History UsefulNotes / Christianity

25th Jul '16 2:27:02 PM MsChibi
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* AmbiguouslyChristian: A character ''might'' be Christian, though this is unconfirmed.
* UsefulNotes/AmericanChurches: The different types of churches and denominations in the USA.


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* CaughtUpInTheRapture: The belief held by ''some'' Christian denominations that faithful Christians will be taken up to {{Heaven}} at the end of the world, and spared the tribulation to come.


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* ChurchOfSaintGenericus: A church is shown, but it's not clear which denomination it is.


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* RaisedCatholic: A person who was raised in the faith, and though s/he might have left it, still has some practices or hang-ups from the faith.
3rd Jul '16 9:27:03 AM gemmabeta2
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As in any major religious group, there are offshoots of the Latter-day Saints church, some of which are the source for the continuing stereotype of isolated polygamists. The mainstream LDS church, based in Salt Lake City, UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}, considers polygamy grounds for excommunication, and has since 1890, Divine authorization for this practice having been withdrawn (largely due to Congress' insistence on a ban on polygamy before granting statehood to Utah). As Mormon doctrine is wildly different from most other Christian churches, as noted above, some don't consider it to be Christian at all. Others (such as Latter-day Saints, obviously) take the view that Latter-day Saint theology is a restoration of original Christianity, without accretions and variances found in other Christian traditions. Rather good at keeping genealogical records, incidentally, due to the doctrine that families are meant to be eternal, they believe it is possible for dead people to be converted.

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As in any major religious group, there are offshoots of the Latter-day Saints church, some of which are the source for the continuing stereotype of isolated polygamists. The mainstream LDS church, based in Salt Lake City, UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}, considers polygamy grounds for excommunication, and has since 1890, Divine authorization for this practice having been withdrawn (largely due to Congress' insistence on a ban on polygamy before granting statehood to Utah). Although there are also LDS offshoots that headed in the other direction, repudiating many of standard Mormonism's more "out-there" doctrines to be closer to mainstream Christianity, the biggest of those being the Community of Christ (formerly the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints) As Mormon doctrine is wildly different from most other Christian churches, as noted above, some don't consider it to be Christian at all. Others (such as Latter-day Saints, obviously) take the view that Latter-day Saint theology is a restoration of original Christianity, without accretions and variances found in other Christian traditions. Rather good at keeping genealogical records, incidentally, due to the doctrine that families are meant to be eternal, they believe it is possible for dead people to be converted.
22nd Jun '16 8:15:37 PM karstovich2
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They teach that Christ was not nailed to a "cross" but a stake, which was the common method of execution for criminals then, and which the Romans referred to as a ''stauros'' (upright stake) or ''crux simplex'' in Latin. They also believe that only 144,000 persons will reside in Heaven while the rest of the faithful will remain on earth to live forever in peace, and the wicked will be destroyed (i.e. and not spend the rest of eternity getting tortured, a view not shared by most of Christendom). Focus on individual study of the Bible, the holiness of blood (they are not OK with blood transfusions, but don't go to the lengths Jews go to to remove blood from meat), and disbelief in the ability of earthly human governments to solve the world's problems (they obey the laws of the land in which they reside and pay taxes, but refuse to serve in the military or salute the flag). They are most known for their door to door preaching work, or "witnessing" which has both changed many lives and annoyed many others. FYI: Although the late Michael Jackson used to preach door to door, he had left Jehovah's Witnesses soon after the release of ''Thriller''. (In his immediate family, only his mother is an active member.)

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They teach that Christ was not nailed to a "cross" but a stake, which was the common method of execution for criminals then, and which the Romans referred to as a ''stauros'' (upright stake) or ''crux simplex'' in Latin. They also believe that only 144,000 persons will reside in Heaven while the rest of the faithful will remain on earth to live forever in peace, and the wicked will be destroyed (i.e. and not spend the rest of eternity getting tortured, a view not shared by most of Christendom). Focus on individual study of the Bible, the holiness of blood (they are not OK with blood transfusions, transfusions,[[note]]Which has led to some interesting applications in medicine involving [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autotransfusion autotransfusion/"cell saver"]] technology, as transfusions of your own blood ''are'' OK. This incidentally has led to a rare intersection of medical malpractice and the First Amendment in lawsuits involving American Jehovah's Witness patients seeking treatment in hospitals specializing in "bloodless" surgery catering to their religious wishes; Drexel University Hospital in UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} has been a particularly interesting case study.[[/note]] but don't go to the lengths Jews go to to remove blood from meat), and disbelief in the ability of earthly human governments to solve the world's problems (they obey the laws of the land in which they reside and pay taxes, but refuse to serve in the military or salute the flag). They are most known for their door to door preaching work, or "witnessing" which has both changed many lives and annoyed many others. FYI: Although the late Michael Jackson used to preach door to door, he had left Jehovah's Witnesses soon after the release of ''Thriller''. (In his immediate family, only his mother is an active member.)
22nd Jun '16 7:42:39 PM karstovich2
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* '''Jehovah's Witnesses''' -- Jehovah's Witnesses treat Literature/TheBible as the only source of truth. They use God's name, Jehovah[[note]]Most scholars of the Hebrew Bible agree that while the lack of vowels in written Hebrew make it uncertain, the most likely pronunciation of God's name was Yahweh (or something very similar). Jehovah seems to have been a corrupted Latinization that fused Yahweh with Adonai ("Lord"), the world that ancient Jews actually ''spoke'' in the place of God's name because speaking His name aloud was forbidden in almost all circumstances. But regardless of this, Jehovah's Witnesses are certain that Jehovah was and is His real name.[[/note]], and are most widely known for their [[HollywoodJehovahsWitness worldwide preaching activities]], honoring Jesus' command to "make disciples of people of all nations." They do not consider Jesus to be God himself, but rather, the son of God and inferior to the Father. Each member of this faith has made an extensive study of the Bible and dedicated his or her life to Jehovah God to do his will. No one is required to preach for any set amount of time, nor do they receive any pay, for their witnessing is a lifelong volunteer work. Their official website, with Frequently Asked Questions and other information, can be found [[http://www.jw.org/en/ here.]]\\

