History TroubledProduction / Music

31st Aug '16 10:34:22 AM mlsmithca
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* While recording ''Music/{{Synchronicity}}'' in Montserrat, the members of Music/ThePolice each recorded their parts in different rooms (Stewart Copeland played drums in the dining room, Sting worked from the control room and Andy Summers recorded in the actual studio) and only overdubbed instruments when just one of them was in the studio at a time because they couldn't stand to be in the same room. Additionally, Sting and Stewart Copeland started a fight while recording "Every Breath You Take", which almost made producer Hugh Padgham walk out. It got even worse when they went back to try to record what would have been their sixth album, where they were going to do new recordings of all their greatest hits (it was released, with only "Don't Stand So Close to Me" updated). According to Andy Summers, one morning, as he expected, Stewart and Sting got into a fight about how to program a Synclavier shortly after they began working (Copeland had broken his collarbone and couldn't play drums, so the percussion needed to be done electronically - and he wanted to use a Fairlight computer instead of the synth). He slipped out and came back seven hours later ... only to find them still having the same exact argument.

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* While recording ''Music/{{Synchronicity}}'' in Montserrat, the members of Music/ThePolice each recorded their parts in different rooms (Stewart Copeland played drums in the dining room, room,[[note]] The dining room was stiflingly hot, which made Stewart's hands sweat so much that he couldn't hold onto his drumsticks and ended up having to tape them to his hands.[[/note]] Sting worked from the control room and Andy Summers recorded in the actual studio) and only overdubbed instruments when just one of them was in the studio at a time because they couldn't stand to be in the same room. Additionally, Sting and Stewart Copeland started a fight while recording "Every Breath You Take", which almost made producer Hugh Padgham walk out. It got even worse when they went back to try to record what would have been their sixth album, where they were going to do new recordings of all their greatest hits (it was released, with only "Don't Stand So Close to Me" updated). According to Andy Summers, one morning, as he expected, Stewart and Sting got into a fight about how to program a Synclavier shortly after they began working (Copeland had broken his collarbone and couldn't play drums, so the percussion needed to be done electronically - and he wanted to use a Fairlight computer instead of the synth). He slipped out and came back seven hours later ... only to find them still having the same exact argument.
29th Aug '16 7:12:09 PM thelivingtoad
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** Also, Becker and co-leader Donald Fagen became [[ControlFreak control freaks]] in production, to an even greater extent than that they had already become infamous for two years earlier when making ''Aja'', demanding ''dozens'' of takes from studio musicians and continuous tweaks to already recorded material (the fade-out for "Babylon Sisters" alone took ''55 attempts'' for Becker, Fagen and their longtime producer Gary Katz to decide on a version they liked). One track was recorded over and over ... only so they could get the drum part right. [[Music/DireStraits MarkKnopfler]] spent five hours in another studio jamming over the "Time out of Mind" instrumental, only to see just a few of his fills used in the fadeout of what turned out to be the band's last hit single.

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** Also, Becker and co-leader Donald Fagen became [[ControlFreak control freaks]] in production, to an even greater extent than that they had already become infamous for two years earlier when making ''Aja'', demanding ''dozens'' of takes from studio musicians and continuous tweaks to already recorded material (the fade-out for "Babylon Sisters" alone took ''55 attempts'' for Becker, Fagen and their longtime producer Gary Katz to decide on a version they liked). One track was recorded over and over ... only so they could get the drum part right. [[Music/DireStraits MarkKnopfler]] Mark Knopfler]] spent five hours in another studio jamming over the "Time out of Mind" instrumental, only to see just a few of his fills used in the fadeout of what turned out to be the band's last hit single.
29th Aug '16 7:11:52 PM thelivingtoad
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** Also, Becker and co-leader Donald Fagen became [[ControlFreak control freaks]] in production, to an even greater extent than that they had already become infamous for two years earlier when making ''Aja'', demanding ''dozens'' of takes from studio musicians and continuous tweaks to already recorded material (the fade-out for "Babylon Sisters" alone took ''55 attempts'' for Becker, Fagen and their longtime producer Gary Katz to decide on a version they liked). One track was recorded over and over ... only so they could get the drum part right. Music/MarkKnopfler pent five hours in another studio jamming over the "Time out of Mind" instrumental, only to see just a few of his fills used in the fadeout of what turned out to be the band's last hit single.

