History TroubledProduction / VideoGames

13th Feb '16 12:37:06 PM multibrawlr
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** Evil Dog returned to Indiegogo in May 2015. It surprised nobody thatteam ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story once again started a new campaign,]]'' which, this time, was aimed at funding "the full game", along with a Patreon that Stevens had created. Needless to say, both campaigns saw very little backer turnout and ended becoming total failures, with the Indiegogo campaign in particular raising ''only $1,620'' of its massive $185,000 goal (though the team still received the money due to "flexible funding"). Shortly after, it was revealed that Stevens, who was anticipating the campaign's eventual failure, had already [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project]] to focus on his personal life.
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** Evil Dog returned to Indiegogo in May 2015. It surprised nobody thatteam that the team ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story once again started a new campaign,]]'' which, this time, was aimed at funding "the full game", along with a Patreon that Stevens had created. Needless to say, both campaigns saw very little backer turnout and ended becoming total failures, with the Indiegogo campaign in particular raising ''only $1,620'' of its massive $185,000 goal (though the team still received the money due to "flexible funding"). Shortly after, it was revealed that Stevens, who was anticipating the campaign's eventual failure, had already [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project]] to focus on his personal life.

* ''Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End'', the final installment in the critically-acclaimed ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'' series, hasn’t exactly been going smooth sailing for developer Creator/NaughtyDog .
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* ''Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End'', the final installment in the critically-acclaimed ''VideoGame/{{Uncharted}}'' series, hasn’t exactly been going smooth sailing for developer Creator/NaughtyDog .Creator/NaughtyDog.
13th Feb '16 12:27:52 PM multibrawlr
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*The cancellation of the indie game ''Ant Simulator'' -- along with the controversy that ignited afterwards -- [[http://www.polygon.com/2016/2/1/10889756/ant-simulator-eteeski-strippers-liquor-allegations-video tells a story of both deception and dysfunction]]. It’s hurt the spirits of everyone involved (tons of money and hours spent developing the game were lost), but there’s two conflicting accounts from the three developers regarding what actually happened behind the scenes. **Erik Tereshinski, one of the developers, made [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2IWl29BNawg a video]] in January 2015 announcing that ''Ant Simulator'' was cancelled, and claimed that his lifelong friends and business partners Tyler Monce and Devon Staley had spent the development money on things like “booze and strippers”. Later, he bemoaned Monce’s incompetence with submitting the game to Sony for a software development kit, asserted that Staley had been dishonest regarding conversations with Sony, and accused the two of overspending on setting up an office in the basement of Staley’s mother’s home. **On the other side of the coin, Monce and Staley [[http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2016/02/01/ant-simulator-business-partners-respond-devs-claims-100-percent-bull.aspx denied Tereshinski’s allegations]] and began pointing fingers at him. They claimed that Tereshinski had complete control over their company [=ETeeski=] -- which included bank accounts, social media accounts and the website — partly because of [[SmallNameBigEgo his ego]]. They also accused him of transferring funds from the studio to his personal bank account. Monce and Staley have since considered pursuing legal action against Tereshinski.
13th Feb '16 11:33:46 AM multibrawlr
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*''VideoGame/TheAct'' was a story-centric interactive game with hand-drawn animation from ex-Creator/{{Disney}} animators. It was initially seen as an arcade game with later plans for console and PC ports. The developer, Cecropia, test-marketed the game in several New England locations. Despite positive reviews, publisher interest sadly didn’t materialize, and Cecropia ended up [[CreatorKiller closing its doors]] in 2008. Several arcade kits were auctioned off, however, which ended up in arcades in Utah and Florida, and a dedicated cabinet currently makes annual appearances at the California Extreme pinball and arcade show in Santa Clara, California. A third-party company named React Entertainment ported the game to iOS devices in June 2012. However, the game was later removed from the App store in early 2015, with React Entertainment having ceased operations.
13th Feb '16 8:39:47 AM multibrawlr
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** Most of the blame was placed on [=MercurySteam=]'s leader, Enric Álvarez. Outside of his seemingly friendly demeanor in the public media, in actuality [[SmallNameBigEgo his ego had grown]] since the success of the first ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow'', and he completely undermined and overlooked his programmers, designers and artists, running development based on his own personal criteria.
