History UsefulNotes / Armenia

11th May '18 11:03:59 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Tucked away in the Caucasus mountains, in that little clutch of former Soviet Republics where Russia meets Turkey, is Armenia ('''Armenian:''' Հայաստան Hayastan), officially known as the Republic of Armenia ('''Armenian:''' Հայաստանի Հանրապետություն Hayastani Hanrapetutyun), a Eastern European/Western Asian country. Though the current republic formed after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, it's not a new country by any means - the first Kingdom of Armenia goes back to 331 BC, and was the first country to officially adopt Christianity, in 301 AD. It also used to be ''much'' bigger than it is now, most of its former historical lands now being part of Turkey (this includes Mt. Ararat, which while considered a national symbol of Armenia and actually visible from the capital Yerevan, is rather awkwardly located over the border in Turkey).

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Tucked away in the Caucasus mountains, in that little clutch of former Soviet Republics UsefulNotes/{{Soviet|RussiaUkraineAndSoOn}} republics where Russia UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} meets Turkey, UsefulNotes/{{Turkey}}, is the Eurasian country of Armenia ('''Armenian:''' Հայաստան Hayastan), officially known as the Republic of Armenia ('''Armenian:''' Հայաստանի Հանրապետություն Hayastani Hanrapetutyun), a Eastern European/Western Asian country.Hanrapetutyun). Though the current republic formed after the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, it's not a new country by any means - the first Kingdom of Armenia goes back to 331 BC, and was the first country to officially adopt Christianity, in 301 AD. It also used to be ''much'' bigger than it is now, most of its former historical lands now being part of Turkey (this includes Mt. Ararat, which while considered a national symbol of Armenia and actually visible from the capital Yerevan, is rather awkwardly located over the border in Turkey).
10th May '18 1:09:06 PM Surenity
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See also: UsefulNotes/RepublicOfArtsakh, UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor

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See also: UsefulNotes/RepublicOfArtsakh, UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor
UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor, ArmenianMedia
10th May '18 1:04:00 PM Surenity
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The country was plagued with government corruption for many years; a side effect in many post-Soviet countries. However, the Armenian people have begun to stand up to it. In the 2010's alone there were protests nearly every year starting with a peaceful protest against rising bus fares in 2014, followed by the "Electric Yerevan" protests against rising electricity prices. In 2016 protests broke out after a nationalist group known as Sasna Dzerer (Daredevils of Sassoun) took over a police station and held officers hostage while demanding President Sargsyan resign; these ended with the arrests of the group. The most unprecedented protest occurred in 2018; President Serge Sargsyan oversaw constitutional amendments which transferred most of the President's powers to the Prime Minister, and shortly after his final term as President became the Prime Minister. The people, tired of government corruption which had caused a large class gap and rampant emigration from the country, revolted; but peacefully. From April to May 2018 protesters blocked streets for ten full days, holding dances and barbecues, filling the streets of Yerevan and Armenia's smaller cities. It was called a VelvetRevolution in the media. This gave the government two choices: violently put an end to the protests and incite an even worse reaction from their own people and look much worse internationally than they already did, or give in to their demands. Sargsyan resigned as Prime Minister, and protest leader Nikol Pashinyan took his place a couple weeks later, after parliament very reluctantly elected him.

