History TroubledProduction / VideoGames

14th Mar '17 11:28:09 AM mlsmithca
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** [=YandereDev=] had always wanted to garner a fanbase from something of his creation. He ended up getting his wish, and it ''[[GoneHorriblyRight far]]'' [[GoneHorriblyRight exceeded his expectations]]; on a daily basis, he was literally flooded with emails and comments, ''all of which'' he tried reading (which consequently gave himself less time to develop the game).[=YandereDev=] quickly [[WhyTheFandomCantHaveNiceThings became loathe to reply to fan emails and comments]]. Furthermore, he issued [[https://yanderedev.wordpress.com/.../things-you-should-not-email-yanderedev-about/ constant reminders]] to discourage his fanbase's misguided efforts to assist (including unhelpful bug reports, offers of help without a proper resume, and suggestions that were impossible, already considered, or outright stupid)[[note]]Fan art is the only exception[[/note]]. The fact that [=YandereDev=] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbQkf10LBnA was forced to do so]] ''on the game's two-year anniversary'' and created an AudienceSurrogate character based upon those who annoy him speaks volumes.

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** [=YandereDev=] had always wanted to garner a fanbase from something of his creation. He ended up getting his wish, and it ''[[GoneHorriblyRight far]]'' [[GoneHorriblyRight exceeded his expectations]]; on a daily basis, he was literally flooded with emails and comments, ''all of which'' he tried reading (which consequently gave himself less time to develop the game). [=YandereDev=] quickly [[WhyTheFandomCantHaveNiceThings became loathe to reply to fan emails and comments]]. Furthermore, he issued [[https://yanderedev.wordpress.com/.../things-you-should-not-email-yanderedev-about/ constant reminders]] to discourage his fanbase's misguided efforts to assist (including unhelpful bug reports, offers of help without a proper resume, and suggestions that were impossible, already considered, or outright stupid)[[note]]Fan art is the only exception[[/note]]. The fact that [=YandereDev=] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbQkf10LBnA was forced to do so]] ''on the game's two-year anniversary'' and created an AudienceSurrogate character based upon those who annoy him speaks volumes.
12th Mar '17 8:02:40 PM multibrawlr
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* Development on ''VideoGame/YandereSimulator'' began in 2014 by its sole programmer, "[=YandereDev=]", and ever since then has trudged through a lengthy (and rather stressful) production.
** [=YandereDev=] had always wanted to garner a fanbase from something of his creation. He ended up getting his wish, and it ''[[GoneHorriblyRight far]]'' [[GoneHorriblyRight exceeded his expectations]]; on a daily basis, he was literally flooded with emails and comments, ''all of which'' he tried reading (which consequently gave himself less time to develop the game).[=YandereDev=] quickly [[WhyTheFandomCantHaveNiceThings became loathe to reply to fan emails and comments]]. Furthermore, he issued [[https://yanderedev.wordpress.com/.../things-you-should-not-email-yanderedev-about/ constant reminders]] to discourage his fanbase's misguided efforts to assist (including unhelpful bug reports, offers of help without a proper resume, and suggestions that were impossible, already considered, or outright stupid)[[note]]Fan art is the only exception[[/note]]. The fact that [=YandereDev=] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbQkf10LBnA was forced to do so]] ''on the game's two-year anniversary'' and created an AudienceSurrogate character based upon those who annoy him speaks volumes.
** As of January 2016, Website/{{Twitch}} [[ScrewedByTheNetwork has banned the game]] and threatened to immediately suspend anyone caught streaming it. [=YandereDev=] stated in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hS6GLrM0mVA a video]] that he was provided no explanation for this, arguing that the violent and questionable content in ''Yandere Simulator'' can be seen in other games allowed by Twitch. An official response ''finally'' came in February 2017, stating that things in early builds like the naked [[Manga/AttackOnTitan Titans]] and violence against minors[[note]](no peaceful executions existed at the time)[[/note]] had violated guidelines. While later versions have rectified most of the complaints, Twitch has nonetheless refused to re-review the game until it is closer to completion.