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** Most of the blame was placed on [=MercurySteam=]'s leader, Enric Álvarez. Outside of his seemingly friendly demeanor in the public media, in actuality [[SmallNameBigEgo his ego had grown]] since the success of the first ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow'', and he completely undermined and overlooked his programmers, designers and artists, running development based on his own personal criteria. As such, employees were often forced to include game features and mechanics into the final game that they didn't even like (such as the stealth sequences).

** [=MercurySteam=]'s primary game engine was coded by only two people, and since Álvarez was prone to hovering over and monitoring his employees, killing ideas that he didn't like left and right, it was never updated, reducing the development down to a very sluggish pace. Employees were also forced to include game features and mechanics into the final game that they didn't even like (such as the stealth sequences). In response to the game's poor reception, Álvarez [[ArtistDisillusionment claimed that the reviewers's gripes had no merits and that they weren't doing their jobs properly]]. Additionally, he seemed to deny the complaints of his employees, [[https://mobile.twitter.com/Enric_Alvarez/status/439658992621875200 as a post on his Twitter page showed]]. * The Kickstarter-funded, motion-controlled sword-fighting game ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/260688528/clang Clang]]'' proved to be a failure of massive proportions. The game was developed by Subutai Production and sci-fi author Creator/NealStephenson, whose inspiration to make the game was his dissatisfaction over the portrayal of sword-fighting in most modern video games. Its 2012 Kickstarter campaign received over $500,000 in donations, all of which intended to help Subutai attract investors and publishers. But shortly after, production slowed to a crawl after the announcement that the developer had exhausted all of the backers’ funds, ran into financial troubles and couldn't find anyone to invest in the project. Refunds were finally issued two years later in response to growing frustration from backers. Stephenson then announced the game's cancellation and also claimed that several people –including him and members of Subutai- were dealt significant financial losses at the end of the day. * Another Kickstarter project: ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/primerist/code-hero-a-game-that-teaches-you-to-make-games-he Code Hero]]'', [[GameWithinaGame a game coined as being able to teach players how to make games]]. The campaign began in January 2012 and nearly doubled its $100,000 goal. But when February arrived, people began complaining that they had not received their backing rewards. The website and Twitter accounts for the developer Primer Labs were also infrequently updated, and two proposed release deadlines would be missed. This impelled backers to demand their money back, fearing that the game was insufficiently funded. ''Code Hero'' designer Alex Peake [[http://www.ign.com/articles/2012/12/14/code-hero-dev-responds-to-kickstarter-complaints assured everyone]] that Primer Labs was “committed to finishing this game” when threats of legal action from backers came up. It was eventually revealed that the funds raised covered the costs of the game up to October, after which most of the game’s developers became ''volunteers''. Some versions of the game have been made available on the Internet, but since 2012 Primer Labs’s Facebook and Twitter pages have been inactive.
