History UsefulNotes / Amtrak

8th Aug '15 9:12:44 PM TomWalpertac2
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In the most heavily populated region, the Northeast, the rail system is extensive enough to rival those of Europe and includes a high-speed line. Everywhere else, it's generally slower than rail travel seventy years ago; this isn't for any technological reason, but rather largely one of power and scheduling (i.e.: the freight companies own most of the track, and give their trains priority over Amtrak in scheduling; this results in a lot of delays outside major rail hubs like Chicago, as an Amtrak train may have to wait as much as an hour to let one or two or more freight trains pass before pulling into the station) and to some degree infrastructure (a lot of track could use some upgrades and much of it is single-track, which slows down times). However, high-speed rail is set to be extended to other regions in the next decade (the "[[UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Chicago Hub]]" region--which extends from Cleveland and Detroit to Kansas City east-west and Minneapolis to Louisville north-south--has seen particularly extensive improvements to Amtrak in preparation for it). But if media depict a passenger train in the contemporary US, it will most likely be an Amtrak train. In particular, it will likely be either a ''Pacific Surfliner'' or a ''Northeast Corridor'' train, even if the setting is [[JustTrainWrong somewhere completely different.]]
to:
In the most heavily populated region, the Northeast, the rail system is extensive enough to rival those of Europe and includes a high-speed line. Everywhere else, it's generally slower than rail travel seventy years ago; this isn't for any technological reason, but rather largely one of power and scheduling (i.e.: the freight companies own most of the track, and often give their trains priority over Amtrak in scheduling; this results in a lot of delays outside major rail hubs like Chicago, as an Amtrak train may have to wait as much as an hour to let one or two or more freight trains pass before pulling into the station) and to some degree infrastructure (a lot of track could use some upgrades and much of it is single-track, which slows down times). However, high-speed rail is set to be extended to other regions in the next decade (the "[[UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Chicago Hub]]" region--which extends from Cleveland and Detroit to Kansas City east-west and Minneapolis to Louisville north-south--has seen particularly extensive improvements to Amtrak in preparation for it). But if media depict a passenger train in the contemporary US, it will most likely be an Amtrak train. In particular, it will likely be either a ''Pacific Surfliner'' or a ''Northeast Corridor'' train, even if the setting is [[JustTrainWrong somewhere completely completely]] [[FlyoverCountry different.]]
7th Aug '15 12:05:23 PM SetsunasaNiWa
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cleaning Captain Obvious trope sinkhole use, project thread here
* The Chicago Hub services include long-range trains (''California Zephyr'' to Oakland, ''Capitol Limited'' to Washington DC, ''Southwest Chief'' to Los Angeles, ''Lake Shore Limited'' to New York-Boston, ''Empire Builder'' to Seattle-Portland, and ''City of New Orleans'' to [[CaptainObvious guess where]]) as well as shorter corridor services to Milwaukee, Detroit-Pontiac-Flint, Grand Rapids, and St. Louis that are all being upgraded to higher speeds; for instance, the Chicago-Milwaukee ''Hiawatha'' covers the 86 miles in 89 minutes, including three intermediate stops and slow running in city centers.
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* The Chicago Hub services include long-range trains (''California Zephyr'' to Oakland, ''Capitol Limited'' to Washington DC, ''Southwest Chief'' to Los Angeles, ''Lake Shore Limited'' to New York-Boston, ''Empire Builder'' to Seattle-Portland, and ''City of New Orleans'' to [[CaptainObvious guess where]]) where) as well as shorter corridor services to Milwaukee, Detroit-Pontiac-Flint, Grand Rapids, and St. Louis that are all being upgraded to higher speeds; for instance, the Chicago-Milwaukee ''Hiawatha'' covers the 86 miles in 89 minutes, including three intermediate stops and slow running in city centers.
