History UsefulNotes / AmericanEnglish

3rd Oct '17 2:13:35 PM Nazo
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* '''Fag''' in American English is an ''extremely'' derogatory and offensive term for a (male) homosexual. In fact, the use or misuse of the word "fag" has been ([[{{Pun}} ahem]]) the butt of many jokes about Brits over here. Stick with "cigarette," "cig," or "smoke" (i.e. a pack of smokes, bumming a smoke) when visiting the States. ("Fag" is recognized, especially if you have a strong accent, but the joke is ''irresistible''.)

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* '''Fag''' in American English is an ''extremely'' derogatory and offensive term for a (male) homosexual.homosexual man. In fact, the use or misuse of the word "fag" has been ([[{{Pun}} ahem]]) the butt of many jokes about Brits over here. Stick with "cigarette," "cig," or "smoke" (i.e. a pack of smokes, bumming a smoke) when visiting the States. ("Fag" is recognized, especially if you have a strong accent, but the joke is ''irresistible''.)
30th Aug '17 9:23:01 PM JakesBrain
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** While $2 bills do exist (UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson is on the front), they are seldom seen, let alone used. Some younger people have been known to think they're fake. They're quite real. In fact, one particularly convenient way to split up money is: a $1 bill, two $2 bills, a $5 bill, and a $10 bill lets you pay any exact number of dollars from $1 up to $20 with the fewest possible bills (except for a $20 bill of course). The $2 bill is printed at a far lower rate than any other bill, but it's still being printed today.

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** While $2 bills do exist (UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson is on the front), they are seldom seen, let alone used.used -- mainly because most banks don't find it necessary to stock them. Some younger people have been known to think they're fake. They're quite real. In fact, one particularly convenient way to split up money is: a $1 bill, two $2 bills, a $5 bill, and a $10 bill lets you pay any exact number of dollars from $1 up to $20 with the fewest possible bills (except for a $20 bill of course). The $2 bill is printed at a far lower rate than any other bill, but it's still being printed today.
20th Aug '17 3:34:17 PM BlackSunNocturne
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** Another sandwich related one: In New England, especially around Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island, you might hear people talking about "gaggers", which is referring to hot dogs or weiners.


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** Branching off from using shotgun to refer to the front passenger seat, a noticeable amount of people in the US call the seat directly behind the passenger front is "Cobain", as in Music/KurtCobain. The reason why its called this should be obvious if one has knowledge of [[AteHisGun how Kurt Cobain committed suicide, and how his body was found]]. Unless you know someone is into [[CrossingTheLineTwice Extreme]] BlackComedy, or know them very well, don't say that. Especially not to a Nirvana fan.
16th Jul '17 9:44:31 PM Sugao
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** '''Padre''' can also be used in Texas and the Southwest as a short version of ''compadre'', meaning a friend. If your friend happens to be a priest, he is your ''Padre padre'' (Texans tend to love a good pun).
16th Jul '17 11:09:21 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** Furthermore, the term is ''never'' applied to prostitutes. Saying someone looks like a 'rent boy' is likely to get confused stares.

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** Furthermore, the term 'rent' is ''never'' applied to prostitutes. Saying someone looks like a 'rent boy' is likely to get confused stares.
16th Jul '17 11:08:56 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** Furthermore, the term is ''never'' applied to prostitutes. Saying someone looks like a 'rent boy' is likely to get confused stares.
16th Jul '17 10:46:30 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** A similar term is '''semi''' (pronounced SEM-eye), "18 wheeler", or "big rig" which refers specifically to large trailer-trucks of the sort used to haul freight cross-country. Someone who drives semi trucks for a living is called a '''trucker'''.

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** A similar term is '''semi''' (pronounced SEM-eye), "18 wheeler", or "big rig" which refers specifically to large trailer-trucks of the sort used to haul freight cross-country. Someone who drives semi trucks for a living is called a '''trucker'''.'''trucker''' (and yes, they've all heard ''all'' the puns about that).
16th Jul '17 10:40:52 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** However, '''Cable TV''' or just '''cable''' most often refers to shows that are on pay television channels. Note that no one uses the term "telly" except in a sarcastic reference to the British slang.

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** However, '''Cable TV''' or just '''cable''' most often refers to pay television services, or to shows that are only on pay television non-broadcast channels. Note that no one uses the term "telly" except in a sarcastic reference to the British slang.
16th Jul '17 10:39:21 AM Schol-R-LEA
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Added DiffLines:

** However, '''Cable TV''' or just '''cable''' most often refers to shows that are on pay television channels. Note that no one uses the term "telly" except in a sarcastic reference to the British slang.
16th Jul '17 10:35:45 AM Schol-R-LEA
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* '''Pastor''', '''Minister''', or '''Reverend''' can all refer to a clergyman regardless of denomination. '''Padre''' is a regionalism mostly seen in Texas and the Southwest, and while it most often is used to refer to a Roman Catholic priest, it is sometimes used for other denominations as well. As a title, '''Father''' usually applies to a Catholic priest, but it is sometimes applied more broadly as well (primarily among Episcopalians, which are the U.S. offshoot of the Anglican Church).

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* '''Pastor''', '''Minister''', or '''Reverend''' can all refer to a clergyman regardless of denomination.denomination; 'primate' (for a bishop, as opposed to an ape) and 'vicar' are almost unknown. '''Padre''' is a regionalism mostly seen in Texas and the Southwest, and while it most often is used to refer to a Roman Catholic priest, it is sometimes used for other denominations as well. As a title, '''Father''' usually applies to a Catholic priest, but it is sometimes applied more broadly as well (primarily among Episcopalians, which are the U.S. offshoot of the Anglican Church).
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