to:

** Also, Becker and co-leader Donald Fagen became [[ControlFreak control freaks]] in production, to an even greater extent than that they had already become infamous for two years earlier when making ''Aja'', demanding ''dozens'' of takes from studio musicians and continuous tweaks to already recorded material (the fade-out for "Babylon Sisters" alone took ''55 attempts'' for Becker, Fagen and their longtime producer Gary Katz to decide on a version they liked). One track was recorded over and over ... only so they could get the drum part right. Music/MarkKnopfler pent [[Music/DireStraits MarkKnopfler]] spent five hours in another studio jamming over the "Time out of Mind" instrumental, only to see just a few of his fills used in the fadeout of what turned out to be the band's last hit single.
23rd Aug '16 5:02:34 PM gewunomox
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** ''One by One''. Probably helped by the band being burned out by years of touring, no one was satisfied with the recordings. Then during a UK minitour, drummer Taylor Hawkins had an overdose. As he left the hospital, the band rushed back to their Virginia studio, eventually moving to a top-notch LA one... and not only the frustration continued, but tensions were escalating. The band eventually decided to take a break - where, to make it worse, DaveGrohl went touring with Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge, raising some ire from Hawkins. The band eventually decided they'd at least play the Coachella festival - where the rehearsals were mostly silent until guitarist Chris Shifflet (who was recording his first album with the band) said "Man, is it just me or we can cut the air here with a knife?" and fights broke out. But the concert was done, and since the band enjoyed their performance, they decided to re-record the album from scratch in Virginia during just two weeks. As Dave put out: "This version of 'All of My Life' cost $1 million and sounds like crap. This was recorded in half an hour in my basement and is the biggest fucking song we've ever had!"

to:

** ''One by One''. Probably helped by the band being burned out by years of touring, no one was satisfied with the recordings. Then during a UK minitour, drummer Taylor Hawkins had an overdose. As he left the hospital, the band rushed back to their Virginia studio, eventually moving to a top-notch LA one... and not only the frustration continued, but tensions were escalating. The band eventually decided to take a break - where, to make it worse, DaveGrohl Music/DaveGrohl went touring with Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge, raising some ire from Hawkins. The band eventually decided they'd at least play the Coachella festival - where the rehearsals were mostly silent until guitarist Chris Shifflet (who was recording his first album with the band) said "Man, is it just me or we can cut the air here with a knife?" and fights broke out. But the concert was done, and since the band enjoyed their performance, they decided to re-record the album from scratch in Virginia during just two weeks. As Dave put out: "This version of 'All of My Life' cost $1 million and sounds like crap. This was recorded in half an hour in my basement and is the biggest fucking song we've ever had!"
22nd Aug '16 1:05:58 AM Morgenthaler
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** Weeks before the album was finally released in 2008, lead guitarist Robin Finck again quit the band, which cancelled a hopeful tour. Axl Rose did zero promotion for the album for the next year, barring a few message board fan interviews. The band hired DJ Ashba (who played with [[Music/MotleyCrue Nikki Sixx]] in Sixx AM) as the new lead. A year after the album was released, the band continued the Chinese Democracy Tour (which had been going on since 2001) with a band that only had 3 contributing song writers left. To top it all off, the booklet and promotional materials were rife with errors and some have said the album was actually intended to be a TRIPLE album (Axl Rose has said he always thought of it as a double. SkidRow's Sebastian Bach claims to have heard four albums worth of material at one point). Instead, one record with the majority of the songs being nearly 10 years old was released with no further albums in sight. The band would continue to tour for ''Chinese Democracy'' until 2012. A whole decade of (mostly successful) touring on one album that took 12 years to be released as 1/3rd of the intended content. And that doesn't mention the multiple law suits, including one over plagiarized ambient music before a track (a track that was completed and performed live in 2002, yet had the offending sample added shortly before release in 2008), and a major one with a former manager of the band.

