History TroubledProduction / VideoGames

15th Nov '17 6:42:44 AM Pr1A
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** Red 5 finally decided to pull the plug entirely on July 2017. At this point, most of the playerbase agreed that it was only a matter of time.
14th Nov '17 6:33:19 PM mlsmithca
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** ''Beast's Fury'' was finally cancelled in January 2016, as confirmed by [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ a FurAffinity interview with Stevens]]. His perceived indifference to campaign backers and development team members who had withstood his hostility ignited a massive InternetBackdraft, whereupon [[https://storify.com/Zerochan/getting-started a conga line]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40&feature=iv&src_vid=b4Sq6pkQBTc&annotation_id=annotation_2029632283 of angry, unpaid voice actors and animators]] stepped forth to deride Stevens, demand their money, and warn others. Needless to say, Stevens and Evil Dog's reputations were mercilessly ravaged [[CreatorKiller until they were no more]]. The fighting game community have since then used the project as a ''perfect'' example of the "don'ts" of game development.

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** ''Beast's Fury'' was finally cancelled in January 2016, as confirmed by [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ a FurAffinity interview with Stevens]]. His perceived indifference to campaign backers and development team members who had withstood his hostility ignited a massive InternetBackdraft, whereupon [[https://storify.com/Zerochan/getting-started a conga line]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40&feature=iv&src_vid=b4Sq6pkQBTc&annotation_id=annotation_2029632283 com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40 of angry, unpaid voice actors and animators]] stepped forth to deride Stevens, demand their money, and warn others. Needless to say, Stevens and Evil Dog's reputations were mercilessly ravaged [[CreatorKiller until they were no more]]. The fighting game community have since then used the project as a ''perfect'' example of the "don'ts" of game development.



** The final year of work on the game proved to be a nightmare. Most of Kaosí employees at this point were emotionally and physically weathered, feeling that their labor was being wasted through mismanagement. This was exemplified when a speech from Votypka at the 2010 Kaos holiday party got a bitter response. [[https://twitter.com/DannyBilson/status/24991583564730370 A comment from Bilson on Twitter]] fueled [[http://www.develop-online.net/news/36730/Seven-day-crunch-for-two-months-at-THQ-studio a complaint towards THQ and Kaos by a developer]], and Votypka had to scramble to defend Kaos and deny several allegations. During this time, other game studios empathetically began to offer jobs to several of Kaosí employees, who, needless to say, were more than happy to work on other projects and escape the dysfunction. Morale at Kaos soon lowered drastically, and many personnel quietly left the studio.

to:

** The final year of work on the game proved to be a nightmare. Most of Kaosí employees at this point were emotionally and physically weathered, feeling that their labor was being wasted through mismanagement. This was exemplified when a speech from Votypka at the 2010 Kaos holiday party got a bitter response. [[https://twitter.com/DannyBilson/status/24991583564730370 A comment from Bilson on Twitter]] fueled [[http://www.develop-online.net/news/36730/Seven-day-crunch-for-two-months-at-THQ-studio a complaint towards THQ and Kaos by a developer]], and Votypka had to scramble to defend Kaos and deny several allegations. During this time, other game studios empathetically began to offer jobs to several of Kaosí employees, who, needless to say, who were more than happy to work on other projects and escape the dysfunction. Morale at Kaos soon lowered drastically, and many personnel quietly left the studio.



** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by Executivemeddling. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game's singleplayer nature but rather its quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. [=LucasFilm=] wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore. Needless to say, these demands have led to situations in which approving character costumes, which normally lasts about a week at most, could last for ''months''.

to:

** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by Executivemeddling.ExecutiveMeddling. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game's singleplayer nature but rather its quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. [=LucasFilm=] wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore. Needless to say, these These demands have led to situations in which approving character costumes, which normally lasts about a week at most, could last for ''months''.