** Numerous [[ScheduleSlip schedule slippages]] -- all of which documented on [[Trivia/YandereSimulator the game's Trivia page]] -- plagued development with delays. Among the reasons include [[https://twitter.com/YandereDev/status/686364522882306048 YandereDev's hard drive dying]] on January 10, 2016 (which fortunately didn't delete progress) and a trip to Anime Expo later in July 2016. [=YandereDev=] projected that the game would be released in 2015 with a Kickstarter project for higher production values and to get it on UsefulNotes/{{Steam}}. Given the sluggish pace from a one-man-band programmer like himself, however, ''Yandere Simulator'' has been pushed back as far as 2019.
** Money troubles were apparent, as the $5,000 a month from Patreon that [=YandereDev=] received wasn't enough to hire volunteer animators or riggers who were competent (at least, not while also paying voice actors and 3D modelers). This in turn made implementing Rival-chan excessively difficult, who was incompatible with the animation rigs [=YandereDev=] currently had.
** Despite his best efforts, [=YandereDev=] continued falling behind on updates, and on February 2017 finally had a CreatorBreakdown. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Us5PPyEvKWo A video]] revealed that, for the past two years, [=YandereDev=] had sacrificed most of his personal life and health to work on the game 24/7--all while operating under fears of under-delivering fan expectations and the game dying from a subsequent loss of interest. Additionally, he called into question his own programming skills, expressing interest on hiring a more experienced programmer to help refurbish the game engine. Thus, [=YandereDev=] ended up partnering with [=tinyBuild=] for further development on the game.
11th Mar '17 1:30:23 PM BKelly95
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* ''Parasol Stars'', a spin-off from the ''VideoGame/BubbleBobble'' series, was ported to several systems in the early nineties. However, the Commodore 64 version was cancelled because of a relatively minor Troubled Production. The port was assigned to a programmer whose marriage was falling apart. One night, the programmer got into a heated argument with his wife, so she got on his computer and erased all his work on the port. You're probably thinking "But why didn't he [[NoPlansNoPrototypeNoBackup make backups]]?" Actually, [[SubvertedTrope he did]], but his wife found those and [[DoubleSubversion destroyed them as well]]. At first, Ocean Software tried to cover for the programmer by claiming his computer had been stolen, but later came clean.
27th Feb '17 7:25:21 PM Emptyeye
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* Sir-Tech Software were so confident that ''[[{{VideoGame/Wizardry}} Wizardry IV: The Return of Werdna]]'' would be available by the end of 1984 that they actually told a magazine to announce it was available in its November 1984 issue. The game wouldn't actually see release until 1987; when it was released, a combination of still using tech from 1981 and ludicrous difficulty even by dungeon-crawler standards made it the poorest-selling product in the company's history. [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wizardry_IV:_The_Return_of_Werdna The Other Wiki]] has more on the story.
26th Feb '17 2:53:26 PM nombretomado
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** After a Japanese localization was released and the developers used crowdfunding campaigns to raise enough money to realize the first four DLC characters (as well as the Xbox patch), {{Konami}} wouldn't respond to any contact from Lab Zero, meaning the DLC couldn't be released on consoles. Lab Zero decided to cut their ties to Konami and seek publishing from Marvelous AQL, who published the PC version. In response, Konami requested the game be delisted from both Xbox Live and PSN in December 2013. Lab Zero was only notified of this ''after'' Microsoft and Sony approved the delisting. Thankfully, due to the transfer of publishing rights from Konami to Marvelous AQL, the game was re-released as ''Skullgirls Encore'' in January 2014, and included the long-awaited console release of DLC character Squigly (for free, no less!).

