History UsefulNotes / AmericanClimate

12th Dec '17 1:52:27 PM Lymantria
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The western portion is [[TheOtherRainforest much rainier]], thanks to the mountains keeping the moist air from moving eastward (and leading to the water rights problems to the east). Both summers and winters are mild, with summer temperatures often hovering in the 70s and winter temperatures rarely falling below 40. Snow isn't unheard of, but not particularly common, excluding the more mountainous areas. Whereas the areas east of the mountains are dry, the areas to the west are almost stereotypically wet; UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} and UsefulNotes/{{Portland}} are always depicted as exceptionally rainy[[note]]Seattle itself actually receives only 37 inches per year, less than most cities on the East Coast, as it has dry summers and is itself in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains. Ditto for Portland, which sits in the rain shadow of the Oregon Coast Range. However, it ''is'' exceptionally cloudy and drizzly outside the summer -- between October and May, it's overcast six out of every seven days in Seattle.[[/note]], while UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco's fog is almost as much a part of the city's image as cable cars, the Golden Gate Bridge, [[NewAgeRetroHippie tie-dye Volkswagens]] and [[{{Gayborhood}} rainbow flags]].

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The western portion is [[TheOtherRainforest [[UsefulNotes/TheOtherRainforest much rainier]], thanks to the mountains keeping the moist air from moving eastward (and leading to the water rights problems to the east). Both summers and winters are mild, with summer temperatures often hovering in the 70s and winter temperatures rarely falling below 40. Snow isn't unheard of, but not particularly common, excluding the more mountainous areas. Whereas the areas east of the mountains are dry, the areas to the west are almost stereotypically wet; UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} and UsefulNotes/{{Portland}} are always depicted as exceptionally rainy[[note]]Seattle itself actually receives only 37 inches per year, less than most cities on the East Coast, as it has dry summers and is itself in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains. Ditto for Portland, which sits in the rain shadow of the Oregon Coast Range. However, it ''is'' exceptionally cloudy and drizzly outside the summer -- between October and May, it's overcast six out of every seven days in Seattle.[[/note]], while UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco's fog is almost as much a part of the city's image as cable cars, the Golden Gate Bridge, [[NewAgeRetroHippie tie-dye Volkswagens]] and [[{{Gayborhood}} rainbow flags]].
10th Nov '17 8:30:09 PM EdnaWalker
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The Central Valley experiences hot, dry summers and mild to cool winters. The Sacramento Valley is a little wetter than the San Joaquin Valley.

The coastal areas of central-to-southern California have a climate that is unique in the nation. Called a "Mediterranean" climate after the largest area in the world to possess it, it is characterized by dry summers, wet winters, and mild temperatures year-round. Outside California and the Mediterranean, it is only found in a few other places worldwide, such as [[UsefulNotes/{{Chile}} Santiago]], [[UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica Cape Town]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Australia}} Adelaide and Perth]]. Of course, since UsefulNotes/{{Hollywood}} happens to be located in this tiny region, filmmakers often assume that this is what it's like in most parts of the world, leading to the trope ItsAlwaysSpring.

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The Central Valley experiences and the Sierra Nevada foothills experience hot, dry summers and mild to cool winters.winters. The summer temperatures often soar into the 90s and triple digits. The winter temperatures sometimes drop below 30 degrees F at night, but don't drop below 20 degrees F outside of record lows. The Sacramento Valley is a little wetter than the San Joaquin Valley.

The coastal areas of central-to-southern California California, as well as the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada foothills, have a climate that is unique in the nation. Called a "Mediterranean" climate after the largest area in the world to possess it, it is characterized by dry summers, wet winters, and mild temperatures year-round. either year-round or from mid-fall to mid-spring. Outside California California, Southern Oregon, and the Mediterranean, it is only found in a few other places worldwide, such as [[UsefulNotes/{{Chile}} Santiago]], [[UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica Cape Town]], [[UsefulNotes/{{Australia}} Adelaide and Perth]]. Of course, since UsefulNotes/{{Hollywood}} happens to be located in this tiny region, filmmakers often assume that this is what it's like in most parts of the world, leading to the trope ItsAlwaysSpring.
23rd Mar '17 6:06:55 AM TomWalpertac2
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!!!Alaska

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!!!Alaska!!Alaska
23rd Mar '17 6:00:08 AM TomWalpertac2
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Eastern Colorado is more like the Great Plains climatewise.