** Given the constant redtape, lack of employees, and poor morale, it was clear by 2017 that ''Ragtag'' couldn't meet the demands of being a best-selling licensed ''Star Wars'' game with quality comparable to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. Needless to say, the game was cancelled in 2017 and Visceral Games was shut down. Given how tumultuous the development phase became, it was seen as a mercy kill with many employees actually happy that they were let go.

to:

** Given the constant redtape, lack of employees, and poor morale, it was clear by 2017 that ''Ragtag'' couldn't meet the demands of being a best-selling licensed ''Star Wars'' game with quality comparable to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. Needless to say, the The game was cancelled in 2017 and Visceral Games was shut down. Given how tumultuous the development phase became, it was seen as a mercy kill with many employees actually happy that they were let go.



This proved to be a fatal mistake, for without Miyamoto and Iwata to keep watch over him and his work, Dyack's ego [[SmallNameBigEgo spiraled out of control]] and he grew progressively more hostile towards virtually everyone, including his own staff (see one interpretation of the ''X-Men Destiny'' situation for more details). Development on the game suffered dearly for it. This resulted in mediocre sales and reviews, a bunch of projects left in the garbage bin over the next few years and most importantly of all, a disastrous lawsuit against Creator/EpicGames. Silicon Knights paid a license to use the Unreal Engine 3 for ''Too Human'', didn't like it, and began reverse-engineering it until they decided the engine was now 100% Silicon Knights and 0% Epic. They stopped payments to Epic and demanded refunds for the money they already paid to them. Problem was, the "new" engine used in the final product still contained portions of Epic code... Needless to say, Silicon Knights lost big time and paid [[CreatorKiller the ultimate price]] in 2013.

to:

This proved to be a fatal mistake, for without Miyamoto and Iwata to keep watch over him and his work, Dyack's ego [[SmallNameBigEgo spiraled out of control]] and he grew progressively more hostile towards virtually everyone, including his own staff (see one interpretation of the ''X-Men Destiny'' situation for more details). Development on the game suffered dearly for it. This resulted in mediocre sales and reviews, a bunch of projects left in the garbage bin over the next few years and most importantly of all, a disastrous lawsuit against Creator/EpicGames. Silicon Knights paid a license to use the Unreal Engine 3 for ''Too Human'', didn't like it, and began reverse-engineering it until they decided the engine was now 100% Silicon Knights and 0% Epic. They stopped payments to Epic and demanded refunds for the money they already paid to them. Problem was, the "new" engine used in the final product still contained portions of Epic code... Needless to say, and Silicon Knights lost big time and paid [[CreatorKiller the ultimate price]] in 2013.



What neither Activision nor Silicon Knights could have foreseen was Creator/{{Disney}}'s acquisition of Marvel midway during development: With Disney publishing games themselves, Activision and Disney got into disagreements over the former's Marvel video game contract, causing the budget to shrink down in the process; Silicon Knights was not paid by Activision during conversations and had to fund the game's development out of their own pockets at the point. Needless to say, the game suffered for it and with Activision's Marvel contract being "so complicated and detailed to unravel" that Disney couldn't do anything to help the project, the final game had to be released as a mess. Disney would eventually buy out nearly all of Activision's Marvel licenses a few years later.

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What neither Activision nor Silicon Knights could have foreseen was Creator/{{Disney}}'s acquisition of Marvel midway during development: With Disney publishing games themselves, Activision and Disney got into disagreements over the former's Marvel video game contract, causing the budget to shrink down in the process; Silicon Knights was not paid by Activision during conversations and had to fund the game's development out of their own pockets at the point. Needless to say, the The game suffered for it and with Activision's Marvel contract being "so complicated and detailed to unravel" that Disney couldn't do anything to help the project, the final game had to be released as a mess. Disney would eventually buy out nearly all of Activision's Marvel licenses a few years later.
13th Nov '17 4:22:35 AM patriciovalencia117
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* Before its cancellation, the ''Star Wars'' game codenamed ''VideoGame/{{Ragtag}}'' suffered from tumultuous development according to [[https://kotaku.com/the-collapse-of-viscerals-ambitious-star-wars-game-1819916152 Kotaku]]. Much of the defunct game's quagmire could be attributed to the actions of publisher Creator/ElectronicArts and Star Wars rights-holder Creator/Lucasfilm.