13th Jun '15 8:31:34 AM oknazevad
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no hyphen
* Union Station, UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC is Amtrak's headquarters, the second busiest station, and just a few blocks from the Capitol. Well known for being a tourist attraction in its own right, with beautiful architecture and many shops, not unlike New York's Grand Central Terminal. It is not uncommon for VIP's to be seem riding the train from Washington, the most notable being Delaware Senator (and current [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem Vice-President]]) Joe Biden, who ''never had a residence in Washington'' until he became VP, and commuted to his home in Wilmington by Amtrak for 20+ years. It has a connection to the UsefulNotes/WashingtonMetro on the latter's Red Line, as well as commuter rail service into Maryland and Virginia by way of MARC and Virginia Railway Express, respectively.
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* Union Station, UsefulNotes/WashingtonDC is Amtrak's headquarters, the second busiest station, and just a few blocks from the Capitol. Well known for being a tourist attraction in its own right, with beautiful architecture and many shops, not unlike New York's Grand Central Terminal. It is not uncommon for VIP's to be seem riding the train from Washington, the most notable being Delaware Senator (and current [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem Vice-President]]) Vice President]]) Joe Biden, who ''never had a residence in Washington'' until he became VP, and commuted to his home in Wilmington by Amtrak for 20+ years. It has a connection to the UsefulNotes/WashingtonMetro on the latter's Red Line, as well as commuter rail service into Maryland and Virginia by way of MARC and Virginia Railway Express, respectively.
2nd May '15 8:20:26 AM Morgenthaler
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So Congress passed a law ending this requirement and replacing it with a skeletal network that became Amtrak. It began service in May of 1971. Though ridership has rebounded enormously since then, the network is run on a [[NoBudget very small budget]], so certain priorities have to be set. It doesn't help that it is continually subject to ExecutiveMeddling from Congress, making silly mandates such as requiring Amtrak to carry guns in checked baggage (without providing any funds for lockable cabinets for said guns), as well as threats to [[WhatAnIdiot cut off funding for onboard food service]]. Then, of course, are the continual [[ArtisticLicenseEconomics demands that Amtrak somehow pay for itself]], despite no other passenger rail system in the world making a profit, and despite [[{{Hypocrite}} massive federal funding for competing highways and airports]]. Things are getting a bit better, now that the [[JoeBiden Vice President]] is a RailEnthusiast, as well as the increasing costs and [[OverreactingAirportSecurity general unpleasantness]] of air travel resulting in Amtrak setting annual ridership records for almost every year of the past decade.
to:
So Congress passed a law ending this requirement and replacing it with a skeletal network that became Amtrak. It began service in May of 1971. Though ridership has rebounded enormously since then, the network is run on a [[NoBudget very small budget]], so certain priorities have to be set. It doesn't help that it is continually subject to ExecutiveMeddling from Congress, making silly mandates such as requiring Amtrak to carry guns in checked baggage (without providing any funds for lockable cabinets for said guns), as well as threats to [[WhatAnIdiot cut off funding for onboard food service]]. Then, of course, are the continual [[ArtisticLicenseEconomics demands that Amtrak somehow pay for itself]], despite no other passenger rail system in the world making a profit, and despite [[{{Hypocrite}} massive federal funding for competing highways and airports]]. Things are getting a bit better, now that the [[JoeBiden [[UsefulNotes/JoeBiden Vice President]] is a RailEnthusiast, as well as the increasing costs and [[OverreactingAirportSecurity general unpleasantness]] of air travel resulting in Amtrak setting annual ridership records for almost every year of the past decade.
20th Feb '15 6:52:06 PM karstovich2
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* 30th Street Station, UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} is the third busiest station in the Amtrak system, as it is on the Northeast Corridor and the connection point for every train into the interior of Pennsylvania. This station, built by the Pennsylvania Railroad in the early 1900s, also has connections to New Jersey Transit to Atlantic City, as well as SEPTA's vast subway, streetcar and commuter rail network. Despite all of that, no Amtrak trains terminate here (sans two early-morning Keystone Service trains that only run from Philadelphia to Harrisburg).
to:
* 30th Street Station, UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} is the third busiest station in the Amtrak system, as it is on the Northeast Corridor and the connection point for every train into the interior of Pennsylvania. This station, built by the Pennsylvania Railroad in the early 1900s, also has connections to New Jersey Transit UsefulNotes/NewJerseyTransit to Atlantic City, as well as SEPTA's vast subway, streetcar and commuter rail network. Despite all of that, no Amtrak trains terminate here (sans two early-morning Keystone Service trains that only run from Philadelphia to Harrisburg). Harrisburg); all Amtrak trains are through services.