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The country was plagued with government corruption for many years; a side effect in many post-Soviet countries. However, the Armenian people have begun to stand up to it. In the 2010's alone there were protests nearly every year starting with a peaceful protest against rising bus fares in 2014, followed by the "Electric Yerevan" protests against rising electricity prices.prices in 2015. In 2016 protests broke out after a nationalist group known as Sasna Dzerer (Daredevils of Sassoun) took over a police station and held officers hostage while demanding President Sargsyan resign; these ended with the arrests of the group. The most unprecedented protest occurred in 2018; President Serge Sargsyan oversaw constitutional amendments which transferred most of the President's powers to the Prime Minister, and shortly after his final term as President became the Prime Minister. The people, tired of government corruption which had caused a large class gap and rampant emigration from the country, revolted; but peacefully. From April to May 2018 protesters blocked streets for ten full days, holding dances and barbecues, filling the streets of Yerevan and Armenia's smaller cities. It was called a VelvetRevolution in the media. This gave the government two choices: violently put an end to the protests and incite an even worse reaction from their own people and look much worse internationally than they already did, or give in to their demands. Sargsyan resigned as Prime Minister, and protest leader Nikol Pashinyan took his place a couple weeks later, after parliament very reluctantly elected him.
him. Commentators marked this as Armenia finally declaring independence from the Soviet Union, 27 years after its fall.
10th May '18 1:00:19 PM Surenity
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There was a brief moment in 2009 in which it looked like Turkey and Armenia ''might'' reconcile, with the signing of Protocols that would open their border, but as it turns out Turkey soon began attaching preconditions that included Armenia dropping the genocide issue and forfeiting Nagorno-Karabakh, so the Protocols went into limbo, which for several years conveniently allowed Turkey to threaten to pull out of them at the slightest hint that a country (most notably the US) was thinking about recognizing the Armenian Genocide. Most countries stopped buying the excuse as the years passed, until finally in February 2015, President Sarkisian of Armenia withdrew the protocols from Parliament, citing Turkey's inactivity and unreasonable preconditions.

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There was a brief moment in 2009 in which it looked like Turkey and Armenia ''might'' reconcile, with the signing of Protocols that would open their border, but as it turns out Turkey soon began attaching preconditions that included Armenia dropping the genocide issue and forfeiting Nagorno-Karabakh, so the Protocols went into limbo, which for several years conveniently allowed Turkey to threaten to pull out of them at the slightest hint that a country (most notably the US) was thinking about recognizing the Armenian Genocide. Most countries stopped buying the excuse as the years passed, until finally in February 2015, President Sarkisian Sargsyan of Armenia withdrew the protocols from Parliament, citing Turkey's inactivity and unreasonable preconditions.
preconditions.

The country was plagued with government corruption for many years; a side effect in many post-Soviet countries. However, the Armenian people have begun to stand up to it. In the 2010's alone there were protests nearly every year starting with a peaceful protest against rising bus fares in 2014, followed by the "Electric Yerevan" protests against rising electricity prices. In 2016 protests broke out after a nationalist group known as Sasna Dzerer (Daredevils of Sassoun) took over a police station and held officers hostage while demanding President Sargsyan resign; these ended with the arrests of the group. The most unprecedented protest occurred in 2018; President Serge Sargsyan oversaw constitutional amendments which transferred most of the President's powers to the Prime Minister, and shortly after his final term as President became the Prime Minister. The people, tired of government corruption which had caused a large class gap and rampant emigration from the country, revolted; but peacefully. From April to May 2018 protesters blocked streets for ten full days, holding dances and barbecues, filling the streets of Yerevan and Armenia's smaller cities. It was called a VelvetRevolution in the media. This gave the government two choices: violently put an end to the protests and incite an even worse reaction from their own people and look much worse internationally than they already did, or give in to their demands. Sargsyan resigned as Prime Minister, and protest leader Nikol Pashinyan took his place a couple weeks later, after parliament very reluctantly elected him.



* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister in 2018 with a shady constitutional referendum with almost zero input from the citizens of Armenia, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country demanding his resignation. The protests were ultimately successful, and he was replaced by Opposition leader Nikol Pashinian.

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* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister in 2018 with a shady constitutional referendum with almost zero input from the citizens of Armenia, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country demanding his resignation. The protests were ultimately successful, and he was replaced by Opposition leader Nikol Pashinian.Pashinyan.



* VelvetRevolution: Occurred in April/May 2018. Then-president Serge Sargsyan oversaw constitutional amendments which transferred most of the President's powers to the Prime Minister, and shortly after his final term as President became the Prime Minister. The people, tired of government corruption which had caused a large class gap and rampant emigration from the country, revolted; but peacefully. From April to May 2018 protesters blocked streets for ten full days, holding dances and barbecues. It was called a Velvet Revolution in the media. This gave the government two choices: violently put an end to the protests and incite an even worse reaction from their own people and look much worse internationally than they already did, or give in to their demands. Sargsyan resigned as Prime Minister, and protest leader Nikol Pashinian took his place a couple weeks later, after parliament very reluctantly elected him.