to:

* Before its cancellation, the ''Star Wars'' game codenamed ''VideoGame/{{Ragtag}}'' suffered from tumultuous development according to [[https://kotaku.com/the-collapse-of-viscerals-ambitious-star-wars-game-1819916152 Kotaku]]. Much of the defunct game's quagmire could be attributed to the actions of publisher Creator/ElectronicArts and Star Wars rights-holder Creator/Lucasfilm.[=LucasFilm=].



** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by the demands of EA and [=LucasFilm=]. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game's singleplayer nature but rather its quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. [=LucasFilm=] wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore. Needless to say, these demands have led to situations in which approving character costumes, which normally lasts about a week at most, could last for ''months''.

to:

** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by the demands of EA and [=LucasFilm=].Executivemeddling. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game's singleplayer nature but rather its quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. [=LucasFilm=] wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore. Needless to say, these demands have led to situations in which approving character costumes, which normally lasts about a week at most, could last for ''months''.



** Given the constant redtape, lack of employees, and poor morale, it was clear by 2017 that ''Ragtag'' couldn't meet the demands of being a best-selling licensed ''Star Wars'' game with quality comparable to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. Needless to say, the game was cancelled in 2017 and Visceral Games was shut down. Given how tumultuous the development phase became, many parties were glad they stopped working on the game with many employees actually happy that they were let go.

to:

** Given the constant redtape, lack of employees, and poor morale, it was clear by 2017 that ''Ragtag'' couldn't meet the demands of being a best-selling licensed ''Star Wars'' game with quality comparable to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. Needless to say, the game was cancelled in 2017 and Visceral Games was shut down. Given how tumultuous the development phase became, many parties were glad they stopped working on the game it was seen as a mercy kill with many employees actually happy that they were let go.
11th Nov '17 11:17:31 AM comicwriter
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** Additionally, Marvel engaged in a bit of ExecutiveMeddling themselves, refusing to allow the game to use characters from the Comicbook/XMen or Comicbook/FantasticFour franchises due to their film rights being controlled by Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox. The conspicuous absences of fan favorites like Comicbook/{{Wolverine}}, Comicbook/{{Magneto}}, Comicbook/{{Storm}} and Comicbook/DoctorDoom were immediately noticed by fans, leading to massive amounts of online backlash and negative publicity.
3rd Nov '17 6:16:44 AM patriciovalencia117
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** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by the demands of EA and Lucasfilm. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game monetization but rather quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. Lucasfilm wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore.

All of these demands would have been impossible given how Visceral Games' manpower was divided due to working on several other games and how the studio couldn't hire more employees due to the high cost of having a studio in San Francisco. The fact that they literally couldn't afford to make a screw-up in the ''Star Wars'' IP did not help matters.

to:

** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by the demands of EA and Lucasfilm. [=LucasFilm=]. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game monetization game's singleplayer nature but rather its quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. Lucasfilm [=LucasFilm=] wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore.

