History UsefulNotes / Christianity

11th May '16 2:56:40 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheKnightsHospitallers, TheKnightsTemplar and TheTeutonicKnights: Religious orders founded durring the Crusade period with Christianity at their core.
27th Mar '16 11:44:46 PM mugiwara
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Not exactly a formally recognized group but a fairly large subset of Catholics in an ambiguous category. After their victory in the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party has required that all religions in mainland China sever ties to foreign bodies, such as the Vatican, and submit to the authority of the Chinese state. Those Catholics who refused to renounce the Vatican went underground and have been subject to persecution, especially before 1980's. Those who did were organized as the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association (CPCA) that maintained the same practices and doctrines as Catholics elsewhere but did not recognize the authority of the Pope, at least in an official sense. Technically, this would make the CPCA a "schismatic" group in Catholic terminology and several Catholic groups, especially those opposed to the government of the People's Republic of China consider them as such. However, the Vatican itself considers the situation as taking place under duress due to the complex situation that is mostly political in nature and accepts the CPCA churches as being in full communion with Rome. This means all sacraments at CPCA churches are considered valid and those who are baptized by CPCA priests and attend masses therein are as Catholic as any other. While CPCA bishops are formally appointed by the Chinese government (after having been "elected" by appropriate bodies) without official input by Vatican, most of them are given informal recognition by the Vatican as well. Still, because CPCA is subject to the authority of the Chinese government, it often bends its doctrines to accommodate the latter's wishes, even on matters of religious doctrine. The status of the CPCA, in addition to the more common problem concerning Taiwan, is a major stumbling block preventing a formal relationship between the Holy See and the People's Republic from being established.

to:

Not exactly a formally recognized group but a fairly large subset of Catholics in an ambiguous category. After their victory in the Chinese Civil War, the Communist Party has required that all religions in mainland China sever ties to foreign bodies, such as the Vatican, and submit to the authority of the Chinese state. Those Catholics who refused to renounce the Vatican went underground and have been subject to persecution, especially before 1980's. Those who did were organized as the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association (CPCA) that maintained the same practices and doctrines as Catholics elsewhere but did not recognize the authority of the Pope, at least in an official sense. Technically, this would make the CPCA a "schismatic" group in Catholic terminology and several Catholic groups, especially those opposed to the government of the People's Republic of China consider them as such. However, the Vatican itself considers the situation as taking place under duress due to the complex situation that is mostly political in nature and accepts the CPCA churches as being in full communion with Rome. This means all sacraments at CPCA churches are considered valid and those who are baptized by CPCA priests and attend masses therein are as Catholic as any other. While CPCA bishops are formally appointed by the Chinese government (after having been "elected" by appropriate bodies) without official input by Vatican, most of them are given informal recognition by the Vatican as well. Still, because CPCA is subject to the authority of the Chinese government, it often bends its doctrines to accommodate the latter's wishes, even on matters of religious doctrine. The status of the CPCA, in addition to the more common problem concerning Taiwan, is a major stumbling block preventing a formal relationship between the Holy See and the People's Republic from being established.
established. In contrast, the "One Country, Two Systems" policy implemented in the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau ensures the free practice of religion without intervention from the state, and the Catholics who live there are considered to be in full communion with Rome.
19th Mar '16 10:05:35 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Circumcision. Paul says it's unnecessary, else God would have done it for us. Can we do it (for non-medical reasons) anyway? Are we still required to? Do we have to? Is it encouraged but not required? Discouraged?

to:

* Circumcision. Paul says it's unnecessary, else God would have done it for us. Can we do it (for non-medical reasons) anyway? Are we still required to? Do we have to? Is it encouraged but not required? Discouraged? What about female circumcision?
19th Mar '16 9:56:11 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Are we rewarded for believing the "right" things and/or doing good deeds here and now on Earth? Or is our reward solely an afterlife thing? What forms might these rewards take?

to:

* Are we rewarded for believing the "right" things and/or doing good deeds here and now on Earth? Or is our reward solely an afterlife thing? What forms might these rewards take?take? Should we even be concerned about that?
19th Mar '16 9:37:56 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Does God have a gender?

to:

* Does God have a gender? If so, does that mean that that gender is superior to any others, or that people of other genders are not ''truly'' made in God's image, or only reflect that through the "superior" gender?
19th Mar '16 9:36:10 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Do we have to publicly identify as Christian, or make a public statement of faith, or can that be private? Do we have to recite [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinner%27s_prayer the Sinner's Prayer]] in order to be saved, or to truly be a Christian?
21st Feb '16 9:07:09 AM sonicsuns3
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Muddying the waters in regards to discussions of Christianity and its various denominations and branches is that the names of some of these branches come from concepts that most of Christianity adheres to. Words such as "catholic", "orthodox", and "evangelical" have meanings beyond being the name of a kind of church.

to:

Muddying the waters in regards to discussions of Christianity and its various denominations and branches is that the names of some of these branches come from concepts that most of Christianity adheres to. Words such as "catholic", "orthodox", and "evangelical" have meanings beyond being the name of a kind of church. \n[[note]]For instance, "catholic" can mean "universal", "orthodox" can mean "having the correct beliefs", and "evangelical" can mean "talking to other people about your faith". Naturally there are many churches that embrace these concepts, regardless of what they call themselves.[[/note]]
21st Feb '16 8:55:42 AM sonicsuns3
Is there an issue? Send a Message