to:

** Weeks before the album was finally released in 2008, lead guitarist Robin Finck again quit the band, which cancelled a hopeful tour. Axl Rose did zero promotion for the album for the next year, barring a few message board fan interviews. The band hired DJ Ashba (who played with [[Music/MotleyCrue Nikki Sixx]] in Sixx AM) as the new lead. A year after the album was released, the band continued the Chinese Democracy Tour (which had been going on since 2001) with a band that only had 3 contributing song writers left. To top it all off, the booklet and promotional materials were rife with errors and some have said the album was actually intended to be a TRIPLE album (Axl Rose has said he always thought of it as a double. SkidRow's Music/SkidRow's Sebastian Bach claims to have heard four albums worth of material at one point). Instead, one record with the majority of the songs being nearly 10 years old was released with no further albums in sight. The band would continue to tour for ''Chinese Democracy'' until 2012. A whole decade of (mostly successful) touring on one album that took 12 years to be released as 1/3rd of the intended content. And that doesn't mention the multiple law suits, including one over plagiarized ambient music before a track (a track that was completed and performed live in 2002, yet had the offending sample added shortly before release in 2008), and a major one with a former manager of the band.
19th Aug '16 1:29:05 PM Morgenthaler
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** Michael kept away from the rest of his family as often as he could offstage. JamesBrown turned down his offer to perform with them in New York City, as he too objected to the ticket lottery. And an offer to have one of the shows filmed for TV/video release was one the brothers were willing to take, but Michael nixed it...and then had his own crew film a show with the same intent. It was never released.

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** Michael kept away from the rest of his family as often as he could offstage. JamesBrown Music/JamesBrown turned down his offer to perform with them in New York City, as he too objected to the ticket lottery. And an offer to have one of the shows filmed for TV/video release was one the brothers were willing to take, but Michael nixed it...and then had his own crew film a show with the same intent. It was never released.
13th Aug '16 12:42:27 PM multibrawlr
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** ''[[Music/{{Smile}} SMiLE]]'' is one of the most fascinating examples of this in music history. It was meant to be, in Brian's words, a "teenage symphony to God", a whole album's worth of music similar in style to their smash hit "Good Vibrations", and the album that would top his previous masterpiece, ''Music/PetSounds''. But as time went on, Brian's already fragile psyche began to crumble, coupled with his heavy consumption of cocaine and LSD, to the point that he began believing that one of his songs ("The Elements: Fire") was starting fires around the studio it was recorded at. The band's former manager Jack Rieley commented that Brian also suffered from a loss of confidence after the "Heroes and Villains" single stiffed on the charts, and was so perfectionistic and [[ProtectionFromEditors untouchable]] in the studio he would not be able to stop reworking songs despite having excellent versions alerady, leading to later versions of the same songs degenerating in quality from excessive investment in the project without anyone to put the brakes on. Things weren't going well around him, either; by that time, the band was suing Capitol Records over royalties and trying to set up their own record label, Brian's brother Carl Wilson was nearly drafted for the Vietnam War, and worst of all, Brian's bandmate and cousin Mike Love came into heated arguments with Brian's lyrical partner Van Dyke Parks over the meaning of such lines as "columnated ruins domino" and "over and over, the crow cries uncover the cornfield", eventually driving Van Dyke Parks into leaving the project behind. By that point, ''Smile'' was basically over, and on May 6, 1967, the project was officially shelved. (More than 30 years later, Wilson resurrected the thing as a solo album, and 7 years afterwards what could be salvaged of the project emerged as ''The Smile Sessions'' to celebrate the band's 50th anniversary.)
** It is far from the only album that the band had issues with. In 1992, they got together to record what was to be another triumphant return for the band, ''Summer in Paradise''. Unfortunately, Brian Wilson was struggling with leaving the care of another person at the time and couldn't make the recording sessions. This left notorious Jerkass Mike Love in charge of the recording. Love demanded synthesized drum and bass parts, prevented certain band members from being able to play on the album, insisted on allowing ''Series/FullHouse'' star John Stamos to sing on a track despite band member wishes, and made things a general living hell for those involved. The album barely sold 10,000 copies, was critically lambasted, and was left out of the 2000-2001 reissues.

