ducked the Bison again]]. The most recent, in 2016, was also the most recent FCS win over a ranked FBS team, with the Bison going into Iowa and taking the Hawkeyes down.
6th Sep '17 11:49:42 PM KYCubbie
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The second level of Division I football, also known as FCS or its former designation of "I-AA" (pronounced "one-double-A"). Created in 1978 when the NCAA split Division I football into two groups, it's distinguished from FBS by fewer scholarships[[note]]FCS schools are limited to awarding 63 ''full'' scholarships; however, FCS football is an "equivalency" sport rather than a "head count" sport, meaning a full scholarship can be split into partial scholarships, but FCS schools are still limited to 85 players receiving financial aid for football[[/note]], no minimum attendance requirement[[note]]FBS schools are supposed to maintain an average attendance of 15,000 per game in any rolling two year period; however this rule is rarely enforced[[/note]] and by also having an official NCAA championship. The four-team College Football Playoff in FBS, which started in 2014, is not operated by the NCAA.

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The second level of Division I football, also known as FCS or its former designation of "I-AA" (pronounced "one-double-A"). Created in 1978 when the NCAA split Division I football into two groups, it's distinguished from FBS by fewer scholarships[[note]]FCS schools are limited to awarding 63 ''full'' scholarships; however, FCS football is an "equivalency" sport rather than a "head count" sport, meaning a full scholarship can be split into partial scholarships, but FCS schools are still limited to 85 players receiving financial aid for football[[/note]], no minimum attendance requirement[[note]]FBS schools are supposed to maintain an average attendance of 15,000 per game in any rolling two year two-year period; however this rule is rarely enforced[[/note]] and by also having an official NCAA championship. The four-team College Football Playoff in FBS, which started in 2014, is not operated by the NCAA.



* ''Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC)'' [Bethune–Cookman, Delaware State, Florida A&M, Hampton, Howard, Morgan State, Norfolk State, North Carolina A&T, North Carolina Central, Savannah State, South Carolina State]: Formed in 1970, it is a conference of historically black colleges and universities ([=HBCUs=]). Like the MAC and Sun Belt in FBS, has done little of note, and the colleges are often scheduled as easy wins. Savannah State, in particular, has been criticized for regularly agreeing to play in vastly one-sided games against power house schools, where they inevitably [[CurbStompBattle lose by over 70 or 80 points]]. Due to a distinct lack of success in the FCS playoffs, it decided in 2015 to not participate in the playoffs (for the second time in the FCS era), opting instead for a postseason game between its champion and the SWAC (below) champion (also for the second time).

to:

* ''Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC)'' [Bethune–Cookman, Delaware State, Florida A&M, Hampton, Howard, Morgan State, Norfolk State, North Carolina A&T, North Carolina Central, Savannah State, South Carolina State]: Formed in 1970, it is a conference of historically black colleges and universities ([=HBCUs=]). Like the MAC and Sun Belt in FBS, has done little of note, and the colleges are often scheduled as easy wins. Savannah State, in particular, has been criticized for regularly agreeing to play in vastly one-sided games against power house schools, where they inevitably [[CurbStompBattle lose by over 70 or 80 points]]. Due to a distinct lack of success in the FCS playoffs, it decided in 2015 to not participate in the playoffs (for the second time in the FCS era), opting instead for a postseason game between its champion and the SWAC (below) champion (also for the second time). On a happier note, the MEAC was involved in the biggest point-spread upset in NCAA football history in 2017, when Howard won at [[UsefulNotes/LasVegas UNLV]] as a 45.5-point underdog.



* ''Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC)'' [Illinois State, Indiana State, Missouri State, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, South Dakota, South Dakota State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Youngstown State]: One of two football-only leagues in FCS, with a history that is, to say the least, a ContinuitySnarl. While the MVFC claims 1985 as its founding date, its history can be traced through two branches dating back as far as 1907, and involves four other conferences, one of them a women's sports league. ''Seriously.'' Nonetheless, it's at or near the top of the FCS pecking order, and its top teams are often competitive with the bottom half or so of FBS. North Dakota State won five straight FCS titles from 2011 to 2015, and has beaten an FBS team in each season since 2010—except in 2015, when the FBS caught a break by none of its members scheduling NDSU, and 2017, when the FBS [[GenreSavvy apparently caught on to the trend]] and [[SarcasmMode ducked the Bison again]]. The most recent, in 2016, was also the most recent FCS win over a ranked FBS team, with the Bison going into Iowa and taking the Hawkeyes down.