They have very different ideas of what God is compared to mainstream Christianity, since LDS doctrine holds that there was a universal departure from what was taught in Christ's time, necessitating a restoration via Joseph Smith. The LDS church holds the view that there are living prophets on the Earth today relaying modern revelation, much of which is found in the book "Doctrine and Covenants". The canon of Scripture is: the Bible (in English-speaking countries, the King James version is official), the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and a smaller, more miscellaneous volume called "Pearl of Great Price". The LDS view of the afterlife includes three possible levels that can be fairly described as "heaven" (and one level called "outer darkness", reserved for the most evil). Mormons believe if they do good works and live faithful lives now, they can be Gods in the afterlife and rule over their own planets. This is not to say that they believe they can "earn" this on their own merits. They don't, but regard the Atonement made by Christ as essential to any of this and that even after becoming like gods they are still under the rule of God. (The fact that the word god has multiple meanings makes the topic somewhat confusing to talk about.)\\

to:

They have very different ideas of what God is compared to mainstream Christianity, since LDS doctrine holds that there was a universal departure from what was taught in Christ's time, necessitating a restoration via Joseph Smith. The LDS church holds the view that there are living prophets on the Earth today relaying modern revelation, much of which is found in the book "Doctrine and Covenants". The canon of Scripture is: the Bible (in English-speaking countries, the King James version is official), the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and a smaller, more miscellaneous volume called "Pearl of Great Price". The LDS view of the afterlife includes three possible levels that can be fairly described as "heaven" (and one level called "outer darkness", reserved for the most evil). Mormons believe if they do good works and live faithful lives now, they can be Gods in the afterlife and rule over their own planets. This is not to say that they believe they can "earn" this on their own merits. They don't, but regard the Atonement made by Christ as essential to any of this and that even after becoming like gods they are still under the rule of God. (The fact that the word god "god" has multiple meanings makes the topic somewhat confusing to talk about.)\\
21st Feb '16 8:37:03 AM sonicsuns3
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} Amish]] -- Probably the most well known of the Anabaptists, they are most well known for their disavowal of technology. They aren't hostile to technology per se, only its tendency to get in the way of leading a good Christian life. So they do allow SchizoTech -- case in point: horse drawn buggies with blinkers. Also famous for their barn raisings, quilts, excellent homemade furniture and oddly enough, wild teenagers.[[note]]It's not until adulthood that you formally vow to abide by the church's rules, so adolescence is often seen as your one last chance to try forbidden things before you either straighten up or leave the church entirely. (Most Amish teens choose to take the vow when the time comes.)[[/note]] They are also [[IncrediblyLamePun sects maniacs]], schisms within schisms (based as often on what technology and/or dress is permitted as actual beliefs), to the point where many sects consist of a single congregation, and more than one of a single family. Outsiders tend to collectively refer to the horse-and-buggy, no-buttons sects as "Old Order".\\

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} Amish]] -- Probably the most well known of the Anabaptists, they are most well known for their disavowal of technology. They aren't hostile to technology per se, only its tendency to get in the way of leading a good Christian life. So they do allow SchizoTech -- case in point: horse drawn buggies with blinkers. Also famous for their barn raisings, quilts, excellent homemade furniture and oddly enough, wild teenagers.[[note]]It's not until adulthood that you formally vow to abide by the church's rules, so adolescence is often seen as your one last chance to try forbidden things before you either straighten up or leave the church entirely. (Most Amish teens choose to take the vow when the time comes.)[[/note]] They are also [[IncrediblyLamePun sects maniacs]], schisms within schisms (based as often on what technology and/or dress is permitted as actual beliefs), to the point where many sects consist of a single congregation, and more than one of a single family. Outsiders tend to collectively refer to the horse-and-buggy, no-buttons sects as "Old Order".\\
21st Feb '16 8:34:46 AM sonicsuns3
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} Amish]] -- Probably the most well known of the Anabaptists, they are most well known for their disavowal of technology. They aren't hostile to technology per se, only its tendency to get in the way of leading a good Christian life. So they do allow SchizoTech -- case in point: horse drawn buggies with blinkers. Also famous for their barn raisings, quilts, excellent homemade furniture and oddly enough, wild teenagers. They are also [[IncrediblyLamePun sects maniacs]], schisms within schisms (based as often on what technology and/or dress is permitted as actual beliefs), to the point where many sects consist of a single congregation, and more than one of a single family. Outsiders tend to collectively refer to the horse-and-buggy, no-buttons sects as "Old Order".\\

to:

** [[UsefulNotes/{{Amish}} Amish]] -- Probably the most well known of the Anabaptists, they are most well known for their disavowal of technology. They aren't hostile to technology per se, only its tendency to get in the way of leading a good Christian life. So they do allow SchizoTech -- case in point: horse drawn buggies with blinkers. Also famous for their barn raisings, quilts, excellent homemade furniture and oddly enough, wild teenagers. [[note]]It's not until adulthood that you formally vow to abide by the church's rules, so adolescence is often seen as your one last chance to try forbidden things before you either straighten up or leave the church entirely. (Most Amish teens choose to take the vow when the time comes.)[[/note]] They are also [[IncrediblyLamePun sects maniacs]], schisms within schisms (based as often on what technology and/or dress is permitted as actual beliefs), to the point where many sects consist of a single congregation, and more than one of a single family. Outsiders tend to collectively refer to the horse-and-buggy, no-buttons sects as "Old Order".\\
This list shows the last 10 events of 174. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Christianity