History TroubledProduction / Music

24th Jul '17 5:06:47 PM multibrawlr
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* The Human League's third album ''Dare'' had a much more troublesome production than the band's previous two albums, which were flops. The band's two lead members, Martyn Ware and Ian Craig Marsh, left the band in 1980 and formed a new group, Heaven 17. The press pretty much declared The Human League dead right there, as the only two members left were the ones that they perceived had the least to do with the band's musical direction: vocalist Philip Oakey and visual artist Adrian Wright. To add insult to injury, the band was already in crippling debt and Virgin Records was looking to drop them, but they still owed another album to the label. Oakey recruited two local teenage singers, Susanne Sulley and Joanne Catherall, to sing for the group and recruited keyboardist Ian Burden and guitarist Jo Callis to round out the band. When the new iteration of The Human League arrived at the studio to record their new album, they discovered that the artist in the adjacent studio was, of all bands, Heaven 17. The toxic atmosphere between the two bands led The Human League to book a new studio outside of their native Sheffield, which resulted in the still-underage Sulley and Catheral having to frequently take bus trips back to the city to attend school. While still working on the album, the band issued the single "The Sound of the Crowd", which Virgin reluctantly promoted, only to see it become their first Top 40 hit. Virgin then asked for two more singles, again before the album was even finished, causing some stress with the recording process. Virgin's idea paid off: "Love Action (I Believe In Love)" and "Open Your Heart" were even ''bigger'' hits, both reaching the Top 10. When ''Dare'' was finally released in October 1981, it was a massive smash for both the band and label...but Virgin still wanted one more single, and picked "Don't You Want Me". Oakey begged them not to release it because he thought it was the worst song on the album. They rebuffed him, and he was sure the song would embarrass the band and ruin the career they worked so hard to rebuild. He didn't need to worry: In a rare case of ExecutiveMeddling gone right, "Don't You Wan't Me" was the biggest of all of their hits, a #1 in both the UK and the US, and one of the most popular New Wave songs of the entire 1980s.

to:

* The Human League's third album ''Dare'' had a much more troublesome production than the band's previous two albums, which were flops.
**
The band's two lead members, Martyn Ware and Ian Craig Marsh, left the band in 1980 and formed a new group, Heaven 17. The press pretty much declared The Human League dead right there, as the only two members left were the ones that they perceived had the least to do with the band's musical direction: vocalist Philip Oakey and visual artist Adrian Wright. To add insult to injury, the band was already in crippling debt and Virgin Records was looking to drop them, but they still owed another album to the label. label.
**
Oakey recruited two local teenage singers, Susanne Sulley and Joanne Catherall, to sing for the group and recruited keyboardist Ian Burden and guitarist Jo Callis to round out the band. When the new iteration of The Human League arrived at the studio to record their new album, they discovered that the artist in the adjacent studio was, of all bands, Heaven 17. The toxic atmosphere between the two bands led The Human League to book a new studio outside of their native Sheffield, which resulted in the still-underage Sulley and Catheral having to frequently take bus trips back to the city to attend school. school.
**
While still working on the album, the band issued the single "The Sound of the Crowd", which Virgin reluctantly promoted, only to see it become their first Top 40 hit. Virgin then asked for two more singles, again before the album was even finished, causing some stress with the recording process. Virgin's idea paid off: "Love Action (I Believe In Love)" and "Open Your Heart" were even ''bigger'' hits, both reaching the Top 10. 10.
**
When ''Dare'' was finally released in October 1981, it was a massive smash for both the band and label...but Virgin still wanted one more single, and picked "Don't You Want Me". Oakey begged them not to release it because he thought it was the worst song on the album. They rebuffed him, and he was sure the song would embarrass the band and ruin the career they worked so hard to rebuild. He didn't need to worry: In a rare case of ExecutiveMeddling gone right, "Don't You Wan't Me" was the biggest of all of their hits, a #1 in both the UK and the US, and one of the most popular New Wave songs of the entire 1980s.