All of
lore. Needless to say, these demands would have been impossible given how led to situations in which approving character costumes, which normally lasts about a week at most, could last for ''months''.
** Furthermore, the
Visceral Games' manpower Games was divided due to working short on several other games and how talented staff. The high costs of running the studio in San Francisco meant that EA couldn't hire more new employees. Exacerbating issues is that for much of 2014 and 2015, many of Visceral's employees due had to also work on the high cost spin-off game ''VideoGame/BattlefieldHardline''. Motive Studios, one of having a studio in San Francisco. The fact EA's existing subsidiaries, tried helping out only to be pulled away to work on ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefrontII2017'', leaving Visceral Games again short on manpower.
** Given the constant redtape, lack of employees, and poor morale, it was clear by 2017
that they literally ''Ragtag'' couldn't afford to make a screw-up in meet the demands of being a best-selling licensed ''Star Wars'' IP did not help matters.
game with quality comparable to ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic''. Needless to say, the game was cancelled in 2017 and Visceral Games was shut down. Given how tumultuous the development phase became, many parties were glad they stopped working on the game with many employees actually happy that they were let go.
3rd Nov '17 6:03:35 AM patriciovalencia117
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* Before its cancellation, the ''Star Wars'' game codenamed ''VideoGame/{{Ragtag}}'' suffered from tumultuous development according to [[https://kotaku.com/the-collapse-of-viscerals-ambitious-star-wars-game-1819916152 Kotaku]]. Much of the defunct game's quagmire could be attributed to the actions of publisher Creator/ElectronicArts and Star Wars rights-holder Creator/Lucasfilm.
** Before working on the game, developer studio Visceral Games was in bad shape after ''VideoGame/DeadSpace3'' and ''[[VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo Army of Two: The Devil's Cartel]]'' had flopped in 2013. These flops had left the demoralized and short of manpower, leading to much bad blood between the studio and its owner Creator/ElectronicArts. When the studio was given the Star Wars license and writer Amy Hennig joined the team, there was hope that the studio could recover and deliver a solid game.
** However, the studio was constantly hamstrung by the demands of EA and Lucasfilm. Contrary to internet rumors, EA's meddling was not because of game monetization but rather quality. EA wanted a game to score a 90% on Metacritic and develop an innovative gameplay mechanic like the [[VideoGame/HalfLife2 Gravity Gun]]. Lucasfilm wanted to inspect and approve of every game design decision while also placing restrictions on the game's tone and lore.

All of these demands would have been impossible given how Visceral Games' manpower was divided due to working on several other games and how the studio couldn't hire more employees due to the high cost of having a studio in San Francisco. The fact that they literally couldn't afford to make a screw-up in the ''Star Wars'' IP did not help matters.
15th Oct '17 12:00:32 AM therealjackieboy
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** Speaking of these features, to cut costs, the makers of the game had to reuse assets from the Capcom characters used in ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'', as well as other older games they were in. This also meant that the reused character models from MvC3 had to be reshaded in order to make them fit with the art style and engine; given how heavy on shading the art style for MvC3 was, the poor model quality really shows.

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** Speaking of these features, to cut costs, the makers of the game had to reuse assets from the Capcom characters used in ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'', as well as other older games they were in. This also meant that the reused character models from MvC3 [=MvC3=] had to be reshaded in order to make them fit with the art style and engine; given how heavy on shading the art style for MvC3 [=MvC3=] was, the poor model quality really shows.


