History UsefulNotes / Christianity

31st May '17 7:13:41 AM gemmabeta2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Christian Scientists''' -- more properly "The Church of Christ, Scientist". Founded by a Boston woman, Mary Baker Eddy, whose sickness was not healed by "animal magnetism" (which worked by inadvertently hypnotizing the patient) but did get better after praying. Their main difference from other types of Christianity is denying the existence of the physical world (which peculiarly sounds rather like UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}}). This leads to the conclusion that there is no need to rely on drugs and medical treatment, since these imply a reality to the physical. In practice, failing to be good enough at seeing that there is no physical world is not a sin, so members are allowed to seek medical help as a second resort. They also deny the existence of evil, Satan, and any need to evangelize or proselytize. They are very much in favor of reading, though. Not to be confused with the [[ChurchOfHappyology Church of Scientology]]. The sect established ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Christian_Science_Monitor The Christian Science Monitor]]'' as a response to criticism and ridicule of Eddy early on; it eventually became a top outlet for high-quality journalism in the United States. Currently, the church is in the process of a long and slow decline brought about by the invention of antibiotics and chemotherapy.

to:

* '''Christian Scientists''' -- more properly "The Church of Christ, Scientist". Founded by a Boston woman, Mary Baker Eddy, whose sickness was not healed by "animal magnetism" (which worked by inadvertently hypnotizing the patient) but did get better after praying. Their main difference from other types of Christianity is denying the existence of the physical world (which peculiarly sounds rather like UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}}). This leads to the conclusion that there is no need to rely on drugs and medical treatment, since these imply a reality to the physical. In practice, failing to be good enough at seeing that there is no physical world is not a sin, so members are allowed to seek medical help as a second resort. They also deny the existence of evil, Satan, and any need to evangelize or proselytize. They are very much in favor of reading, though. Not to be confused with the [[ChurchOfHappyology Church of Scientology]]. The sect established ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Christian_Science_Monitor The Christian Science Monitor]]'' as a response to criticism and ridicule of Eddy early on; it eventually became a top outlet for high-quality journalism in the United States. Currently, the church is in the process of a long and slow decline brought about by the invention of antibiotics and chemotherapy. The denomination is generally grouped with other Metaphysical Christian movements spawned during the 19th Century such as Christian Spiritualism and the Unity Church, of which Christian Science is the largest of these denominations still extant.
25th May '17 2:54:09 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Catholic Christians''' believe that UsefulNotes/{{the Pope}} is the rightful successor of St. Peter, who was given the authority by Jesus to guide and direct the Christian Church on Earth, and that faith alone isn't sufficient except combined with acts. This last bit means that a Christian, to a Catholic, is someone who acknowledges s/he is a sinner, accepts Christ's offer of salvation, is forgiven by God on Christ's behalf, repents and changes his or her life to reflect this, and spreads the word to others, with the Church (e.g. Pope) being the final earthly authority for figuring out how to actually do that; once you have done that, you have to do good things and actually act like you believe and try to be a better person to be saved. Contrary to common misunderstanding, Catholics do believe in the Bible as strongly as Protestant Christians do, but their belief in the Church's authority simply means they do not believe that the Bible is the sole source of knowledge in determining how to be saved and live a moral life. The term "Roman Catholic" is both misnomer and was once a derisive term. Their official name is simply, "The Catholic Church," which has many liturgical variants, or rites, but all believing in the same core values mentioned. The Roman, or Latin Rite, is what resides in Rome and is the liturgy seem most by Westerners, including the U.S.

to:

* '''Catholic Christians''' believe that UsefulNotes/{{the Pope}} is the rightful successor of St. Peter, who was given the authority by Jesus to guide and direct the Christian Church on Earth, and that faith alone isn't sufficient except combined with acts. This last bit means that a Christian, to a Catholic, is someone who acknowledges s/he is a sinner, accepts Christ's offer of salvation, is forgiven by God on Christ's behalf, repents and changes his or her life to reflect this, and spreads the word to others, with the Church (e.g. Pope) being the final earthly authority for figuring out how to actually do that; once you have done that, you have to do good things and actually act like you believe and try to be a better person to be saved. Contrary to common misunderstanding, Catholics do believe in the Bible as strongly as Protestant Christians do, but their belief in the Church's authority simply means they do not believe that the Bible is the sole source of knowledge in determining how to be saved and live a moral life. The term "Roman Catholic" is both a misnomer and was once a derisive term. Their official name is simply, simply "The Catholic Church," which has many liturgical variants, or rites, but all believing in the same core values mentioned. The Roman, or Latin Rite, is what resides in Rome and is the liturgy seem most by Westerners, including the U.S.
25th May '17 2:51:30 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[IAmNotShazam Christ is not Jesus' last name]], but His title designating His role as Messiah and Savior. It comes from the Greek ''Christos'', meaning "[[TheChosenOne anointed]]", in turn a translation of ''Māîăḥ''. This is why phrases like "Passion of ''the'' Christ" make sense. Note that this also means that referring to Jesus as "Christ" or "Jesus Christ", rather than just "Jesus", constitutes an implied claim that Jesus was, in fact, the Messiah, and thus should be avoided when you're trying to draw a distinction between the Christian view and the "historical" secular view of Jesus. Those who wish to refer to Jesus is a secular or historical way can refer to him as simply Jesus, as he's pretty well known, or Jesus of Nazareth if you want to be specific ("Jesús" is a fairly common male name in Spain and Latin America, and to be honest the word "Jesus" is the result of a game of [[RecursiveTranslation interlingual telephone]] for "Yeshua"--a name that appears in the Old Testament, where it is translated "Joshua"[[note]]English translations of the Bible since the King James Version have relied on the Hebrew Masoretic Text for the Old Testament, while the New Testament is usually compiled from primarily Greek sources. It would not have been immediately obvious to early translators that the Greek Ἰησοῦς ''Iēsous'' and the Hebrew יְהוֹשֻׁעַ‎ ''Yehoshua''/ישוע‎ ''Yeshua'' were the same thing, and so the distinction stuck. Spanish translators ''were'' aware, however, so there are plenty of men named "Jesús" in the Spanish Bible--and now you know why "Jesús" is a common name in Latin America: in Spanish, the Son of God happens to have been named Josh.[[/note]]). Yehoshua in itself is hebrew for "Jehovah salvage" or "Jehovah is salvation" which is pretty apropiate.

to:

* [[IAmNotShazam Christ is not Jesus' last name]], but His title designating His role as Messiah and Savior. It comes from the Greek ''Christos'', meaning "[[TheChosenOne anointed]]", in turn a translation of ''Māîăḥ''. This is why phrases like "Passion of ''the'' Christ" make sense. Note that this also means that referring to Jesus as "Christ" or "Jesus Christ", rather than just "Jesus", constitutes an implied claim that Jesus was, in fact, the Messiah, and thus should be avoided when you're trying to draw a distinction between the Christian view and the "historical" secular view of Jesus. Those who wish to refer to Jesus is a secular or historical way can refer to him as simply Jesus, as he's pretty well known, or Jesus of Nazareth if you want to be specific ("Jesús" is a fairly common male name in Spain and Latin America, and to be honest the word "Jesus" is the result of a game of [[RecursiveTranslation interlingual telephone]] for "Yeshua"--a name that appears in the Old Testament, where it is translated "Joshua"[[note]]English translations of the Bible since the King James Version have relied on the Hebrew Masoretic Text for the Old Testament, while the New Testament is usually compiled from primarily Greek sources. It would not have been immediately obvious to early translators that the Greek Ἰησοῦς ''Iēsous'' and the Hebrew יְהוֹשֻׁעַ‎ ''Yehoshua''/ישוע‎ ''Yeshua'' were the same thing, and so the distinction stuck. Spanish translators ''were'' aware, however, so there are plenty of men named "Jesús" in the Spanish Bible--and now you know why "Jesús" is a common name in Latin America: in Spanish, the Son of God happens to have been named Josh.[[/note]]). Yehoshua in itself is hebrew for "Jehovah salvage" or "Jehovah is salvation" which is pretty apropiate.appropriate.
25th May '17 2:49:47 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Judaism and Islam stress orthopraxy (correct action) while Christianity emphasizes orthodoxy (correct belief). This led to the other Abrahamic religions to view Christianity as more "liberal".

to:

* Judaism and Islam stress orthopraxy (correct action) while Christianity emphasizes orthodoxy (correct belief). This led to the other Abrahamic religions to view Christianity as more "liberal".
4th Apr '17 3:01:07 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SinisterMinister:The Church is a large organization and some of its clergy has been more manevolent than other parts.

to:

* SinisterMinister:The SinisterMinister: The Church is a large organization and some of its clergy has been more manevolent than other parts.
20th Mar '17 8:46:47 PM KYCubbie
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In many cases, the independent "Christian Churches" that schismed off in the 20th Century are basically Baptists in practice, descended from Presbyterians (the Campbells were Scots-Irish), and refuse to use any sectarian name more specific than "Christian." (The term "Campbellite Baptist" was applied by outsiders, and is not used by the sect.) Quite a small sect, and of course they insist they're not a sect, they're just Christians. Very confusing, and then they start calling themselves Christian in contrast to other Christian sects, thus taking the name of a major world religion for their tiny schism of same.