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** ''[[Music/{{Smile}} SMiLE]]'' is one of the most fascinating examples of this in music history. It was meant to be, in Brian's words, a "teenage symphony to God", a whole album's worth of music similar in style to their smash hit "Good Vibrations", and the album that would top his previous masterpiece, ''Music/PetSounds''. But as time went on, Brian's already fragile psyche began to crumble, coupled with his heavy consumption of cocaine and LSD, to the point that he began believing that one of his songs ("The Elements: Fire") was starting fires around the studio it was recorded at. at.
***
The band's former manager Jack Rieley commented that Brian also suffered from a loss of confidence after the "Heroes and Villains" single stiffed on the charts, and was so perfectionistic and [[ProtectionFromEditors untouchable]] in the studio he would not be able to stop reworking songs despite having excellent versions alerady, leading to later versions of the same songs degenerating in quality from excessive investment in the project without anyone to put the brakes on. on.
***
Things weren't going well around him, either; by that time, the band was suing Capitol Records over royalties and trying to set up their own record label, Brian's brother Carl Wilson was nearly drafted for the Vietnam War, and worst of all, Brian's bandmate and cousin Mike Love came into heated arguments with Brian's lyrical partner Van Dyke Parks over the meaning of such lines as "columnated ruins domino" and "over and over, the crow cries uncover the cornfield", eventually driving Van Dyke Parks into leaving the project behind. behind.
***
By that point, ''Smile'' was basically over, and on May 6, 1967, the project was officially shelved. (More than 30 years later, Wilson resurrected the thing as a solo album, and 7 years afterwards what could be salvaged of the project emerged as ''The Smile Sessions'' to celebrate the band's 50th anniversary.)
** It is far from the only album that the band had issues with. In 1992, they got together to record what was to be another triumphant return for the band, ''Summer in Paradise''. Unfortunately, Brian Wilson was struggling with leaving the care of another person at the time and couldn't make the recording sessions. This left notorious Jerkass {{Jerkass}} Mike Love in charge of the recording. Love demanded synthesized drum and bass parts, prevented certain band members from being able to play on the album, insisted on allowing ''Series/FullHouse'' star John Stamos to sing on a track despite band member wishes, and made things a general living hell for those involved. The album barely sold 10,000 copies, was critically lambasted, and was left out of the 2000-2001 reissues.



* Music/JeffBuckley had both a very notable aversion and straight-forward example of this. ''Music/{{Grace}}'' is one of the most easy-going recordings in popular music history, while ''Music/SketchesForMySweetheartTheDrunk'' is an ''entirely'' different story. Buckley first recorded several songs in Manhattan with Music/{{Television}} guitarist Tom Verlaine as producer in 1996 and early 1997, but he and his band were dissatisfied with the results, and some tension plagued these sessions due to the band's changing lineup (''Grace'' drummer Matt Johnson bolted after the first recordings, and was replaced with Parker Kindred). Buckley and the band took another hack at recording the songs with Verlaine in Memphis in February, but he was dissatisfied with the results again and fired Verlaine, asking ''Grace'' producer Andy Wallace to return as a replacement. He continued to record several 4-track demos in preparation for the session with Wallace, and sent his band back to New York while he stayed behind to work, mailing them the results (much to their excitement). The band was scheduled to return to Memphis for rehearsals and recording on 29 May 1997, but on that evening Buckley accidentally drowned in the Wolf River. The album was ultimately released posthumously as a double album, with the first CD containing all the previously-recorded, Verlaine-produced material Buckley had rejected, and the second CD containing Buckley's unfinished home demos. The album is generally considered good, but really jarring, as the potential the album could have had brings sadness to many listeners. What also didn't help was that the producer they sent in was really pushing for hits to be written. ''Grace'' suffered slight sales disappointment in the eyes of Sony. Imagine the producer's insistence on hits combined with Buckley's above-mentioned perfectionism. That's what amounted to this album being recorded. This is where Buckley's famous quote "I write music for people who are crying on the highway to a blasting stereo" came from.