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* ''VideoGame/{{Scalebound}}, a game about a badass smart-aleck who could fight and control dragons that was stuck in DevelopmentHell for seven years, finally looked like it was going to get out of it in 2015 as a collaboration between Creator/PlatinumGames (specifically Creator/HidekiKamiya) and Creator/MicrosoftStudios. Unfortunately, the game ended up being cancelled in early 2017 due to the two companies' different creative ideas and design philosophies clashing together, resulting in a negative impact on the moral of the development team. Platinum wanted a large world that had a consistently great frame-rate, while Microsoft wanted a more scaled down game that showed off the graphical capabilities of the console. All of these disagreements caused the game to remain in limbo until its cancellation, and for Kamiya and producer J.P. Kellams to take a month long absence from their respected companies to recuperate their mental health.
14th Oct '17 11:39:22 PM therealjackieboy
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* According to [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kanICweLFM this video]], ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcomInfinite'' had a rocky development cycle thanks to loads of ExecutiveMeddling from Creator/{{Capcom}}, such as slicing the game's intended budget in half (with the other half going into making ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV'' DLC). This caused the game to not only have [[NoBudget the lowest budget in the series]], but also the [[SpecialEffectsFailure downgrade in model quality, cutscene animation, and gameplay features]].
** Speaking of these features, to cut costs, the makers of the game had to reuse assets from the Capcom characters used in ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'', as well as other older games they were in. This also meant that the reused character models from MvC3 had to be reshaded in order to make them fit with the art style and engine; given how heavy on shading the art style for MvC3 was, the poor model quality really shows.
** All of this caused Capcom employees to become [[CreatorBacklash extremely disappointed in the product]], while the higher-ups wouldn't have any concerns with the game until fans started reacting really negatively to the graphics and models on social media (in particular Chun-Li's model, which ended up being reworked on before the game shipped, to better reception). The higher-ups also forced ComicBook/BlackPanther and VideoGame/MonsterHunter to become paid DLC characters, despite having already been completed and meant for the final game.
14th Oct '17 3:25:09 PM Yeow95
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*** The game started life as ''Project Apollo'' in 2011 (later given the working titles ''Sonic Origins'' and ''Sonic Synergy''). Heavily taking after ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'' (which members of the studio had previously worked on), the project initially started out as a standalone action-adventure game with heavy focuses on exploration, multiplayer co-op, and story (boasting an origin story about Sonic and Eggman with time-travel and ancient beings), with notably different character designs. As the studio spent two years developing a vertical slice demo for Sega, [[ExecutiveMeddling mandates by the publisher and chief studio Sonic Team kicked in]], causing heavy changes to the original concept (among other things, speed was increased, exploration was removed, character designs were retooled to be closer to the main series, the origins backstory was axed entirely, and various game mechanics were scrapped).
*** The game was originally developed for a digital release for Steam, with Xbox Live and [=PlayStation=] Store releases planned if sales were good (development kits for the [=PlayStation=] and Xbox platforms can be spied out in certain developer footage and screenshots for the game). This was undone by Sega pitching the game's vertical slice to publisher Nintendo, and [[ScrewedByTheNetwork ultimately folding the project into an exclusive partnership deal]] between the two parties; resulting in the game compromised into the game being Sega's third and final exclusive Sonic game for Nintendo's {{Wii U}} platform. This proved to be a major problem since the game ran on the [=CryEngine=] 3 game engine, which was not officially supported on the Wii U.[[note]]To say nothing of the fact that [=CryEngine=] 3 was an engine normally designed for first-person shooters; not for action-adventure games with co-op as it is...[[/note]] When the team starting porting the game to the Wii U in mid-2013, the results forced fundamental changes to the game--four-player co-op was restricted to two-player co-op, game mechanics had to be entirely reworked, and levels were streamlined into a lineal progression. A notorious quote from one of the game's developers was that the team "was fighting against the engine the entire time".
*** During this time, a separate group of people pitched to Sega the idea of an animated Sonic TV series, which would eventually develop into the ''Sonic Boom'' sub-franchise. Despite BRB's game spending most of its development as an unrelated project, Sega later gave control over the game to the production team for the show a handful of months before the game's release, resulting in ''more'' changes being made to the story (and Knuckles' [[DumbMuscle personality]]) [[DolledUpInstallment to bring it closer to the animated show]]. This chiefly explains why the final game and the animated show [[InNameOnly have only a handful of tenuous connections to each other]].
*** The bottom of the game's production ultimately fell out when a large chunk of the team was found to have left in July 2014, either voluntarily or being let go; with the game reportedly going gold that same month. This revelation, alongside the previous Nintendo-exclusive Sonic games in the partnership selling poorly, has led to the common consensus that Sega rushed the game's development so they could release the game and quickly conclude the contract (as well as shove the game out [[ChristmasRushed in time for the Christmas season]]).
*** It all culminated into the final game having [[ObviousBeta a whole murderer's row of glitches and game exploits caused by design oversights]] and unpolished graphics that left a lot to be desired -- a stark contrast to [[NeverTrustATrailer early footage released for the game]], which showcased impressive visuals. In a telling move, Sega [[NotScreenedForCritics enforced a review embargo]] to prevent official reviewers from telling the public about the mess the game was in, [[StreisandEffect not that it did any good once the game was launched]]. The resulting fallout from the game's failure was was BRB [[CreatorKiller nearly going out of business]] (having only worked on AR/VR games since ''Rise of Lyric'') and the game being partly responsible for Sega undergoing layoffs and restructuring the following year, followed by the publisher's CEO later apologizing for betraying consumers' trust in recent years.

