History TroubledProduction / Music

24th Nov '17 8:06:10 AM Twentington
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* Music/TobyKeith had a minor example with his ''Blue Moon'' album. In 1994, Creator/MercuryRecords moved him to the newly created Polydor Nashville branch, of which he was supposed to be the flagship artist. However, Polydor closed after releasing the lead single "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You", so he was moved to A&M for "A Woman's Touch". A&M then closed as well (Keith said that he was only with A&M for 15 weeks), so he finally went back to Mercury for the album's third and final single, "Me Too".
13th Nov '17 1:18:45 PM thezoraidude
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* Dutch heavy metal festival Dynamo Open Air didn't went through without problems, partly due to its massive success in the 1990's
** Once the festival became a multiple-day event, several traffic jams were noted in the Eindhoven area, where the festival was held, particularily for the 1994 and 1995 editions. The former was featured in a Dutch record book for causing the longest traffic jam in Netherlands, while the latter, which featured {{Music/Paradise Lost}}, {{Music/Type O Negative}}, {{Music/Biohazard}} and {{Music/Machine Head}} as headliners, became overcrowded, with 118,000 people attending. This caused local authorities to set a strict 60,000 people limit for future editions of the festival.
** Despite the attendance restriction, the editions from 1996 to 1998 went smoothly. However, after the 1998 edition, the festival could no longer be held on the airport site due to housing redevelopment. The 1999 edition was held on a former garbage dump in Mierlo, near Eindhoven. It had the misfortune to occur during a particularily hot spring, which caused sanitary problems and water shortage, and traffic delays were occuring.
** In the end, the festival was shrunk down to only one day, and had different locations for each edition following. A permanent site was found in Lichtenvoorde, where the 2001 edition was supposed to be hold. However, a foot-and-mouth disease epidemia invaded the area, causing the cancellation of the festival a few weeks before it could occur.
** By the time the festival resumed in 2002, it was completely overshadowed by other festivals like Graspop Metal Meeting in Belgium, Wacken Open Air in Germany or Tuska Open Air in Finland. However, the organizers found hope when a leisure park in Neunen could host the festival permanently as of 2003... only to find out the nesting season occured during the festival, and that the high level of noise would chase the birds away from their maternal homes, thus violating a then-recent law about animal protection. 2003 then became another year without Dynamo Open Air.
** The last Dynamo Open Air was held in Hellendoorn, on the Dauwpop site, in 2005. The festival was not sold-out, with only about 1000 people attending, despite featuring {{Music/Anthrax}} as main headliner, thus ending the festival for good.
** However, a new version of the festival, named Dynamo Metalfest, is held in Eindhoven since 2015, without any problems.
2nd Nov '17 9:59:52 PM kenyastarflight
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* The Fyre Festival in 2017, organized by rapper Ja Rule and tech entrepreneur Billy [=McFarland=], became the music festival equivalent of [[TroubledProduction/{{Other}} Dashcon]] before it even ended, and undoubtedly a far higher-profile debacle given the massive amounts of money and big-name celebrities involved. [[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2017/04/29/the-founder-of-the-disastrous-fyre-festival-has-a-history-of-overpromising-elite-access/ This article]] in ''The Washington Post'' gives a rundown of what happened at the festival itself, [[http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/04/fyre-festival-exumas-bahamas-disaster.html this article]] in ''New York'' magazine provides a behind-the-scenes look and [[https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/21/arts/music/fyre-festival-billy-mcfarland-ja-rule-criminal-investigation.html this]] ''New York Times'' piece examines the messy aftermath that lasted for months.

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* The Fyre Festival in 2017, organized by rapper Ja Rule and tech entrepreneur Billy [=McFarland=], became the music festival equivalent of [[TroubledProduction/{{Other}} Dashcon]] before it even ended, and undoubtedly a far higher-profile debacle given the massive amounts of money and big-name celebrities involved. [[https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2017/04/29/the-founder-of-the-disastrous-fyre-festival-has-a-history-of-overpromising-elite-access/ This article]] in ''The Washington Post'' gives a rundown of what happened at the festival itself, [[http://nymag.com/thecut/2017/04/fyre-festival-exumas-bahamas-disaster.html this article]] in ''New York'' magazine provides a behind-the-scenes look and [[https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/21/arts/music/fyre-festival-billy-mcfarland-ja-rule-criminal-investigation.html this]] ''New York Times'' piece examines the messy aftermath that lasted for months. Internet Historian also has [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBPg5ftCMv8 an in-depth analysis]] of the festival and its aftermath.
30th Oct '17 5:39:24 PM mlsmithca
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** There were no technical issues with the recording, to be fair. But the band's unrelenting schedule of alternating touring and recording had taken its toll on their personal relationships after almost a decade. "We were all pretty sick of each other", said bassist Tiran Porter.