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* VelvetRevolution: Occurred in April/May 2018. Then-president 2018, a bloodless revolution forced Prime Minister Serge Sargsyan oversaw constitutional amendments which transferred most of the President's powers to the Prime Minister, and shortly resign after his final term as President became the Prime Minister. The people, tired of government corruption which had caused less than a large class gap and rampant emigration from the country, revolted; but peacefully. From April to May 2018 protesters week in office. Protesters blocked streets for ten full days, holding dances and barbecues. It was called a Velvet Revolution in the media. This gave the government two choices: violently put an end to the protests They were eventually joined by police officers and incite an even worse reaction soldiers from their own people and look much worse internationally than they already did, or give in to their demands. the military. Sargsyan resigned as Prime Minister, and protest leader Nikol Pashinian Pashinyan took his place a couple weeks later, after parliament very reluctantly elected him.
10th May '18 12:49:50 PM Surenity
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Added DiffLines:

* VelvetRevolution: Occurred in April/May 2018. Then-president Serge Sargsyan oversaw constitutional amendments which transferred most of the President's powers to the Prime Minister, and shortly after his final term as President became the Prime Minister. The people, tired of government corruption which had caused a large class gap and rampant emigration from the country, revolted; but peacefully. From April to May 2018 protesters blocked streets for ten full days, holding dances and barbecues. It was called a Velvet Revolution in the media. This gave the government two choices: violently put an end to the protests and incite an even worse reaction from their own people and look much worse internationally than they already did, or give in to their demands. Sargsyan resigned as Prime Minister, and protest leader Nikol Pashinian took his place a couple weeks later, after parliament very reluctantly elected him.
10th May '18 12:34:45 PM Surenity
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* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister in 2018 with a shady constitutional referendum with almost zero input from the citizens of Armenia, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country demanding his resignation.

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* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister in 2018 with a shady constitutional referendum with almost zero input from the citizens of Armenia, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country demanding his resignation. The protests were ultimately successful, and he was replaced by Opposition leader Nikol Pashinian.
19th Apr '18 5:25:14 PM Surenity
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** Gyumri, Armenia's second-largest city, is a good example. It's name was changed from Gyumri to Alexandropol under Tsarist Russian rule in 1837, then to Leninakan in 1924 under Soviet rule, only to revert back to Gyumri in 1991 with Armenia's independence.


Added DiffLines:

** Gyumri, Armenia's second-largest city, is a good example. It's name was changed from Gyumri to Alexandropol under Tsarist Russian rule in 1837, then to Leninakan in 1924 under Soviet rule, only to revert back to Gyumri in 1991 with Armenia's independence.


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** Calling everyone "aziz" in the northern Lori province (local slang, almost like "dude" in English but gender-neutral).
19th Apr '18 5:19:48 PM Surenity
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See also: UsefulNotes/RepublicOfArtsakh, UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor



See also: UsefulNotes/RepublicOfArtsakh, UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor



* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country.

to:

* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister, Minister in 2018 with a shady constitutional referendum with almost zero input from the citizens of Armenia, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country.country demanding his resignation.
19th Apr '18 5:17:19 PM Surenity
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'''Ancient to Medieval Times'''

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'''Ancient [[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:'''Ancient
to Medieval Times'''
Times''']]




'''Ottoman Rule and the Genocide'''

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[[folder:
'''Ottoman Rule and the Genocide'''
Genocide''']]




'''The First Republic and Soviet Armenia'''

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[[folder:
'''The First Republic and Soviet Armenia'''
Armenia''']]




'''Modern Armenia'''

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[[folder:
'''Modern Armenia'''
Armenia''']]