to:

* ''Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC)'' [Illinois State, Indiana State, Missouri State, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, South Dakota, South Dakota State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Youngstown State]: One of two football-only leagues in FCS, with a history that is, to say the least, a ContinuitySnarl. While the MVFC claims 1985 as its founding date, its history can be traced through two branches dating back as far as 1907, and involves four other conferences, one of them a women's sports league. ''Seriously.'' ''[[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer Seriously.]]'' Nonetheless, it's at or near the top of the FCS pecking order, and its top teams are often competitive with the bottom half or so of FBS. North Dakota State won five straight FCS titles from 2011 to 2015, and has beaten an FBS team in each season since 2010—except in 2015, when the FBS caught a break by none of its members scheduling NDSU, and 2017, when the FBS [[GenreSavvy apparently caught on to the trend]] and [[SarcasmMode ducked the Bison again]]. The most recent, in 2016, was also the most recent FCS win over a ranked FBS team, with the Bison going into Iowa and taking the Hawkeyes down.
2nd Sep '17 12:08:52 PM kquinn0830
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* ''Big Ten (sometimes [=B1G=])'' [Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Nebraska, Northwestern, Ohio State, Penn State, Purdue, Rutgers, Wisconsin]: The name "Big Ten" is an ArtifactTitle - there have been 11 schools in the conference for awhile, and expanded to 12 in 2011 with the addition of Nebraska. After Penn State joined, the conference logo was redesigned to have a hidden "11" in the center. Obviously, it was changed yet again when Nebraska joined, though the number "12" is not hidden anywhere in the text this time. Instead, the number "10" is hidden in the logo (which is the source of the conference's "[=B1G=]" branding). Yet another "power conference", this one tied to the Rose Bowl. Until recently, it was an exclusively Midwestern conference but this ended in 1993 with the addition of Penn State (and further waned in 2014 with the East Coast schools Rutgers and Maryland joining). There are plenty of historical powerhouses in the Big Ten: Michigan, Ohio State, Nebraska, and Penn State all have incredibly storied histories and have produced multiple national championships and tons of NFL greats. One notable person in the Big Ten is Penn State's late former head coach Joe Paterno, the longest-serving (over fifty years) and (once again) most-winning coach in NCAA Division I history, who was fired from the school during the 2011 season over failing to communicate with police during a university child-rape scandal by one of his former assistants. The NCAA later ordered Penn State's wins from 1998 through Paterno's firing stricken from the record books, costing [=JoePa=] over 100 wins... but those wins were restored in January 2015. The Michigan-Ohio State rivalry is probably one of the ten largest in the country.[[note]]ESPN ran a commercial once where a guy in an Ohio State jersey and a girl in a Michigan jersey were kissing, with the tagline "If it wasn't for sports, this wouldn't be disgusting."[[/note]] With the expansion to 12 teams, the Big Ten implemented divisional play for the first time in 2011. Unlike most conferences with 12 or more teams, which go with geographical division names, the Big Ten opted to name their divisions "Legends" and "Leaders"... a choice which (unsurprisingly) was almost universally ridiculed. However, with the arrival of Maryland and Rutgers, the conference scrapped "Legends" and "Leaders" in favor of "East" and "West", with an almost perfect geographic split on the basis of time zones, with teams on Central Time in the West and teams on Eastern Time in the East; the exception being the universities in Indiana, both of which are on Eastern (Purdue was sent to the West Division and Indiana to the East, in part because of rivalries, but mostly because Purdue has a bigger fanbase in the Chicago area).