* Lift To Experience's one and only album ''The Texas Jerusalem Crossroads''. The album was an idea as early as 1997; it's a double concept album about the end of the world and the "holy ground" being Texas. It deconstructed many American and Christian ideas and was just nearly ''too'' ambitious. Many record companies refused to sign the band because of how anti-commercial they were. It took a whopping ''4 years'' to finally get a producer that was willing to work with them. After a few live sessions with Creator/JohnPeel that yielded dissatisfaction (rare for a Peel recording), they finally settled on Simon Raymonde of Bella Union Records. His ex-bandmate Robin Guthrie of the Cocteau Twins also showed interest and helped produce the album. By the time the band started getting the album recorded, they had started feuding so badly that it would take hours to record a single track. Their ambition was getting in their own way and the members couldn't agree on how to deal with the complexity of the concepts. Whole tracks which were frequently played by the band live were scrapped as they could no longer agree on composition. To make matters worse, Guthrie was a living hell to deal with. His perfectionist nature caused for constant re-recordings of takes that the already on-edge band members thought were perfect. Raymonde was also facing a crumbling financial status as his assets were getting liquidated left and right, and he hadn't been getting along with Guthrie since the Cocteaus' acrimonious breakup. He was quoted as saying that it was the band's music that helped keep him going, even though mixing was difficult as shoegazing was a venture he had never tried before. The album was met with mixed to ''highly'' positive reviews. It wouldn't be for another 10 years or so that the album would be recognized for its achievement in lyrical and musical complexity. The band situation was apparently so bad, LTE disbanded just a couple of months after release with a disastrous tour. Lead vocalist Josh T. Pearson would not release anything for another 10 years due to the stress of this release.

to:

* Lift To Experience's one and only album ''The Texas Jerusalem Crossroads''. Crossroads''.
**
The album was an idea as early as 1997; it's a double concept album about the end of the world and the "holy ground" being Texas. It deconstructed many American and Christian ideas and was just nearly ''too'' ambitious. Many record companies refused to sign the band because of how anti-commercial they were. It took a whopping ''4 years'' to finally get a producer that was willing to work with them. them.
**
After a few live sessions with Creator/JohnPeel that yielded dissatisfaction (rare for a Peel recording), they finally settled on Simon Raymonde of Bella Union Records. His ex-bandmate Robin Guthrie of the Cocteau Twins also showed interest and helped produce the album. By the time the band started getting the album recorded, they had started feuding so badly that it would take hours to record a single track. Their ambition was getting in their own way and the members couldn't agree on how to deal with the complexity of the concepts. Whole tracks which were frequently played by the band live were scrapped as they could no longer agree on composition. composition.
**
To make matters worse, Guthrie was a living hell to deal with. His perfectionist nature caused for constant re-recordings of takes that the already on-edge band members thought were perfect. Raymonde was also facing a crumbling financial status as his assets were getting liquidated left and right, and he hadn't been getting along with Guthrie since the Cocteaus' acrimonious breakup. He was quoted as saying that it was the band's music that helped keep him going, even though mixing was difficult as shoegazing was a venture he had never tried before. before.
**
The album was met with mixed to ''highly'' positive reviews. It wouldn't be for another 10 years or so that the album would be recognized for its achievement in lyrical and musical complexity. The band situation was apparently so bad, LTE disbanded just a couple of months after release with a disastrous tour. Lead vocalist Josh T. Pearson would not release anything for another 10 years due to the stress of this release.