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** After a Japanese localization was released and the developers used crowdfunding campaigns to raise enough money to realize the first four DLC characters (as well as the Xbox patch), {{Konami}} {{Creator/Konami}} wouldn't respond to any contact from Lab Zero, meaning the DLC couldn't be released on consoles. Lab Zero decided to cut their ties to Konami and seek publishing from Marvelous AQL, who published the PC version. In response, Konami requested the game be delisted from both Xbox Live and PSN in December 2013. Lab Zero was only notified of this ''after'' Microsoft and Sony approved the delisting. Thankfully, due to the transfer of publishing rights from Konami to Marvelous AQL, the game was re-released as ''Skullgirls Encore'' in January 2014, and included the long-awaited console release of DLC character Squigly (for free, no less!).
12th Feb '17 10:02:51 AM TheGreenHerring
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* The development of ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' itself went generally smoothly, but its infamous [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDOInteractiveMultiplayer 3DO]] port was something else. It was produced by a company called Art Data Interactive that reportedly believed that all one had to do to port a game to another platform was to recompile its code, and that new weapons could be added just by importing new art assets. This ultimately led to the port being developed by ''one programmer in ten weeks'', which forced her to live in her office to complete it in time. This alongside the difficulties she ran into with the 3DO explains why the result was such a PortingDisaster. Nine years later, the programmer, [[https://github.com/Olde-Skuul/doom3do Rebecca Heineman, released the source code alongside her story of its production and a wish that she had time to polish her work before release.]]

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* The development of ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' itself went generally smoothly, but its infamous [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDOInteractiveMultiplayer 3DO]] port was something else. It was produced by a company called Art Data Interactive that reportedly believed that all one had to do to port a game to another platform was to recompile its code, and that new weapons could be added just by importing new art assets. This ultimately led to the port being developed by ''one programmer in ten weeks'', which forced her to live in her office to complete it in time. This alongside the difficulties she ran into with the 3DO explains why the result was such a PortingDisaster. Nine years later, the programmer, [[https://github.com/Olde-Skuul/doom3do Rebecca Heineman, released the source code alongside her story of its production and a wish that she had time to polish her work before release.]]
21st Jan '17 10:10:02 PM multibrawlr
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** The project began in 2013 when Austrailian indie game developer Rhyan Stevens and his Montreal-based company, Evil Dog Productions, [[note]] primarily known for flash and mobile games like ''The Road of the Dead'', [[/note]] sought to capitalize on the fame and recognition of Lab Zero's popular 2-D fighter ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' with [[StartMyOwn a 2-D fighter of their own.]] The fact that development had begun on such a propitious note [[ToughActToFollow coupled with how high the bar had been set by its predecessor]] was perhaps a sign of the meltdown to come.
** Taking a page from ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created one of his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' Hoping to provide backers more incentive to support the project, Stevens reached out to much-revered Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]], promising them to be included as guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. He even got professional fighting game player Justin Wong in on [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 plugging]] [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/596559628554506241 the game]]. While this proved successful (the campaign raised over $20,000), the guest characters were never finished; reportedly, the Youtubers were only promised ''a stake in the project'', as opposed to actual money for their inclusion in the game.[[note]] It's really no wonder why Max and Aaron quietly severed their support, and are yet to mention the project ever again.[[/note]]
** Shortly after the campaign ended, a public admittance from Evil Dog revealed that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Moreover, they couldn't finish the initial two characters from the game's cast with what they received. With little support elsewhere, the team approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would only be used to create -- rather than a final product -- something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived,[[note]] save for one, which was apparently turned down, [[/note]] forcing Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money. In the face of skepticism, Evil Dog raked in over $47,000.
** Unbeknownst to Evil Dog's audience, [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 there were numerous problems]] running amok behind the scenes. Stevens was reportedly [[BadBoss verbally abusive, overly demanding ]] and (allegedly) ''even went as far as not paying his animators'', which had created a stressful working environment without leadership or morale. The hand-drawn animations themselves were both time-consuming and expensive: the game was planned to have ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]] which required exclusive animations when performed on every single current ''and'' future character in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' frequently reused animations whenever possible to keep costs down, while at the same time avoiding gimmicky mechanics like these which had no impact on gameplay. [[/note]] Even worse -- only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog addressed this issue with ''yet another'' campaign on Kickstarter, promising to expand their roster and adjust animators' schedules for more progress. It ended up making twice its goal, but yet most of the animations remained unfinished.