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* ''Big Ten (sometimes [=B1G=])'' [Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Michigan State, Minnesota, Nebraska, Northwestern, Ohio State, Penn State, Purdue, Rutgers, Wisconsin]: The name "Big Ten" is an ArtifactTitle - there have been 11 schools in the conference for awhile, and expanded to 12 in 2011 with the addition of Nebraska. After Penn State joined, the conference logo was redesigned to have a hidden "11" in the center. Obviously, it was changed yet again when Nebraska joined, though the number "12" is not hidden anywhere in the text this time. Instead, the number "10" is hidden in the logo (which is the source of the conference's "[=B1G=]" branding). Yet another "power conference", this one tied to the Rose Bowl. Until recently, it was an exclusively Midwestern conference but this ended in 1993 with the addition of Penn State State[[note]]Though no one really minded due to the fact Central Pennsylvania is very culturally similar to the Midwest[[/note]] (and further waned in 2014 with the East Coast schools Rutgers and Maryland joining).joining)[[note]]Which purists did mind since the two are located very close to the Atlantic coast and are very Eastern culture wise[[/note]]. There are plenty of historical powerhouses in the Big Ten: Michigan, Ohio State, Nebraska, and Penn State all have incredibly storied histories and have produced multiple national championships and tons of NFL greats. One notable person in the Big Ten is Penn State's late former head coach Joe Paterno, the longest-serving (over fifty years) and (once again) most-winning coach in NCAA Division I history, who was fired from the school during the 2011 season over failing to communicate with police during a university child-rape scandal by one of his former assistants. The NCAA later ordered Penn State's wins from 1998 through Paterno's firing stricken from the record books, costing [=JoePa=] over 100 wins... but those wins were restored in January 2015. The Michigan-Ohio State rivalry is probably one of the ten largest in the country.[[note]]ESPN ran a commercial once where a guy in an Ohio State jersey and a girl in a Michigan jersey were kissing, with the tagline "If it wasn't for sports, this wouldn't be disgusting."[[/note]] With the expansion to 12 teams, the Big Ten implemented divisional play for the first time in 2011. Unlike most conferences with 12 or more teams, which go with geographical division names, the Big Ten opted to name their divisions "Legends" and "Leaders"... a choice which (unsurprisingly) was almost universally ridiculed. However, with the arrival of Maryland and Rutgers, the conference scrapped "Legends" and "Leaders" in favor of "East" and "West", with an almost perfect geographic split on the basis of time zones, with teams on Central Time in the West and teams on Eastern Time in the East; the exception being the universities in Indiana, both of which are on Eastern (Purdue was sent to the West Division and Indiana to the East, in part because of rivalries, but mostly because Purdue has a bigger fanbase in the Chicago area).
1st Sep '17 2:37:18 AM KYCubbie
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* ''Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC)'' [Illinois State, Indiana State, Missouri State, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, South Dakota, South Dakota State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Youngstown State]: One of two football-only leagues in FCS, with a history that is, to say the least, a ContinuitySnarl. While the MVFC claims 1985 as its founding date, its history can be traced through two branches dating back as far as 1907, and involves four other conferences, one of them a women's sports league. ''Seriously.'' Nonetheless, it's at or near the top of the FCS pecking order, and its top teams are often competitive with the bottom half or so of FBS. North Dakota State won five straight FCS titles from 2011 to 2015, and has beaten an FBS team in each season since 2010—except in 2015, when the FBS caught a break by none of its members scheduling NDSU. The most recent, in 2016, was also the most recent FCS win over a ranked FBS team, with the Bison going into Iowa and taking the Hawkeyes down.

to:

* ''Missouri Valley Football Conference (MVFC)'' [Illinois State, Indiana State, Missouri State, North Dakota State, Northern Iowa, South Dakota, South Dakota State, Southern Illinois, Western Illinois, Youngstown State]: One of two football-only leagues in FCS, with a history that is, to say the least, a ContinuitySnarl. While the MVFC claims 1985 as its founding date, its history can be traced through two branches dating back as far as 1907, and involves four other conferences, one of them a women's sports league. ''Seriously.'' Nonetheless, it's at or near the top of the FCS pecking order, and its top teams are often competitive with the bottom half or so of FBS. North Dakota State won five straight FCS titles from 2011 to 2015, and has beaten an FBS team in each season since 2010—except in 2015, when the FBS caught a break by none of its members scheduling NDSU.NDSU, and 2017, when the FBS [[GenreSavvy apparently caught on to the trend]] and [[SarcasmMode ducked the Bison again]]. The most recent, in 2016, was also the most recent FCS win over a ranked FBS team, with the Bison going into Iowa and taking the Hawkeyes down.
26th Aug '17 12:40:11 AM KYCubbie
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Alignments listed are as of the upcoming 2017 season.

