History TroubledProduction / VideoGames

17th Jul '17 5:21:30 PM Kelothan
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* ''VideoGame/{{Action 52}}'' is what happens when you get four inexperienced programmers together in a recording studio, have them work on 52 games at once in less time than it takes to make ''one'', constantly change ideas throughout development, and expect to kickstart a franchise without even getting an official release. It's lucky to have even been finished, and [[ObviousBeta there was no way in hell any bug testing was going to take place]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Action 52}}'' is what happens when you get four inexperienced programmers together in a recording studio, have them work on 52 games at once in less time than it takes to make ''one'', constantly change ideas throughout development, and expect to kickstart a franchise without even getting an official release. with little promotion. It's lucky to have even been finished, and [[ObviousBeta there was almost no way in hell any bug testing was going to take took place]].
14th Jul '17 4:09:10 PM Anicomicgeek
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** The first account, via WordOfGod [[http://nichegamer.com/2015/05/denis-dyack-interview-part-1-yellow-journalism-and-what-really-happened-with-x-men-destiny/ from Silicon Knights chef Denis Dyack]], claims that behind-the-scenes Creator/MarvelComics licensing problems threw a monkey wrench into the game's budget: He says that the game was intended as a major AAA release at the end published by Activision, who formerly held the Marvel game license at the beginning of development, with Silicon Knights even pumping even more money into the budget than its employees' salary.\\\

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** The first account, via WordOfGod [[http://nichegamer.com/2015/05/denis-dyack-interview-part-1-yellow-journalism-and-what-really-happened-with-x-men-destiny/ from Silicon Knights chef chief Denis Dyack]], claims that behind-the-scenes Creator/MarvelComics licensing problems threw a monkey wrench into the game's budget: He says that the game was intended as a major AAA release at the end published by Activision, who formerly held the Marvel game license at the beginning of development, with Silicon Knights even pumping even more money into the budget than its employees' salary.\\\
14th Jul '17 4:09:10 PM Anicomicgeek
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3rd Jul '17 5:11:44 AM TheEditor
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** In the finished product now, all the signs are there -- an abrupt and DisappointingLastLevel, with several promised features not coming to fruition, the game's TwistEnding revealed suddenly and out of context, and the game's TrueFinalBoss deleted and reduced to unfinished cutscene footage as a special edition Blu-Ray extra. An entire third chapter of the game appears to have been cut when it became apparent that the game was not going to break even for Konami. It's rumored that the game has become a CreatorKiller for Konami's AAA game production, though the company has publicly denied this.

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** In When the finished product now, all game finally came out, it was immediately bombarded with universal acclaim... with the signs are there -- an abrupt and exception of a notoriously DisappointingLastLevel, with several promised features not coming to fruition, the game's TwistEnding revealed suddenly and out of context, and the game's TrueFinalBoss deleted and reduced to unfinished cutscene footage as a special edition Blu-Ray extra. An entire third chapter of the game appears to have been cut when it became apparent that the game was not going to break even for Konami. It's rumored that the game has become a CreatorKiller for Konami's AAA game production, though the company has publicly denied this.
25th Jun '17 12:47:45 PM multibrawlr
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** Shortly after, Evil Dog [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Furthermore, they were unable to complete the first two characters with what they had received. With little support elsewhere, Evil Dog approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would strictly be used to create something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived ( psave for one, which was apparently turned down). This forced Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money, who, despite skepticism, raked in over $47,000.
** Unbeknownst to the public, [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 numerous problems]] ran amok behind the scenes. The biggest was Stevens himself, whose [[BadBoss verbally abusive and demanding nature]] ex-employees contributed to a stressful working environment without leadership or morale. He was also alleged to have been ''forgoing pay'' to his animators and voice actors -- like {{Creator/Danielle McRae}} -- on board with the project. This resulted in Maximilian Dood and Egoraptor's guest characters being scrapped, their respective likenesses having since distanced themselves from the project altogether.
** The animators had it worse: on top of Stevens' arrogance, they were hamstrung by the sluggish nature of developing the hand-drawn sprites. In one case, they painstakingly resized every individual sprite to improve frame rate. Expenses skyrocketed from the ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]], which required exclusive animations when performed on all current ''and'' future characters in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' reused animations and avoided gimmicky mechanics with little impact on gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse, only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog promised to expand their roster and speed up progress with ''yet another'' Kickstarter campaign, which improved nothing despite making twice its goal.

to:

** Shortly after, Evil Dog [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Furthermore, they were unable to complete the first two characters with what they had received. With little support elsewhere, Evil Dog approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would strictly be used to create something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived ( psave (save for one, which was apparently turned down). This forced Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money, who, despite skepticism, raked in over $47,000.
** Unbeknownst to the public, [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 numerous problems]] ran amok behind the scenes. The biggest was Stevens himself, whose [[BadBoss verbally abusive and demanding nature]] ex-employees contributed to a stressful working environment without leadership or morale. He was also alleged to have been ''forgoing pay'' to his multiple animators and voice actors -- like including {{Creator/Danielle McRae}} -- on board who were involved with the project. This resulted in led to Maximilian Dood and Egoraptor's guest characters being scrapped, as their respective likenesses having since distanced themselves from the project altogether.
** The animators had it worse: on top of Stevens' arrogance, they were hamstrung by the sluggish nature of developing the hand-drawn sprites. In one case, they painstakingly resized every individual sprite to improve frame rate. Expenses skyrocketed from the ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]], which required exclusive animations when performed on all current ''and'' future characters in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' reused animations and avoided gimmicky mechanics with little impact on gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse, only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog promised to expand their roster and speed up progress with ''yet another'' Kickstarter campaign, which improved nothing nothing, despite making twice its goal.



** The demo finally arrived after numerous delays, though wound up a major letdown. Stevens and Evil Dog had previously claimed that they were "experienced" in fighting game development, but the [[ObviousBeta bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] proved otherwise to seasoned fighting game players. Evil Dog took feedback and pledged to release patches, but to the chagrin of players, they dedicated ''entire updates'' to adding in non-gameplay features like the finishing moves.

to:

** The demo finally arrived after numerous delays, though wound up a major letdown. Stevens and Evil Dog had previously claimed that they were "experienced" in fighting game development, but the [[ObviousBeta bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] proved otherwise to seasoned fighting game players. Though Evil Dog took feedback and pledged promised to release patches, but patch the game, to the chagrin of players, players they dedicated ''entire updates'' to adding in non-gameplay features like the finishing moves.



** This turnover had a chaotic impact on the game code, with fragments inserted here and there by totally different people who had never communicated. Demos made from this increasingly buggy mess failed to impress at industry events. Communications between all the people working on the game did not get any better: one artist submitted the infamous "1,300-pixel arrow", a texture file for a crossbow bolt that was inexplicably 1300 pixels by 960 pixels. For reference, that's about the size of your monitor, twice as large as the game's actual resolution, and a hell of a lot larger than the space a crossbow bolt actually takes up. When Romero hired his then-girlfriend, Stevie Case, to work on level design, he nearly triggered another full-staff walkout.

to:

** This turnover had a chaotic impact on the game code, with fragments inserted here and there by totally different people who had never communicated. Demos made from this increasingly buggy mess failed to impress at industry events. Communications between all the people working on the game did not get any better: one artist submitted the infamous "1,300-pixel arrow", a texture file for a crossbow bolt that was inexplicably 1300 pixels by 960 pixels. [[note]] For reference, that's about the size of your monitor, twice as large as the game's actual resolution, and a hell of a lot larger than the space a crossbow bolt actually takes up. [[/note]] When Romero hired his then-girlfriend, Stevie Case, to work on level design, he nearly triggered another full-staff walkout.
25th Jun '17 12:32:02 PM multibrawlr
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** Inspired by ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' To incentivize donations, Stevens promised Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]] their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. This proved successful, and the campaign raised over $20,000.
** Shortly after, Evil Dog [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Furthermore, they were unable to complete the first two characters with what they had received. With little support elsewhere, Evil Dog approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would strictly be used to create something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived,[[note]] save for one, which was apparently turned down, [[/note]] forcing Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money. Despite skepticism, they raked in over $47,000.

to:

** Inspired by ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' To incentivize donations, Stevens promised Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]] their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. This The project also enjoyed free publicity from small [=YouTube=] channels and indie gaming websites who were eager to help. All of this proved successful, and the campaign raised over $20,000.
** Shortly after, Evil Dog [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Furthermore, they were unable to complete the first two characters with what they had received. With little support elsewhere, Evil Dog approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would strictly be used to create something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived,[[note]] save arrived ( psave for one, which was apparently turned down, [[/note]] forcing down). This forced Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money. Despite money, who, despite skepticism, they raked in over $47,000.



