History TroubledProduction / Music

10th Dec '16 9:35:00 AM tonagamu
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* Music/BruceSpringsteen's ''Music/BornToRun'' is another legendary story. After 3 financially unsuccessful though critically acclaimed albums, The Boss' career almost came to an end when Columbia Records almost dropped him entirely. Springsteen promised a smash hit and Columbia gave him a deadline of 6 months to finish the album. At this point, Springsteen was running out of funds to pay The E Street Band, with many of its members thinking of walking out of the recording process. Recording ultimately took a year and a half, triple the time Columbia originally wanted. Springsteen got into dozens of arguments with his fellow musicians, as his musical ideas that were in his head were difficult to bring to fruition. The album ended up ''drastically'' over-budget, causing Columbia to almost consider dropping the album altogether. Song selection was so great that 7 tracks were left on the cutting room floor just to keep the album from being overlong. Ultimately ''Born to Run'' turned into the Boss' greatest musical achievement, selling far more copies than Columbia was demanding. It thrusted Springsteen into the limelight and even attracted attention to his prior albums, which are all also looked at as classics now.

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* Music/BruceSpringsteen's ''Music/BornToRun'' is another legendary story. After 3 2 financially unsuccessful though critically acclaimed albums, The Boss' career almost came to an end when Columbia Records almost dropped him entirely. Springsteen promised a smash hit and Columbia gave him a deadline of 6 months to finish the album. At this point, Springsteen was running out of funds to pay The E Street Band, with many of its members thinking of walking out of the recording process. Recording ultimately took a year and a half, triple the time Columbia originally wanted. Springsteen got into dozens of arguments with his fellow musicians, as his musical ideas that were in his head were difficult to bring to fruition. The album ended up ''drastically'' over-budget, causing Columbia to almost consider dropping the album altogether. Song selection was so great that 7 tracks were left on the cutting room floor just to keep the album from being overlong. Ultimately ''Born to Run'' turned into the Boss' greatest musical achievement, selling far more copies than Columbia was demanding. It thrusted Springsteen into the limelight and even attracted attention to his prior albums, which are all both also looked at as classics now.
10th Dec '16 9:02:38 AM tonagamu
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** ''Down Colorful Hill'' is probably the most tame of these. The recordings had already been done and all the band needed to do was give them to the record company for mixing. However, there were problems. The band argued with Ivo Watts for what songs they wanted on the album. Many of the demos they thought were their best work were scrapped in favor of the lesser known, "more accessible" ones. Though the album was praised, Kozelek wasn't pleased with it because the label also changed the atmospheric textures that made the early demos so memorable.

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** ''Down Colorful Hill'' is probably the most tame of these. The recordings had already been done and all the band needed to do was give them to the record company for mixing. However, there were problems. The band argued with Ivo Watts the American branch of 4AD Records for what songs they wanted on the album. Many of the demos they thought were their best work were scrapped in favor of the lesser known, "more accessible" ones. Though the album was praised, Kozelek wasn't pleased with it because the label also changed the atmospheric textures that made the early demos so memorable.



** During the production of what was supposed to be a Mark Kozelek solo album, ''Music/SongsForABlueGuitar'', Creator/FourADRecords manager Ivo Watts ended up in a raging argument with Kozelek over a ''guitar solo''. Because Kozelek refused to change it, Watts threw not just Kozelek but the entire RHP project off the label, just a couple of months before the album was due to be released. During the next several weeks, Kozelek desperately tried to find a label that would release the album as well as let him finish it. Even when Island Records took him in, they demanded the guitar solos changed and that the album be labeled as Red House Painters rather than a solo album. While the guitar solos ended up staying, Kozelek would not release his first true solo album until 2000. When ''Songs'' was finally released it was met with some of the most inept marketing seen this side of ''Souvlaki'' and barely made a ding on the Billboard charts. This is something Island would use against him and the Painters on the next release. ''Music/SongsForABlueGuitar'' is considered one of the best albums to be associated with the singer/songwriter.