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* '''Jehovah's Witnesses''' -- Jehovah's Witnesses treat Literature/TheBible as the only source of truth. They use God's name, Jehovah[[note]]Most scholars of the Hebrew Bible agree that while the lack of vowels in written Hebrew make it uncertain, the most likely pronunciation of God's name was Yahweh (or something very similar).similar like Yahuwa or Yehowa). Jehovah seems to have been a corrupted Latinization that fused Yahweh with Adonai ("Lord"), the world that ancient Jews actually ''spoke'' in the place of God's name because speaking His name aloud was forbidden in almost all circumstances. But regardless of this, Jehovah's Witnesses are certain that Jehovah was and is His real name.[[/note]], and are most widely known for their [[HollywoodJehovahsWitness worldwide preaching activities]], honoring Jesus' command to "make disciples of people of all nations." They do not consider Jesus to be God himself, but rather, the son of God and inferior to the Father. Each member of this faith has made an extensive study of the Bible and dedicated his or her life to Jehovah God to do his will. No one is required to preach for any set amount of time, nor do they receive any pay, for their witnessing is a lifelong volunteer work. Their official website, with Frequently Asked Questions and other information, can be found [[http://www.jw.org/en/ here.]]\\
22nd Jun '16 7:26:20 PM karstovich2
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* '''Reformed/Presbyterians''': As the name implies, these have a presbyterian polity; also, following the Reformed tradition of Zwingli, Calvin, and Knox, they typically have a Calvinist soteriology. The major origin point for this denomination is Geneva, but most extant churches originate in either the Netherlands (where the Reformed church became dominant for a number of reasons) or Scotland (where Knox successfully converted the Lowlands). In general, if a church calls itself Reformed, it's probably in the Dutch tradition (with Dutch actually having ''two'' words for "Reformed", the ''hervormde'' being somewhat laxer Calvinists and the
''gereformeerde'' being stricter and more doctrinaire), while if it calls itself Presbyterian, it's probably in the Scottish tradition. \\

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* '''Reformed/Presbyterians''': As the name implies, these have a presbyterian polity; also, following the Reformed tradition of Zwingli, Calvin, and Knox, they typically have a Calvinist soteriology. The major origin point for this denomination is Geneva, but most extant churches originate in either the Netherlands (where the Reformed church became dominant for a number of reasons) or Scotland (where Knox successfully converted the Lowlands). In general, if a church calls itself Reformed, it's probably in the Dutch tradition (with Dutch actually having ''two'' words for "Reformed", the ''hervormde'' being somewhat laxer Calvinists and the
the ''gereformeerde'' being stricter and more doctrinaire), while if it calls itself Presbyterian, it's probably in the Scottish tradition. \\
22nd Jun '16 7:25:54 PM karstovich2
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* '''Reformed/Presbyterians''': As the name implies, these have a presbyterian polity; also, following the Reformed tradition of Zwingli, Calvin, and Knox, they typically have a Calvinist soteriology. The major origin point for this denomination is Geneva, but most extant churches originate in either the Netherlands (where the Reformed church became dominant for a number of reasons) or Scotland (where Knox successfully converted the Lowlands). In general, if a church calls itself Reformed, it's probably in the Dutch tradition, while if it calls itself Presbyterian, its probably in the Scottish tradition. \\

to:

* '''Reformed/Presbyterians''': As the name implies, these have a presbyterian polity; also, following the Reformed tradition of Zwingli, Calvin, and Knox, they typically have a Calvinist soteriology. The major origin point for this denomination is Geneva, but most extant churches originate in either the Netherlands (where the Reformed church became dominant for a number of reasons) or Scotland (where Knox successfully converted the Lowlands). In general, if a church calls itself Reformed, it's probably in the Dutch tradition, tradition (with Dutch actually having ''two'' words for "Reformed", the ''hervormde'' being somewhat laxer Calvinists and the
''gereformeerde'' being stricter and more doctrinaire),
while if it calls itself Presbyterian, its it's probably in the Scottish tradition. \\
22nd Jun '16 7:14:56 PM karstovich2
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** These are the two major soteriological streams in Protestantism. There are others: Luther had his own soteriology, roughly halfway between the Calvinist and Arminian (although it ''predates'' the Arminian, Luther having been dead for about ten years by the time Arminius was born), which only the Lutherans really buy. Then there's Universalism, which is, simply put, "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin everyone is saved]]"; a few churches have bought into that over time. And then there's the aforementioned (semi)-Pelagianism, in which being saved is a choice you make; this doctrine would be more or less not worth mentioning, except that Mormonism (whose place in the Christian tradition is peculiar and a bit uncomfortable) has been described by a (somewhat eccentric) Mormon theologian as having a "completely Pelagian" soteriology.