** The animators had it worse: on top of Stevens' arrogance, they were hamstrung by the sluggish nature of developing the hand-drawn sprites. In one case, they painstakingly resized every individual sprite to improve frame rate. Expenses skyrocketed from the ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]], which required exclusive animations when performed on all current ''and'' future characters in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' reused animations and avoided gimmicky mechanics with little impact on gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse, only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog promised to expand their roster and speed up progress with ''yet another'' Kickstarter campaign, which improved nothing, despite making twice its goal.

to:

** The animators had it worse: on top of Stevens' arrogance, they were hamstrung by the sluggish nature of developing the hand-drawn sprites. In one case, they painstakingly resized every individual sprite to improve frame rate. Expenses skyrocketed from the ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]], which required exclusive animations when performed on all current ''and'' future characters in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' reused animations and avoided gimmicky mechanics with little impact on gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse, only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog promised to expand their roster and speed up progress with ''yet another'' Kickstarter campaign, which improved nothing, nothing despite making twice its goal.



** Despite the online acrimony, Evil Dog returned with [[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story another Indiegogo campaign]] and a Patreon in May 2015. The goal was an immense $185,000, which was far more realistic -- if not daunting -- than their initial campaigns. By this point, however, Evil Dog's incompetence and animosity had burned so many bridges that ''the majority of their fanbase'' refused to support them out of protest. The campaign flopped in spectacular fashion, grossing $1,620[[note]] which the team still pocketed due to "flexible funding"[[/note]]...a mere 1% of their goal. Anticipating the campaign's failure, Stevens [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project]] to focus on his personal life.

to:

** Despite the online acrimony, Evil Dog returned with [[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story another Indiegogo campaign]] and a Patreon in May 2015. For good measure, they also solicited [[https://mobile.twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 promotion]] from professional fighting game player Justin Wong. The goal was an immense $185,000, which was far more realistic -- if not daunting -- than their initial campaigns. By this point, however, Evil Dog's incompetence and animosity had burned so many bridges that ''the majority of their fanbase'' refused to support them out of protest. The campaign flopped in spectacular fashion, grossing $1,620[[note]] which $1,620 [[note]] (which the team still pocketed due to "flexible funding"[[/note]]...funding") [[/note]]...a mere 1% of their goal. Anticipating the campaign's failure, Stevens [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project]] to focus on his personal life.
24th Jun '17 2:01:55 PM legoking831
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* One would think that, as bad as ''VideoGame/{{Superman 64}}'' was, it was solely developer Titus' fault. However, in [[http://www.protonjon.com/blog/?p=48 an interview]] with Eric Caen, one of the founders of Titus, with LetsPlay/ProtonJon, it's revealed a lot of the reasons for the game's poorness was [[ExecutiveMeddling politics]] with Creator/WarnerBros and Creator/DCComics towards Titus (the virtual reality world? They didn't want Superman kicking real people). In fact, Caen mentions that the game was only "10% of what they envisioned" and that while it ''was'' a money-maker, it hurt them in the long run because they were forced to cancel the UsefulNotes/PlayStation version of the game.

to:

* One would think that, as bad as ''VideoGame/{{Superman 64}}'' was, it was solely developer Titus' fault. However, in [[http://www.protonjon.com/blog/?p=48 an interview]] with Eric Caen, one of the founders of Titus, with LetsPlay/ProtonJon, it's revealed a lot of the reasons for the game's poorness was [[ExecutiveMeddling politics]] with Creator/WarnerBros and Creator/DCComics towards Titus (the virtual reality world? They didn't want Superman kicking real people). In fact, Caen mentions that the game was only "10% "not even 10% of what they envisioned" and that while it ''was'' a money-maker, it hurt them in the long run because they were forced to cancel the UsefulNotes/PlayStation version of the game.
24th Jun '17 11:19:56 AM multibrawlr
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** The project began in 2013 when Austrailian indie game developer Rhyan Stevens and his Montreal-based company, Evil Dog Productions, [[note]] primarily known for flash and mobile games like ''The Road of the Dead'', [[/note]] sought to capitalize on the fame and recognition of Lab Zero's popular 2-D fighter ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' with [[StartMyOwn a 2-D fighter of their own.]] The fact that development had begun on such a propitious note - [[ToughActToFollow coupled with how high the bar had been set by its predecessor]] - was perhaps a sign of the meltdown to come.
** Taking a page from ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' Hoping to provide backers more incentive to support the project, Stevens reached out to much-revered Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]], promising them their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. He even got professional fighting game player Justin Wong in on [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 plugging]] [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/596559628554506241 the game]]. While this proved successful (the campaign raised over $20,000), the guest characters were never finished; reportedly, the Youtubers were only promised ''a stake in the project'', as opposed to actual money for their inclusion in the game.[[note]] It's really no wonder why Max and Aaron quietly severed their support, and have yet to mention the project ever again.[[/note]]
** Shortly after the campaign ended, Evil Dog [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Furthermore, they couldn't finish the initial two characters from the game's cast with what they received. With little support elsewhere, the team approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would only be used to create -- rather than a final product -- something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived,[[note]] save for one, which was apparently turned down, [[/note]] forcing Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money. In the face of skepticism, Evil Dog raked in over $47,000.
** Unbeknownst to Evil Dog's audience, [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 there were numerous problems]] running amok behind the scenes. Stevens was reportedly [[BadBoss verbally abusive, overly demanding ]] and (allegedly) ''even went as far as not paying his animators'', which had created a stressful working environment without leadership or morale. The hand-drawn animations themselves were both time-consuming and expensive: the game was planned to have ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]] which required exclusive animations when performed on every single current ''and'' future character in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' reused animations and avoided gimmicky mechanics with little impact on gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse -- only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog addressed this issue with ''yet another'' campaign on Kickstarter, promising to expand their roster and adjust animators' schedules for more progress. It ended up making twice its goal, but yet most of the animations remained unfinished.
** Coupled with this was Evil Dog's unnerving tendency to use the campaign money more on the game's aesthetic (which included the aforementioned finishing moves) [[SkewedPriorities and less on developing and refining the gameplay]]. The funds were wasted away on in-game cinematics and even [[VersusCharacterSplash versus splash art]] and [[IdleAnimation idle animations]] for characters that weren't even ''started'' yet and were unlikely to ever be finished, given the game's troubled state. Ridiculously enough, Evil Dog was making plans for a sequel and an animated short film -- all before even ''the demo'' of their first game was to be released (though said ideas ended as quickly as they started when the game's troubles worsened).
** These problems constantly pushed back the release of the game's anticipated demo, which -- when it finally arrived -- wound up a major letdown. Stevens and Evil Dog claimed that they were "experienced" in fighting game development, but the [[ObviousBeta bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] proved otherwise to seasoned fighting game players. Evil Dog took feedback and pledged to release patches, but to the chagrin of players, they dedicated ''entire updates'' to adding in non-gameplay features like the finishing moves, rather than following through on their initial promises.
** Vying for the support of ''Skullgirls''[='=] campaign backers, Evil Dog promoted the project on the official forum, ''Skullheart''. What followed -- in an epic public relations fail -- was Stevens and his lead programmer Marco Arsenault relentlessly attacking ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics on [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. ''Skullgirls''[='=] developer Mike "Z" Zaimont was among them, whose advice and offer to provide ''the Skullgirls game engine'' were harshly rejected. Elsewhere, [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 it became apparent]] that [[{{Determinator}} a dedicated Evil Dog]] stalked those with negative opinions online, harassing them with scathing, confrontational messages. Their [[CantTakeCriticism treatment of criticism like the devil]] was widely [[https://youtu.be/DslNQQ-Xmdc?t=572 condemned]], granting the project notoriety among the fighting game community and killing any chance of getting the support of the ''Skullgirls'' community.
** Then, [[InternetBackdraft backlash]] erupted following the revelation that [[FurryFandom furry]] artist Adam Wan -- who was accused by the fandom of being a bully and a sexual predator -- was tied to the project. In panic mode, Evil Dog quietly dropped all mention of Wan from their crowdfunding campaigns, but they didn't officially announce if he was actually removed from the team...which led to mass speculation that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information. Wan's involvement [[CassandraTruth was later confirmed by one of Evil Dog's game designers on an Internet chat log]], but the damage had already been done.
** Despite the online acrimony, Evil Dog was bold enough to return with [[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story another Indiegogo campaign]] and a Patreon in May 2015. The goal was an immense $185,000, which was far more realistic -- if not daunting -- than their initial campaigns. By this point, however, Evil Dog's incompetence and animosity had burned so many bridges that ''the majority of their fanbase'' essentially refused to help them any further en masse. The campaign flopped in spectacular fashion, receiving only a measly $1,620 pledged from 32 backers[[note]] which the team still pocketed due to "flexible funding"[[/note]]...a mere 1% of their goal. Anticipating the campaign's failure, Stevens [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project to focus on his personal life.]]
** The project was finally cancelled in January 2016, according to [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ an interview]] on [=FurAffinity=] with Evil Dog. A comment by Stevens that suggested that he was entitled to the raised money ignited a massive InternetBackdraft. Outcry was generated among the thousands of campaign backers who wouldn't receive refunds, with some threatening legal action. In retaliation, a multitude of animators and voice actors who worked on the project (including {{Creator/Danielle McRae}}) [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40&feature=iv&src_vid=b4Sq6pkQBTc&annotation_id=annotation_2029632283 publically told their stories, while also lambasting Evil Dog]]. The reputations of Stevens and his company were mercilessly ravaged [[CreatorKiller until they were no more]]. Since then, the fighting game community have used the development of ''Beast's Fury'' as a prime example of the "don'ts" of fighting game development.