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** [=MercurySteam=]'s primary game engine was coded by only two people, and since Álvarez was prone to hovering over and monitoring his employees, killing ideas that he didn't like left and right, it was never updated, reducing the development down to a very sluggish pace. Employees were also forced to include game features and mechanics into the final game that they didn't even like (such as the stealth sequences). In response to the game's poor reception, Álvarez [[ArtistDisillusionment claimed that the reviewers's gripes had no merits and that they weren't doing their jobs properly]]. Additionally, he seemed to deny the complaints of his employees, [[https://mobile.twitter.com/Enric_Alvarez/status/439658992621875200 as a post on his Twitter page showed]]. * The Kickstarter-funded, motion-controlled sword-fighting game ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/260688528/clang Clang]]'' proved to be a failure of massive proportions. The game was developed by Subutai Production and sci-fi author Creator/NealStephenson, whose inspiration to make the latter of which making the game was his out of dissatisfaction over the portrayal of sword-fighting in most modern video games. Its 2012 Kickstarter campaign received over $500,000 in donations, all of which were intended to help Subutai attract investors and publishers. But shortly Shortly after, production [[DevelopmentHell slowed to a crawl after crawl]] following the announcement that the developer had exhausted all of the backers’ funds, ran into financial troubles and couldn't find anyone to invest in the project. Refunds were finally issued two years later in response to growing frustration from backers. Stephenson then announced the game's cancellation and also claimed that several people –including him and members of Subutai- were dealt significant financial losses at the end of the day. * Another Kickstarter project: ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/primerist/code-hero-a-game-that-teaches-you-to-make-games-he Code Hero]]'', [[GameWithinaGame a game coined as being able to teach players how to make games]]. The campaign began in January 2012 and nearly doubled its $100,000 goal. But when February arrived, people began complaining that they had not received their backing rewards. The Developer Primer Labs' website and Twitter accounts for the developer Primer Labs were also infrequently updated, and two proposed release deadlines would be missed. This impelled backers to demand their money back, fearing Fearing that the game project was insufficiently funded.funded, backers to demanded refunds en masse. ''Code Hero'' designer Alex Peake [[http://www.ign.com/articles/2012/12/14/code-hero-dev-responds-to-kickstarter-complaints assured everyone]] that Primer Labs was “committed to finishing this game” when threats of legal action from backers came up. It began to threaten legal action. Later, it was eventually revealed that the funds raised covered the costs of the game only up to October, after which most of the game’s developers became ''volunteers''. Some versions of the game have been made available on the Internet, but since 2012 Primer Labs’s Facebook and Twitter pages have been inactive.

** Publisher THQ was exercising a new greenlighting policy, scrutinizing prototypes and giving feedback before authorizing development on games. Impressed with the pitch demo, THQ requested that Kaos prepare a demo for E3 2009. In a frenzy of pressure, the development team worked for over 18 months on the demo – which was only about five minutes long- eating up tons of resources in the process.
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** Publisher THQ Creator/{{THQ}} was exercising a new greenlighting policy, scrutinizing prototypes and giving feedback before authorizing development on games. Impressed with the pitch demo, THQ requested that Kaos prepare a demo for E3 2009. In a frenzy of pressure, the development team worked for over 18 months on the demo – which was only about five minutes long- eating up tons of resources in the process.

** THQ and Kaos undertook an audit of ''Homefront'' to see how long it would take to get every feature into the game, only to both realize that it would be next to impossible to create what they envisioned. All the while, Kaos had been seizing millions of dollars to pay off development on the game and had little to show for it. Schulman fought with THQ executives who were frustrated over how he was managing the company and responding to publisher directives. Schulman refused demands for more transparency, and he ended up leaving Kaos.
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** THQ and Kaos undertook an audit of ''Homefront'' to see how long it would take to get every feature into the game, only to both realize that it would be next to impossible to create what they envisioned. All the while, Kaos had been seizing millions of dollars to pay off development on the game and had little to show for it. Schulman fought with THQ executives who were frustrated over how he was managing the company and responding to publisher directives. Schulman He continuously refused demands for more transparency, and shortly after he ended up leaving Kaos. left Kaos.

** By late 2009 and early 2010, it was looking extremely unlikely that the game would be shipped. Kaos brought in several veteran shooter developers to help, including some from EA. They also got a new production lead: David Broadhurst, who was rather controversial in his efforts to get Kaos to finish the game on time; he rode several employees hard to ensure that progress would be made, and publicly rebuked them in front of the rest of the studio. Despite the fact that he was solely credited for making sure that ''Homefront'' would be finished, many employees bemoaned his hostile leadership over Kaos. ** The final year of work on the game proved to be a nightmare. Most of Kaos’ employees at this point were emotionally and physically weathered, feeling that their labor was being wasted through mismanagement. This was exemplified when a speech from Votypka at the 2010 Kaos holiday party got a bitter response. [[https://twitter.com/DannyBilson/status/24991583564730370 A comment from Bilson on Twitter]] fueled [[http://www.develop-online.net/news/36730/Seven-day-crunch-for-two-months-at-THQ-studio a complaint towards THQ and Kaos by a developer]], and Votypka had to scramble to defend Kaos and deny several allegations. During this time, other game studios empathetically began to offer jobs to several of Kaos’ employees, who, needless to say, were more than happy to work on other projects and escape the dysfunction. Morale at Kaos soon lowered drastically, and many personnel quietly left the studio. ** The game itself received mixed reviews, but did not perform as well as Kaos had hoped. Critics all praised the multiplayer over the single-player campaign. After Kaos had released ''Homefront'', March 2011 marked a large stock drop, and shortly after in June THQ had already announced the developer’s closure. A sequel was announced, ''Homefront: The Revolution'', which is set to be released in 2016 by Deep Silver Dambuster.