to:

* ** In many cases, the independent "Christian Churches" that schismed off in the 20th Century are basically Baptists in practice, descended from Presbyterians (the Campbells were Scots-Irish), and refuse to use any sectarian name more specific than "Christian." (The term "Campbellite Baptist" was applied by outsiders, and is not used by the sect.) Quite a small sect, and of course they insist they're not a sect, they're just Christians. Very confusing, and then they start calling themselves Christian in contrast to other Christian sects, thus taking the name of a major world religion for their tiny schism of same.



* '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnosticism]]''' -- Non-"orthodox" sects which were active from approximately 100-400 AD. Orthodox Christian sects ended up disavowing them, which resulted in some rather interesting developments. Gnostic writers and their texts were far more common in the early centuries of the Church and have a very different flavor than the modern Bible. Today they are largely extinct, but a few holdouts still remain, especially with the discovery of the Nag Hammadi library in the 1940s.\\

to:

* '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}} Gnosticism]]''' '''UsefulNotes/{{Gnosticism}}''' -- Non-"orthodox" sects which were active from approximately 100-400 AD. Orthodox Christian sects ended up disavowing them, which resulted in some rather interesting developments. Gnostic writers and their texts were far more common in the early centuries of the Church and have a very different flavor than the modern Bible. Today they are largely extinct, but a few holdouts still remain, especially with the discovery of the Nag Hammadi library in the 1940s.\\



* '''Messianic Judaism''' -- A largely American and British phenomenon beginning in the late 19th century, Messianic Judaism attempts to reconcile the division between Christianity and Judaism by combining aspects of each. Messianic Jews tend to describe themselves as Jews who observe Jewish law and believe that Jesus is the messiah as described in the Hebrew Bible. Messianic Jews sometimes are stuck in a bit of a inter-religious limbo, many Jewish groups dispute their self-identification as Jews (the Law of Return in Israel, for one, considers them a separate religion); meanwhile, quite a few Christian groups dispute their self-identification as Christians, as many Messianic Jews follow the Jewish understanding of the Messiah and thereby denying the Trinity. The fact that Jews have a very different concept than Christians of what it even means to be the Messiah explains why most mainstream Jews consider Messianic Judaism to be a Christian rather than Jewish sect.

to:

* '''Messianic Judaism''' -- A largely American and British phenomenon beginning in the late 19th century, Messianic Judaism attempts to reconcile the division between Christianity and Judaism by combining aspects of each. Messianic Jews tend to describe themselves as Jews who observe Jewish law and believe that Jesus is the messiah as described in the Hebrew Bible. Messianic Jews sometimes are stuck in a bit of a inter-religious limbo, limbo: many Jewish groups dispute their self-identification as Jews (the Law of Return in Israel, for one, considers them a separate religion); meanwhile, quite a few Christian groups dispute their self-identification as Christians, as many Messianic Jews follow the Jewish understanding of the Messiah and thereby denying the Trinity. The fact that Jews have a very different concept than Christians of what it even means to be the Messiah explains why most mainstream Jews consider Messianic Judaism to be a Christian rather than Jewish sect.



They have very different ideas of what God is compared to mainstream Christianity, since LDS doctrine holds that there was a universal departure from what was taught in Christ's time, necessitating a restoration via Joseph Smith. The LDS church holds the view that there are living prophets on the Earth today relaying modern revelation, much of which is found in the book "Doctrine and Covenants". The canon of Scripture is: the Bible (in English-speaking countries, the King James version is official), the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and a smaller, more miscellaneous volume called "Pearl of Great Price". The LDS view of the afterlife includes three possible levels that can be fairly described as "heaven" (and one level called "outer darkness", reserved for the most evil). Mormons believe if they do good works and live faithful lives now, they can be Gods in the afterlife and rule over their own planets. This is not to say that they believe they can "earn" this on their own merits. They don't, but regard the Atonement made by Christ as essential to any of this and that even after becoming like gods they are still under the rule of God. (The fact that the word "god" has multiple meanings makes the topic somewhat confusing to talk about.)\\

to:

They have very different ideas of what God is compared to mainstream Christianity, since LDS doctrine holds that there was a universal departure from what was taught in Christ's time, necessitating a restoration via Joseph Smith. The LDS church holds the view that there are living prophets on the Earth today relaying modern revelation, much of which is found in the book "Doctrine ''Doctrine and Covenants". Covenants''. The canon of Scripture is: the Bible (in English-speaking countries, the King James version is official), the Book ''Book of Mormon, Mormon'', the Doctrine ''Doctrine and Covenants, Covenants'', and a smaller, more miscellaneous volume called "Pearl ''Pearl of Great Price".Price''. The LDS view of the afterlife includes three possible levels that can be fairly described as "heaven" (and one level called "outer darkness", reserved for the most evil). Mormons believe if they do good works and live faithful lives now, they can be Gods in the afterlife and rule over their own planets. This is not to say that they believe they can "earn" this on their own merits. They don't, but regard the Atonement made by Christ as essential to any of this and that even after becoming like gods they are still under the rule of God. (The fact that the word "god" has multiple meanings makes the topic somewhat confusing to talk about.)\\
15th Mar '17 6:43:16 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GodInHumanForm: According to pretty much all Christian beliefs, this is {{Jesus}}' identity but it's complicated; fully human and fully divine at the same time.

to:

* GodInHumanForm: According to pretty much all Christian beliefs, this is {{Jesus}}' UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}' identity but it's complicated; fully human and fully divine at the same time.



* JesusTaboo: [[RunningGag Obviously]]. Although it would be pretty hard to discuss Christianity without ever mentioning {{Jesus}}, you will sometimes find his name avoided out of reverence, such as calling him "Our Lord."

to:

* JesusTaboo: [[RunningGag Obviously]]. Although it would be pretty hard to discuss Christianity without ever mentioning {{Jesus}}, UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}, you will sometimes find his name avoided out of reverence, such as calling him "Our Lord."
14th Mar '17 10:25:46 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion that originated in what is now UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} in the 1st century A.D. as an offshoot of UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}}. It is based on the teachings of [[{{Jesus}} Jesus of Nazareth]], a rabbi and preacher whose followers identified Him as the ''Messiah'' promised in the Old Testament, and who was executed by Roman and Judean authorities for supposedly presenting Himself as such. Originally one of several reformist sects of Judaism at the time, the movement of Jesus' followers opened its doors to non-Jews some time in the first hundred years after Jesus' death and gradually became a religion separate from if still linked to Judaism: Christianity. Christianity spread throughout UsefulNotes/{{the Roman Empire}}, despite systematic persecution of Christians, and in the 4th century became the official religion of the Empire, and thereafter the dominant religion throughout Europe and the western world.

to:

Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion that originated in what is now UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} in the 1st century A.D. as an offshoot of UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}}. It is based on the teachings of [[{{Jesus}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} Jesus of Nazareth]], a rabbi and preacher whose followers identified Him as the ''Messiah'' promised in the Old Testament, and who was executed by Roman and Judean authorities for supposedly presenting Himself as such. Originally one of several reformist sects of Judaism at the time, the movement of Jesus' followers opened its doors to non-Jews some time in the first hundred years after Jesus' death and gradually became a religion separate from if still linked to Judaism: Christianity. Christianity spread throughout UsefulNotes/{{the Roman Empire}}, despite systematic persecution of Christians, and in the 4th century became the official religion of the Empire, and thereafter the dominant religion throughout Europe and the western world.
13th Mar '17 6:55:00 AM SSJMagus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Also known for putting the Messianic in MessianicArchetype, though the trope itself is [[OlderThanTheyThink older than many of us think]]. The Messiah, just to let you know, is actually a Jewish Trope (and Judaism the TropeNamer). Mashiah actually means Anointed One, and refers to the King of Israel, born of David's line, who will usher in a new era of peace and restoration of the Davidic/Solomonic kingdom (the Golden Age, so to speak). Christians just happen to believe Jesus is that Messiah, whereas non-Christian Jews (obviously) don't.

to:

Also known for putting the Messianic in MessianicArchetype, though the trope itself is [[OlderThanTheyThink older than many of us think]]. The Messiah, just to let you know, is actually a Jewish Trope (and Judaism the TropeNamer). Mashiah actually means Anointed One, and refers to the King of Israel, born of David's line, who will usher in a new era of peace and restoration of the Davidic/Solomonic kingdom (the Golden Age, so to speak). Christians just happen to believe Jesus is that Messiah, whereas non-Christian Jews (obviously) don't.
don't. Jews also do not believe that the Messiah's role involves any saving of souls, while Christians believe that to be the entire purpose of of the Messiah.
25th Feb '17 9:40:48 PM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message
This list shows the last 10 events of 229. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Christianity