6th Feb '15 2:25:03 PM Tdarcos
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Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (With one exception, [[note]]Hong Kong's subway system, which offers ''no'' discounts of any kind, is the only passenger railway anywhere in the world that does make a profit.[[/note]] privately-owned passenger trains anywhere in the world generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
to:
Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (With one exception, [[note]]Hong Kong's subway system, which offers ''no'' discounts of any kind, is the only passenger railway anywhere in the world that does make a profit.[[/note]] privately-owned passenger trains anywhere in the world generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service. passenger service. In 1969, the largest bankruptcy in history at that point was the Penn Central Railroad, essentially bankrupted by money-losing passenger service, and it proceeded to get worse (more big railroads would go under) if something wasn't done.
6th Feb '15 2:21:25 PM Tdarcos
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Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (With one exception, [[note]]Hong Kong's subway system, which offers ''no'' discounts of any kind, is the only passenger railway anywhere in the world that does make a profit.[[/note]] Privately-owned passenger trains anywhere in the world generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
to:
Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (With one exception, [[note]]Hong Kong's subway system, which offers ''no'' discounts of any kind, is the only passenger railway anywhere in the world that does make a profit.[[/note]] Privately-owned privately-owned passenger trains anywhere in the world generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
6th Feb '15 2:20:37 PM Tdarcos
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Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (Privately-owned passenger trains anywhere generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
to:
Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (Privately-owned (With one exception, [[note]]Hong Kong's subway system, which offers ''no'' discounts of any kind, is the only passenger railway anywhere in the world that does make a profit.[[/note]] Privately-owned passenger trains anywhere in the world generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
10th Jan '15 9:35:22 AM karstovich2
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Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
to:
Amtrak, the UsefulNotes/{{trademark}} name of The National Passenger Railway Corporation, is the national railway of the United States. Privately-owned passenger trains in the US had always operated at a loss. (Privately-owned passenger trains anywhere generally run at a loss.) As car ownership and passenger flights exploded following UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo, many railroad companies were going out of business, in part because the government required them to provide service.
14th Oct '14 10:56:13 AM karstovich2
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In the most heavily populated region, the Northeast, the rail system is extensive enough to rival those of Europe and includes a high-speed line. Everywhere else, it's generally slower than rail travel seventy years ago, although high-speed rail is set to be extended to other regions in the next decade (the "[[UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Chicago Hub]]" region--which extends from Cleveland and Detroit to Kansas City east-west and Minneapolis to Louisville north-south--has seen particularly extensive improvements to Amtrak in preparation for it). But if media depict a passenger train in the contemporary US, it will most likely be an Amtrak train. In particular, it will likely be either a ''Pacific Surfliner'' or a ''Northeast Corridor'' train, even if the setting is [[JustTrainWrong somewhere completely different.]]
to:
In the most heavily populated region, the Northeast, the rail system is extensive enough to rival those of Europe and includes a high-speed line. Everywhere else, it's generally slower than rail travel seventy years ago, although ago; this isn't for any technological reason, but rather largely one of power and scheduling (i.e.: the freight companies own most of the track, and give their trains priority over Amtrak in scheduling; this results in a lot of delays outside major rail hubs like Chicago, as an Amtrak train may have to wait as much as an hour to let one or two or more freight trains pass before pulling into the station) and to some degree infrastructure (a lot of track could use some upgrades and much of it is single-track, which slows down times). However, high-speed rail is set to be extended to other regions in the next decade (the "[[UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Chicago Hub]]" region--which extends from Cleveland and Detroit to Kansas City east-west and Minneapolis to Louisville north-south--has seen particularly extensive improvements to Amtrak in preparation for it). But if media depict a passenger train in the contemporary US, it will most likely be an Amtrak train. In particular, it will likely be either a ''Pacific Surfliner'' or a ''Northeast Corridor'' train, even if the setting is [[JustTrainWrong somewhere completely different.]]
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