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** By late 2009 and early 2010, it was looking extremely unlikely that the game would be shipped. Kaos brought in several veteran shooter developers to help, including some from EA.Creator/{{Electronic Arts}}. They also got a new production lead: David Broadhurst, who was rather controversial in his efforts to get Kaos to finish the game on time; he rode several employees hard to ensure that progress would be made, and publicly rebuked them in front of the rest of the studio. Despite the fact that he was solely credited for making sure that ''Homefront'' would be finished, many employees bemoaned his hostile leadership over Kaos. ** The final year of work on the game proved to be a nightmare. Most of Kaos’ employees at this point were emotionally and physically weathered, feeling that their labor was being wasted through mismanagement. This was exemplified when a speech from Votypka at the 2010 Kaos holiday party got a bitter response. [[https://twitter.com/DannyBilson/status/24991583564730370 A comment from Bilson on Twitter]] fueled [[http://www.develop-online.net/news/36730/Seven-day-crunch-for-two-months-at-THQ-studio a complaint towards THQ and Kaos by a developer]], and Votypka had to scramble to defend Kaos and deny several allegations. During this time, other game studios empathetically began to offer jobs to several of Kaos’ employees, who, needless to say, were more than happy to work on other projects and escape the dysfunction. Morale at Kaos soon lowered drastically, and many personnel quietly left the studio. ** The game itself studio. **At the end of the day, ''Homefront'' received mixed reviews, but did not perform as well as Kaos reviews from critics at release and had hoped. Critics all praised the multiplayer over the single-player campaign. After Kaos had released ''Homefront'', completely undershot Kaos's expectations. In March 2011 marked there was a large stock drop, and shortly after in June June, THQ had already announced the developer’s closure. A that [[CreatorKiller Kaos was shutting down]]. However, a sequel was announced, ''Homefront: The Revolution'', which is set to be released in 2016 by Deep Silver Dambuster.
8th Feb '16 3:25:56 AM Freshmeat
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* ''VideoGame/LANoire'' competely destroyed Team Bondi due to the lead designer having [[http://xbox360.ign.com/articles/117/1179020p1.html serious rage issues]] and treating it like his MagnumOpus. In order to get the game back on budget, they hired and chewed up nearly every budding game programmer and artist in Sydney and they were so hostile that publisher Rockstar publicly swore off ever working with them again. Said lead designer reportedly went to work on another project afterward, titled ''The Whore Of The Orient''. Team Bondi has been since bought out by the company that produced ''Film/MadMax'', ''WesternAnimation/HappyFeet'', and Babe, so there may now be a change in their working conditions...
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* ''VideoGame/LANoire'' competely destroyed Team Bondi due to the lead designer having [[http://xbox360.ign.com/articles/117/1179020p1.html serious rage issues]] and treating it like his MagnumOpus.masterpiece. In order to get the game back on budget, they hired and chewed up nearly every budding game programmer and artist in Sydney and they were so hostile that publisher Rockstar publicly swore off ever working with them again. Said lead designer reportedly went to work on another project afterward, titled ''The Whore Of The Orient''. Team Bondi has been since bought out by the company that produced ''Film/MadMax'', ''WesternAnimation/HappyFeet'', and Babe, so there may now be a change in their working conditions...

* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' was intended to be series creator Creator/HideoKojima's magnum opus, but it also marked the end of an era, as it was his final project for Creator/{{Konami}} due to a contentious production.
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* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolidVThePhantomPain'' was intended to be series creator Creator/HideoKojima's magnum opus, masterpiece, but it also marked the end of an era, as it was his final project for Creator/{{Konami}} due to a contentious production.

