History TroubledProduction / VideoGames

14th Jan '17 6:28:19 PM nombretomado
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* [[Creator/LucasArts LucasArts]]'s fall from grace and eventual dissolution has been covered in multiple [[http://kotaku.com/how-lucasarts-fell-apart-1401731043 feature stories]], and showed a company that was equal parts mismanaged and directionless.

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* [[Creator/LucasArts LucasArts]]'s Creator/LucasArts' fall from grace and eventual dissolution has been covered in multiple [[http://kotaku.com/how-lucasarts-fell-apart-1401731043 feature stories]], and showed a company that was equal parts mismanaged and directionless.



** The developer started production on an internal prototype for the next installment in the ''Battlefront'' series. According to interviews with co-founder Steve Ellis, the concept was so good that Lucasarts was pushing them to release it as soon as possible, and they promised gameplay elements like a seamless transition from the player flying a ship in space to landing on a planet and exiting, cutting-edge tech upgrades and more. Likewise, [=LucasArts=] reportedly promised the developer that they could also develop a ''Battlefront 4'' if the third installment was successful.
** In early 2008, [=LucasArts=] went through a round of layoffs and the relationship between the publisher and developer soured. [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-04-26-timesplitters-dev-was-working-on-star-wars-battlefront-3-and-4 According to Ellis]], the new executives were sour on the concept and wanted to trim as many projects as they could. Consequently, the game began missing content milestones, and previous cash injections that were given by LucasArts dried up. Other accounts claim that the company was deliberately lying about their progress on the game to continue receiving support payments from [=LucasArts=]. All of this was compounded by the failure of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 game ''VideoGame/{{Haze}}'', which sold poorly and garnered harsh critical reviews.

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** The developer started production on an internal prototype for the next installment in the ''Battlefront'' series. According to interviews with co-founder Steve Ellis, the concept was so good that Lucasarts [=LucasArts=] was pushing them to release it as soon as possible, and they promised gameplay elements like a seamless transition from the player flying a ship in space to landing on a planet and exiting, cutting-edge tech upgrades and more. Likewise, [=LucasArts=] reportedly promised the developer that they could also develop a ''Battlefront 4'' if the third installment was successful.
** In early 2008, [=LucasArts=] went through a round of layoffs and the relationship between the publisher and developer soured. [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-04-26-timesplitters-dev-was-working-on-star-wars-battlefront-3-and-4 According to Ellis]], the new executives were sour on the concept and wanted to trim as many projects as they could. Consequently, the game began missing content milestones, and previous cash injections that were given by LucasArts [=LucasArts=] dried up. Other accounts claim that the company was deliberately lying about their progress on the game to continue receiving support payments from [=LucasArts=]. All of this was compounded by the failure of the UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 game ''VideoGame/{{Haze}}'', which sold poorly and garnered harsh critical reviews.
13th Jan '17 2:17:33 PM comicwriter
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* ''Marvel'', the cancelled Franchise/MarvelUniverse fighting game from Creator/ElectronicArts, was plagued with problems from Day 1:

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* ''Marvel'', ''Marvel'' aka ''Marvel: Chaos'', the cancelled Franchise/MarvelUniverse fighting game from Creator/ElectronicArts, was plagued with problems from Day 1:
1st Jan '17 3:04:01 PM Shamrock95
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* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'''s infamous development. Instead of ruining a single man's career, the issues demolished DNF's development staff. The game's development was so troubled, in fact, that ''it has [[DevelopmentHistory/DukeNukemForever its own work page]] on ThisVeryWiki''. The fourteen-year DevelopmentHell that ensued was due to switching engines, 3D Realms founder George Broussard publicly insulting DNF's publisher, tons of changes beyond engine switches that would necessitate restarting the entire project, and more. DNF is truly spectacular, in that its production was so troubled that the staff ''had nothing worth publicly showing aside from a couple of screenshots''. In the end, Gearbox Software took over production, and suddenly revealed the game ''[[SavedFromDevelopmentHell would]]'' come out. Gearbox took the code and levels that 3D Realms had "finished" -- which were largely conceptual and unrelated -- and, in one year, completed the project that 3D Realms couldn't in fourteen.

