History UsefulNotes / AmericanEnglish

25th May '16 9:18:10 PM Doug86
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* '''Shotgun''' can refer to either a gun or the passenger seat in a car: if someone wants to ride as the front passenger, they might say "I call shotgun" or "I'm riding shotgun" or oftentimes just "Shotgun!" if staking their claim on the seat. For the last use, custom dictates that the first person to verbally call "shotgun" gets the seat. The term dates from the WildWest era, when stagecoaches frequently required an armed guard; he would sit out on top of the coach to the right of the horses' driver. Some younger people might use the variant '''shotty''' (same meanings) and occasionally use it to call "dibs" on other things, like the last slice of pizza.

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* '''Shotgun''' can refer to either a gun or the passenger seat in a car: if someone wants to ride as the front passenger, they might say "I call shotgun" or "I'm riding shotgun" or oftentimes just "Shotgun!" if staking their claim on the seat. For the last use, custom dictates that the first person to verbally call "shotgun" gets the seat. The term dates from the WildWest TheWildWest era, when stagecoaches frequently required an armed guard; he would sit out on top of the coach to the right of the horses' driver. Some younger people might use the variant '''shotty''' (same meanings) and occasionally use it to call "dibs" on other things, like the last slice of pizza.
24th May '16 8:43:44 PM Doug86
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** The somewhat rare letter ash ("Æ") is almost totally out of use. "E" is used instead, or in some cases type out an A followed by an E. "Æsthetic", for example, is "aesthetic" or "esthetic". To type out an "ash" requires the use of the alt codes on U.S. keyboards (alt-145 for lowercase and alt-146 for uppercase, if you were wondering[[note]]If you're using a Mac, it's Option-single quote for lowercase and Shift-Option-single quote for uppercase[[/note]]). The same goes for ''ethel'' (""). The only place where you will see those two letters (along with the diaeresis) used nowadays is in ''Magazine/TheNewYorker'' magazine or some fantasy works (for example, ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'').

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** The somewhat rare letter ash ("Æ") ("[=Æ=]") is almost totally out of use. "E" is used instead, or in some cases type out an A followed by an E. "Æsthetic", "[=Æ=]sthetic", for example, is "aesthetic" or "esthetic". To type out an "ash" requires the use of the alt codes on U.S. keyboards (alt-145 for lowercase and alt-146 for uppercase, if you were wondering[[note]]If you're using a Mac, it's Option-single quote for lowercase and Shift-Option-single quote for uppercase[[/note]]). The same goes for ''ethel'' (""). The only place where you will see those two letters (along with the diaeresis) used nowadays is in ''Magazine/TheNewYorker'' magazine or some fantasy works (for example, ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'').
19th May '16 10:18:28 PM bloodraven117
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* '''Guy''' (pronounced the standard, non-French way, so as to rhyme with "fry") is what Americans say instead of "bloke". It means exactly the same. The plural, "guys," can mean a group of males or a mixed-gender group, but never a group of females (except in the Jersey/Midwest "you guys" sense). "Guy" also has a negative connotation in the military, in particular the Army, whose non-commissioned officers often use it as a substitute for other vivid language in an attempt to cast a more 'professional' image. May often be used at civilians' expense or as a jest between junior enlisted.

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* '''Guy''' (pronounced the standard, non-French way, so as to rhyme with "fry") is what Americans say instead of "bloke". It means exactly the same. The plural, "guys," can mean a group of males or a mixed-gender group, but never a group of females (except in the Jersey/Midwest "you guys" sense). "Guy" also has a negative connotation in the military, in particular the Army, whose non-commissioned officers often use it as a substitute for other vivid language in an attempt to cast a more 'professional' image. May often be used at civilians' expense or as a jest between junior enlisted. Its also frowned upon severely in the Air Force.
18th May '16 5:20:31 PM Exxolon
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* '''[=SATs=]''' are what the Americans complete at the end of high school, and need to get into their chosen university. Also, be noted that they do have an option of taking the '''ACT''' instead, and neither test is required to graduate high school: they're only used for college admissions. Some colleges (mostly private ones) are becoming "test-optional", meaning that you can apply without having taken either the SAT ''or'' ACT and you can be accepted based on other factors, although if you ''do'' submit test scores, they will be taken into account. This is still quite rare, however, and most schools require at least one of the major tests. The term has leaked into British English as a colloquial name for the much reviled National Curriculum assessment though the British pronounce is "sat" as in "Saturday" rather than the American "S-A-T" pronunciation of each letter.

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* '''[=SATs=]''' are what the Americans complete at the end of high school, and need to get into their chosen university. Also, be noted that they do have an option of taking the '''ACT''' instead, and neither test is required to graduate high school: they're only used for college admissions. Some colleges (mostly private ones) are becoming "test-optional", meaning that you can apply without having taken either the SAT ''or'' ACT and you can be accepted based on other factors, although if you ''do'' submit test scores, they will be taken into account. This is still quite rare, however, and most schools require at least one of the major tests. The term has leaked into British English as a colloquial name for the much reviled National Curriculum assessment though the British pronounce is it "sat" as in "Saturday" rather than the American "S-A-T" pronunciation of each letter.
18th May '16 5:14:21 PM Exxolon
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* '''[=SATs=]''' are what the Americans complete at the end of high school, and need to get into their chosen university. Also, be noted that they do have an option of taking the '''ACT''' instead, and neither test is required to graduate high school: they're only used for college admissions. Some colleges (mostly private ones) are becoming "test-optional", meaning that you can apply without having taken either the SAT ''or'' ACT and you can be accepted based on other factors, although if you ''do'' submit test scores, they will be taken into account. This is still quite rare, however, and most schools require at least one of the major tests.