* SiliconKnights (as documented in the ''Blood Omen'' and ''Eternal Darkness'' entries above) hit its creative nadir with CEO Denis Dyack's pet project and [[MagnumOpusDissonance self-considered magnum opus]] ''VideoGame/TooHuman''. It took second place to ''Duke Nukem Forever'' as the king of {{Vaporware}}: announced in 1999 and released in 2008, having effectively existed in three incarnations on three console generations (UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, and the final released product on UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}). It was cancelled the first time around by the original publishers (a partnership between ElectronicArts and MetroGoldwynMayer) for reasons unknown to even the developers, and sidelined the second time around due to too much workload with Nintendo. The reason why the Xbox 360 was ultimately chosen? Because Dyack, a man of graphics and technology, was utterly disgusted by the {{Wii}} hardware's lack of horsepower and immediately burned bridges with Nintendo.
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* SiliconKnights (as documented in the ''Blood Omen'' and ''Eternal Darkness'' entries above) hit its creative nadir with CEO Denis Dyack's pet project and [[MagnumOpusDissonance self-considered magnum opus]] masterpiece ''VideoGame/TooHuman''. It took second place to ''Duke Nukem Forever'' as the king of {{Vaporware}}: announced in 1999 and released in 2008, having effectively existed in three incarnations on three console generations (UsefulNotes/{{PlayStation}}[=/=]UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn, UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube, and the final released product on UsefulNotes/{{Xbox 360}}). It was cancelled the first time around by the original publishers (a partnership between ElectronicArts and MetroGoldwynMayer) for reasons unknown to even the developers, and sidelined the second time around due to too much workload with Nintendo. The reason why the Xbox 360 was ultimately chosen? Because Dyack, a man of graphics and technology, was utterly disgusted by the {{Wii}} hardware's lack of horsepower and immediately burned bridges with Nintendo.
7th Feb '16 6:43:19 PM Prfnoff
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* ''VideoGame/{{Apocalypse}}'' contains credits for the game that Creator/{{Activision}} tried to develop internally but eventually gave up on and had Neversoft remake from the ground up.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Apocalypse}}'' contains a full list of credits for the version of the game that Creator/{{Activision}} tried to develop internally but eventually gave up on and had Neversoft remake rebuild from the ground up.
7th Feb '16 6:40:43 PM Prfnoff
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* ''VideoGame/{{Apocalypse}}'' contains credits for the game that Creator/{{Activision}} tried to develop internally but eventually gave up on and had Neversoft remake from the ground up.
1st Feb '16 8:33:22 PM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''VideoGame/TombRaiderTheAngelOfDarkness'' was [[http://kotaku.com/that-time-a-gritty-tomb-raider-reboot-almost-sank-the-f-1756491490 beset]] by a [[https://web.archive.org/web/20110223192551/http://www.next-gen.biz/features/the-making-of-tomb-raider-the-angel-of-darkness litany of problems]] that began the moment the game entered development. ** With Creator/CoreDesign's main team working on ''VideoGame/TombRaiderChronicles'', an underfunded new team was put in charge of the ''Franchise/TombRaider'' series' [[UsefulNotes/TheSixthGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames next-gen]] debut on the UsefulNotes/PlayStation2. This team had no experience with the [=PS2=]'s exotic hardware, and spent a year just trying to figure out how to work with it. When Richard Morton, the lead programmer on ''Chronicles'', finished that game and went on to bring his team to work on ''The Angel of Darkness'', he was mortified at what he saw. He and his team had to dump the entire year's work and start from scratch. ** The game was essentially [[TooManyCooksSpoilTheSoup made by committee]]. The senior management at Core was seeking to play FollowTheLeader with the big games of the time, and told the team to incorporate ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid''[='=]s stealth gameplay, ''VideoGame/{{Shenmue}}''[='=]s character interaction, and RPGElements, among other features. They also commissioned a DarkerAndEdgier 'epic' story that would [[EpisodicGame span multiple games]] and take place mostly in modern city environments, as opposed to the tombs and lost civilizations that were the series' hallmark. This led to the game being essentially cut in half midway through development, leaving behind a tangle of {{plot hole}}s, inconsistencies, and characters and story elements that felt tacked-on. None of this went over well with the developers, who had enough trouble getting the game to work properly on the [=PS2=] hardware. ** The public first became aware of these problems at [=E3=] 2002, when Creator/{{Eidos}} and Core showcased 'playable' levels that were little more than tech demos, showing that the game was nowhere near a state where it could be finished by its Fall 2002 release date. Another demonstration at a buyers' conference saw Core co-founder Jeremy Heath-Smith cursing on stage over the buggy state the game was in. ** The game finally came out in June 2003, whereupon it met a scathing reception and sales numbers to match. The fiasco was a CreatorKiller for Core and a FranchiseKiller for ''Tomb Raider'', which only survived by way of [[VideoGame/TombRaiderLegend a reboot]] from Crystal Dynamics.