** Coupling this was Evil Dog's unnerving tendency to use the campaign money more on the game's aesthetic (which included the aforementioned finishing moves) [[SkewedPriorities and less on developing and refining the gameplay]]. The funds were wasted away on in-game cinematics and even [[VersusCharacterSplash versus splash art]] and [[IdleAnimation idle animations]] for characters that weren't even ''started'' yet and were unlikely to ever be finished, given the game's troubled state. Ridiculously enough, Evil Dog was making plans for a sequel and an animated short film -- all before even ''the demo'' of their first game was to be released. [[note]] These ideas ended as quickly as they started when the game's troubles didn't improve. [[/note]]
** The game's long-awaited demo was constantly delayed because of these problems, though when it finally arrived, it proved to be a major letdown. Stevens and Evil Dog claimed that they were "experienced" in fighting game development, but the [[ObviousBeta bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] proved otherwise to seasoned fighting game players. Evil Dog took feedback and offered to update the demo, but to the chagrin of players, they failed to follow through on their promises, dedicating ''entire updates'' just to add in non-gameplay features like the finishing moves.
** In the hopes that those who supported ''Skullgirls''[='=] crowdfunding campaign would be able to do the same for their project, Evil Dog took to the game's official forum, ''Skullheart'', as a means of promotion. What followed was Stevens and Evil Dog's lead programmer Marco Arsenault relentlessly attacking ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics on [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. One the critics who they were especially harsh to was Mike "Z" Zaimont -- ''Skullgirls''[='=] developer, who tried to offer Evil Dog his vast game development experience and even ''the Skullgirls game engine'' for them to use, but [[WhatAnIdiot they declined his offer]]. It was also [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 suggested]] that Evil Dog [[{{Determinator}} was going out of their way]] to give the same treatment to critics on social media, to the point where they were ''following'' people across websites and live gaming streams to harass them with scathing, confrontational messages [[ArtistDisillusionment that defended the game]]. Stevens and Evil Dog were [[https://youtu.be/DslNQQ-Xmdc?t=572 condemned]] for [[CantTakeCriticism their poor handling of criticism]], which had ''decimated'' all hope of getting any support whatsoever from the ''Skullgirls'' community.
** On top of this, [[InternetBackdraft backlash]] erupted following the revelation that [[FurryFandom furry]] artist Adam Wan -- who was accused by the fandom of being a bully and a sexual predator -- was tied to the project. In panic mode, Evil Dog quietly dropped all mention of Wan from their crowdfunding campaigns, but they didn't officially announce if he was actually removed from the team...which led to mass speculation that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information. Wan's involvement [[CassandraTruth was later confirmed by one of Evil Dog's game designers on an Internet chat log]], but the whole outrage had already stricken a blow to the game's image and contributed more to the discontent of its fans.
** Despite the online acrimony, Evil Dog nonetheless returned with [[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story another Indiegogo campaign]] and a Patreon in May 2015. The goal was an immense $185,000, which was far more realistic -- if not daunting -- than their initial campaigns. But by this point, Evil Dog had burned so many bridges from years of incompetence and animosity, and so it was no surprise that the campaign flopped ''spectacularly''. It received only a measly $1,620 pledged from 32 backers[[note]] which the team still pocketed due to "flexible funding"[[/note]]...a mere 1% of their goal. This was followed by a damning report in which Stevens -- in anticipation of the campaign's eventual failure -- had [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project to focus on his personal life.]]
** Later, in January 2016, several things happened: [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ an interview]] on [=FurAffinity=] with the developers was released, confirming that the project was cancelled. A comment by Stevens that suggested that he was entitled to the raised money ignited a massive InternetBackdraft. As documented [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40&feature=iv&src_vid=b4Sq6pkQBTc&annotation_id=annotation_2029632283 here]], several voice actors (including {{Creator/Danielle McRae}}), animators and others involved with the project -- one by one -- publicly recounted their poor experiences with it during development, which [[CreatorKiller further tattered the image of Stevens and Evil Dog]]. Meanwhile, the thousands of campaign backers who couldn't get refunds were equally livid, with many proclaiming Stevens a "thief" and the project an utter scam, as well a handful threatening legal action. Since then, the fighting game community have used the development of ''Beast's Fury'' as a prime example of the "don'ts" of fighting game development.