* Perhaps the most morbid example was Music/{{Mayhem}}'s ''De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas''. Back in 1991, before most of the songs were fully written (initial songwriting began in 1987), lead singer [[MeaningfulName Dead]] offed himself [[NoKillLikeOverkill by hacking his wrists up multiple times before blowing his brains out with a shotgun.]] Almost immediately after Dead's suicide, stories about guitarist Euronymous taking pictures of the body and even making a stew out of the brain (along with Euronymous's generally poor treatment of Dead when he was alive) had prompted bassist Necrobutcher to leave the band. Mayhem, lacking both a vocalist and a bassist, brought on Attila Csihar and Euronymous's then-friend Varg Vikernes to help finish recording. From the start there were issues with finishing what Dead started. Meanwhile in 1992 Varg and Euronymous were out burning churches along with the rest of the "Black Circle" started by Euronymous. However, tensions soon rose between the duo over both priorities (Euronymous feared Varg was using Mayhem and the Black Circle's crimes to boost Burzum record sales) and politics (Euronymous leaned [[DirtyCommunists far to the left,]] and Varg was [[ThoseWackyNazis even farther to the right]]). [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement The details of what eventually happened are still disputed]] but by the end of it Varg had stabbed Euronymous to death in 1993, with recording just finished. He was arrested and sentenced to 21 years in prison for both the murder and the arsons. Drummer Hellhammer was asked by Euronymous's family to remove Varg's bass and redo the parts, but eventually he simply left it in, most likely because he had no idea how to play bass. The album would not be released until 1994 due to the controversy surrounding the murder. (Oh, and their next album? 1995's ''Dawn of the Black Hearts'', an LP with one of Euronymous's postmortem photos of Dead as the cover.)

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* Perhaps the most morbid example was Music/{{Mayhem}}'s ''De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas''. Sathanas''.
**
Back in 1991, before most of the songs were fully written (initial songwriting began in 1987), lead singer [[MeaningfulName Dead]] offed himself [[NoKillLikeOverkill by hacking his wrists up multiple times before blowing his brains out with a shotgun.]] Almost immediately after Dead's suicide, stories about guitarist Euronymous taking pictures of the body and even making a stew out of the brain (along with Euronymous's generally poor treatment of Dead when he was alive) had prompted bassist Necrobutcher to leave the band. band.
**
Mayhem, lacking both a vocalist and a bassist, brought on Attila Csihar and Euronymous's then-friend Varg Vikernes to help finish recording. From the start there were issues with finishing what Dead started. Meanwhile Meanwhile, in 1992 1992, Varg and Euronymous were out burning churches along with the rest of the "Black Circle" started by Euronymous. However, tensions soon rose between the duo over both priorities (Euronymous feared Varg was using Mayhem and the Black Circle's crimes to boost Burzum record sales) and politics (Euronymous leaned [[DirtyCommunists far to the left,]] and Varg was [[ThoseWackyNazis even farther to the right]]). right]]).
**
[[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement The details of what eventually happened are still disputed]] disputed]], but by the end of it it, Varg had stabbed Euronymous to death in 1993, with recording just finished. He was arrested and sentenced to 21 years in prison for both the murder and the arsons. Drummer Hellhammer was asked by Euronymous's family to remove Varg's bass and redo the parts, but eventually he simply left it in, most likely because he had no idea how to play bass. The album would not be released until 1994 due to the controversy surrounding the murder. (Oh, and their next album? 1995's ''Dawn of the Black Hearts'', an LP with one of Euronymous's postmortem photos of Dead as the cover.)