Armenia sits on the Europe/Asia boundary, but culturally it's considered European (being the first officially Christian country helped), plays its sport in European federations and usually competes in the Series/EurovisionSongContest as mentioned. Armenia's loyalties to Europe came into some question in September 2013 however, when Armenia opted to join Russia's new Customs Union over a free-trade deal with UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion, sparking a rivalry between the two organizations. Seeing as how Russia is a much closer and more essential ally to Armenia than the EU is, this decision went over a lot better in Armenia than it later would in Ukraine, though there were minor protests. It is still hoped by many EU members that Armenia can still make some kind of trading deal with the EU while also being part of the Customs Union, in light of it's rather unique geopolitical situation, but Russia likes to keep Armenia on a short leash, like the rest of the former Soviet states, so it remains to be seen. In fact, looking at the bigger picture, the closed border between Turkey and Armenia serves not just as a separation between Turks and Armenians, but as a boundary between NATO and Russia-aligned countries, the last modern vestige of the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain; one reason Russia sees Armenia as very valuable. Tensions late in 2015 between Russia and Turkey relating to the Syrian Civil War have led to this border possibly becoming a hot spot in the near future, and is heavily fortified by the Russians.

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Armenia sits on the Europe/Asia boundary, but culturally it's considered European (being the first officially Christian country helped), plays its sport in European federations and usually competes in the Series/EurovisionSongContest as mentioned. Armenia's loyalties to Europe came into some question in September 2013 however, when Armenia opted to join Russia's new Customs Union over a free-trade deal with UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion, sparking a rivalry between the two organizations. Seeing as how Russia is a much closer and more essential ally to Armenia than the EU is, this decision went over a lot better in Armenia than it later would in Ukraine, though there were minor protests. It is still hoped by many EU members would be until 2017 that Armenia can still make some kind of trading finally struck a trade deal with the EU while that was also being part of the Customs Union, in light of it's rather unique geopolitical situation, but Russia likes acceptable to keep Armenia on a short leash, like the rest of the former Soviet states, so it remains to be seen. Russia. In fact, looking at the bigger picture, the closed border between Turkey and Armenia serves not just as a separation between Turks and Armenians, but as Armenian, despite having good relations on countries on both sides, is a sort of boundary between NATO and Russia-aligned countries, the last modern vestige of the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain; one reason Russia sees Armenia as very valuable. Tensions late in 2015 between Russia and Turkey relating to the Syrian Civil War have led to this border possibly becoming a hot spot in the near future, and is heavily fortified by the Russians.




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[[/folder]]



* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Nagorno-Karabakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora.

to:

* ZeroPercentApprovalRating: Serge Sargsyan is the most unpopular president in the modern republic's short history, as is his government in general, who are accused of being corrupt oligarchs that embezzle money from the rest of the country. The dissent came to a fever pitch in the summer of 2016 when a revolutionary group called Sasna Dzerer took over a police station in Yerevan, protesting against rumors that the government was going to cede parts of Nagorno-Karabakh Artsakh to Azerbaijan and demanding the president's resignation, holding police officers hostage for nearly two weeks until being forced to surrender. The incident had the effect of ruining what little popularity the president may still have had at home and in the diaspora. Needless to say, when Sargsyan promoted himself to Prime Minister, in effect giving himself a third presidential term, the people were not amused, with protests erupting across the country.
1st Apr '18 8:31:53 PM Wariolander
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After the initial celebrations when the country became independent, Armenia was essentially in shambles, faced with war, economic collapse, an energy shortage, and it still needed to clean up after the 1988 earthquake. Locals will recall the early 1990's as being a bleak and grim time where citizens of Yerevan were only allotted one hour of electricity per day, and in winter had to burn furniture, books and tree branches to stay warm. People began emigrating from the country in large numbers. Amazingly, Armenia eventually picked itself up and persevered; currently this is the longest Armenia has ever been independent since the Bagratuni Kingdom fell in 1045. Modern Armenia still has poor relations with Turkey, and also with its neighbor, Azerbaijan, over the region of UsefulNotes/NagornoKarabakh, nominally an autonomous Arminopohone part of the Azerbaijani SSR [[note]]ItsALongStory, but the gist of it is: Stalin's DivideAndConquer tactics (minus the usual infighting component--dramatic ethnic violence didn't rise until decades after Stalin's death) basically carved up the Caucasus and placed lots of ethnic groups that didn't like each other in the same administrative area, on basis of ancient communities that delved deeply into each other territories, in order to justify Soviet presence in the region. Nagorno-Karabakh, being a traditionally Armenian area, was made an autonomous oblast within Soviet Azerbaijan, a move that kept conflict at a minimum for decades while the Soviets kept forces there, and has also been suggested as meant to placate Turkey. What happened when the USSR collapsed and there was suddenly no force to stop open conflict should be easy to guess.[[/note]], but which the region's native Armenians, [[UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor with help from the country itself]], freed after a war between 1992-1994. It's now declared itself an independent country known as the Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh (or Artsakh), which no one recognizes - no, not even Armenia, because the situation's basically been frozen ever since the 1994 ceasefire and [[StatusQuoIsGod understandably, the Armenian government is not eager to restart armed conflict]], though the Armenian president has gone on the record stating Armenia would recognize it if another war broke out. Azerbaijan, on the other hand, hasn't been quite as passive, and violates the ceasefire almost daily. The country is only stopped from unleashing a full-on war by international pressure, and the fact that it fared poorly last time. It would also mean firing on Russian Peacekeepers stationed in the area, which didn't work great for the last country that did that.[[note]]Georgia in 2008[[/note]].