to:

** The project began in 2013 when Austrailian indie game developer Rhyan Stevens and his Montreal-based company, Evil Dog Productions, [[note]] primarily known for flash and mobile games like ''The Road of the Dead'', [[/note]] sought to capitalize on the fame and recognition of Lab Zero's popular 2-D fighter ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' with [[StartMyOwn a 2-D fighter of their own.]] The fact that development had begun on such a propitious note - [[ToughActToFollow coupled with how high the bar had been set by its predecessor]] - was perhaps a sign of the meltdown to come.
** Taking a page from ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created one of his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' Hoping to provide backers more incentive to support the project, Stevens reached out to much-revered Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]], promising them to be included as their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. He even got professional fighting game player Justin Wong in on [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 plugging]] [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/596559628554506241 the game]]. While this proved successful (the campaign raised over $20,000), the guest characters were never finished; reportedly, the Youtubers were only promised ''a stake in the project'', as opposed to actual money for their inclusion in the game.[[note]] It's really no wonder why Max and Aaron quietly severed their support, and are yet to mention the project ever again.[[/note]]
** Shortly after the campaign ended, a public admittance from Evil Dog revealed [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Moreover, Furthermore, they couldn't finish the initial two characters from the game's cast with what they received. With little support elsewhere, the team approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would only be used to create -- rather than a final product -- something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived,[[note]] save for one, which was apparently turned down, [[/note]] forcing Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money. In the face of skepticism, Evil Dog raked in over $47,000.
** Unbeknownst to Evil Dog's audience, [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 there were numerous problems]] running amok behind the scenes. Stevens was reportedly [[BadBoss verbally abusive, overly demanding ]] and (allegedly) ''even went as far as not paying his animators'', which had created a stressful working environment without leadership or morale. The hand-drawn animations themselves were both time-consuming and expensive: the game was planned to have ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]] which required exclusive animations when performed on every single current ''and'' future character in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' frequently reused animations whenever possible to keep costs down, while at the same time avoiding and avoided gimmicky mechanics like these which had no with little impact on gameplay.gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse -- only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog addressed this issue with ''yet another'' campaign on Kickstarter, promising to expand their roster and adjust animators' schedules for more progress. It ended up making twice its goal, but yet most of the animations remained unfinished.
** Coupling Coupled with this was Evil Dog's unnerving tendency to use the campaign money more on the game's aesthetic (which included the aforementioned finishing moves) [[SkewedPriorities and less on developing and refining the gameplay]]. The funds were wasted away on in-game cinematics and even [[VersusCharacterSplash versus splash art]] and [[IdleAnimation idle animations]] for characters that weren't even ''started'' yet and were unlikely to ever be finished, given the game's troubled state. Ridiculously enough, Evil Dog was making plans for a sequel and an animated short film -- all before even ''the demo'' of their first game was to be released. [[note]] These released (though said ideas ended as quickly as they started when the game's troubles didn't improve. [[/note]]
worsened).
** The These problems constantly pushed back the release of the game's long-awaited demo was constantly delayed because of these problems, though anticipated demo, which -- when it finally arrived, it proved to be arrived -- wound up a major letdown. Stevens and Evil Dog claimed that they were "experienced" in fighting game development, but the [[ObviousBeta bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] proved otherwise to seasoned fighting game players. Evil Dog took feedback and offered pledged to update the demo, release patches, but to the chagrin of players, they failed to follow through on their promises, dedicating dedicated ''entire updates'' just to add adding in non-gameplay features like the finishing moves.
moves, rather than following through on their initial promises.