to:

*** The game started life as ''Project Apollo'' in 2011 (later given the working titles ''Sonic Origins'' and ''Sonic Synergy''). Heavily taking after ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'' (which members of the studio had previously worked on), the project initially started out as a standalone action-adventure game with heavy focuses on exploration, multiplayer co-op, and story (boasting an origin story about Sonic and Eggman with time-travel and ancient beings), with notably different character designs. As the studio spent two years developing a vertical slice demo for Sega, [[ExecutiveMeddling mandates by the publisher and chief studio Sonic Team kicked in]], causing heavy changes to the original concept (among other things, speed was increased, exploration was removed, downplayed, character designs were retooled to be closer to the main series, the origins backstory was axed entirely, and various game mechanics were scrapped).
*** The game was originally developed for a digital release for Steam, with Xbox Live and [=PlayStation=] Store releases planned if sales were good (development kits for the [=PlayStation=] and Xbox platforms can be spied out in certain developer footage and screenshots for the game). This was undone by Sega pitching the game's vertical slice to publisher Nintendo, and [[ScrewedByTheNetwork ultimately folding the project into an exclusive partnership deal]] between the two parties; resulting in the game compromised into the game being Sega's third and final exclusive Sonic game for Nintendo's {{Wii U}} platform. This proved to be a major problem since the game ran on the [=CryEngine=] 3 game engine, which was not officially supported on the Wii U.[[note]]To say nothing of the fact that [=CryEngine=] 3 was an engine normally designed for first-person shooters; not for action-adventure games with co-op as it is...[[/note]] When the team starting porting the game to the Wii U in mid-2013, the results forced fundamental changes to the game--four-player co-op was restricted to two-player co-op, many game mechanics had to be entirely reworked, reworked or removed, and levels were streamlined into a lineal progression. A notorious quote from one of the game's developers was that the team "was fighting against the engine the entire time".
*** During this time, a separate group of people pitched to Sega the idea of an animated Sonic TV series, which would eventually develop into the ''Sonic Boom'' sub-franchise. Despite BRB's game spending most of its development as an unrelated project, Sega later gave control over the game to the production team for the show a handful of months before the game's release, resulting in ''more'' changes being made to the game (particularly its story (and and Knuckles' [[DumbMuscle personality]]) personality]], as well as requesting for characters, levels, and cutscenes to be added to the game) [[DolledUpInstallment to bring it closer to the animated show]]. This chiefly explains why the final game and the animated show [[InNameOnly have only a handful of tenuous connections to each other]].
*** The bottom of the game's production ultimately eventually fell out when a large chunk of the team was found to have left in July 2014, either voluntarily or being let go; with the game reportedly going gold that same month. This revelation, alongside the previous Nintendo-exclusive Sonic games in the partnership selling poorly, has led to the common consensus that Sega rushed the game's development so they could release the game and quickly conclude the contract (as well as shove the game out [[ChristmasRushed in time for the Christmas season]]).
*** It all culminated into In the long run, the final game having that was released as ''Rise of Lyric'' had [[ObviousBeta a whole murderer's row of glitches and game exploits caused by design oversights]] and oversights]], as well as unpolished graphics that left a lot to be desired -- a stark contrast to [[NeverTrustATrailer early footage released for the game]], which showcased impressive visuals. In a telling move, Sega [[NotScreenedForCritics enforced a review embargo]] to prevent official reviewers from telling the public about the mess the game was in, [[StreisandEffect not that it did any good once the game was launched]]. The resulting fallout from the game's failure was was BRB [[CreatorKiller nearly going out of business]] (having only worked on AR/VR games since ''Rise of Lyric'') and the game being partly responsible for Sega undergoing layoffs and restructuring the following year, followed by the publisher's CEO later apologizing for betraying consumers' trust in recent years.
14th Oct '17 3:13:57 PM Yeow95
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*** The game started life as ''Project Apollo'' in 2011 (later given the working titles ''Sonic Origins'' and ''Sonic Synergy''). Heavily taking after ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'' (which members of the studio had previoused worked on), the project initially started out as a standalone action-adventure game with heavy focuses on exploration, multiplayer co-op, and story (boasting an origin story about Sonic and Eggman with time-travel and ancient beings), with notably different character designs. As the studio spent two years developing a vertical slice demo for Sega, [[ExecutiveVeto mandates by the publisher and chief studio Sonic Team kicked in]], causing heavy changes to the original concept (among other things, speed was increased, exploration was removed, character designs were retooled to be closer to the main series, the origins backstory was axed entirely, and various game mechanics were scrapped).
*** The game was originally developed as a digital release for Steam, with Xbox Live and PlayStation Store releases planned if sales were good (development kits for the PlayStation and Xbox platforms can be spied out in certain developer footage and screenshots for the game). This was undone by Sega pitching the game's vertical slice to publisher Nintendo, and [[ScrewedByTheNetwork ultimately folding the project into an exclusive partnership deal]] between the two parties; resulting in the game compromised into the game being Sega's third and final exclusive Sonic game for Nintendo's {{Wii U}} platform. This proved to be a major problem since the game ran on the [=CryEngine=] 3 game engine, which was not officially supported on the Wii U.[[note]]To say nothing of the fact that [=CryEngine=] 3 was an engine normally designed for first-person shooters; not for action-adventure games with co-op as it is...[[/note]] When the team starting porting the game to the Wii U in mid-2013, the results forced fundamental changes to the game--four-player co-op was restricted to two-player co-op, game mechanics had to be entirely reworked, and levels were streamlined into a lineal progression. A notorious quote from one of the game's developers was that the team "was fighting against the engine the entire time".

