History UsefulNotes / Alchemy

13th Jun '17 10:05:37 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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Producing gold from lead was considered possible ([[ArtisticLicenseEconomics and economically desirable]]) by the ancient alchemists[[labelnote:*]]And indeed, it has at last been done with particle accelerators, [[CoolButInefficient although the process costs more money than the gold you get will pay for]],[[/labelnote]] but for them this was only a worthless parlor trick. The ''panacea'' could cure any disease and extend life. But what alchemists worldwide were truly looking for was AppliedPhlebotinum that would grant life eternal and perhaps nigh-omnipotence. In Dar-al-Islam, it was known as the ''elixir''. Indian alchemists sought it as ''soma ras''. In Christendom, it was called the ''philosopher's stone.'' This was the ''Great Work''.[[note]]One notes that they considered the transmutation of gold and the achievement of immortality to be connected. Because gold does not tarnish, rust, corrode, etc., it is immortal.[[/note]] Some of the alchemists were even rumured to have succeeded -- there are occultists who will inform you that Le Comte de Saint Germain, born in the 18th century, still walks the streets among us. The same is said for the alchemist Nicolas Flamel and his wife, who lived in Paris in the 15th century.

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Producing gold from lead was considered possible ([[ArtisticLicenseEconomics and economically desirable]]) by the ancient alchemists[[labelnote:*]]And indeed, it has at last been done with particle accelerators, [[CoolButInefficient although the process costs more money than the gold you get will pay for]],[[/labelnote]] but for them this was only a worthless parlor trick. The ''panacea'' could cure any disease and extend life. But what alchemists worldwide were truly looking for was AppliedPhlebotinum that would grant life eternal and perhaps nigh-omnipotence. In Dar-al-Islam, it was known as the ''elixir''. Indian alchemists sought it as ''soma ras''. In Christendom, it was called the ''philosopher's stone.'' This was the ''Great Work''.[[note]]One notes that they considered the transmutation of gold and the achievement of immortality to be connected. Because gold does not tarnish, rust, corrode, etc., it is immortal.[[/note]] Some of the alchemists were even rumured rumored to have succeeded -- there are occultists who will inform you that Le Comte de Saint Germain, born in the 18th century, still walks the streets among us. The same is said for the alchemist Nicolas Flamel and his wife, who lived in Paris in the 15th century.
2nd May '17 9:37:21 PM Fireblood
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Producing gold from lead was considered possible ([[ArtisticLicenseEconomics and economically desirable]]) by the ancient alchemists [[labelnote:*]]and indeed, it has at last been done with particle accelerators, [[CoolButInefficient although the process costs more money than the gold you get will pay for]][[/labelnote]] but for them this was only a worthless parlour trick. The ''panacea'' could cure any disease and extend life. But what alchemists worldwide were truly looking for was AppliedPhlebotinum that would grant life eternal and perhaps nigh-omnipotence. In Dar-al-Islam, it was known as the ''elixir''. Indian alchemists sought it as ''soma ras''. In Christendom, it was called the ''philosopher's stone.'' This was the ''Great Work''. [[note]]One notes that they considered the transmutation of gold and the achievement of immortality to be connected. Because gold does not tarnish, rust, corrode, etc., it is immortal.[[/note]] Some of the alchemists were even rumoured to have succeeded -- there are occultists who will inform you that le Count de Saint Germain, born in the 18th century, still walks the streets among us. The same is said for the alchemist Nicolas Flamel and his wife, who lived in Paris in the 15th century.

to:

Producing gold from lead was considered possible ([[ArtisticLicenseEconomics and economically desirable]]) by the ancient alchemists [[labelnote:*]]and alchemists[[labelnote:*]]And indeed, it has at last been done with particle accelerators, [[CoolButInefficient although the process costs more money than the gold you get will pay for]][[/labelnote]] for]],[[/labelnote]] but for them this was only a worthless parlour parlor trick. The ''panacea'' could cure any disease and extend life. But what alchemists worldwide were truly looking for was AppliedPhlebotinum that would grant life eternal and perhaps nigh-omnipotence. In Dar-al-Islam, it was known as the ''elixir''. Indian alchemists sought it as ''soma ras''. In Christendom, it was called the ''philosopher's stone.'' This was the ''Great Work''. [[note]]One notes that they considered the transmutation of gold and the achievement of immortality to be connected. Because gold does not tarnish, rust, corrode, etc., it is immortal.[[/note]] Some of the alchemists were even rumoured rumured to have succeeded -- there are occultists who will inform you that le Count Le Comte de Saint Germain, born in the 18th century, still walks the streets among us. The same is said for the alchemist Nicolas Flamel and his wife, who lived in Paris in the 15th century.
5th Apr '17 4:18:42 PM EdwardGil
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Added DiffLines:

It should also be noted that the PhilosophersStone is not a MacGuffin where PossessionEqualsMastery. ''If'' one is skilled enough to create one at any time, then they can do the other things as well. It's like how originally a Black Belt in martial arts was blackened by the dirt of experience; or more accurately, how a master programmer could make a program that others could use; but others would just be script kiddies unless they understand as well.
13th Mar '16 3:34:34 PM FordPrefect
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Alchemists had a vast cosmological worldview that shares more in common with the ancient pagan pantheon than it does with either monotheism or modern science. They believed, as did Creator/{{Aristotle}}, that the world was composed of a handful of elements that generated the world by moving according to their own natures, animated by the great Source from which all life sprung. Western alchemists generally divided the elements into fire, water, wind, earth, and quintessence (star-matter). Eastern alchemists had a different worldview, and saw fire, water, earth, wood, and metal. Due to the supression of alternative religious philosophy in Europe, many alchemical books are intentionally difficult to read and understand.

to:

Alchemists had a vast cosmological worldview that shares more in common with the ancient pagan pantheon than it does with either monotheism or modern science. They believed, as did Creator/{{Aristotle}}, that the world was composed of a handful of elements that generated the world by moving according to their own natures, animated by the great Source from which all life sprung. Western alchemists generally divided the elements into fire, water, wind, earth, and quintessence (star-matter). Eastern alchemists had a different worldview, and saw fire, water, earth, wood, and metal. Due to the supression suppression of alternative religious philosophy in Europe, many alchemical books are intentionally difficult to read and understand.
30th Jan '16 9:15:55 PM SantosLHalper
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[[caption-width-right:270:As above, so below.]]