** In Vying for the hopes that those who supported support of ''Skullgirls''[='=] crowdfunding campaign would be able to do the same for their project, backers, Evil Dog took to promoted the game's project on the official forum, ''Skullheart'', as a means of promotion. ''Skullheart''. What followed -- in an epic public relations fail -- was Stevens and Evil Dog's his lead programmer Marco Arsenault relentlessly attacking ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics on [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. One the critics who they were especially harsh to was Mike "Z" Zaimont -- ''Skullgirls''[='=] developer, who tried to developer Mike "Z" Zaimont was among them, whose advice and offer Evil Dog his vast game development experience and even to provide ''the Skullgirls game engine'' for them to use, but [[WhatAnIdiot they declined his offer]]. It was also were harshly rejected. Elsewhere, [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 suggested]] it became apparent]] that Evil Dog [[{{Determinator}} was going out of their way]] to give the same treatment to critics on social media, to the point where they were ''following'' people across websites and live gaming streams to harass a dedicated Evil Dog]] stalked those with negative opinions online, harassing them with scathing, confrontational messages [[ArtistDisillusionment that defended messages. Their [[CantTakeCriticism treatment of criticism like the game]]. Stevens and Evil Dog were devil]] was widely [[https://youtu.be/DslNQQ-Xmdc?t=572 condemned]] for [[CantTakeCriticism their poor handling of criticism]], which had ''decimated'' all hope condemned]], granting the project notoriety among the fighting game community and killing any chance of getting any the support whatsoever from of the ''Skullgirls'' community.
** On top of this, Then, [[InternetBackdraft backlash]] erupted following the revelation that [[FurryFandom furry]] artist Adam Wan -- who was accused by the fandom of being a bully and a sexual predator -- was tied to the project. In panic mode, Evil Dog quietly dropped all mention of Wan from their crowdfunding campaigns, but they didn't officially announce if he was actually removed from the team...which led to mass speculation that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information. Wan's involvement [[CassandraTruth was later confirmed by one of Evil Dog's game designers on an Internet chat log]], but the whole outrage damage had already stricken a blow to the game's image and contributed more to the discontent of its fans.
been done.
** Despite the online acrimony, Evil Dog nonetheless returned was bold enough to return with [[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story another Indiegogo campaign]] and a Patreon in May 2015. The goal was an immense $185,000, which was far more realistic -- if not daunting -- than their initial campaigns. But by By this point, however, Evil Dog Dog's incompetence and animosity had burned so many bridges from years of incompetence and animosity, and so it was no surprise that the ''the majority of their fanbase'' essentially refused to help them any further en masse. The campaign flopped ''spectacularly''. It received in spectacular fashion, receiving only a measly $1,620 pledged from 32 backers[[note]] which the team still pocketed due to "flexible funding"[[/note]]...a mere 1% of their goal. This was followed by a damning report in which Stevens -- in anticipation of Anticipating the campaign's eventual failure -- had failure, Stevens [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project to focus on his personal life.]]
** Later, The project was finally cancelled in January 2016, several things happened: according to [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ an interview]] on [=FurAffinity=] with the developers was released, confirming that the project was cancelled.Evil Dog. A comment by Stevens that suggested that he was entitled to the raised money ignited a massive InternetBackdraft. As documented Outcry was generated among the thousands of campaign backers who wouldn't receive refunds, with some threatening legal action. In retaliation, a multitude of animators and voice actors who worked on the project (including {{Creator/Danielle McRae}}) [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40&feature=iv&src_vid=b4Sq6pkQBTc&annotation_id=annotation_2029632283 here]], several voice actors (including {{Creator/Danielle McRae}}), animators and others involved with the project -- one by one -- publicly recounted publically told their poor experiences with it during development, which stories, while also lambasting Evil Dog]]. The reputations of Stevens and his company were mercilessly ravaged [[CreatorKiller further tattered the image of Stevens and Evil Dog]]. Meanwhile, the thousands of campaign backers who couldn't get refunds until they were equally livid, with many proclaiming Stevens a "thief" and the project an utter scam, as well a handful threatening legal action.no more]]. Since then, the fighting game community have used the development of ''Beast's Fury'' as a prime example of the "don'ts" of fighting game development.