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** During the production of what was supposed to be a Mark Kozelek solo album, ''Music/SongsForABlueGuitar'', Creator/FourADRecords manager Ivo Watts the American branch of Creator/FourADRecords ended up in a raging argument with Kozelek over a ''guitar solo''. Because Kozelek refused to change it, Watts they threw not just Kozelek but the entire RHP project off the label, just a couple of months before the album was due to be released. During the next several weeks, Kozelek desperately tried to find a label that would release the album as well as let him finish it. Even when Island Records took him in, they demanded the guitar solos changed and that the album be labeled as Red House Painters rather than a solo album. While the guitar solos ended up staying, Kozelek would not release his first true solo album until 2000. When ''Songs'' was finally released it was met with some of the most inept marketing seen this side of ''Souvlaki'' and barely made a ding on the Billboard charts. This is something Island would use against him and the Painters on the next release. ''Music/SongsForABlueGuitar'' is considered one of the best albums to be associated with the singer/songwriter.
24th Nov '16 2:01:26 PM Twentington
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* Nitty Gritty Dirt Band had a minor example with their 1999 album ''Bang Bang Bang''. It was originally to be released in early 1998 through Rising Tide Records, and the title track was making headway on the charts. But Rising Tide closed up just before the album's release, so the band was quickly moved to Decca Records. Not long after, Decca closed up its Nashville branch as well. Finally, the album was released in 1999 through Creator/DreamWorks Records, which also reissued the title track. Humorously, the re-release charted lower than the first time around on Rising Tide.
12th Nov '16 12:12:04 AM TropesForever
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** Wakeman, at this point, was not even bothering to hide his discontent with the band. He often wandered off during recording to the studio bar to play darts, and even skipped a whole session to play moog for a song for Black Sabbath, who were recording ''Sabbath Bloody Sabbath'' in the adacent studio at the time, and even more amusingly, [[TheyJustDidntCare ate curry on stage]] during a show on the supporting tour. He left after the tour had finshed

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** Wakeman, at this point, was not even bothering to hide his discontent with the band. He often wandered off during recording to the studio bar to play darts, and even skipped a whole session to play moog for a song for Black Sabbath, who were recording ''Sabbath Bloody Sabbath'' in the adacent studio at the time, and even more amusingly, [[TheyJustDidntCare ate curry on stage]] stage during a show on the supporting tour. He left after the tour had finshed
7th Nov '16 5:56:49 PM SwimToTheMoon
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* {{Music/Yes}} have had a number of pretty troubled productions, but none are as immense as the notorious ''Tales From Topographic Oceans'':
** Yes were near the end of their 1973 ''Close to the Edge'' tour when Jon Anderson came up with the concept, which was an interpretation of a lengthy footnote in the book ''Autobiography of a Yogi'', which was four paragraphs that described the "Shastas", known in Western culture as the four bodies of Hindu text. Anderson later admitted, some years after the album came out, that he didn't truly understand this and [[OldShame regretted it]]. Anderson pitched this idea to Steve Howe, and he was on board with it, with the two spending nights in their hotel rooms devising vocal guitar melodies, and one final 7 hour session completing their ideas for the album, which to the two of them, was "magical". This was where the album began to take shape as a double album of four side-length tracks.
** The other band members, on the other hand, hated this idea and thought Anderson was on crack. Regardless, they agreed to it, mainly due to Anderson and Howe's persuasion powers. Despite that, Chris Squire thought there was some substance to the music, but not enough, and Rick Wakeman's comments that the band had "ventured into avant garde jazz rock, and I had nothing to offer there" had ended what Howe described as a period of "elusive harmony" within the band. Despite this, Anderson wrote in the liner notes that the band members "made a contribution of their own to the music".
** Then came time to record. Nobody could agree on where they wanted record- Anderson and Wakeman wanted to record in the countryside, and Squire and Howe decided they wanted to continue recording in London, with White being the only one who didn't seem to mind either. But even he couldn't help but side with the band when Anderson pitched the idea of recording in a forest, under a tent at night. Anderson claimed the band told him, "[[FunnyMoments Get a life, Jon!]]". The band eventually agreed on recording in London at Morgan Studios, mainly due to the fact that it had the country's first ever 24-track tape machine.
** Recording sessions were, to say the least, a farce. Lane persuaded Anderson to help decorate the studio with plants and toy farm animals; Squire, until his death, held belief that this was a joke on Anderson who wanted to record in the country. This went to hell in a handbasket, as the plants died halfway through production and the cows were covered in graffiti.
** Not making matters better, Anderson's ego began to take over, and eventually drove Wakeman to irritation. He began pitching unusual requests to the band members that made them wonder if he had been strung out on drugs- for one, during rehearsals, he had vacationed to India with his wife, leaving the band to work 16 hour days in the studio, up to 7 days a week at a time, leaving them frustrated that he was hard to contact. Additionally, one particularly bizarre request was that he wanted a "bathroom sound effect" on his voice (your guess is as good as ours as to whatever that is), asking Michael Tait, their lighting engineer, to build him a plywood box with ceramic tiles stuck to it to filter his voice through. The tiles often fell off while they recorded, leaving him to junk it completely.
** Wakeman, at this point, was not even bothering to hide his discontent with the band. He often wandered off during recording to the studio bar to play darts, and even skipped a whole session to play moog for a song for Black Sabbath, who were recording ''Sabbath Bloody Sabbath'' in the adacent studio at the time, and even more amusingly, [[TheyJustDidntCare ate curry on stage]] during a show on the supporting tour. He left after the tour had finshed
** One particular incident even saw the album ''nearly getting destroyed''. Jon Anderson left the studio with producer Eddy Offord, who was carrying the tapes, one morning. They placed the tapes on the top of the car... and forgot they left them on there. The tapes slid off the roof, into traffic, and luckily, Anderson, in the nick of time, narrowly stopped a city bus from demolishing the tapes, running into traffic to stop it.
** The resulting album was extremely mixed in reception. Back in the 1970s, it bombed on the charts, was hated by critics (one particular critic giving it a one-word review "[[IncrediblyLamePun No]]" at the band's expense). It was seen by even hardened fans of the band as the very reason progressive rock is hated among the public, with its contrived format of a double album full of 20-minute songs being extremely alienating. It has been somewhat VindicatedByHistory, but it's still seen as a popular example of excess in Prog-rock.
5th Nov '16 9:36:00 AM mlsmithca
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* Dua Lipa, an Albanian-British pop star is not immune to this trope either. Her video for [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nydxbGhgv8 Blow Your Mind (Mwah)]] was hit with several problems, notably:
** Finding the vintage outfits for the models cameoing in the video (who were friends of Dua Lipa)
** Filming location. Apparently it took a long time to get the right location.
** Discussion over the "right" filming technique but there was never (according to WordOfGod) any PrimaDonna behavior. One commentator online suggested Hannah Lux Davis would have done a better video!
* ArianaGrande is not immune to this either. Her video for "Into You" had troubles with quality of film and finding the right cars as props for the video!