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** There were no technical issues with the recording, to be fair. But but the band's unrelenting schedule of alternating touring and recording had taken its toll on their personal relationships after almost a decade. "We were all pretty sick of each other", said bassist Tiran Porter.



** The actual recording of the album was rather peaceful for the most part. However when it was released, the album sold fewer copies than ''Awake'' and while it got decent reviews from critics, the majority of the fanbase hated the album (although not as much [[VindicatedByHistory these days]]) and were afraid of the band selling-out and becoming a more radio-friendly rock/metal band. The album however was considered a commercial failure. While the band supported the album with a successful club/theater concert tour, the label only made one music video (for the song "Hollow Years") and they barely promoted the album in general. That's right, [[Main/{{Irony}} the label didn't want the band to release a commercial failure, yet Elektra Records were the main reason the album was a commercial failure]]. This whole debacle led to the band to force the label to allow creative freedom on all future albums, which they agreed to do. This freedom and a new keyboardist led the band to create their follow up. ''Music/{{Metropolis Pt 2 Scenes From A Memory}}.''

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** The actual recording of the album was rather peaceful for the most part. However when it was released, the album sold fewer copies than ''Awake'' and while it got decent reviews from critics, the majority of the fanbase hated the album (although not as much [[VindicatedByHistory these days]]) and were afraid of the band selling-out and becoming a more radio-friendly rock/metal band. The album however was considered a commercial failure. While the band supported the album with a successful club/theater concert tour, the label only made one music video (for the song "Hollow Years") and they barely promoted the album in general. That's right, [[Main/{{Irony}} [[{{Irony}} the label didn't want the band to release a commercial failure, yet Elektra Records were the main reason the album was a commercial failure]]. This whole debacle led to the band to force the label to allow creative freedom on all future albums, which they agreed to do. This freedom and a new keyboardist led the band to create their follow up. ''Music/{{Metropolis Pt 2 Scenes From A Memory}}.''



** Water, at least, was not a problem as one of the nearby ponds had been tapped for it and provided abundantly during the festival. However, they got more than they bargained for as the last two days of the festival were beset by torrential storms that aggravated the existing issues and forced the promoters to shuffle the lineup around almost constantly. The Music/GratefulDead especially suffered from the effects of the rain as their lighting and sound were subpar; some of the band also got electric shocks.[[note]]A major reason they're neither in the movie nor on the album[[/note]] A turntable underneath the main stage, meant to allow one act to play while the next one was setting up, also failed, exacerbating these issues. (Richie Havens wasn't supposed to open the show, but since he was there and Sweetwater was not, he was asked to; after he'd run out of his planned material he [[ThrowItIn improvised]] "Freedom" right there on stage; it became one of his signature songs)

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** Water, at least, was not a problem as one of the nearby ponds had been tapped for it and provided abundantly during the festival. However, they got more than they bargained for as the last two days of the festival were beset by torrential storms that aggravated the existing issues and forced the promoters to shuffle the lineup around almost constantly. The Music/GratefulDead especially suffered from the effects of the rain as their lighting and sound were subpar; some of the band also got electric shocks.[[note]]A major reason they're neither in the movie nor on the album[[/note]] A turntable underneath the main stage, meant to allow one act to play while the next one was setting up, also failed, exacerbating these issues. (Richie Havens wasn't supposed to open the show, but since he was there and Sweetwater was not, he was asked to; after he'd run out of his planned material he [[ThrowItIn improvised]] "Freedom" right there on stage; it became one of his signature songs)songs.)



** Amid much fanfare, Ross claimed she was going back on tour with "The Supremes." However, this would not be the much-anticipated reunion of the original trio (Ross, Cindy Birdsong, and Mary Wilson.) Instead, Ross toured with Scherrie Payne and Linda Laurence (Two singers who had replaced the originals back in the 70s, and were essentially Ross' old backup singers.)