* Music/RedHotChiliPeppers sixth album, ''One Hot Minute'' has sometimes been nicknamed ''One Hot Nightmare'' by fans who read about the production process of the album. After the critical and commercial success of Music/BloodSugarSexMagik, the Peppers were astonished that they had become so famous seemingly overnight. Not comfortable with the fame, guitarist John Frusciante ditched the band in the middle of their tour for that album. They scrambled to find a guitarist to replace him, using many session guitarists for the remaining live shows. When talks started for their next album, the band auditioned several guitarists and ended up settling with former Music/JanesAddiction guitarist Dave Navarro. At first, he clicked well with the band, getting along with all the members. Once production started, however, things got really weird. Navarro would show up late to recording sessions, if he could be bothered to show up at all. When he did show up, he had a professional attitude that clashed heavily with the rest of the band. He would constantly criticize the band's jamming and writing process, leaving vocalist Anothony Keidis, bassist Flea, and drummer Chad Smith feeling alienated by Navarro's involvement with the band. Music was scarcely written, leading record executives to suspect whether the album would even be completed. After a Woodstock '94 show, which was the first live performance to feature Navarro, attracted interest from fans, the band struggled even harder to get the album completed. The album wouldn't be released until 1995, spending a whopping ''3 years'' in production, triple the time the Chili Peppers were used to. The story doesn't even end there. Navarro's erratic behavior proved to be problematic during the disastrous tour for ''One Hot Minute''. He would throw fits, hog the spotlight, and play the music incorrectly. Eventually, Navarro was sacked in 1997, and the Peppers eventually got Frusciante back for their next 3 albums, which led to a resurgence in their popularity. ''One Hot Minute'' left many fans feeling strange and betrayed, while others welcomed the change. It's regarded as one of the Peppers' weaker efforts, though not their worst. The lessons learned, though, helping the band to make sure all future recordings went much smoother.

to:

* Music/RedHotChiliPeppers sixth album, ''One Hot Minute'' has sometimes been nicknamed ''One Hot Nightmare'' by fans who read about the production process of the album.
**
After the critical and commercial success of Music/BloodSugarSexMagik, the Peppers were astonished that they had become so famous seemingly overnight. Not comfortable with the fame, guitarist John Frusciante ditched the band in the middle of their tour for that album. They scrambled to find a guitarist to replace him, using many session guitarists for the remaining live shows. When talks started for their next album, the band auditioned several guitarists and ended up settling with former Music/JanesAddiction guitarist Dave Navarro. At first, he clicked well with the band, getting along with all the members.
**
Once production started, however, things got really weird. Navarro would show up late to recording sessions, if he could be bothered to show up at all. When he did ''did'' show up, he had a professional attitude that clashed heavily with the rest of the band. He would constantly criticize the band's jamming and writing process, leaving vocalist Anothony Keidis, bassist Flea, and drummer Chad Smith feeling alienated by Navarro's involvement with the band. Music was scarcely written, leading record executives to suspect whether the album would even be completed. completed.
**
After a Woodstock '94 show, which was the first live performance to feature Navarro, attracted interest from fans, the band struggled even harder to get the album completed. The album wouldn't be released until 1995, spending a whopping ''3 years'' in production, triple the time the Chili Peppers were used to. to.
**
The story doesn't even end there. Navarro's erratic behavior proved to be problematic during the disastrous tour for ''One Hot Minute''. He would throw fits, hog the spotlight, and play the music incorrectly. Eventually, Navarro was sacked in 1997, and the Peppers eventually got Frusciante back for their next 3 albums, which led to a resurgence in their popularity. ''One Hot Minute'' left many fans feeling strange and betrayed, while others welcomed the change. It's regarded as one of the Peppers' weaker efforts, though not their worst. The lessons learned, though, helping the band to make sure all future recordings went much smoother.
23rd Jul '17 6:34:14 PM DanielCase
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** In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).

to:

** In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. [[YokoOhNo The bandmembers' wives and girlfriends were also going at on their partners' behalf]], to the point that their manager says that things really were the way everyone thinks it was with the Beatles. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).
23rd Jul '17 6:25:04 PM DanielCase
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* In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).
* Years later there was ''..Famous Last Words...'' The band, by that time living in L.A. and enjoying the success of their previous album, ''Music/BreakfastInAmerica'', were feeling pressure to follow it up with a successful album. Vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, was growing disenchanted with the L.A. lifestyle, the music industry and touring, and was trying to start a family with his new wife and children. He had taken up yoga, meditation, vegetarianism and spiritual soul-searching, and wanted to record the album in his home studio. The rest of the band members were not adopting Hodgson's lifestyle, and he and the band were growing apart. Hodgson also felt that as Supertramp were getting tighter and more structured in soundcheck rehearsals, they stopped jamming, and were coming up with less ideas as a result; also, it had taken the fun out of the band for him. Vocalist/keyboardist Rick Davies, the other bandleader, recorded his vocals at his own home studio. Davies had also fired longtime manager Dave Margereson and employed his wife Sue as manager, a move Roger was uncomfortable with in a band already over-influenced by bickering wives gunning for their husbands in a [[Film/ThisIsSpinalTap Spinal Tap]] manner. When the album came out, it was criticized for (relatively) uninspired material and slick production, and sold a fraction of the amount BIA had done. Finally, Hodgson decided to leave the group in 1983 after a successful world tour.