to:

** The project began in 2013 when Austrailian indie game developer Rhyan Stevens and his Montreal-based company, Evil Dog Productions, [[note]] primarily known for flash and mobile games like ''The Road of the Dead'', [[/note]] sought to capitalize on the fame and recognition of Lab Zero's popular 2-D fighter ''VideoGame/{{Skullgirls}}'' with [[StartMyOwn a 2-D fighter of their own.]] The fact that development had begun on such a propitious note - [[ToughActToFollow coupled with how high the bar had been set by its predecessor]] - was perhaps a sign of the meltdown to come.
come.
** Taking a page from Inspired by ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' Hoping to provide backers more incentive to support the project, To incentivize donations, Stevens reached out to much-revered promised Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]], promising them Egoraptor]] their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. He even got professional fighting game player Justin Wong in on [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 plugging]] [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/596559628554506241 the game]]. While this This proved successful (the successful, and the campaign raised over $20,000), the guest characters were never finished; reportedly, the Youtubers were only promised ''a stake in the project'', as opposed to actual money for their inclusion in the game.[[note]] It's really no wonder why Max and Aaron quietly severed their support, and have yet to mention the project ever again.[[/note]]
$20,000.
** Shortly after the campaign ended, after, Evil Dog [[https://www.facebook.com/BeastsFuryGame/posts/810800969016456 realized]] that their projections for the animation costs had ''severely'' undershot what they were in actuality. Furthermore, they couldn't finish were unable to complete the initial first two characters from the game's cast with what they had received. With little support elsewhere, the team Evil Dog approached the fighting game community ''[[https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/beastsfurygame/keep-beasts-fury-going/ with a fourth campaign.]]'' They stated that contributions would only strictly be used to create -- rather than a final product -- something presentable for potential investors and publishers...who ''never'' arrived,[[note]] save for one, which was apparently turned down, [[/note]] forcing Evil Dog to continue relying on crowdfunding money. In the face of Despite skepticism, Evil Dog they raked in over $47,000.
** Unbeknownst to Evil Dog's audience, the public, [[https://twitter.com/sorcererlance/status/685188410672205824 there were numerous problems]] running ran amok behind the scenes. The biggest was Stevens was reportedly himself, whose [[BadBoss verbally abusive, overly abusive and demanding ]] and (allegedly) ''even went as far as not paying his animators'', which had created nature]] ex-employees contributed to a stressful working environment without leadership or morale. He was also alleged to have been ''forgoing pay'' to his animators and voice actors -- like {{Creator/Danielle McRae}} -- on board with the project. This resulted in Maximilian Dood and Egoraptor's guest characters being scrapped, their respective likenesses having since distanced themselves from the project altogether.
**
The animators had it worse: on top of Stevens' arrogance, they were hamstrung by the sluggish nature of developing the hand-drawn animations themselves were both time-consuming and expensive: sprites. In one case, they painstakingly resized every individual sprite to improve frame rate. Expenses skyrocketed from the game was planned to have ''VideoGame/MortalKombat''-esque [[FinishingMove finishing moves]] moves]], which required exclusive animations when performed on every single all current ''and'' future character characters in the cast. [[note]] In contrast, ''Skullgirls'' reused animations and avoided gimmicky mechanics with little impact on gameplay in order to lower costs. [[/note]] Even worse -- worse, only two animators were working on the game in their spare time. Evil Dog addressed this issue promised to expand their roster and speed up progress with ''yet another'' campaign on Kickstarter, promising to expand their roster and adjust animators' schedules for more progress. It ended up Kickstarter campaign, which improved nothing, despite making twice its goal, but yet most goal.
** Most
of the animations remained unfinished.