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** Amid much fanfare, Ross claimed she was going back on tour with "The Supremes." However, this would not be the much-anticipated reunion of the original trio (Ross, of Ross, Cindy Birdsong, and Mary Wilson.) Wilson. Instead, Ross toured with Scherrie Payne and Linda Laurence (Two Laurence, two singers who had replaced the originals back in the 70s, and were essentially Ross' old backup singers.)
23rd Oct '17 7:40:28 PM DanielCase
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* In addition to the problems that plagued Music/DavidBowie's 197374 ''Diamond Dogs'' tour (see below under Concert Tours), ''David Live'' had some additional troubles of its own:
** Bowie's backup band learned of the intent to record the shows at Philadelphia's Tower Theatre only a few hours before the first one. Since recording a live album had not been provided for by their contracts, they threatened to walk out, and stuck to their guns when Bowie's initial offer was too low. Finally, after he promised them $5,000 each, they agreed to play. However, the bad taste the whole experience had left in their mouth affected their performances to an extent that is audible on the album.
** But at least those performances were audible. As the album's notes admit, some of the backing vocals had to be overdubbed after recording since the singers were often too far from the microphone, and later it was divulged that this issue had affected some of the sax parts as well.
** Many critics have also taken issue with Bowie's new arrangements of his songs, and his singing (probably a result of the already-stressful tour). Bowie admits in retrospect that the cover image makes him look dead. Despite these shortcomings, the album is still essential listening as it captures Bowie as he transitioned from the Ziggy Stardust[[note]]He has since described this album as the "final death" of Ziggy[[/note]] sound and persona of his early work to the more soul-influenced sound of ''Young Americans''.
16th Oct '17 10:51:29 AM igordebraga
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* Music/{{Aerosmith}}'s ''Nine Lives'', their return to Creator/ColumbiaRecords after experience a CareerResurrection at Creator/GeffenRecords, did not come out easily. One week before rehearsals, drummer Joey Kramer left because he went into a deep depression, having grieved the loss of his father shortly prior, and the band even hired a session drummer in case Kramer didn't return. The first recordings with Glen Ballard (who co-wrote a few tracks) did not satisfy the band, leading to a delayed release as Aerosmith fired their long time manager, reunited with Geffen's A&R man John Kalodner (who was at Columbia, but the manager decided to keep away) - who helped Tyler with the painful task of cutting over 10 tracks he had recorded - and discarded what had been done to re-record under producer Kevin Shirley. Then shortly after release, the album cover drew fury from Hindus and had to be replaced.
* Music/{{Alphaville}} ran into this issue for two of their albums

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* Music/{{Aerosmith}}'s ''Nine Lives'', their return to Creator/ColumbiaRecords after experience experiencing a CareerResurrection at Creator/GeffenRecords, did not come out easily. One week before rehearsals, drummer Joey Kramer left because he went into a deep depression, having grieved the loss of his father shortly prior, and the band even hired a session drummer in case Kramer didn't return. The first recordings with Glen Ballard (who co-wrote a few tracks) did not satisfy the band, leading to a delayed release as Aerosmith fired their long time manager, reunited with Geffen's A&R man John Kalodner (who was at Columbia, but the manager decided to keep away) - who helped Tyler with the painful task of cutting over 10 tracks he had recorded - and discarded what had been done to re-record under producer Kevin Shirley. Then shortly after release, the album cover drew fury from Hindus and had to be replaced.
* Music/{{Alphaville}} ran into this issue for two of their albumsalbums.



* Music/FooFighters have several troubled albums to their name.

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* Music/FooFighters have several two troubled albums to their name.



** Two albums later, ''One by One'' had the band struggling again. Probably helped by the band being burned out by years of touring, no one was satisfied with the recordings. Then during a UK minitour, drummer Taylor Hawkins had an overdose. As he left the hospital, the band rushed back to their Virginia studio, eventually moving to a top-notch LA one... and not only the frustration continued, but tensions were escalating. The band eventually decided to take a break - where, to make it worse, Music/DaveGrohl went touring with Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge, raising some ire from Hawkins. The band eventually decided they'd at least play the Coachella festival - where the rehearsals were mostly silent until guitarist Chris Shifflet (who was recording his first album with the band) said "Man, is it just me or we can cut the air here with a knife?" and fights broke out. But the concert was done, and since the band enjoyed their performance, they decided to re-record the album from scratch in Virginia during just two weeks. As Dave put out: "This version of 'All of My Life' cost $1 million and sounds like crap. This was recorded in half an hour in my basement and is the biggest fucking song we've ever had!"