to:

* ** In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).
* Years ** A decade later there was ''..Famous Last Words...'' The band, by that time living in L.A. and enjoying the success of their previous album, ''Music/BreakfastInAmerica'', were feeling pressure to follow it up with a successful album. Vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, was growing disenchanted with the L.A. lifestyle, the music industry and touring, and was trying to start a family with his new wife and children. He had taken up yoga, meditation, vegetarianism and spiritual soul-searching, and wanted to record the album in his home studio. The rest of the band members were not adopting Hodgson's lifestyle, and he and the band were growing apart. Hodgson also felt that as Supertramp were getting tighter and more structured in soundcheck rehearsals, they stopped jamming, and were coming up with less ideas as a result; also, it had taken the fun out of the band for him. Vocalist/keyboardist Rick Davies, the other bandleader, recorded his vocals at his own home studio. Davies had also fired longtime manager Dave Margereson and employed his wife Sue as manager, a move Roger was uncomfortable with in a band already over-influenced by bickering wives gunning for their husbands in a [[Film/ThisIsSpinalTap Spinal Tap]] manner. When the album came out, it was criticized for (relatively) uninspired material and slick production, and sold a fraction of the amount BIA had done. Finally, Hodgson decided to leave the group in 1983 after a successful world tour.
23rd Jul '17 6:23:29 PM DanielCase
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* The Music/{{Supertramp}} album, ''..Famous Last Words...'' The band, by that time living in L.A. and enjoying the success of their previous album, ''Music/BreakfastInAmerica'', were feeling pressure to follow it up with a successful album. Vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, was growing disenchanted with the L.A. lifestyle, the music industry and touring, and was trying to start a family with his new wife and children. He had taken up yoga, meditation, vegetarianism and spiritual soul-searching, and wanted to record the album in his home studio. The rest of the band members were not adopting Hodgson's lifestyle, and he and the band were growing apart. Hodgson also felt that as Supertramp were getting tighter and more structured in soundcheck rehearsals, they stopped jamming, and were coming up with less ideas as a result; also, it had taken the fun out of the band for him. Vocalist/keyboardist Rick Davies, the other bandleader, recorded his vocals at his own home studio. Davies had also fired longtime manager Dave Margereson and employed his wife Sue as manager, a move Roger was uncomfortable with in a band already over-influenced by bickering wives gunning for their husbands in a [[Film/ThisIsSpinalTap Spinal Tap]] manner. When the album came out, it was criticized for (relatively) uninspired material and slick production, and sold a fraction of the amount BIA had done. Finally, Hodgson decided to leave the group in 1983 after a successful world tour.

to:

* The * Music/{{Supertramp}} album, has had two of these:
* In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).
* Years later there was
''..Famous Last Words...'' The band, by that time living in L.A. and enjoying the success of their previous album, ''Music/BreakfastInAmerica'', were feeling pressure to follow it up with a successful album. Vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, was growing disenchanted with the L.A. lifestyle, the music industry and touring, and was trying to start a family with his new wife and children. He had taken up yoga, meditation, vegetarianism and spiritual soul-searching, and wanted to record the album in his home studio. The rest of the band members were not adopting Hodgson's lifestyle, and he and the band were growing apart. Hodgson also felt that as Supertramp were getting tighter and more structured in soundcheck rehearsals, they stopped jamming, and were coming up with less ideas as a result; also, it had taken the fun out of the band for him. Vocalist/keyboardist Rick Davies, the other bandleader, recorded his vocals at his own home studio. Davies had also fired longtime manager Dave Margereson and employed his wife Sue as manager, a move Roger was uncomfortable with in a band already over-influenced by bickering wives gunning for their husbands in a [[Film/ThisIsSpinalTap Spinal Tap]] manner. When the album came out, it was criticized for (relatively) uninspired material and slick production, and sold a fraction of the amount BIA had done. Finally, Hodgson decided to leave the group in 1983 after a successful world tour.
2nd Jul '17 12:22:23 PM nombretomado
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* Music/MyBloodyValentine's ''Loveless''. You can probably get the whole lowdown on TheOtherWiki or the band's own page, but just to recap: main vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Kevin Shields is perfectionist to the point of James-Cameron-ness, 19 recording studios were used, 16 engineers were credited (most of them just ended up bringing Shields tea; only Anjali Dutt and Alan Moulder actually ''engineered'' anything), Shields and vocalist/guitarist Bilinda Butcher didn't allow the engineers to actually ''listen'' to them while recording vocals, drummer Colm Ó Cíosóig couldn't take part due to illness and homelessness (his drumming was {{sampl|ing}}ed, and he only played live on two tracks), they took two weeks to master the whole thing and it was almost all ruined when the computer they were using threw the entire album out of order and Shields had to piece it back together from memory. For years their label head Alan [=McGee=] claimed they spent £250.000 and almost bankrupted Creation Records, a claim Shields always disputed as exaggerated - his most recent explanation was that only "a few thousand" were actually used to record while the rest was "money to live on". However, it is true that the production of ''Loveless'' ended up terrorizing Creation's staff and draining their finances, with the label's second-in-command Dick Green having a nervous breakdown and tearfully begging Shields to just get it over with already - one publicist even commented that Green's hair turned grey from all the stress.

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* Music/MyBloodyValentine's ''Loveless''. You can probably get the whole lowdown on TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki or the band's own page, but just to recap: main vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Kevin Shields is perfectionist to the point of James-Cameron-ness, 19 recording studios were used, 16 engineers were credited (most of them just ended up bringing Shields tea; only Anjali Dutt and Alan Moulder actually ''engineered'' anything), Shields and vocalist/guitarist Bilinda Butcher didn't allow the engineers to actually ''listen'' to them while recording vocals, drummer Colm Ó Cíosóig couldn't take part due to illness and homelessness (his drumming was {{sampl|ing}}ed, and he only played live on two tracks), they took two weeks to master the whole thing and it was almost all ruined when the computer they were using threw the entire album out of order and Shields had to piece it back together from memory. For years their label head Alan [=McGee=] claimed they spent £250.000 and almost bankrupted Creation Records, a claim Shields always disputed as exaggerated - his most recent explanation was that only "a few thousand" were actually used to record while the rest was "money to live on". However, it is true that the production of ''Loveless'' ended up terrorizing Creation's staff and draining their finances, with the label's second-in-command Dick Green having a nervous breakdown and tearfully begging Shields to just get it over with already - one publicist even commented that Green's hair turned grey from all the stress.



* In a lesser example compared to most here: Music/{{U2}} frequently showed live footage of war-torn Sarajevo during the Zoo TV Tour, while promising someday they would perform there. Once things had calmed down in Bosnia and they decided to keep their promise (during the tour of ''Pop'', listed in the Albums folder above), it was enough for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U2_concert_in_Sarajevo a detailed article on]] TheOtherWiki. Sponsors tried to cancel the concert, border control kept the road crew off Bosnia for hours, the band had to rehearse in a damaged theater and sleep in a bullet-ridden Holiday Inn, and during the concert Bono started losing his voice (forcing him to [[AudienceParticipationSong request for crowd help]], and The Edge to [[StepUpToTheMicrophone take over lead vocals in a few tracks]]).