to:

* '''[=SATs=]''' are what the Americans complete at the end of high school, and need to get into their chosen university. Also, be noted that they do have an option of taking the '''ACT''' instead, and neither test is required to graduate high school: they're only used for college admissions. Some colleges (mostly private ones) are becoming "test-optional", meaning that you can apply without having taken either the SAT ''or'' ACT and you can be accepted based on other factors, although if you ''do'' submit test scores, they will be taken into account. This is still quite rare, however, and most schools require at least one of the major tests. The term has leaked into British English as a colloquial name for the much reviled National Curriculum assessment though the British pronounce is "sat" as in "Saturday" rather than the American "S-A-T" pronunciation of each letter.
15th Apr '16 3:10:44 PM DavidDelony
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* '''[French] fries''' ([[BeamMeUpScotty No one ever seriously]] called them "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_fries freedom fries]]".) are what people in the UK call "chips". They can be dipped in many things -- ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, barbecue sauce, and sometimes horseradish sauce are all fairly common. The thick ones favored in the U.K. are called "steak fries." If you were thinking of asking for vinegar, don't. You'll get red wine vinegar, some very odd looks, and a rather confused waitperson (unless you're on the New England coast). However, malt vinegar ''can'' be bought at most grocery stores and at places that serve fish and chips.

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* '''[French] fries''' ([[BeamMeUpScotty No one ever seriously]] called them "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_fries freedom fries]]".) are what people in the UK call "chips". They can be dipped in many things -- ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, barbecue sauce, and sometimes horseradish sauce are all fairly common. The thick ones favored in the U.K. are called "steak fries." fries", with the longer, thinner variety the most common type you'll get in restaurants. If you were thinking of asking for vinegar, don't. You'll get red wine vinegar, some very odd looks, and a rather confused waitperson (unless you're on the New England coast). However, malt vinegar ''can'' be bought at most grocery stores and at places that serve fish and chips.
15th Apr '16 3:09:59 PM DavidDelony
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* '''[French] fries''' ([[BeamMeUpScotty No one ever seriously]] called them "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_fries freedom fries]]".) are what people in the UK call "chips". They can be dipped in many things -- ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, barbecue sauce, and sometimes horseradish sauce are all fairly common. If you were thinking of asking for vinegar, don't. You'll get red wine vinegar, some very odd looks, and a rather confused waitperson (unless you're on the New England coast). However, malt vinegar ''can'' be bought at most grocery stores and at places that serve fish and chips.

to:

* '''[French] fries''' ([[BeamMeUpScotty No one ever seriously]] called them "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_fries freedom fries]]".) are what people in the UK call "chips". They can be dipped in many things -- ketchup, mayonnaise, mustard, barbecue sauce, and sometimes horseradish sauce are all fairly common. The thick ones favored in the U.K. are called "steak fries." If you were thinking of asking for vinegar, don't. You'll get red wine vinegar, some very odd looks, and a rather confused waitperson (unless you're on the New England coast). However, malt vinegar ''can'' be bought at most grocery stores and at places that serve fish and chips.
31st Mar '16 2:37:14 PM RoseAndHeather
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** Then there is "period" in the sense meaning "menstrual cycle," as in "Are you on your period?" (Thus the trope NoPeriodsPeriod)

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** Then there is "period" in the sense meaning "menstrual cycle," as in "Are you on your period?" period?"[[labelnote:*]]Which, needless to say, males in general should ''not'' ask someone they are not already on ''very'' familiar terms with, and you better have a damned good reason for asking.[[/labelnote]] (Thus the trope NoPeriodsPeriod)
29th Mar '16 9:27:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* The phrase '''knocked up''' is slang for pregnant, often specifically denoting an ''unintended'' pregnancy resulting from unsafe sex. (Hence, the movie ''KnockedUp''.) Telling someone "I will knock you up," means "I will impregnate you." Say "I'll wake you in the morning," "I'll wake you up," or "I'll come and knock on your door," instead.

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* The phrase '''knocked up''' is slang for pregnant, often specifically denoting an ''unintended'' pregnancy resulting from unsafe sex. (Hence, the movie ''KnockedUp''.''Film/KnockedUp''.) Telling someone "I will knock you up," means "I will impregnate you." Say "I'll wake you in the morning," "I'll wake you up," or "I'll come and knock on your door," instead.
8th Mar '16 2:50:27 PM Exxolon
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* '''Busboy''' or '''busser''': Nothing to do with public transport. Instead an employee of a restaurant whose duties include dish washing and "bussing" the tables, that is, gathering up the dirty dishes/napkins/etc and wiping the tabletop down. This position generally doesn't exist in Britain - waiters clear the tables and junior kitchen employees washes dishes/operates dishwashers.

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* '''Busboy''' or '''busser''': Nothing to do with public transport. Instead an employee of a restaurant whose duties include dish washing and "bussing" the tables, that is, gathering up the dirty dishes/napkins/etc and wiping the tabletop down. This position generally doesn't exist in Britain - waiters clear the tables and junior kitchen employees washes dishes/operates wash dishes/operate dishwashers.
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