to:

* Music/JeffBuckley had both a very notable aversion and straight-forward example of this. ''Music/{{Grace}}'' is one of the most easy-going recordings in popular music history, while ''Music/SketchesForMySweetheartTheDrunk'' is an ''entirely'' different story. Buckley story.
**Buckley
first recorded several songs in Manhattan with Music/{{Television}} guitarist Tom Verlaine as producer in 1996 and early 1997, but he and his band were dissatisfied with the results, and some tension plagued these sessions due to the band's changing lineup (''Grace'' drummer Matt Johnson bolted after the first recordings, and was replaced with Parker Kindred). Kindred).
**
Buckley and the band took another hack at recording the songs with Verlaine in Memphis in February, but he was dissatisfied with the results again and fired Verlaine, asking ''Grace'' producer Andy Wallace to return as a replacement. He continued to record several 4-track demos in preparation for the session with Wallace, and sent his band back to New York while he stayed behind to work, mailing them the results (much to their excitement). excitement).
**
The band was scheduled to return to Memphis for rehearsals and recording on 29 May 1997, but on that evening Buckley accidentally drowned in the Wolf River. The album was ultimately released posthumously as a double album, with the first CD containing all the previously-recorded, Verlaine-produced material Buckley had rejected, and the second CD containing Buckley's unfinished home demos. demos.
**
The album is generally considered good, but really jarring, as the potential the album could have had brings sadness to many listeners. What also didn't help was that the producer they sent in was really pushing for hits to be written. ''Grace'' suffered slight sales disappointment in the eyes of Sony. Imagine the producer's insistence on hits combined with Buckley's above-mentioned perfectionism. That's what amounted to this album being recorded. This is where Buckley's famous quote "I write music for people who are crying on the highway to a blasting stereo" came from.



** Enya's production team comprised a trio: herself, producer/arranger Nicky Ryan, and songwriter/lyricist Roma Ryan. The other two realized just how erratic and hard to work with Enya could be. A perfectionist of the highest magnitude, Enya was demanding of her compositions. She insisted on overdubbing her voice, sometimes hundreds of times, without sampling. This meant that a single vocal line would be recorded up to '''50 times''' just for it to be to her liking. To give you an image of how difficult this is to accomplish, the recording decks at the studios at which they recorded the album could hold a maximum of 32 tracks. This meant that levels would have to be figured out for 32 of the tracks, and then processed to fit on fewer tracks to make space for others. She demanded the tracks be laid out in demos in one studio before completely re-recording the album in another. To add insult to injury, there would be times where the Ryans would throw out hours' worth of work when it wasn't working out and would later find Enya enraged. She also ended up tripping on the steps of one of the studios, resulting in a "doped out on pain killers" Enya struggling to finish up the album. To this day, ''Watermark'' is considered one of the greatest, if not ''the'' greatest New Age album ever made, but it had a hell of a time getting there.

to:

** Enya's production team comprised a trio: herself, producer/arranger Nicky Ryan, and songwriter/lyricist Roma Ryan. The other two realized just how erratic and hard to work with Enya could be. A perfectionist of the highest magnitude, Enya was demanding of her compositions. She insisted on overdubbing her voice, sometimes hundreds of times, without sampling. This meant that a single vocal line would be recorded up to '''50 times''' just for it to be to her liking. [[note]] To give you an image of how difficult this is to accomplish, the recording decks at the studios at which they recorded the album could hold a maximum of 32 tracks. This tracks-- which meant that levels would have to be figured out for 32 of the tracks, and then processed to fit on fewer tracks to make space for others. She others.[[/note]]
** Enya
demanded the tracks be laid out in demos in one studio before completely re-recording the album in another. To add insult to injury, there would be times where the Ryans would throw out hours' worth of work when it wasn't working out and would out, only to later find Enya her enraged. She Enya also ended up tripping on the steps of one of the studios, resulting in a "doped out on pain killers" Enya struggling to finish up the album. To this day, ''Watermark'' is considered one of the greatest, if not ''the'' greatest New Age album ever made, but it had a hell of a time getting there.
24th Jul '16 3:04:13 PM nombretomado
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** The original tour promoter had apparently just backed out when Chuck Sullivan, son of New England Patriots' then-owner Billy Sullivan, met with an executive at Epic Records. His goal was to get a date at Sullivan Stadium in Foxboro, where the Pats were not just the home team but the owners. He'd earned a lot of respect in the NFL for his role in helping his father regain control of the team after a mid-'70s boardroom coup (which led to a class-action suit the elder Sullivan ultimately lost). Since he'd promoted concerts in college and BobHope USO tours in the Army, he knew a little about the business and had started promoting shows at Sullivan to make extra money. When he learned the Jacksons were seeking a tour promoter, he put together a bid.

to:

** The original tour promoter had apparently just backed out when Chuck Sullivan, son of New England Patriots' then-owner Billy Sullivan, met with an executive at Epic Records. His goal was to get a date at Sullivan Stadium in Foxboro, where the Pats were not just the home team but the owners. He'd earned a lot of respect in the NFL for his role in helping his father regain control of the team after a mid-'70s boardroom coup (which led to a class-action suit the elder Sullivan ultimately lost). Since he'd promoted concerts in college and BobHope Creator/BobHope USO tours in the Army, he knew a little about the business and had started promoting shows at Sullivan to make extra money. When he learned the Jacksons were seeking a tour promoter, he put together a bid.
20th Jul '16 6:31:13 PM tonagamu
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** ''Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge'' showed the band facing problems with alcoholism and drug addiction. Gerard has described the recording process as a blur. He had an emotional breakdown that resulted in him having to face his inner demons and defeat his alcoholism. Being part of a major label for the first time also created tension among fans, who were not enjoying the new "commercial" direction the band was heading in.

to:

** ''Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge'' showed the band facing problems with alcoholism and drug addiction. Gerard has described the recording process as a blur. He had an emotional breakdown that resulted in him having to face his inner demons and defeat his alcoholism. Being part of a major label for the first time also created tension among fans, who were not enjoying the new "commercial" direction the band was heading in. They also had to fire their drummer, Matt Pellissier, who caused an internet backlash over the situation.


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** For ''Danger Days'', the band threw out an entire albums' worth of material and started from scratch. This album, titled ''Conventional Weapons'' wouldn't see release for almost 4 years. Having even more bad luck with drummers, Bob Bryar was fired for stealing from the band. The controversy surrounding the band caused them to become frustrated and attempting to aim for a more light-hearted, fun sound. However, Gerard ended up going with a rather complicated storyline anyways that the band did not entirely care for. Other members were also still sour about ''Conventional Weapons'' being ditched. After another exhaustive tour, the band were simply too burned out to keep going and broke up in 2013. They are now seen as the big important rock band of the 2000s, with the controversy surrounding them having fizzled out.
20th Jul '16 6:26:49 PM tonagamu
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Added DiffLines:

** None of the other albums can hold a candle to ''The Black Parade''. Frustrated from the seemingly directionless concept of ''Three Cheers'', they wanted to aim for a higher concept circulating around death and morbid situations. The problem was that they may have very well overdid the exploration of the concept. The band bickered constantly. Way trapped himself alone in a room, forcing himself into a depressive stupor. Mikey Way had to battle ''his'' alcoholism and drug addiction now, taking a vacation away from the band for nearly half the production. The media was also hounding MCR at this point, as the emo controversy had reached its peak. Shortly after the album was released, they embarked an exhaustive 3 year-long tour that left them hating the songs they had just written so much that they were enjoying re-exploring ''Bullets'' era songs to try to make up for it. A 13 year old fan-girl also committed suicide during this time and Glenn Beck accused them of being occultists. Needless to say, this lead to the problems that would later lead to the band's breakup.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.Music