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* In a lesser example compared to most here: Music/{{U2}} frequently showed live footage of war-torn Sarajevo during the Zoo TV Tour, while promising someday they would perform there. Once things had calmed down in Bosnia and they decided to keep their promise (during the tour of ''Pop'', listed in the Albums folder above), it was enough for [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U2_concert_in_Sarajevo a detailed article on]] TheOtherWiki.Wiki/TheOtherWiki. Sponsors tried to cancel the concert, border control kept the road crew off Bosnia for hours, the band had to rehearse in a damaged theater and sleep in a bullet-ridden Holiday Inn, and during the concert Bono started losing his voice (forcing him to [[AudienceParticipationSong request for crowd help]], and The Edge to [[StepUpToTheMicrophone take over lead vocals in a few tracks]]).
30th Jun '17 8:44:23 PM Pren
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** In May 2017, a criminal investigation was launched by the FBI, who are looking into possible mail, wire and securities fraud by [=McFarland=] and Ja Rule. The festival also continues to be a huge headache for everyone who was duped by it, including catering companies that are still owed thousands of dollars and Blink-182, who are unable to get their equipment out of customs due to the legal mess around the festival.

to:

** In May 2017, a criminal investigation was launched by the FBI, who are looking into possible mail, wire and securities fraud by [=McFarland=] and Ja Rule. The festival also continues to be a huge headache for everyone who was duped by it, including catering companies that are still owed thousands of dollars and Blink-182, who are unable to get their equipment out of customs due to the legal mess around the festival. [=McFarland=] was arrested two months later.
19th Jun '17 6:09:47 PM Ezclee4050
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** The show had been the Music/GratefulDead's idea, intended as a sort of West Coast Woodstock. It was supposed to have been in Golden Gate Park, but increasing animosity between the SFPD and the Haight-Ashbury hippie community led the city to drag its feet issuing permits, so they looked elsewhere. Sears Point Raceway in Marin County, north of the city, was willing, but they wanted the Rolling Stones to put up a $100,000 bond, which was a stumbling block. At the last minute, Dick Carter, the owner of Altamont Speedway, offered to host the concert. However, the short time to prepare meant it was impossible to set up proper support facilities like portable toilets and medical tents to the necessary extent.

to:

** The show had been the Music/GratefulDead's idea, intended as a sort of West Coast Woodstock. It was supposed to have been in Golden Gate Park, but increasing animosity between the SFPD and the Haight-Ashbury hippie community led the city to drag its feet issuing permits, so they looked elsewhere. Sears Point Raceway in Marin Sonoma County, north of the city, was willing, but they wanted the Rolling Stones to put up a $100,000 bond, which was a stumbling block. At the last minute, Dick Carter, the owner of Altamont Speedway, offered to host the concert. However, the short time to prepare meant it was impossible to set up proper support facilities like portable toilets and medical tents to the necessary extent.
22nd May '17 11:21:34 AM thelivingtoad
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** The lineup was also not as strong. Woodstock '94 had a variety of performers from old classics (Aerosmith; Bob Dylan; Joe Cocker; Crosby, Stills, & Nash) to established modern acts (Metallica, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day) to rising stars (Nine Inch Nails, The Cranberries, Melissa Etheridge). Woodstock '99 tried to do the same but it didn't have near the same effect. Apart from a solo set by Music/TheWho's John Entwhistle and Music/GratefulDead drummer Mickey Hart's new world music project, no performers from the original Woodstock showed up, and the organizers were stuck with returning performers from the '94 festival (like Sheryl Crow and RHCP) as well as critically maligned newer acts (like Creed, Limp Bizkit, Kid Rock, and Insane Clown Posse). Limp Bizkit's set was particularly singled out for criticism. There were a few bright spots (mostly non-hard rock acts like Alanis Morrisette, Elvis Costello, G. Love and Special Sauce, James Brown, The Tragically Hip and Jamiroquai), though those were few and far between.