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** Two albums later, ''One by One'' had the band struggling again. Probably helped by the band being burned out by years of touring, no one was satisfied with the recordings. Then during a UK minitour, drummer Taylor Hawkins had an overdose. As he left the hospital, the band rushed back to their Virginia studio, eventually moving to a top-notch LA one... and not only the frustration continued, but tensions were escalating. The band eventually decided to take a break - where, to make it worse, Music/DaveGrohl went touring with Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge, raising some ire from Hawkins. The band eventually decided they'd at least play the Coachella festival - where the rehearsals were mostly silent until guitarist Chris Shifflet (who was recording his first album with the band) said "Man, is it just me or we can cut the air here with a knife?" and fights broke out. But the concert was done, and since the band enjoyed their performance, they decided to re-record the album from scratch (aside from a track featuring [[Music/{{Queen}} Brian May]]) in Virginia during just two weeks. As Dave put out: "This version of 'All of My Life' cost $1 million and sounds like crap. This was recorded in half an hour in my basement and is the biggest fucking song we've ever had!"



*** Songwriting went well for the most part; it was when they got to Copenhagen, Denmark, to record at Sweet Silence Studios where the problems began. Lars Ulrich still had no idea how rhythm theory worked and required roadie Flemming Larsen to help guide him through the songs, and making things worse, Ulrich had to record his drum parts in a warehouse at the back of the studio - with absolutely nothing in the way of acoustics, which explains the overly reverb-y drum sound on the album. Sound problems occurred throughout the production because the band's gear was stolen three weeks before they arrived in Copenhagen (including Hetfield's favourite guitar, which served as the inspiration for the song "Fade to Black"). The band also had nowhere to stay, so they had to sleep during the daytime ''at the studio'' and record at night, as they had not enough money for a hotel (hotels in Scandinavia were notoriously expensive at the time). Worse yet, the band had only 29 days to record, as a number of European shows were quickly approaching (this left them running on fumes by the time the shows arrived).

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*** Songwriting went well for the most part; it was when they got to Copenhagen, Denmark, to record at Sweet Silence Studios where the problems began. Lars Ulrich still had no idea how rhythm theory worked and required roadie Flemming Larsen to help guide him through the songs, and making things worse, Ulrich had to record his drum parts in a warehouse at the back of the studio - with absolutely nothing in the way of acoustics, which explains the overly reverb-y drum sound on the album. Sound problems occurred throughout the production because the band's gear was stolen three weeks before they arrived in Copenhagen (including Hetfield's favourite guitar, guitar and amplifier, which served as the inspiration for the song "Fade to Black"). The band also had nowhere to stay, so they had to sleep during the daytime ''at the studio'' and record at night, as they had not enough money for a hotel (hotels in Scandinavia were notoriously expensive at the time). Worse yet, the band had only 29 days to record, as a number of European shows were quickly approaching (this left them running on fumes by the time the shows arrived).
16th Oct '17 10:25:26 AM igordebraga
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** ''Bridges to Babylon'' only saw problems emerge when it was time to record in LA, as Keith Richards did not like Mick Jagger's plan to invite outside producers such as Music/TheDustBrothers, whose work on Music/{{Beck}}'s ''Odelay'' had impressed Jagger, and looping expert Danny Saber. Richards hated electronic music and refused to work with either of them. He even fired Saber from the album when he found out he was overdubbing guitars. As for The Dust Brothers, they ultimately only worked on three tracks. Most of the album was instead produced by Don Was, who had produced ''Voodoo Lounge''. Midway through production, Was had to keep Jagger and Richards in separate rooms and studios. Richards and his engineer friend had to steal tapes to make sure a track was finished. Charlie Watts, only got through the conflict by bonding with famous session percussionist and former [[Music/JohnLennon Plastic Ono Band]] member Jim Keltner, with whom he would make a solo record later. Watts ultimately flew out of Los Angeles as soon as he was not needed anymore. By the end of the sessions, none of the Stones were speaking to one another. It was their last album for nine years.