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*** The game started life as ''Project Apollo'' in 2011 (later given the working titles ''Sonic Origins'' and ''Sonic Synergy''). Heavily taking after ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxter'' (which members of the studio had previoused previously worked on), the project initially started out as a standalone action-adventure game with heavy focuses on exploration, multiplayer co-op, and story (boasting an origin story about Sonic and Eggman with time-travel and ancient beings), with notably different character designs. As the studio spent two years developing a vertical slice demo for Sega, [[ExecutiveVeto [[ExecutiveMeddling mandates by the publisher and chief studio Sonic Team kicked in]], causing heavy changes to the original concept (among other things, speed was increased, exploration was removed, character designs were retooled to be closer to the main series, the origins backstory was axed entirely, and various game mechanics were scrapped).
*** The game was originally developed as for a digital release for Steam, with Xbox Live and PlayStation [=PlayStation=] Store releases planned if sales were good (development kits for the PlayStation [=PlayStation=] and Xbox platforms can be spied out in certain developer footage and screenshots for the game). This was undone by Sega pitching the game's vertical slice to publisher Nintendo, and [[ScrewedByTheNetwork ultimately folding the project into an exclusive partnership deal]] between the two parties; resulting in the game compromised into the game being Sega's third and final exclusive Sonic game for Nintendo's {{Wii U}} platform. This proved to be a major problem since the game ran on the [=CryEngine=] 3 game engine, which was not officially supported on the Wii U.[[note]]To say nothing of the fact that [=CryEngine=] 3 was an engine normally designed for first-person shooters; not for action-adventure games with co-op as it is...[[/note]] When the team starting porting the game to the Wii U in mid-2013, the results forced fundamental changes to the game--four-player co-op was restricted to two-player co-op, game mechanics had to be entirely reworked, and levels were streamlined into a lineal progression. A notorious quote from one of the game's developers was that the team "was fighting against the engine the entire time".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.VideoGames