27th Jan '16 6:57:31 PM mlsmithca
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Emdashes either get spaces on both sides or spaces on neither side. Not space on just one side.
** Shortly after the campaign ended with over $20,000 raised, Evil Dog publicly admitted that --because of some poor money budgeting-- they realized that the funds raised weren't even enough to cover the costs for animations for the first two characters, along with art for other game mechanics like the [[FinishingMove finishing moves]]. With little support elsewhere, the team approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign,]]'' claiming that any contributions would only go towards creating something presentable for potential investors and publishers, rather than a final product. Said investors and publishers ''never'' arrived, so Evil Dog was forced to rely on its backers. They ended up raking in over $47,000. ** The hand-drawn animations for the game took an extremely long time to produce-- not just because some of the mechanics (including the finishing moves) painstakingly required different animations on each separate character, but also that Evil Dog had only two animators working on the game ''in their spare time''. Knowing this, they started ''yet another'' Kickstarter campaign, dedicated to expanding their small roster and hiring more full-time animators, along with breaking down their 9 month schedule to a 2 to 3 months basis to ensure more progress on the animation than before. The campaign made twice its goal, but many of the animations were ''still'' unfinished.
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** Shortly after the campaign ended with over $20,000 raised, Evil Dog publicly admitted that --because -- because of some poor money budgeting-- budgeting -- they realized that the funds raised weren't even enough to cover the costs for animations for the first two characters, along with art for other game mechanics like the [[FinishingMove finishing moves]]. With little support elsewhere, the team approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign,]]'' claiming that any contributions would only go towards creating something presentable for potential investors and publishers, rather than a final product. Said investors and publishers ''never'' arrived, so Evil Dog was forced to rely on its backers. They ended up raking in over $47,000. ** The hand-drawn animations for the game took an extremely long time to produce-- produce -- not just because some of the mechanics (including the finishing moves) painstakingly required different animations on each separate character, but also that Evil Dog had only two animators working on the game ''in their spare time''. Knowing this, they started ''yet another'' Kickstarter campaign, dedicated to expanding their small roster and hiring more full-time animators, along with breaking down their 9 month schedule to a 2 to 3 months basis to ensure more progress on the animation than before. The campaign made twice its goal, but many of the animations were ''still'' unfinished.

** The skewed priorities and the tedious animation further delayed the game's demo. When it finally arrived, [[ObviousBeta the bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] became clear signals --especially to seasoned fighting game players-- that Stevens and Evil Dog, despite claiming the opposite, had little knowledge and experience in fighting game development. Although Evil Dog took feedback and offered to update the demo, it became obvious that their priorities of fixing the gameplay were not in order, as they dedicated ''one full update'' just to add in a character's finisher. ** Evil Dog --perhaps most infamously among fighting game fans-- then promoted the game on ''Skullheart'', the official ''Skullgirls'' forum. They were hopeful that those who supported ''Skullgirls''[='=] crowdfunding effort would be able to do the same for theirs. What followed was Stevens and the lead programmer Marco Arsenault lashing out at ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics in [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. One of those critics was a certain Mike Z, the developer of ''Skullgirls'', who had tried to offer advice and apparently even ''the Skullgirls game engine'' to Evil Dog, to which they refused both. This pretty much killed off any chance of Evil Dog getting support from the ''Skullgirls'' community. ** The horrid PR didn't stop there-- [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 one user on the thread]] claimed that many of the more critical fans of the game found themselves on the receiving end of Evil Dog's attempts to shut them down [[ArtistDisillusionment (branding them "haters" whose criticisms posed a threat to the game's image)]] via confrontational, scathing responses through their social media pages. Apparently, [[{{Determinator}} they even went out of their way to do so]], to the point where they were ''following'' people to multiple sites and live gaming streams just to harass them with said messages.