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** ''Bridges to Babylon'' only saw problems emerge when it was time to record in LA, as Keith Richards did not like Mick Jagger's plan to invite outside producers such as Music/TheDustBrothers, whose work on Music/{{Beck}}'s ''Odelay'' had impressed Jagger, and looping expert Danny Saber. Richards hated electronic music and refused to work with either of them. He even fired threw Saber from the album studio when he found out he was overdubbing guitars. As for The Dust Brothers, they ultimately only worked on three tracks. Most of the album was instead produced by Don Was, who had produced ''Voodoo Lounge''. Midway through production, Was had to keep Jagger and Richards in separate rooms and studios. Richards and his engineer friend had to steal tapes to make sure a track was finished. Charlie Watts, only got through the conflict by bonding with famous session percussionist and former [[Music/JohnLennon Plastic Ono Band]] member Jim Keltner, with whom he would make a solo record later. Watts ultimately flew out of Los Angeles as soon as he was not needed anymore. By the end of the sessions, none of the Stones were speaking to one another. It was their last album for nine eight years.



** In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. [[YokoOhNo The bandmembers' wives and girlfriends were also going at on their partners' behalf]], to the point that their manager says that things really were the way everyone thinks it was with the Beatles. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).

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** In 1974 they were touring the West Coast of North America in support of their breakout album ''Music/Crime of the Century'' ''Music/CrimeOfTheCentury'' when vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Roger Hodgson, one of the band's leaders, broke his hand. This forced the cancellation of the remaining shows, and with nothing better to do the band went into the studios in L.A. to record their next album. They had a lot of time ... but nothing else. Hodgson and songwriting partner Rick Davies hadn't even begun to think about their next album yet, and not only didn't have any overriding theme or concept for it, they hadn't even begun to write songs. Thus the band went forward with all they had: songs they hadn't used on ''Crime'', and a few leftovers from previous sessions. Given those choices, it's no surprise that everyone took two weeks off at one point so Hodgson and Davies could write some new songs ... leaving them, despite their original surfeit of time, with no time left to rehearse the new songs before having to record them. [[YokoOhNo The bandmembers' wives and girlfriends were also going at on their partners' behalf]], to the point that their manager says that things really were the way everyone thinks it was with the Beatles. Davies came up with the title, ''Crisis? What Crisis?'', as an ironic comment on the situation, as well as the cover-art concept. It got some good reviews, but on the whole the band was unhappy with it due to the circumstances under which they recorded it. (Hodgson, however, has since said that upon further consideration he likes it the best of all Supertramp's albums).



* Music/TheWho's Pete Townshend, after ''Music/{{Tommy}}'''s immense success, intended to create another rock opera, this time with a sci-fi bent, called ''Lifehouse''. Its plot would involve a dystopian heavily polluted virtual reality-based future (virtual reality before the term was even coined), where a Scottish farmer family go to the Lifehouse concert in London, the [[BrownNote perfect note]] rings out and the concertgoers disappear after having achieved musical Nirvana (no, [[Music/{{Nirvana}} not that kind]]). The Who would take over the Young Vic theatre, develop new material with influence from the audience and a story would evolve. It would be a movie. Pete would modify his new synths to pick up information from audience members to create musical portraits (something basically impossible then and still pretty complicated now). Unsurprisingly, this was a recipe for disaster. Pete's inability to figure out just what the fuck he wanted caused him to have a nervous breakdown, and after spending four months of live concerts at the Young Vic and unproductive studio sessions, he finally junked the whole RockOpera concept. The Who gathered up their best songs, and entered Olympic Studios with producer Glyn Johns. The result was ''Music/WhosNext'', widely considered the band's best album.