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Alignments listed are as of the upcoming current 2017 season.
22nd Aug '17 10:57:00 PM KYCubbie
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** UAB football returned in 2017 after having dropped the sport at the end of the 2014 season. Because [=C-USA=] requires all member schools to sponsor football, it was initially believed that UAB would be kicked out of the league at the end of the 2014–15 school year. The decision to drop football turned out to be driven at least as much by politics within the University of Alabama system[[note]]At the time, the system's board of trustees was dominated by alumni of the main campus in Tuscaloosa. Supporters of both UAB and the system's other campus in Huntsville felt that the board was holding those campuses back. On top of that, arguably the most powerful member of the board at the time was local businessman and Alabama (Tuscaloosa) alum Paul Bryant, Jr. If the name sounds vaguely familiar to you... yes, he's the son of Alabama football coaching legend Paul "Bear" Bryant.[[/note]] as by finances, leading to a strong movement to bring the sport back.[[note]]Not just to bring football back... the student body, faculty, ''and'' alumni association all gave votes of no confidence to UAB's president, and there were moves in the state legislature to make UAB independent of the UA system, or to reorganize the system board to give alumni of each campus equal representation. The Website/{{Twitter}} hashtag [=#FreeUAB=] gained some notoriety at this time.[[/note]] UAB relented, announcing that it would [[HesBack reinstate football]] in 2017, in turn leading [=C-USA=] to announce that it would keep UAB. Also, the NCAA announced that UAB would be reinstated immediately as an FBS member and be bowl-eligible in 2017.

to:

** UAB football returned in 2017 after having dropped the sport at the end of the 2014 season. Because [=C-USA=] requires all member schools to sponsor football, it was initially believed that UAB would be kicked out of the league at the end of the 2014–15 school year. The decision to drop football turned out to be driven at least as much by state politics within the University of Alabama system[[note]]At the time, the system's board of trustees was dominated by alumni of the main campus in Tuscaloosa. Supporters of both UAB and the system's other campus in Huntsville felt that the board was holding those campuses back. On top of that, arguably the most powerful member of the board at the time was local businessman and Alabama (Tuscaloosa) alum Paul Bryant, Jr. If the name sounds vaguely familiar to you... yes, he's the son of Alabama football coaching legend Paul "Bear" Bryant.[[/note]] as by finances, leading to a strong movement to bring the sport back.[[note]]Not just back (and an unsuccessful attempt to bring football back... the student body, faculty, ''and'' alumni association all gave votes of no confidence to force out UAB's president, and there were moves in the state legislature to make UAB independent of the UA system, or to reorganize the system board to give alumni of each campus equal representation. The Website/{{Twitter}} hashtag [=#FreeUAB=] gained some notoriety at this time.[[/note]] president). UAB relented, announcing that it would [[HesBack reinstate football]] in 2017, in turn leading [=C-USA=] to announce that it would keep UAB. Also, the NCAA announced that UAB would be reinstated immediately as an FBS member and be bowl-eligible in 2017. For a good overview of the controversy surrounding UAB's decision, see [[https://www.sbnation.com/college-football/2015/6/2/8702385/uab-football-return this story]].



** Coastal Carolina left the FCS Big South after 2015–16 to go up to FBS. After spending 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, the Chanticleers will join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible). In May 2017, the conference announced that the 10 football-playing schools will be divided into two divisions of five teams with the team ranked highest in the College Football Playoff rankings hosting the game; however, if no team ranks in the CFP rankings, then the conference will use a computer rankings formula similar to the former Bowl Championship Series.

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** Coastal Carolina left the FCS Big South after 2015–16 to go up to FBS. After spending 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, the Chanticleers will join joined Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible). In May 2017, the conference announced that the 10 football-playing schools will be divided into two divisions of five teams with the team ranked highest in the College Football Playoff rankings hosting the game; however, if no team ranks in the CFP rankings, then the conference will use a computer rankings formula similar to the former Bowl Championship Series.



** North Dakota will leave the all-sports Big Sky Conference in 2018 to join the Summit League, which doesn't play football. The Fighting Hawks will remain in Big Sky football until 2020, when they'll join several of their traditional regional rivals in the Missouri Valley Football Conference (below).

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** North Dakota will leave the all-sports Big Sky Conference in 2018 to join the Summit League, which doesn't play football. football but is home to most of the school's traditional rivals. The Fighting Hawks will remain in Big Sky football until 2020, when they'll join several of their traditional regional said rivals in the Missouri Valley Football Conference (below).
30th Jun '17 10:31:12 PM KYCubbie
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** Wichita State will become The American's first full but non-football member in July 2017. This gives the league 12 members on its non-football side to go along with its 12 football members. The arrival of the Shockers also gives a major boost to the league's profile in men's basketball.

to:

** Wichita State will become became The American's first full but non-football member in July 2017. This gives the league 12 members on its non-football side to go along with its 12 football members. The arrival of the Shockers also gives a major boost to the league's profile in men's basketball.