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** The skewed priorities and the tedious animation further delayed the game's demo. When it finally arrived, [[ObviousBeta the bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] became clear signals --especially -- especially to seasoned fighting game players-- players -- that Stevens and Evil Dog, despite claiming the opposite, had little knowledge and experience in fighting game development. Although Evil Dog took feedback and offered to update the demo, it became obvious that their priorities of fixing the gameplay were not in order, as they dedicated ''one full update'' just to add in a character's finisher. ** Evil Dog --perhaps -- perhaps most infamously among fighting game fans-- fans -- then promoted the game on ''Skullheart'', the official ''Skullgirls'' forum. They were hopeful that those who supported ''Skullgirls''[='=] crowdfunding effort would be able to do the same for theirs. What followed was Stevens and the lead programmer Marco Arsenault lashing out at ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics in [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. One of those critics was a certain Mike Z, the developer of ''Skullgirls'', who had tried to offer advice and apparently even ''the Skullgirls game engine'' to Evil Dog, to which they refused both. This pretty much killed off any chance of Evil Dog getting support from the ''Skullgirls'' community. ** The horrid PR didn't stop there-- there -- [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 one user on the thread]] claimed that many of the more critical fans of the game found themselves on the receiving end of Evil Dog's attempts to shut them down [[ArtistDisillusionment (branding them "haters" whose criticisms posed a threat to the game's image)]] via confrontational, scathing responses through their social media pages. Apparently, [[{{Determinator}} they even went out of their way to do so]], to the point where they were ''following'' people to multiple sites and live gaming streams just to harass them with said messages.

** Creative director Dave Votypka became the general manager, but struggled with doing both jobs at once. THQ’s vice president of core games, Danny Bilson, then stepped forth in an effort to get the game back on track. Despite his past experience, Bilson’s arrogance and inconsistency at times threw off a lot of Kaos employees. His ideas were suddenly pitching the game as a rival of the ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series-- a task deemed by Kaos and THQ as too large to undertake. However, the team would press forward doing so anyway, which clashed with their original ideas for the game’s story and environments; they made tons of last-minute revisions in the hopes of surpassing what ''Call of Duty'' offered.
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** Creative director Dave Votypka became the general manager, but struggled with doing both jobs at once. THQ’s vice president of core games, Danny Bilson, then stepped forth in an effort to get the game back on track. Despite his past experience, Bilson’s arrogance and inconsistency at times threw off a lot of Kaos employees. His ideas were suddenly pitching the game as a rival of the ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'' series-- series -- a task deemed by Kaos and THQ as too large to undertake. However, the team would press forward doing so anyway, which clashed with their original ideas for the game’s story and environments; they made tons of last-minute revisions in the hopes of surpassing what ''Call of Duty'' offered.
27th Jan '16 6:45:01 PM multibrawlr
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** Evil Dog --perhaps most infamously among fighting game fans-- then promoted the game on ''Skullheart'', the official ''Skullgirls'' forum. They were hopeful that those who supported ''Skullgirls''[='=] crowdfunding effort would be able to do the same for theirs. What followed was Stevens and the lead programmer Marco Arsenault lashing out at ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics in [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. One of those critics was a certain Mike Z, the developer of ''Skullgirls'', who had tried to offer advice and apparently even ''the Skullgirls game engine'' to Evil Dog, to which they refused both. This pretty much killed off any chance of Evil Dog getting support from the community of what's been regarded as one of the most popular fighting games available. ** The horrid PR didn't stop there- [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 one user on the thread]] claimed that many of the more critical fans of the game found themselves on the receiving end of Evil Dog's attempts to shut them down [[ArtistDisillusionment (branding them "haters" whose criticisms posed a threat to the game's image)]] via confrontational, scathing responses through social media apps including Facebook and Twitter. Apparently, [[{{Determinator}} they even went out of their way to do so]], to the point where they were ''following'' people across multiple sites just to harass them with said messages. ** Things then took a turn for the [[FromBadtoWorse worse]] when [[InternetBackdraft backlash]] erupted following the revelation that Adam Wan, a [[FurryFandom furry]] artist accused of being a bully and a sexual predator, was tied to the project. In response, Evil Dog quietly dropped his name from their crowdfunding campaigns, but there was no official word if Wan was actually removed from the team. This led to fans speculating that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information from them. Wan's involvement was later confirmed by one of Evil Dog's game designers on an Internet chat log, but the whole outrage was already enough to strike a blow to the game's image and contribute more to the discontent of both its gaming and furry fanbases.