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* Music/TheWho's Pete Townshend, after ''Music/{{Tommy}}'''s immense success, intended to create another rock opera, this time with a sci-fi bent, called ''Lifehouse''. Its plot would involve a dystopian heavily polluted virtual reality-based future (virtual reality before the term was even coined), where a Scottish farmer family go to the Lifehouse concert in London, the [[BrownNote perfect note]] rings out and the concertgoers disappear after having achieved musical Nirvana (no, [[Music/{{Nirvana}} not that kind]]). The Who would take over the Young Vic theatre, develop new material with influence from the audience and a story would evolve. It would be a movie. Pete would modify his new synths to pick up information from audience members to create musical portraits (something basically impossible then and still pretty complicated now). Unsurprisingly, this was a recipe for disaster. Pete's inability to figure out just what the fuck he wanted caused him to have a nervous breakdown, and after spending four months of live concerts at the Young Vic and unproductive studio sessions, sessions that ultimately led the band to ditch long-time producer Kit Lambert, he finally junked the whole RockOpera concept. The Who gathered up their best songs, and entered Olympic Studios with producer Glyn Johns. The result was ''Music/WhosNext'', widely considered the band's best album.
30th Sep '17 8:12:04 PM thelivingtoad
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** ''Bridges to Babylon'' only saw problems emerge when it was time to record in LA, as Keith Richards did not like Mick Jagger's plan to invite outside producers such as Music/TheDustBrothers and would both berate those and record separatedly. Producer Don Was came to the point he kept Jagger and Richards separate, Richards and his engineer friend had to steal tapes to make sure a track was finished, and Charlie Watts, who only went through the conflicts by bonding with a percussionist with whom he would make a solo record later, flew out of Los Angeles as soon as he was not needed anymore.

to:

** ''Bridges to Babylon'' only saw problems emerge when it was time to record in LA, as Keith Richards did not like Mick Jagger's plan to invite outside producers such as Music/TheDustBrothers Music/TheDustBrothers, whose work on Music/{{Beck}}'s ''Odelay'' had impressed Jagger, and would both berate those looping expert Danny Saber. Richards hated electronic music and record separatedly. Producer refused to work with either of them. He even fired Saber from the album when he found out he was overdubbing guitars. As for The Dust Brothers, they ultimately only worked on three tracks. Most of the album was instead produced by Don Was, who had produced ''Voodoo Lounge''. Midway through production, Was came had to the point he kept keep Jagger and Richards separate, in separate rooms and studios. Richards and his engineer friend had to steal tapes to make sure a track was finished, and finished. Charlie Watts, who only went got through the conflicts conflict by bonding with a famous session percussionist and former [[Music/JohnLennon Plastic Ono Band]] member Jim Keltner, with whom he would make a solo record later, later. Watts ultimately flew out of Los Angeles as soon as he was not needed anymore.anymore. By the end of the sessions, none of the Stones were speaking to one another. It was their last album for nine years.
30th Sep '17 7:09:36 PM thelivingtoad
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** Then, headlining act blink-182 -- who were already uneasy about playing a festival for rich kids -- pulled out of the festival over a lack of payment and particularly after their crew discovered substandard and unsafe production conditions. Shortly after the band put out a public statement, ''every other musician that was scheduled to perform'' backed out too.

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** Then, headlining act blink-182 -- who were already uneasy about playing a festival for rich kids -- pulled out of the festival over a lack of payment and particularly after their crew discovered substandard and unsafe production conditions. Shortly after the band put out a public statement, ''every other musician that was scheduled to perform'' backed out too.
30th Sep '17 7:08:50 PM thelivingtoad
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** Then, headlining act blink-182 pulled out of the festival over a lack of payment and particularly after their crew discovered substandard and unsafe production conditions. Shortly after the band put out a public statement, ''every other musician that was scheduled to perform'' backed out too.

to:

** Then, headlining act blink-182 -- who were already uneasy about playing a festival for rich kids -- pulled out of the festival over a lack of payment and particularly after their crew discovered substandard and unsafe production conditions. Shortly after the band put out a public statement, ''every other musician that was scheduled to perform'' backed out too.



** In May 2017, a criminal investigation was launched by the FBI, who are looking into possible mail, wire and securities fraud by [=McFarland=] and Ja Rule. The festival also continues to be a huge headache for everyone who was duped by it, including catering companies that are still owed thousands of dollars and Blink-182, who are unable to get their equipment out of customs due to the legal mess around the festival. [=McFarland=] was arrested two months later. After a couple more months, Fyre Festival LLC was sued into chapter seven bankruptcy.

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** In May 2017, a criminal investigation was launched by the FBI, who are looking into possible mail, wire and securities fraud by [=McFarland=] and Ja Rule. The festival also continues to be a huge headache for everyone who was duped by it, including catering companies that are still owed thousands of dollars and Blink-182, who are were unable to get their equipment out of customs for months due to the legal mess around the festival. [=McFarland=] was arrested two months later. After a couple more months, Fyre Festival LLC was sued into chapter seven bankruptcy.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.Music