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After the initial celebrations when the country became independent, Armenia was essentially in shambles, faced with war, economic collapse, an energy shortage, and it still needed to clean up after the 1988 earthquake. Locals will recall the early 1990's as being a bleak and grim time where citizens of Yerevan were only allotted one hour of electricity per day, and in winter had to burn furniture, books and tree branches to stay warm. People began emigrating from the country in large numbers. Amazingly, Armenia eventually picked itself up and persevered; currently this is the longest Armenia has ever been independent since the Bagratuni Kingdom fell in 1045. Modern Armenia still has poor relations with Turkey, and also with its neighbor, Azerbaijan, over the region of UsefulNotes/NagornoKarabakh, Nagorno-Karabakh, nominally an autonomous Arminopohone part of the Azerbaijani SSR [[note]]ItsALongStory, but the gist of it is: Stalin's DivideAndConquer tactics (minus the usual infighting component--dramatic ethnic violence didn't rise until decades after Stalin's death) basically carved up the Caucasus and placed lots of ethnic groups that didn't like each other in the same administrative area, on basis of ancient communities that delved deeply into each other territories, in order to justify Soviet presence in the region. Nagorno-Karabakh, being a traditionally Armenian area, was made an autonomous oblast within Soviet Azerbaijan, a move that kept conflict at a minimum for decades while the Soviets kept forces there, and has also been suggested as meant to placate Turkey. What happened when the USSR collapsed and there was suddenly no force to stop open conflict should be easy to guess.[[/note]], but which the region's native Armenians, [[UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor with help from the country itself]], freed after a war between 1992-1994. It's now declared itself an independent country known as the Republic of Nagorno-Karabakh (or Artsakh), Artsakh, which no one recognizes - no, not even Armenia, because the situation's basically been frozen ever since the 1994 ceasefire and [[StatusQuoIsGod understandably, the Armenian government is not eager to restart armed conflict]], though the Armenian president has gone on the record stating Armenia would recognize it if another war broke out. Azerbaijan, on the other hand, hasn't been quite as passive, and violates the ceasefire almost daily. The country is only stopped from unleashing a full-on war by international pressure, and the fact that it fared poorly last time. It would also mean firing on Russian Peacekeepers stationed in the area, which didn't work great for the last country that did that.[[note]]Georgia in 2008[[/note]].



See also: UsefulNotes/NagornoKarabakh, UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor

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See also: UsefulNotes/NagornoKarabakh, UsefulNotes/RepublicOfArtsakh, UsefulNotes/ArmosWithArmor
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