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Eastern Colorado is more like the Great Plains climatewise.
in both climate and geography.
21st Aug '16 3:40:43 AM Morgenthaler
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Foehn winds,[[note]]Also called Chinooks, which is where the name for [[CanucksWithChinooks the helicopter class]] came from[[/note]] strong mountain winds that blow over the mountain tops and warm the leeward side to startlingly high temperatures (records of raising the temperature nearly 100°F is not unheard of), are found in the more mountainous areas, particularly in Colorado. High snowfall and blizzards are also a problem in the mountains.

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Foehn winds,[[note]]Also called Chinooks, which is where the name for [[CanucksWithChinooks [[UsefulNotes/CanucksWithChinooks the helicopter class]] came from[[/note]] strong mountain winds that blow over the mountain tops and warm the leeward side to startlingly high temperatures (records of raising the temperature nearly 100°F is not unheard of), are found in the more mountainous areas, particularly in Colorado. High snowfall and blizzards are also a problem in the mountains.
18th Aug '16 7:25:07 AM Morgenthaler
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In contrast, [[{{Hawaii}} Hawai'i]] enjoys a tropical climate with warm summers and warm winters, though it's less humid than many other tropical regions. Hawai'i is the only state in the U.S. to not record a sub-freezing temperature, though snow isn't unheard of on the slopes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. At the same time, temperatures above 100°F are also unheard of. [[note]]Alaska is the other state in which over 100°F temperatures are unheard. In all the other states, the record high temperatures are at least 105°F.[[/note]] The state has the second highest rainfall average at 460 inches per year, though due to the mountainous features, dry portions on the islands are also commonplace.

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In contrast, [[{{Hawaii}} Hawai'i]] UsefulNotes/{{Hawaii}} enjoys a tropical climate with warm summers and warm winters, though it's less humid than many other tropical regions. Hawai'i is the only state in the U.S. to not record a sub-freezing temperature, though snow isn't unheard of on the slopes of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea. At the same time, temperatures above 100°F are also unheard of. [[note]]Alaska is the other state in which over 100°F temperatures are unheard. In all the other states, the record high temperatures are at least 105°F.[[/note]] The state has the second highest rainfall average at 460 inches per year, though due to the mountainous features, dry portions on the islands are also commonplace.
20th Jul '15 8:09:21 AM Lukethehedgehog
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Due to the geography, the Northeast[[note]]Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont[[/note]] generally experiences warm-to-hot summers, with average temperatures in the 80s and low 90s (though triple-digit temperatures usually only come a few days a year), and cold winters, with daily highs ranging from the high 20s to the low 40s and nighttime lows falling into the teens and single digits. Temperatures on the coast are moderated by the Gulf Stream, resulting in cooler summers and warmer winters in such areas, explaining why places like Cape Cod, the Hamptons and the Jersey Shore are such popular getaways. Heading further inland, the high altitude of the Appalachian Mountains produces cooler weather year-round, allowing them to support large winter resorts as well as a number of summer getaways (like the famous BorschtBelt resorts of the Catskills).

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Due to the geography, the Northeast[[note]]Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont[[/note]] generally experiences warm-to-hot summers, with average temperatures in the 80s and low 90s (though triple-digit temperatures usually only come a few days a year), and cold winters, with daily highs ranging from the high 20s to the low 40s and nighttime lows falling into the teens and single digits. Temperatures on the coast are moderated by the Gulf Stream, resulting in cooler summers and warmer winters in such areas, explaining why places like Cape Cod, the Hamptons and the Jersey Shore are such popular getaways. Heading further inland, the high altitude of the Appalachian Mountains produces cooler weather year-round, allowing them to support large winter resorts as well as a number of summer getaways (like the famous BorschtBelt resorts of the Catskills).
13th Jul '15 8:05:30 PM nombretomado
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Note that, when reading measurements, the US uses AmericanCustomaryMeasurements rather than the metric system. See that page for translating between the two.