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** These are the two major soteriological streams in Protestantism. There are others: Luther had his own soteriology, roughly halfway between the Calvinist and Arminian (although it ''predates'' the Arminian, Luther having been dead for about ten years by the time Arminius was born), which only the Lutherans really buy. Then there's Universalism, which is, simply put, "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin everyone is saved]]"; a few churches have bought into that over time. And then there's the aforementioned (semi)-Pelagianism, in which being saved is a choice you make; this doctrine would be more or less not worth mentioning, except that Mormonism (whose place in the Christian tradition is peculiar and a bit uncomfortable) has been described by a (somewhat eccentric) Mormon theologian as having a "completely Pelagian" soteriology.soteriology (most Mormons who care about the subject would insist that they are, if anything, Arminians, but it's still a point of contention).
11th May '16 2:56:40 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheKnightsHospitallers, TheKnightsTemplar and TheTeutonicKnights: Religious orders founded durring the Crusade period with Christianity at their core.
27th Mar '16 11:44:46 PM mugiwara
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Not exactly a formally recognized group but a fairly large subset of Catholics in an ambiguous category. After their victory in the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party has required that all religions in mainland China sever ties to foreign bodies, such as the Vatican, and submit to the authority of the Chinese state. Those Catholics who refused to renounce the Vatican went underground and have been subject to persecution, especially before 1980's. Those who did were organized as the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association (CPCA) that maintained the same practices and doctrines as Catholics elsewhere but did not recognize the authority of the Pope, at least in an official sense. Technically, this would make the CPCA a "schismatic" group in Catholic terminology and several Catholic groups, especially those opposed to the government of the People's Republic of China consider them as such. However, the Vatican itself considers the situation as taking place under duress due to the complex situation that is mostly political in nature and accepts the CPCA churches as being in full communion with Rome. This means all sacraments at CPCA churches are considered valid and those who are baptized by CPCA priests and attend masses therein are as Catholic as any other. While CPCA bishops are formally appointed by the Chinese government (after having been "elected" by appropriate bodies) without official input by Vatican, most of them are given informal recognition by the Vatican as well. Still, because CPCA is subject to the authority of the Chinese government, it often bends its doctrines to accommodate the latter's wishes, even on matters of religious doctrine. The status of the CPCA, in addition to the more common problem concerning Taiwan, is a major stumbling block preventing a formal relationship between the Holy See and the People's Republic from being established.

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Not exactly a formally recognized group but a fairly large subset of Catholics in an ambiguous category. After their victory in the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party has required that all religions in mainland China sever ties to foreign bodies, such as the Vatican, and submit to the authority of the Chinese state. Those Catholics who refused to renounce the Vatican went underground and have been subject to persecution, especially before 1980's. Those who did were organized as the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association (CPCA) that maintained the same practices and doctrines as Catholics elsewhere but did not recognize the authority of the Pope, at least in an official sense. Technically, this would make the CPCA a "schismatic" group in Catholic terminology and several Catholic groups, especially those opposed to the government of the People's Republic of China consider them as such. However, the Vatican itself considers the situation as taking place under duress due to the complex situation that is mostly political in nature and accepts the CPCA churches as being in full communion with Rome. This means all sacraments at CPCA churches are considered valid and those who are baptized by CPCA priests and attend masses therein are as Catholic as any other. While CPCA bishops are formally appointed by the Chinese government (after having been "elected" by appropriate bodies) without official input by Vatican, most of them are given informal recognition by the Vatican as well. Still, because CPCA is subject to the authority of the Chinese government, it often bends its doctrines to accommodate the latter's wishes, even on matters of religious doctrine. The status of the CPCA, in addition to the more common problem concerning Taiwan, is a major stumbling block preventing a formal relationship between the Holy See and the People's Republic from being established.
established. In contrast, the "One Country, Two Systems" policy implemented in the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau ensures the free practice of religion without intervention from the state, and the Catholics who live there are considered to be in full communion with Rome.
19th Mar '16 10:05:35 PM MsChibi
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* Circumcision. Paul says it's unnecessary, else God would have done it for us. Can we do it (for non-medical reasons) anyway? Are we still required to? Do we have to? Is it encouraged but not required? Discouraged?

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* Circumcision. Paul says it's unnecessary, else God would have done it for us. Can we do it (for non-medical reasons) anyway? Are we still required to? Do we have to? Is it encouraged but not required? Discouraged? What about female circumcision?
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