19th Jan '17 10:36:30 AM nm3youtube
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* ''VideoGame/{{Action 52}}'' is what happens when you get four inexperienced programmers together in a recording studio, have them work on 52 games at once in the time it takes to make ''one'', constantly change ideas throughout development, and expect to kickstart a franchise without even getting an official release. It's lucky to have even been finished.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Action 52}}'' is what happens when you get four inexperienced programmers together in a recording studio, have them work on 52 games at once in the less time than it takes to make ''one'', constantly change ideas throughout development, and expect to kickstart a franchise without even getting an official release. It's lucky to have even been finished.finished, and [[ObviousBeta there was no way in hell any bug testing was going to take place]].
14th Jan '17 6:28:19 PM nombretomado
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* [[Creator/LucasArts LucasArts]]'s fall from grace and eventual dissolution has been covered in multiple [[http://kotaku.com/how-lucasarts-fell-apart-1401731043 feature stories]], and showed a company that was equal parts mismanaged and directionless.

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* [[Creator/LucasArts LucasArts]]'s Creator/LucasArts' fall from grace and eventual dissolution has been covered in multiple [[http://kotaku.com/how-lucasarts-fell-apart-1401731043 feature stories]], and showed a company that was equal parts mismanaged and directionless.



** The developer started production on an internal prototype for the next installment in the ''Battlefront'' series. According to interviews with co-founder Steve Ellis, the concept was so good that Lucasarts was pushing them to release it as soon as possible, and they promised gameplay elements like a seamless transition from the player flying a ship in space to landing on a planet and exiting, cutting-edge tech upgrades and more. Likewise, [=LucasArts=] reportedly promised the developer that they could also develop a ''Battlefront 4'' if the third installment was successful.
** In early 2008, [=LucasArts=] went through a round of layoffs and the relationship between the publisher and developer soured. [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-04-26-timesplitters-dev-was-working-on-star-wars-battlefront-3-and-4 According to Ellis]], the new executives were sour on the concept and wanted to trim as many projects as they could. Consequently, the game began missing content milestones, and previous cash injections that were given by LucasArts dried up. Other accounts claim that the company was deliberately lying about their progress on the game to continue receiving support payments from [=LucasArts=]. All of this was compounded by the failure of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 game ''VideoGame/{{Haze}}'', which sold poorly and garnered harsh critical reviews.

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** The developer started production on an internal prototype for the next installment in the ''Battlefront'' series. According to interviews with co-founder Steve Ellis, the concept was so good that Lucasarts [=LucasArts=] was pushing them to release it as soon as possible, and they promised gameplay elements like a seamless transition from the player flying a ship in space to landing on a planet and exiting, cutting-edge tech upgrades and more. Likewise, [=LucasArts=] reportedly promised the developer that they could also develop a ''Battlefront 4'' if the third installment was successful.
** In early 2008, [=LucasArts=] went through a round of layoffs and the relationship between the publisher and developer soured. [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-04-26-timesplitters-dev-was-working-on-star-wars-battlefront-3-and-4 According to Ellis]], the new executives were sour on the concept and wanted to trim as many projects as they could. Consequently, the game began missing content milestones, and previous cash injections that were given by LucasArts [=LucasArts=] dried up. Other accounts claim that the company was deliberately lying about their progress on the game to continue receiving support payments from [=LucasArts=]. All of this was compounded by the failure of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 game ''VideoGame/{{Haze}}'', which sold poorly and garnered harsh critical reviews.
13th Jan '17 2:17:33 PM comicwriter
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* ''Marvel'', the cancelled Franchise/MarvelUniverse fighting game from Creator/ElectronicArts, was plagued with problems from Day 1:

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* ''Marvel'', ''Marvel'' aka ''Marvel: Chaos'', the cancelled Franchise/MarvelUniverse fighting game from Creator/ElectronicArts, was plagued with problems from Day 1:
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.VideoGames