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* ''VideoGame/DukeNukemForever'''s infamous development. Instead of ruining a single man's career, the issues demolished DNF's development staff. The game's development was so troubled, in fact, that ''it has [[DevelopmentHistory/DukeNukemForever its own work page]] on ThisVeryWiki''. The fourteen-year DevelopmentHell that ensued was due to switching engines, 3D Realms founder George Broussard publicly insulting DNF's publisher, tons of changes beyond engine switches that would necessitate restarting the entire project, and more. DNF is truly spectacular, in that its production was so troubled that the staff ''had nothing worth publicly showing aside from a couple of screenshots''. In the end, Gearbox Software took over production, and suddenly revealed the game ''[[SavedFromDevelopmentHell would]]'' come out. Gearbox took the code and levels that 3D Realms had "finished" -- which were largely conceptual and unrelated -- and, in one year, completed the project that 3D Realms couldn't in fourteen.
31st Dec '16 1:52:51 PM rexeljet
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** ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='=]s own history can be chronicled by the various Alphas, Betas and Deltas made along the way. Rumor had it that ''2'' was supposed to utilize TimeTravel, but it proved way too complicated for the simplistic Sega Genesis. Many Zones were planned and removed, including a curiously named stage called Genocide City and the legendary Hidden Palace Zone (which was much later restored as a secret level in the iOS remake). Sega gave Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} a very early version of ''2'' for ''NickArcade''. The game's production (located in Sega Technical Institute's headquarters) was also notorious for language barriers and conflicting work ethics between Japanese Sonic Team members, who Naka brought to the United States to work on the game as he was unhappy with Sega of Japan's policies; and the American STI members, who assisted in the game's development. (Understandably enough, Naka developed ''Sonic 3 & Knuckles'' in STI on the condition that only his fellow Sonic Team members and other Japanese STI staff would develop the title to avoid another instance of this.)

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** ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''[='=]s own history can be chronicled by the various Alphas, Alphas and Betas and Deltas made along the way. Rumor had it that ''2'' was supposed to utilize TimeTravel, but it proved way far too complicated demanding for the simplistic Sega Genesis. game's ROM size. Many Zones were planned and removed, including a curiously named stage called Cyber City (or Genocide City City) and the legendary Hidden Palace Zone (which was much later restored as a secret level in the iOS remake). Sega gave Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} a very early version of ''2'' for ''NickArcade''. The game's production (located in Sega Technical Institute's headquarters) was also notorious for language barriers and conflicting work ethics between Japanese Sonic Team members, who Naka brought to the United States to work on the game as he was unhappy with Sega of Japan's policies; and the American STI members, who assisted in the game's development. (Understandably enough, Naka developed ''Sonic 3 & Knuckles'' in STI on the condition that only his fellow Sonic Team members and other Japanese STI staff would develop the title to avoid another instance of this.)
26th Dec '16 7:15:05 PM OmegaNemesis13
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' was envisioned as the starting point for a "ten year project" of games [[TheVerse sharing a common mythos]] (ala the ''Franchise/IvaliceAlliance'') called the ''Franchise/FabulaNovaCrystallisFinalFantasy''. Unfortunately the project was plagued with issues mostly stemming from ''XIII'' being the first ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' game produced for the [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]]. The vast majority of time and effort was spent on the creation of the Crystal Tools engine, which was envisioned as the engine Square Enix would use on ''all'' of their future Seventh Generation games. Meanwhile, the team struggled to arrive at a cohesive creative vision for the game: an early trailer (featuring TimeStandsStill battles) was closer to an concept movie than anything else, and the ridiculously extravagant SummonMagic was a contribution from the art team rather than a collective decision. The tastes of roleplaying game fans had also moved on: new technology allowed for sprawling open worlds, and fans rejected the linear storytelling style that had been critically beloved in earlier instalments like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. ''XIII'' sold well but the feedback from fans (and internal strife throughout its development) was enough to torpedo the ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'' project. As a result, the games originally envisioned as part of the project were re-named and reworked in an effort to push them away from the bad reputation surrounding ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' was envisioned as the starting point for a "ten year project" of games [[TheVerse sharing a common mythos]] (ala the ''Franchise/IvaliceAlliance'') called the ''Franchise/FabulaNovaCrystallisFinalFantasy''. Unfortunately the project was plagued with issues mostly stemming from ''XIII'' being the first ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' game produced for the [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]]. The vast majority of time and effort was spent on the creation of the Crystal Tools engine, which was envisioned as the engine Square Enix would use on ''all'' of their future Seventh Generation games. Meanwhile, the team struggled to arrive at a cohesive creative vision for the game: an early trailer (featuring TimeStandsStill battles) was closer to an concept movie than anything else, and the ridiculously extravagant SummonMagic was a contribution from the art team rather than a collective decision. The tastes of roleplaying game fans had also moved on: new technology allowed for sprawling open worlds, and fans rejected the linear storytelling style that had been critically beloved in earlier instalments like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. ''XIII'' sold well but the feedback from fans (and internal strife throughout its development) was enough to torpedo the ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'' project. As a result, the games originally envisioned as part of the project were re-named and reworked in an effort to push them away from the bad reputation surrounding ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''
24th Dec '16 6:59:01 PM Redkun
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' was envisioned as the starting point for a vast new universe of games [[TheVerse sharing a common mythos]] (ala ''Franchise/IvaliceAlliance'') called the ''Franchise/FabulaNovaCrystallisFinalFantasy''. Unfortunately the project was plagued with issues mostly stemming from ''XIII'' being the first ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' game produced for the [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]]. The vast majority of time and effort was spent on the creation of the Crystal Tools engine, which was envisioned as the engine Square Enix would use on ''all'' of their future Seventh Generation games. Meanwhile, the team struggled to arrive at a cohesive creative vision for the game: an early trailer (featuring TimeStandsStill battles) was a non-playable movie, and the ridiculously extravagant SummonMagic was a contribution from the art team rather than a collective decision. The tastes of roleplaying game fans had also moved on: new technology allowed for sprawling open worlds, and fans rejected the linear storytelling style that had been critically beloved in earlier instalments like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. ''XIII'' sold well but the feedback from fans (and internal strife throughout its development) was enough to torpedo the ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'' project. As a result, the games originally envisioned as part of the project were re-named and reworked in an effort to push them away from the bad reputation surrounding ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''