to:
** Evil Dog --perhaps most infamously among fighting game fans-- then promoted the game on ''Skullheart'', the official ''Skullgirls'' forum. They were hopeful that those who supported ''Skullgirls''[='=] crowdfunding effort would be able to do the same for theirs. What followed was Stevens and the lead programmer Marco Arsenault lashing out at ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics in [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. One of those critics was a certain Mike Z, the developer of ''Skullgirls'', who had tried to offer advice and apparently even ''the Skullgirls game engine'' to Evil Dog, to which they refused both. This pretty much killed off any chance of Evil Dog getting support from the community of what's been regarded as one of the most popular fighting games available. ''Skullgirls'' community. ** The horrid PR didn't stop there- there-- [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 one user on the thread]] claimed that many of the more critical fans of the game found themselves on the receiving end of Evil Dog's attempts to shut them down [[ArtistDisillusionment (branding them "haters" whose criticisms posed a threat to the game's image)]] via confrontational, scathing responses through their social media apps including Facebook and Twitter. pages. Apparently, [[{{Determinator}} they even went out of their way to do so]], to the point where they were ''following'' people across to multiple sites and live gaming streams just to harass them with said messages. ** Things then took a turn for the [[FromBadtoWorse worse]] when Then [[InternetBackdraft backlash]] erupted following the revelation that Adam Wan, a [[FurryFandom furry]] artist Adam Wan, who was accused by the fandom of being a bully and a sexual predator, was tied to the project. In response, Evil Dog quietly dropped his name from their crowdfunding campaigns, but there was no official word they didn't officially announce if Wan was actually removed from the team. This led to fans speculating that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information from them. Wan's involvement was later confirmed by one of Evil Dog's game designers on an Internet chat log, but the whole outrage was already enough to strike a blow to the game's image and contribute more to the discontent of both its gaming and furry fanbases.fans.

** In January 2016, [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ an interview]] with Beast Fury Studios on FurAffinity confirmed the project's cancellation. Some [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 animators]] and [[https://twitter.com/DanielleMcVO/status/685287693597556738?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw voice actors]] involved with the game then stepped forth to disclose Stevens' inexperience in game development, bemoan their poor treatment by him behind the scenes, and that he wasn't paying them. Stevens made it clear that he was intending on personally refunding every single person who had either worked for him unpaid or had supported the crowdfunding campaigns, along with sending every backer their long-awaited awards. The fighting game community has since used the meltdown as a prime example of what budding developers ''shouldn't'' do when making a fighting game.
to:
** In January 2016, [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ an interview]] with Beast Fury Studios on FurAffinity confirmed the project's cancellation. Some [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 animators]] and [[https://twitter.com/DanielleMcVO/status/685287693597556738?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw voice actors]] involved with the game then stepped forth to disclose Stevens' inexperience in point fingers at Stevens for his game development, bemoan their poor treatment by him behind development inexperience, his mean-spirited and hostile personality to his workers, and the scenes, and fact that he wasn't paying them. Stevens made it clear quickly assured that he was intending on personally refunding every single person who had either worked for him unpaid or had supported the crowdfunding campaigns, along with reimbursing workers and issuing refunds and sending every backer their long-awaited awards.physical rewards for the campaigns to backers. The fighting game community has since used the meltdown as a prime example of what budding developers ''shouldn't'' do when making a fighting game.
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