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[[caption-width-right:270:As [[caption-width-right:300:As above, so below.]]
30th Jan '16 9:15:43 PM SantosLHalper
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[[caption-width-right:250:As above, so below.]]

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[[caption-width-right:250:As [[caption-width-right:270:As above, so below.]]
30th Jan '16 9:15:33 PM SantosLHalper
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[[caption-width-right:270:As above, so below.]]

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[[caption-width-right:270:As [[caption-width-right:250:As above, so below.]]
30th Jan '16 9:15:23 PM SantosLHalper
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to:

[[caption-width-right:270:As above, so below.]]
7th Jan '16 8:02:34 AM Smeagol17
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Alchemists had a vast cosmological worldview that shares more in common with the ancient pagan pantheon than it does with either monotheism or modern science. They believed, as did Creator/{{Aristotle}}, that the world was composed of a handful of elements that generated the world by moving according to their own natures, animated by the great Source from which all life sprung. Western alchemists generally divided the elements into fire, water, wind, earth, and quintessence (star-matter). Eastern alchemists had a different worldview, and saw fire, water, earth, wood, and metal. Due to the repression of alternative religious philosophy in Europe, many alchemical books are intentionally difficult to read and understand.

to:

Alchemists had a vast cosmological worldview that shares more in common with the ancient pagan pantheon than it does with either monotheism or modern science. They believed, as did Creator/{{Aristotle}}, that the world was composed of a handful of elements that generated the world by moving according to their own natures, animated by the great Source from which all life sprung. Western alchemists generally divided the elements into fire, water, wind, earth, and quintessence (star-matter). Eastern alchemists had a different worldview, and saw fire, water, earth, wood, and metal. Due to the repression supression of alternative religious philosophy in Europe, many alchemical books are intentionally difficult to read and understand.
9th Jul '15 8:42:08 PM poi99
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Let's get something straight. The alchemists, as a whole, [[UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton were not stupid]]. They were not crazy, they were not ignorant, and they were not charlatans (for the most part). Alchemists were at the forefront of science and technology, and they essentially invented modern chemistry and discovered important laws of physics such as EquivalentExchange during their unorthodox experiments. This was, however, nothing more than a side effect of their true research, which was something altogether more ambitious and subtle...

Producing gold from lead ([[YouFailEconomicsForever just ignore how it would make gold worthless]]) was considered possible by the ancient alchemists [[labelnote:*]]and indeed, it has at last been done with particle accelerators, [[CoolButInefficient although the process costs more money than the gold you get will pay for]][[/labelnote]] but for them this was only a worthless parlour trick. The ''panacea'' could cure any disease and extend life. But what alchemists worldwide were truly looking for was AppliedPhlebotinum that would grant life eternal and perhaps nigh-omnipotence. In Dar-al-Islam, it was known as the ''elixir''. Indian alchemists sought it as ''soma ras''. In Christendom, it was called the ''philosopher's stone.'' This was the ''Great Work''. [[note]]One notes that they considered the transmutation of gold and the achievement of immortality to be connected. Because gold does not tarnish, rust, corrode, etc., it is immortal.[[/note]] Some of the alchemists were even rumoured to have succeeded -- there are occultists who will inform you that le Count de Saint Germain, born in the 18th century, still walks the streets among us. The same is said for the alchemist Nicolas Flamel and his wife, who lived in Paris in the 15th century.

to:

Let's get something straight. The alchemists, as a whole, [[UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton were not stupid]].stupid. They were not crazy, they were not ignorant, and they were not charlatans (for the most part). Alchemists were at the forefront of science and technology, and they essentially invented modern chemistry and discovered important laws of physics such as EquivalentExchange during their unorthodox experiments. This was, however, nothing more than a side effect of their true research, which was something altogether more ambitious and subtle...

ambitious...

Producing gold from lead ([[YouFailEconomicsForever just ignore how it would make gold worthless]]) was considered possible ([[ArtisticLicenseEconomics and economically desirable]]) by the ancient alchemists [[labelnote:*]]and indeed, it has at last been done with particle accelerators, [[CoolButInefficient although the process costs more money than the gold you get will pay for]][[/labelnote]] but for them this was only a worthless parlour trick. The ''panacea'' could cure any disease and extend life. But what alchemists worldwide were truly looking for was AppliedPhlebotinum that would grant life eternal and perhaps nigh-omnipotence. In Dar-al-Islam, it was known as the ''elixir''. Indian alchemists sought it as ''soma ras''. In Christendom, it was called the ''philosopher's stone.'' This was the ''Great Work''. [[note]]One notes that they considered the transmutation of gold and the achievement of immortality to be connected. Because gold does not tarnish, rust, corrode, etc., it is immortal.[[/note]] Some of the alchemists were even rumoured to have succeeded -- there are occultists who will inform you that le Count de Saint Germain, born in the 18th century, still walks the streets among us. The same is said for the alchemist Nicolas Flamel and his wife, who lived in Paris in the 15th century.
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