** Coupled with this was Evil Dog's unnerving tendency to use the campaign money more
funds were wasted away on the game's aesthetic (which included the aforementioned finishing moves) [[SkewedPriorities and less on developing and refining the gameplay]]. The funds were wasted away on This included in-game cinematics cinematics, 3-D models (one of which Stevens apparently wanted in a shower scene), and even [[VersusCharacterSplash versus splash art]] and [[IdleAnimation idle animations]] for characters that weren't even ''started'' hadn't yet and were unlikely begun development. Egregiously, despite being yet to ever be finished, given the game's troubled state. Ridiculously enough, release ''the very first demo'', Evil Dog was already making plans for a sequel and an animated short film -- all before even ''the demo'' of their first game was to be released (though said ideas ended as quickly as they started when the game's troubles worsened).
film.
** These problems constantly pushed back the release of the game's anticipated demo, which -- when it The demo finally arrived -- after numerous delays, though wound up a major letdown. Stevens and Evil Dog had previously claimed that they were "experienced" in fighting game development, but the [[ObviousBeta bugs, wonky controls, unbalanced characters and exploitable moves]] proved otherwise to seasoned fighting game players. Evil Dog took feedback and pledged to release patches, but to the chagrin of players, they dedicated ''entire updates'' to adding in non-gameplay features like the finishing moves, rather than moves.
** [[InternetBackdraft Backlash]] erupted
following through on the revelation that [[FurryFandom furry]] artist Adam Wan -- who was accused by the fandom of being a bully and a sexual predator -- was tied to the project. In panic mode, Evil Dog quietly dropped all mention of Wan from their initial promises.
crowdfunding campaigns, but didn't officially announce if he was actually removed from the team...[[GoneHorriblyWrong which led to mass speculation that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information]]. Wan's involvement [[CassandraTruth was later confirmed]] by one of Evil Dog's game designers on [[https://www.dropbox.com/s/ctamabcwjxucdu1/logmidwayofBoF.txt?dl=0 an Internet chat log]], but the damage had already been done.
** Vying for the support of ''Skullgirls''[='=] campaign backers, Evil Dog promoted the project ''Beast's Fury'' on the official forum, ''Skullheart''. What followed -- in an epic public relations fail -- was Stevens and his lead programmer programmer, Marco Arsenault Arsenault, relentlessly attacking ''Skullgirls'' fans and critics on [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/ two]] [[http://skullgirls.com/forums/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-updates-discussion.6723/ different]] threads. ''Skullgirls''[='=] developer Mike "Z" Zaimont was among them, whose advice and offer to provide ''the Skullgirls game engine'' to Evil Dog were harshly rejected. Elsewhere, ([[WhatAnIdiot and stupidly]]) turned down. [[http://skullheart.com/index.php?threads/beasts-fury-kickstarter-is-live.6714/page-4#post-126307 it became apparent]] that Elsewhere online]], [[{{Determinator}} a dedicated Evil Dog]] stalked those with negative opinions online, harassing them with scathing, confrontational messages.and harassed naysayers. Their [[CantTakeCriticism treatment of criticism like the devil]] was widely [[https://youtu.be/DslNQQ-Xmdc?t=572 condemned]], granting the project instant notoriety among the fighting game community and killing any chance of getting the support of the ''Skullgirls'' community.
** Then, [[InternetBackdraft backlash]] erupted following the revelation that [[FurryFandom furry]] artist Adam Wan -- who was accused by the fandom of being a bully
and a sexual predator -- was tied to the project. In panic mode, Evil Dog quietly dropped all mention of Wan from their crowdfunding campaigns, but they didn't officially announce if he was actually removed from the team...which led to mass speculation that Evil Dog was deliberately hiding this information. Wan's involvement [[CassandraTruth was later confirmed by one of Evil Dog's fighting game designers on an Internet chat log]], but the damage had already been done.
communities.