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Note that, when reading measurements, the US uses AmericanCustomaryMeasurements UsefulNotes/AmericanCustomaryMeasurements rather than the metric system. See that page for translating between the two.
2nd Jun '15 4:54:55 AM eviltwin531
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Though the Appalachian and Ozark Mountains get regular winter snowfall, as do Kentucky (which borders the Midwest), parts of Tennessee, and the Chesapeake Bay area (which borders the Northeast), snow of greater than six inches is rare in the Deep South or the lowlands south of Virginia. [[http://i.imgur.com/AvTH4d2.png Here]] is a county-by-county map of the amount of snow it takes to get school districts to cancel classes; south of Richmond, Virginia and outside Appalachia, any snow will usually suffice. This typically leads to a lot of ribbing from Northerners about how Southerners can't drive in the snow (most recently seen when two inches of snow [[http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/01/how-2-inches-of-snow-created-a-traffic-nightmare-in-atlanta/283434/ shut down Atlanta]] in 2014), though as the ground there rarely gets below freezing, Southern roads tend to have [[BossInMooksClothing layers of black ice beneath their shallow snows]]. The fact that Sun Belt cities tend to be more sprawling and reliant on automobiles likewise produces more opportunities for accidents. It's also why Southern roadways are usually much smoother to drive on than their Northern counterparts -- it usually doesn't get cold enough for the water seeping into the ground to freeze and open cracks and potholes.

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Though the Appalachian and Ozark Mountains get regular winter snowfall, as do Kentucky (which borders the Midwest), parts of Tennessee, and the Chesapeake Bay area (which borders the Northeast), snow of greater than six inches is rare in the Deep South or the lowlands south of Virginia. [[http://i.imgur.com/AvTH4d2.png Here]] is a county-by-county map of the amount of snow it takes to get school districts to cancel classes; south of Richmond, Virginia and outside Appalachia, any snow will usually suffice. This typically leads to a lot of ribbing from Northerners about how Southerners can't drive in the snow (most recently seen when two inches of snow [[http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/01/how-2-inches-of-snow-created-a-traffic-nightmare-in-atlanta/283434/ shut down Atlanta]] in 2014), though as the ground there rarely gets below freezing, Southern roads tend to have [[BossInMooksClothing layers of black ice beneath their shallow snows]]. The fact that Sun Belt cities tend to be more sprawling and reliant on automobiles likewise produces more opportunities for accidents.accidents, to say nothing of the fact that many areas have sizable populations living on steep, twisty mountain roads, which are bad enough in the best of circumstances, but when it's icy, muddy, and being driven on by a large, top-heavy school bus filled with small children, you can understand the "better safe than sorry" mentality. It's also why Southern roadways are usually much smoother to drive on than their Northern counterparts -- it usually doesn't get cold enough for the water seeping into the ground to freeze and open cracks and potholes.
18th Nov '14 8:35:10 AM allium
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The Southwest[[note]]UsefulNotes/{{Arizona}}, (Southern) UsefulNotes/{{California}}, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}[[/note]] is an overall dry region that can be split into two areas: the lowlands and deserts on one hand, and the uplands and mountains on the other. In the lowlands of Arizona, New Mexico, southern and western Utah, Nevada, and inland southern California, summer temperatures in the triple digits are the norm, and temperatures in the 110s and even 120s are not unheard of. The lack of humidity is a saving grace in many such areas, producing little added heat index. The mountainous uplands, meanwhile, experience warm summers and cold, snowy winters. The Rocky Mountains in Colorado are home to many of America's premier winter resorts, although New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah are also known to experience very cold winters up in the mountains. (Flagstaff, Arizona, at an elevation of about 6,900 feet, goes over 200 days a year with low temperatures below freezing, the highest number of days in the nation outside Alaska.)

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The Southwest[[note]]UsefulNotes/{{Arizona}}, (Southern) UsefulNotes/{{California}}, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and UsefulNotes/{{Utah}}[[/note]] is an overall dry region that can be split into two areas: the lowlands and deserts on one hand, and the uplands and mountains on the other. In the lowlands of Arizona, New Mexico, southern and western Utah, Nevada, and inland southern California, summer temperatures in the triple digits are the norm, and temperatures in the 110s and even 120s are not unheard of. The lack of humidity is a saving grace in many such areas, producing little added heat index. There is also a brief "monsoon season" (less intense than the classic Indian monsoon, but caused by similar processes) during the late summer, when subtropical moisture (and the occasional hurricane or tropical storm remnant) moves in from the south.

The mountainous uplands, meanwhile, experience warm summers and cold, snowy winters. The Rocky Mountains in Colorado are home to many of America's premier winter resorts, although New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah are also known to experience very cold winters up in the mountains. (Flagstaff, Arizona, at an elevation of about 6,900 feet, goes over 200 days a year with low temperatures below freezing, the highest number of days in the nation outside Alaska.)
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