History UsefulNotes / ArabicLanguage

22nd Aug '16 9:08:50 PM Hadjorim
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However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects, such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi dialect share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fifth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.

to:

However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects, dialects such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi dialect share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fifth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.
15th Aug '16 11:34:33 PM Hadjorim
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However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects, such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi dialect share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fourth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.

to:

However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects, such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi dialect share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fourth fifth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.
14th Aug '16 10:04:22 PM Hadjorim
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However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects, such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fourth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.

to:

However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects, such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi dialect share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fourth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.
14th Aug '16 10:03:22 PM Hadjorim
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However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects (particularly Saudi and Iraqi dialects) share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fourth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.

to:

However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects (particularly dialects, such as (unsurprisingly) Saudi and Iraqi dialects) share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people," or as the fourth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.
27th Jul '16 10:09:50 PM Hadjorim
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The ability to comprehend the Arabic language and converse in it is considered by some to be one of the most defining traits of the Arab people. Yes, this means--even if you've never lived in any Arab country, have no Arab heritage, and not even Muslim--but you hold fluency in the Arabic language, you may be considered an Arab. Double points if you are a Troper. [[OneOfUs Welcome]]/[[BilingualBonus Salaam]]!

to:

The ability to comprehend the Arabic language and converse in it is considered by some to be one of the most defining traits of the Arab people. Yes, this means--even if you've never lived in any Arab country, have no Arab heritage, and not even Muslim--but you hold fluency in the Arabic language, you may be considered an Arab. Double points if you are a Troper. [[OneOfUs Welcome]]/[[BilingualBonus [[BilingualBonus Salaam]]!
4th Jun '16 5:42:42 PM karstovich2
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* '''Sudanese Arabic''' is obviously the dialect of Sudan, both North and South. Apart from its marked Nubian influence, Sudanese Arabic is also notable for its conservative phonology; many sounds from Classical Arabic lost in all other varieties are retained only in Sudanese. That said, Sudanese Arabic has a marked similarity to Egyptian Arabic, particularly Sa`idi, in aspects other than phonology; this should come as no surprise, given that Sudan has been under some kind of Egyptian influence or other for a very long time, and when Sudan won its independence a not-insignificant chunk of the population wanted to join Egypt. Suffice it to say, virtually all Sudanese can understand Egyptian very easily, and Egyptians only need a little bit of adjustment to be able to understand Sudanese (although they will rarely be able to replicate it). Sudan is also notably home to one of the few Arabic creoles, called Nubi. This was the result of non-Arabic-speaking Africans being recruited into the Egyptian forces in Sudan, who were commanded and drilled in Arabic.

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* '''Sudanese Arabic''' is obviously the dialect of Sudan, both North and South. Apart from its marked Nubian influence, Sudanese Arabic is also notable for its conservative phonology; many sounds from Classical Arabic lost in all other varieties are retained only in Sudanese. That said, Sudanese Arabic has a marked similarity to Egyptian Arabic, particularly Sa`idi, in aspects other than phonology; this should come as no surprise, given that Sudan has been under some kind of Egyptian influence or other for a very long time, and when Sudan won its independence a not-insignificant chunk of the population wanted to join Egypt. Suffice it to say, virtually all Sudanese can understand Egyptian very easily, and Egyptians only need a little bit of adjustment to be able to understand Sudanese (although they will rarely be able to replicate it).it), and if Arabic were to split up into separate languages, Sudanese would almost certainly be seen as a dialect of Egyptian by at least some speakers. Sudan is also notably home to one of the few Arabic creoles, called Nubi. This was the result of non-Arabic-speaking Africans being recruited into the Egyptian forces in Sudan, who were commanded and drilled in Arabic.
4th Jun '16 12:55:05 AM MrCandle
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The ability to comprehend the Arabic language and converse in it is considered by some to be one of the most defining traits of the Arab people. Yes, this means--even if you've never lived in any Arab country, have no Arab heritage, and not even Muslim--but you hold fluency in the Arabic language, you may be considered an Arab. Double points if you are a Troper. [[OneOfUs Welcome]]!

to:

The ability to comprehend the Arabic language and converse in it is considered by some to be one of the most defining traits of the Arab people. Yes, this means--even if you've never lived in any Arab country, have no Arab heritage, and not even Muslim--but you hold fluency in the Arabic language, you may be considered an Arab. Double points if you are a Troper. [[OneOfUs Welcome]]!
Welcome]]/[[BilingualBonus Salaam]]!
24th May '16 12:06:51 AM Hadjorim
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However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects (particularly Saudi and Iraqi dialects) share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people." This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.

to:

However, this is not the Arabic that Arabs speak most of the time. They understand it, but they don't speak it. In fact, there are actually no native speakers of MSA. Instead, much like [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Chinese]], all Arabs speak a wide variety of "dialects," many of which are only partially mutually intelligible with each other, and some not at all. [[note]]Some of the eastern dialects (particularly Saudi and Iraqi dialects) share a lot with MSA, while western dialects like Moroccan and Algerian are basically unintelligible even to other native Arabs.[[/note]] Though they are grouped together for political and cultural reasons, the so-called "dialects" of Arabic would be better thought of as separate languages altogether. Many language learning courses advertise MSA as the "lingua franca" of the Arab world spoken by "220 million people." people," or as the fourth most spoken language in the world and so on. This is not true. If two Arabs meet who speak different dialects, almost always they will try to simply muddle through with their own dialects. MSA sounds as "modern" to contemporary Arabs as Shakespearean English sounds to you (or perhaps more pertinently, the King James Bible). Even if you speak to a regular Arab in MSA, he will not respond in it - meaning you probably won't understand him.
28th Apr '16 10:40:33 PM Hadjorim
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There a number of pairs of certain Arabic letters, such as س and ص and ت and ط, the only difference between them is one is an "emphatic" version of the sound (i.e. pronounced a little harder). Language purists will insist that these sounds are completely different. In practice, spoken at full speed even native Arabs will barely notice the difference, if at all.

to:

There a number of pairs of certain Arabic letters, such as س and ص and ت and ط, the only difference between them is one is an "emphatic" version of the sound (i.e. pronounced a little harder). Language purists will insist that these sounds are completely different. In practice, spoken at full speed even native Arabs will barely notice the difference, if at all.
26th Apr '16 12:25:07 PM TalonsofIceandFire
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The ability to comprehend the Arabic language and converse in it is considered by some to be one of the most defining traits of the Arab people. Yes, this means--even if you've never lived in any Arab country, have no Arab heritage, and you're even not a Muslim--but you hold fluency in the Arabic language, you may be considered an Arab. Double points if you are a Troper. [[OneOfUs Welcome]]!

to:

The ability to comprehend the Arabic language and converse in it is considered by some to be one of the most defining traits of the Arab people. Yes, this means--even if you've never lived in any Arab country, have no Arab heritage, and you're not even not a Muslim--but you hold fluency in the Arabic language, you may be considered an Arab. Double points if you are a Troper. [[OneOfUs Welcome]]!
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