** Despite the online acrimony, Evil Dog was bold enough to return returned with [[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/support-beast-s-fury-fighting-game#/story another Indiegogo campaign]] and a Patreon in May 2015. The goal was an immense $185,000, which was far more realistic -- if not daunting -- than their initial campaigns. By this point, however, Evil Dog's incompetence and animosity had burned so many bridges that ''the majority of their fanbase'' essentially refused to help support them any further en masse. out of protest. The campaign flopped in spectacular fashion, receiving only a measly $1,620 pledged from 32 backers[[note]] grossing $1,620[[note]] which the team still pocketed due to "flexible funding"[[/note]]...a mere 1% of their goal. Anticipating the campaign's failure, Stevens [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere bailed on the project project]] to focus on his personal life.]]
life.
** The project ''Beast's Fury'' was finally cancelled in January 2016, according to as confirmed by [[http://www.furaffinity.net/journal/7298947/ an interview]] on [=FurAffinity=] a FurAffinity interview with Evil Dog. A comment by Stevens that suggested that he was entitled Stevens]]. His perceived indifference to the raised money campaign backers and development team members who had withstood his hostility ignited a massive InternetBackdraft. Outcry was generated among the thousands of campaign backers who wouldn't receive refunds, with some threatening legal action. In retaliation, InternetBackdraft, whereupon [[https://storify.com/Zerochan/getting-started a multitude of animators and voice actors who worked on the project (including {{Creator/Danielle McRae}}) conga line]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTG_pSJoz40&feature=iv&src_vid=b4Sq6pkQBTc&annotation_id=annotation_2029632283 publically told of angry, unpaid voice actors and animators]] stepped forth to deride Stevens, demand their stories, while also lambasting money, and warn others. Needless to say, Stevens and Evil Dog]]. The Dog's reputations of Stevens and his company were mercilessly ravaged [[CreatorKiller until they were no more]]. Since then, the The fighting game community have since then used the development of ''Beast's Fury'' project as a prime ''perfect'' example of the "don'ts" of fighting game development.
13th Jun '17 11:06:32 PM crazyrabbits
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* ''VideoGame/MassEffectAndromeda''s mixed to negative reception was thanks to a lengthy and hectic production cycle that involved, according to [[http://kotaku.com/the-story-behind-mass-effect-andromedas-troubled-five-1795886428 this article]] by Jason Schreier of Kotaku, a director change, multiple major re-scopes, an understaffed animation team, technological challenges, communication issues, office politics, a compressed timeline, and brutal crunch".
** While the first ''VideoGame/MassEffect'' met critical acclaim upon its release in 2007, many people disliked the vehicle sections, which were taken out of the later games in the trilogy. When Creator/BioWare began working on another sequel, they decided to take the vehicle portions from the first game and expand upon the concept wanting to make it better, thus deciding to make the game more about exploration, which they felt was lacking in the original trilogy.
** Since [=BioWare=]'s main headquarters in Edmonton was busy with the development of ''VideoGame/{{Anthem}}'', they decided to place their smaller Montreal studio in charge of the game, with the studio only having done DLC for the ''Mass Effect'' games. Production started in 2012. The team went through many ideas, with one being a prequel set during the First Contact Wars, but backed off the idea when fans demanded a sequel.
** When pre-production started in 2013, the director of the game, Gerard Lehiany, came up with loads of ambitious ideas, most notably the ability to explore over one hundred randomly-generated planets. Problems arose when the narrative team had to find a way to combine a [=BioWare=]-esque story with a non-linear game about space exploration.
** More problems arose within the game development team, who were understaffed and facing technical problems with the game's engine. The Frostbite engine (designed by DICE for first-person shooters, not enormous [=RPGs=] like ''Andromeda''), which was used by [=BioWare=] to create ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'' (which also had some development problems), simply could not handle the scope of the game, failing to randomly generate worlds that looked high-quality without having the developers create them by hand. More engine problems included difficulty in sizing the maps, the streaming system, and getting the save system to work. A developer working on the game compared Frostbite to a Formula One Car, saying: [[CripplingOverspecialization "The things it does, it does extremely well, but the things it doesn't do, it REALLY doesn't do."]]