to:

* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' was envisioned as the starting point for a vast new universe "ten year project" of games [[TheVerse sharing a common mythos]] (ala the ''Franchise/IvaliceAlliance'') called the ''Franchise/FabulaNovaCrystallisFinalFantasy''. Unfortunately the project was plagued with issues mostly stemming from ''XIII'' being the first ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' game produced for the [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]]. The vast majority of time and effort was spent on the creation of the Crystal Tools engine, which was envisioned as the engine Square Enix would use on ''all'' of their future Seventh Generation games. Meanwhile, the team struggled to arrive at a cohesive creative vision for the game: an early trailer (featuring TimeStandsStill battles) was a non-playable movie, closer to an concept movie than anything else, and the ridiculously extravagant SummonMagic was a contribution from the art team rather than a collective decision. The tastes of roleplaying game fans had also moved on: new technology allowed for sprawling open worlds, and fans rejected the linear storytelling style that had been critically beloved in earlier instalments like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. ''XIII'' sold well but the feedback from fans (and internal strife throughout its development) was enough to torpedo the ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'' project. As a result, the games originally envisioned as part of the project were re-named and reworked in an effort to push them away from the bad reputation surrounding ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''
24th Dec '16 4:59:58 PM Redkun
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* In 2006, Creator/SquareEnix announced ''Final Fantasy Versus XIII'', which was planned to be a [=PS3=] exclusive game. The game's development didn't really go anywhere for years to come, and the title was still in Pre-Production phase by 2011. News of its progress was sparse as ''Versus XIII'' consistently abstains from the game exhibitions, and rumours of its cancellation began to spread. In 2013, the production team announced that the game would be released in UsefulNotes/{{PS4}} and UsefulNotes/XboxOne (rather than the intended [=PS3=]), and it is retitled to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV''. A year later, it was announced that Creator/TetsuyaNomura has stepped down as the game's director and was replaced by Hajime Tabata, who has since announced a number of large changes to the game's established story, characters and gameplay. The game was then set to be released on September 30, 2016, but was later delayed again to November 29, 2016 in order to avoid a Day One patch... only to release a Day One patch in order to enhance gameplay mechanics and add new moves.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII'' was envisioned as the starting point for a vast new universe of games [[TheVerse sharing a common mythos]] (ala ''Franchise/IvaliceAlliance'') called the ''Franchise/FabulaNovaCrystallisFinalFantasy''. Unfortunately the project was plagued with issues mostly stemming from ''XIII'' being the first ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' game produced for the [[UsefulNotes/TheSeventhGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames Seventh Generation]]. The vast majority of time and effort was spent on the creation of the Crystal Tools engine, which was envisioned as the engine Square Enix would use on ''all'' of their future Seventh Generation games. Meanwhile, the team struggled to arrive at a cohesive creative vision for the game: an early trailer (featuring TimeStandsStill battles) was a non-playable movie, and the ridiculously extravagant SummonMagic was a contribution from the art team rather than a collective decision. The tastes of roleplaying game fans had also moved on: new technology allowed for sprawling open worlds, and fans rejected the linear storytelling style that had been critically beloved in earlier instalments like ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX''. ''XIII'' sold well but the feedback from fans (and internal strife throughout its development) was enough to torpedo the ''Fabula Nova Crystallis'' project. As a result, the games originally envisioned as part of the project were re-named and reworked in an effort to push them away from the bad reputation surrounding ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII''