to:

** The lineup was also not as strong. Woodstock '94 had a variety of performers from old classics (Aerosmith; Bob Dylan; Joe Cocker; Crosby, Stills, & Nash) to established modern acts (Metallica, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day) to rising stars (Nine Inch Nails, The Cranberries, Melissa Etheridge). Woodstock '99 tried to do the same but it didn't have near the same effect. Apart from a solo set by Music/TheWho's John Entwhistle and Music/GratefulDead drummer Mickey Hart's new world music project, no performers from the original Woodstock showed up, and the organizers were stuck with returning performers from the '94 festival (like Sheryl Crow and RHCP) as well as critically maligned newer acts (like Creed, Limp Bizkit, Kid Rock, and Insane Clown Posse). Limp Bizkit's set was particularly singled out for criticism. There were a few bright spots (mostly non-hard rock acts like Alanis Morrisette, Elvis Costello, G. Love and Special Sauce, The Roots, James Brown, The Tragically Hip and Jamiroquai), though those were few and far between.
22nd May '17 11:20:41 AM thelivingtoad
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** The lineup was also not as strong. Woodstock '94 had a variety of performers from old classics (Aerosmith; Bob Dylan; Joe Cocker; Crosby, Stills, & Nash) to established modern acts (Metallica, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day) to rising stars (Nine Inch Nails, The Cranberries, Melissa Etheridge). Woodstock '99 tried to do the same but it didn't have near the same effect. No performers from the original Woodstock showed up and the organizers were stuck with returning performers from the '94 festival (like Sheryl Crow and RHCP) as well as critically maligned newer acts (like Creed, Limp Bizkit, Kid Rock, and Insane Clown Posse). Limp Bizkit's set was particularly singled out for criticism. There were a few bright spots (mostly non-hard rock acts like Alanis Morrisette, Elvis Costello, G. Love and Special Sauce, James Brown, The Tragically Hip and Jamiroquai), though those were few and far between.

to:

** The lineup was also not as strong. Woodstock '94 had a variety of performers from old classics (Aerosmith; Bob Dylan; Joe Cocker; Crosby, Stills, & Nash) to established modern acts (Metallica, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, Green Day) to rising stars (Nine Inch Nails, The Cranberries, Melissa Etheridge). Woodstock '99 tried to do the same but it didn't have near the same effect. No Apart from a solo set by Music/TheWho's John Entwhistle and Music/GratefulDead drummer Mickey Hart's new world music project, no performers from the original Woodstock showed up up, and the organizers were stuck with returning performers from the '94 festival (like Sheryl Crow and RHCP) as well as critically maligned newer acts (like Creed, Limp Bizkit, Kid Rock, and Insane Clown Posse). Limp Bizkit's set was particularly singled out for criticism. There were a few bright spots (mostly non-hard rock acts like Alanis Morrisette, Elvis Costello, G. Love and Special Sauce, James Brown, The Tragically Hip and Jamiroquai), though those were few and far between.
22nd May '17 11:14:55 AM thelivingtoad
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** In May 2017, a criminal investigation was launched by the FBI, who are looking into possible mail, wire and securities fraud by [=McFarland=] and Ja Rule. The festival also continues to be a huge headache for everyone who was duped by it, including catering companies that are still owed thousands of dollars and Blink-182, whose are unable to get their equipment out of customs due to the legal mess around the festival.

to:

** In May 2017, a criminal investigation was launched by the FBI, who are looking into possible mail, wire and securities fraud by [=McFarland=] and Ja Rule. The festival also continues to be a huge headache for everyone who was duped by it, including catering companies that are still owed thousands of dollars and Blink-182, whose who are unable to get their equipment out of customs due to the legal mess around the festival.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.Music