to:

* Creator/{{Bioware}}'s ''VideoGame/MassEffectAndromeda''s mixed to negative reception was thanks to a lengthy and hectic production cycle that involved, according to [[http://kotaku.com/the-story-behind-mass-effect-andromedas-troubled-five-1795886428 this article]] by Jason Schreier of Kotaku, a Kotaku feature article]], a director change, multiple major re-scopes, an understaffed animation team, technological challenges, communication issues, office politics, a compressed timeline, and brutal crunch".
** While the first ''VideoGame/MassEffect'' met critical acclaim upon its release in 2007, many people disliked the vehicle sections, which were taken out of the later games in the trilogy. When Creator/BioWare began working on another sequel, they decided to take the vehicle portions from the first game and expand upon the concept wanting to make it better, thus deciding to make the game more about exploration, which they felt was lacking in the original trilogy.
** Since
Because [=BioWare=]'s main headquarters in Edmonton head office was busy with the development of ''VideoGame/{{Anthem}}'', they decided to place their smaller Montreal studio in charge of the game, with the studio only having done DLC for the ''Mass Effect'' games. Production started in 2012. The team went through many ideas, 2012, with one being a proposed idea for a prequel set during the First Contact Wars, but backed off the idea War scrapped when fans overwhelmingly demanded a sequel.
** When pre-production started in 2013, the director of the game, Gerard Lehiany, Lehiany (the game director) came up with loads of many ambitious ideas, most notably the ability to explore over one hundred randomly-generated procedurally-generated planets. Problems arose when the narrative team had to find a way to combine a [=BioWare=]-esque story with a non-linear game about space exploration.
** More problems arose within the game development team, who were understaffed and facing technical problems with the game's engine. The Frostbite engine (designed by DICE for first-person shooters, not enormous [=RPGs=] like ''Andromeda''), which ''Andromeda'') was used by [=BioWare=] to create ''VideoGame/DragonAgeInquisition'' (which also had some development problems), but it simply could not handle the scope of the game, ''Andromeda'', failing to randomly generate worlds that looked high-quality without having the developers create them by hand. More engine problems included difficulty in sizing the maps, the streaming system, and getting the save system to work. A developer working on the game compared Frostbite to a Formula One Car, saying: [[CripplingOverspecialization "The things it does, it does extremely well, but the things it doesn't do, it REALLY doesn't do."]]



** In the finished product now, all the signs are there -- an abrupt and DisappointingLastLevel, with several promised features not coming to fruition, the game's TwistEnding revealed suddenly and out of context, and the game's TrueFinalBoss deleted and reduced to unfinished cutscene footage as a special edition Blu-Ray extra. An entire third chapter of the game appears to have been cut when it became apparent that the game was not going to break even for Konami. It's rumored now, that the game has become a CreatorKiller for Konami's AAA game production, though the company has publicly denied this.

to:

** In the finished product now, all the signs are there -- an abrupt and DisappointingLastLevel, with several promised features not coming to fruition, the game's TwistEnding revealed suddenly and out of context, and the game's TrueFinalBoss deleted and reduced to unfinished cutscene footage as a special edition Blu-Ray extra. An entire third chapter of the game appears to have been cut when it became apparent that the game was not going to break even for Konami. It's rumored now, that the game has become a CreatorKiller for Konami's AAA game production, though the company has publicly denied this.
13th Jun '17 6:15:31 PM drac0blade
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** Taking a page from ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' Hoping to provide backers more incentive to support the project, Stevens reached out to much-revered Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]], promising them their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. He even got professional fighting game player Justin Wong in on [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 plugging]] [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/596559628554506241 the game]]. While this proved successful (the campaign raised over $20,000), the guest characters were never finished; reportedly, the Youtubers were only promised ''a stake in the project'', as opposed to actual money for their inclusion in the game.[[note]] It's really no wonder why Max and Aaron quietly severed their support, and are yet to mention the project ever again.[[/note]]

to:

** Taking a page from ''Skullgirls''' successful Indiegogo campaign, Stevens [[StartMyOwn created his own]]. Two back-to-back failed campaigns later, he returned with ''[[ThirdTimesTheCharm a]]'' ''[[https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/beast-s-fury-project-indemand#/story third one.]]'' Hoping to provide backers more incentive to support the project, Stevens reached out to much-revered Website/YouTube personalities [[LetsPlay/TheOnlineWarrior Maximilian Dood]] and [[WebVideo/GameGrumps Egoraptor]], promising them their very own guest characters if stretch goals were met...in exchange for promoting the campaign. He even got professional fighting game player Justin Wong in on [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/607665192688742400 plugging]] [[https://twitter.com/jwonggg/status/596559628554506241 the game]]. While this proved successful (the campaign raised over $20,000), the guest characters were never finished; reportedly, the Youtubers were only promised ''a stake in the project'', as opposed to actual money for their inclusion in the game.[[note]] It's really no wonder why Max and Aaron quietly severed their support, and are have yet to mention the project ever again.[[/note]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 512. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.VideoGames