**
In 2006, Creator/SquareEnix announced ''Final Fantasy Versus XIII'', which was planned to be a [=PS3=] exclusive game. The game's development didn't really go anywhere for years to come, and the title was still in Pre-Production phase by 2011. News of its progress was sparse as ''Versus XIII'' consistently abstains from the game exhibitions, and rumours of its cancellation began to spread. In 2013, the production team announced that the game would be released in UsefulNotes/{{PS4}} and UsefulNotes/XboxOne (rather than the intended [=PS3=]), and it is retitled to ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV''. A year later, it was announced that Creator/TetsuyaNomura has stepped down as the game's director and was replaced by Hajime Tabata, who has since announced a number of large changes to the game's established story, characters and gameplay. The game was then set to be released on September 30, 2016, but was later delayed again to November 29, 2016 in order to avoid a Day One patch... only to release a Day One patch in order to enhance gameplay mechanics and add new moves.
22nd Dec '16 11:31:21 AM BaronVonFistcrunch
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* ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' had a hard time getting finished.
** As covered in the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PS6SBnccxMA DOOM Resurrected documentary]], The game started life as ''Doom 4''. Creator/IdSoftware originally built the game as a much more scripted, cinematic experience in the style of ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty'', but [[http://kotaku.com/five-years-and-nothing-to-show-how-doom-4-got-off-trac-468097062 development suffered a number of restarts and employees leaving, with poor management and direction being blamed for the lack of progress]]. When screenshots and concept art leaked out, fans were deeply upset at its derivative FollowTheLeader nature. Id realized the direction of the project was a poor fit for Doom, and rebooted the project with Zenimax's blessing.
** Even then, it was a rough road; Its Quakecon 2014 debut was behind closed doors with no footage allowed, and its E3 2015 showing was met cautiously by the fanbase. Id was forced to outsource the multiplayer as they scrambled to finalize and polish the single-player elements. Bethesda chose to heavily promote the multiplayer in its marketing, which left fans restless about the state of the single-player and only got worse when the multiplayer open beta was slammed for its lack of features and Franchise/{{Halo}}-style weapon loadout system. Bethesda [[NotScreenedForCritics withheld review copies]] in response, which sunk expectations to rock-bottom.
** However, when the game finally released, it was greeted warmly by both fans and critics with the single-player in particular being praised as a quality GenreThrowback, though its multiplayer was and still remains a [[BrokenBase divisive element]].



** Eventually, the project became ''Faith and a .45'', which now featured {{Expy}}ies of Bonnie and Clyde running from John [[MeaningfulName Mammon]], an [[CorruptCorporateExecutive oil baron]] who had bought out part of the United States. Deadline proceeded to pitch the game to a number of publishers, but the game was repeatedly rejected with the reason being "[[CriticalResearchFailure Old West games don't sell]]". Demoralized and confused by this response, the developers realized that publishers had no idea what to do with a game set during TheGreatDepression, and as few games had covered the setting before, it was treated as a western game in the eyes of publishers. There were also doubts about the game's focus on a romantically-involved couple not going over with audiences, as RatedMForManly shooters such as ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'' were hot sellers in the genre.
** In an attempt to get publishers to take on the game, Deadline revealed it to the public with a number of screenshots and trailers, most of which can be seen [[https://www.unseen64.net/2009/08/08/faith-and-a-45-xbox-360-ps3-cancelled/ in this Unseen64 article]]. While the initial publicity and positive reception was a major boost for the developers, publishers remained unconvinced and uninterested in the game. In a last-ditch attempt to sell the concept, Deadline repitched the game in an AfterTheEnd setting akin to ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}''. This was also brushed off by publishers, who by now had made clear that they wanted nothing to do with the game.