** UAB football is returning in 2017 after having dropped the sport at the end of the 2014 season. Because [=C-USA=] requires all member schools to sponsor football, it was initially believed that UAB would be kicked out of the league at the end of the 2014–15 school year. The decision to drop football turned out to be driven at least as much by politics within the University of Alabama system[[note]]At the time, the system's board of trustees was dominated by alumni of the main campus in Tuscaloosa. Supporters of both UAB and the system's other campus in Huntsville felt that the board was holding those campuses back. On top of that, arguably the most powerful member of the board at the time was local businessman and Alabama (Tuscaloosa) alum Paul Bryant, Jr. If the name sounds vaguely familiar to you... yes, he's the son of Alabama football coaching legend Paul "Bear" Bryant.[[/note]] as by finances, leading to a strong movement to bring the sport back.[[note]]Not just to bring football back... the student body, faculty, ''and'' alumni association all gave votes of no confidence to UAB's president, and there were moves in the state legislature to make UAB independent of the UA system, or to reorganize the system board to give alumni of each campus equal representation. The Website/{{Twitter}} hashtag [=#FreeUAB=] gained some notoriety at this time.[[/note]] UAB relented, announcing that it would [[HesBack reinstate football]] in 2017, in turn leading [=C-USA=] to announce that it would keep UAB. Also, the NCAA announced that UAB would be reinstated immediately as an FBS member and be bowl-eligible in 2017.

to:

** UAB football is returning returned in 2017 after having dropped the sport at the end of the 2014 season. Because [=C-USA=] requires all member schools to sponsor football, it was initially believed that UAB would be kicked out of the league at the end of the 2014–15 school year. The decision to drop football turned out to be driven at least as much by politics within the University of Alabama system[[note]]At the time, the system's board of trustees was dominated by alumni of the main campus in Tuscaloosa. Supporters of both UAB and the system's other campus in Huntsville felt that the board was holding those campuses back. On top of that, arguably the most powerful member of the board at the time was local businessman and Alabama (Tuscaloosa) alum Paul Bryant, Jr. If the name sounds vaguely familiar to you... yes, he's the son of Alabama football coaching legend Paul "Bear" Bryant.[[/note]] as by finances, leading to a strong movement to bring the sport back.[[note]]Not just to bring football back... the student body, faculty, ''and'' alumni association all gave votes of no confidence to UAB's president, and there were moves in the state legislature to make UAB independent of the UA system, or to reorganize the system board to give alumni of each campus equal representation. The Website/{{Twitter}} hashtag [=#FreeUAB=] gained some notoriety at this time.[[/note]] UAB relented, announcing that it would [[HesBack reinstate football]] in 2017, in turn leading [=C-USA=] to announce that it would keep UAB. Also, the NCAA announced that UAB would be reinstated immediately as an FBS member and be bowl-eligible in 2017.
27th May '17 12:16:21 AM Gsueagle31049
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** Coastal Carolina left the FCS Big South after 2015–16 to go up to FBS. After spending 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, the Chanticleers will join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible); however, how the teams are selected and where the game will be played will be determined at a later date.

to:

** Coastal Carolina left the FCS Big South after 2015–16 to go up to FBS. After spending 2016 as an FCS independent and non-football Sun Belt member, the Chanticleers will join Sun Belt football in 2017. At the time Coastal was announced as a future member, their arrival would have allowed the conference to stage a conference championship game, but only if it didn't lose any football members (read: boot out Idaho and New Mexico State). However, in 2016, a Big 12 proposal to allow all FBS conferences to stage football championship games, even if they have fewer than 12 members, was approved by the commissioners of the FBS leagues. Subsequently, the conference unanimously voted to hold a conference title game starting in 2018 (the same year Coastal becomes bowl-eligible); bowl-eligible). In May 2017, the conference announced that the 10 football-playing schools will be divided into two divisions of five teams with the team ranked highest in the College Football Playoff rankings hosting the game; however, how if no team ranks in the teams are selected and where CFP rankings, then the game conference will be played will be determined at use a later date.computer rankings formula similar to the former Bowl Championship Series.
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