History UsefulNotes / AmericanEnglish

20th Aug '17 3:34:17 PM BlackSunNocturne
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** Another sandwich related one: In New England, especially around Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island, you might hear people talking about "gaggers", which is referring to hot dogs or weiners.


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** Branching off from using shotgun to refer to the front passenger seat, a noticeable amount of people in the US call the seat directly behind the passenger front is "Cobain", as in Music/KurtCobain. The reason why its called this should be obvious if one has knowledge of [[AteHisGun how Kurt Cobain committed suicide, and how his body was found]]. Unless you know someone is into [[CrossingTheLineTwice Extreme]] BlackComedy, or know them very well, don't say that. Especially not to a Nirvana fan.
16th Jul '17 9:44:31 PM Sugao
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** '''Padre''' can also be used in Texas and the Southwest as a short version of ''compadre'', meaning a friend. If your friend happens to be a priest, he is your ''Padre padre'' (Texans tend to love a good pun).
16th Jul '17 11:09:21 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** Furthermore, the term is ''never'' applied to prostitutes. Saying someone looks like a 'rent boy' is likely to get confused stares.

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** Furthermore, the term 'rent' is ''never'' applied to prostitutes. Saying someone looks like a 'rent boy' is likely to get confused stares.
16th Jul '17 11:08:56 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** Furthermore, the term is ''never'' applied to prostitutes. Saying someone looks like a 'rent boy' is likely to get confused stares.
16th Jul '17 10:46:30 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** A similar term is '''semi''' (pronounced SEM-eye), "18 wheeler", or "big rig" which refers specifically to large trailer-trucks of the sort used to haul freight cross-country. Someone who drives semi trucks for a living is called a '''trucker'''.

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** A similar term is '''semi''' (pronounced SEM-eye), "18 wheeler", or "big rig" which refers specifically to large trailer-trucks of the sort used to haul freight cross-country. Someone who drives semi trucks for a living is called a '''trucker'''.'''trucker''' (and yes, they've all heard ''all'' the puns about that).
16th Jul '17 10:40:52 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** However, '''Cable TV''' or just '''cable''' most often refers to shows that are on pay television channels. Note that no one uses the term "telly" except in a sarcastic reference to the British slang.

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** However, '''Cable TV''' or just '''cable''' most often refers to pay television services, or to shows that are only on pay television non-broadcast channels. Note that no one uses the term "telly" except in a sarcastic reference to the British slang.
16th Jul '17 10:39:21 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** However, '''Cable TV''' or just '''cable''' most often refers to shows that are on pay television channels. Note that no one uses the term "telly" except in a sarcastic reference to the British slang.
16th Jul '17 10:35:45 AM Schol-R-LEA
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* '''Pastor''', '''Minister''', or '''Reverend''' can all refer to a clergyman regardless of denomination. '''Padre''' is a regionalism mostly seen in Texas and the Southwest, and while it most often is used to refer to a Roman Catholic priest, it is sometimes used for other denominations as well. As a title, '''Father''' usually applies to a Catholic priest, but it is sometimes applied more broadly as well (primarily among Episcopalians, which are the U.S. offshoot of the Anglican Church).

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* '''Pastor''', '''Minister''', or '''Reverend''' can all refer to a clergyman regardless of denomination.denomination; 'primate' (for a bishop, as opposed to an ape) and 'vicar' are almost unknown. '''Padre''' is a regionalism mostly seen in Texas and the Southwest, and while it most often is used to refer to a Roman Catholic priest, it is sometimes used for other denominations as well. As a title, '''Father''' usually applies to a Catholic priest, but it is sometimes applied more broadly as well (primarily among Episcopalians, which are the U.S. offshoot of the Anglican Church).
16th Jul '17 10:33:48 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** '''Pop''' and '''Pa''' also mean the same things, though these are increasing seen as regionalisms. '''Pappy''' is a more humorous form most seen as a nickname.
* '''Pastor''', '''Minister''', or '''Reverend''' can all refer to a clergyman regardless of denomination. '''Padre''' is a regionalism mostly seen in Texas and the Southwest, and while it most often is used to refer to a Roman Catholic priest, it is sometimes used for other denominations as well. As a title, '''Father''' usually applies to a Catholic priest, but it is sometimes applied more broadly as well (primarily among Episcopalians, which are the U.S. offshoot of the Anglican Church).
16th Jul '17 10:20:11 AM Schol-R-LEA
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** '''Man''' can be used in a similar fashion, but it has a strong hippie/stoner feel to it today. "Hey, man" is less colored, and used as a way of saying "Hey, you" without seeming as confrontational. '''The Man''' refers to someone seen as oppressive or excessively privileged, especially police or government officials (or, from a minority member, white people in general), though it is increasingly used sarcastically as a way of expressing disdain for PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad. '''You're the Man''', however, expresses that the person in question is really great. Conversely, '''Aw, Man''' is a general expression of disappointment.
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