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** Eventually, the project became ''Faith and a .45'', which now featured {{Expy}}ies of Bonnie and Clyde running from John [[MeaningfulName Mammon]], an [[CorruptCorporateExecutive oil baron]] who had bought out part of the United States. Deadline proceeded to pitch the game to a number of publishers, but the game was repeatedly rejected with the reason being "[[CriticalResearchFailure Old West games games]] [[ItWillNeverCatchOn don't sell]]". Demoralized and confused by this response, the developers realized that publishers had no idea what to do with a game set during TheGreatDepression, and as few games had covered the setting before, it was treated as a western game in the eyes of publishers. publishers, which were seen as poor sellers. There were also doubts about the game's focus on a romantically-involved couple not going over with shooter audiences, as RatedMForManly shooters such as ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'' were the hot sellers in of the genre.
** In an attempt to get publishers to take on the game, Deadline revealed it to the public with a number of screenshots and trailers, most of which can be seen [[https://www.unseen64.net/2009/08/08/faith-and-a-45-xbox-360-ps3-cancelled/ in this Unseen64 article]]. While the initial publicity and positive reception was a major boost for the developers, publishers remained unconvinced and uninterested in the game. In a last-ditch attempt to sell the concept, Deadline repitched the game in an AfterTheEnd setting akin to ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}''. This was also brushed off by publishers, who by now had made clear that they wanted nothing to do with the game.game regardless of its setting.
21st Dec '16 2:56:40 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Faith and a .45'', a cooperative ThirdPersonShooter set in TheGreatDepression, fell victim to this. Though it was mainly external factors and ExecutiveMeddling that killed both the game and its developer, Creator/DeadlineGames.
** According to a [[https://vimeo.com/48436052 post-mortem]] by lead developer Søren Lundgaard, the project originally started as a ''Film/BonnieAndClyde'' video game, directly based on the historical OutlawCouple. While publishers were receptive to the idea, they also demanded the game not use innocents or police officers as enemies, which flew in the face of the concept and forced the developers to spend years reworking the premise.
** Eventually, the project became ''Faith and a .45'', which now featured {{Expy}}ies of Bonnie and Clyde running from John [[MeaningfulName Mammon]], an [[CorruptCorporateExecutive oil baron]] who had bought out part of the United States. Deadline proceeded to pitch the game to a number of publishers, but the game was repeatedly rejected with the reason being "[[CriticalResearchFailure Old West games don't sell]]". Demoralized and confused by this response, the developers realized that publishers had no idea what to do with a game set during TheGreatDepression, and as few games had covered the setting before, it was treated as a western game in the eyes of publishers. There were also doubts about the game's focus on a romantically-involved couple not going over with audiences, as RatedMForManly shooters such as ''VideoGame/GearsOfWar'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'' were hot sellers in the genre.
** In an attempt to get publishers to take on the game, Deadline revealed it to the public with a number of screenshots and trailers, most of which can be seen [[https://www.unseen64.net/2009/08/08/faith-and-a-45-xbox-360-ps3-cancelled/ in this Unseen64 article]]. While the initial publicity and positive reception was a major boost for the developers, publishers remained unconvinced and uninterested in the game. In a last-ditch attempt to sell the concept, Deadline repitched the game in an AfterTheEnd setting akin to ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}''. This was also brushed off by publishers, who by now had made clear that they wanted nothing to do with the game.
** Unable to secure funding for ''Faith and a .45'' or any other in-development games, which included a sequel to ''VideoGame/TotalOverdose'', Deadline filed for bankruptcy in 2009 following the financial failure of ''[[Film/{{Watchmen}} Watchmen: The End Is Nigh]]'', and closed down shortly after.
21st Dec '16 1:56:01 PM BaronVonFistcrunch
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Added DiffLines:

** Also, it appears that Art Data attempted to create FullMotionVideo cutscenes for the 3DO version of Doom, if [[https://twitter.com/burgerbecky/status/675578504352673793 this still photo]] from Rebecca Heineman is any indication. A few more stills were also [[https://www.doomworld.com/vb/post/1375471 dug up]] by fans in all of their SoBadItsGood glory, which was likely why they weren't added to the final game.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.VideoGames