to:

* Dua Lipa, an Albanian-British pop star is not immune to this trope either. Her Dua Lipa's video for [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nydxbGhgv8 Blow Your Mind (Mwah)]] was hit with several problems, notably:
** Finding
notably finding the vintage outfits for the models cameoing in the video (who were friends of Dua Lipa)
** Filming location. Apparently it took a long time to get
Lipa), finding the right location.
** Discussion
filming location, and discussion over the "right" filming technique but technique, though there was never (according to WordOfGod) any PrimaDonna behavior. One commentator online suggested Hannah Lux Davis would have done a better video!
* ArianaGrande is not immune to this either. Her ArianaGrande's video for "Into You" had troubles with quality of film and finding the right cars as props for the video!
5th Nov '16 7:54:38 AM Merseyuser1
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Added DiffLines:

* Dua Lipa, an Albanian-British pop star is not immune to this trope either. Her video for [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nydxbGhgv8 Blow Your Mind (Mwah)]] was hit with several problems, notably:
** Finding the vintage outfits for the models cameoing in the video (who were friends of Dua Lipa)
** Filming location. Apparently it took a long time to get the right location.
** Discussion over the "right" filming technique but there was never (according to WordOfGod) any PrimaDonna behavior. One commentator online suggested Hannah Lux Davis would have done a better video!
* ArianaGrande is not immune to this either. Her video for "Into You" had troubles with quality of film and finding the right cars as props for the video!
24th Oct '16 2:14:00 PM igordebraga
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* Music/{{Aerosmith}}'s ''Nine Lives'', their return to Columbia Records after experience a CareerResurrection at Geffen, did not come out easily. One week before rehearsals, drummer Joey Kramer left because he went into a deep depression, having grieved the loss of his father shortly prior, and the band even hired a session drummer in case Kramer didn't return. The first recordings with Glen Ballard (who co-wrote a few tracks) did not satisfy the band, leading to a delayed release as Aerosmith fired their long time manager, reunited with Geffen's A&R man John Kalodner (who was at Columbia, but the manager decided to keep away) - who helped Tyler with the painful task of cutting over 10 tracks he had recorded - and discarded what had been done to re-record under producer Kevin Shirley. Then shortly after release, the album cover drew fury from Hindus and had to be replaced.



** ''One by One''. Probably helped by the band being burned out by years of touring, no one was satisfied with the recordings. Then during a UK minitour, drummer Taylor Hawkins had an overdose. As he left the hospital, the band rushed back to their Virginia studio, eventually moving to a top-notch LA one... and not only the frustration continued, but tensions were escalating. The band eventually decided to take a break - where, to make it worse, Music/DaveGrohl went touring with Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge, raising some ire from Hawkins. The band eventually decided they'd at least play the Coachella festival - where the rehearsals were mostly silent until guitarist Chris Shifflet (who was recording his first album with the band) said "Man, is it just me or we can cut the air here with a knife?" and fights broke out. But the concert was done, and since the band enjoyed their performance, they decided to re-record the album from scratch in Virginia during just two weeks. As Dave put out: "This version of 'All of My Life' cost $1 million and sounds like crap. This was recorded in half an hour in my basement and is the biggest fucking song we've ever had!"

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** Two albums later, ''One by One''.One'' had the band struggling again. Probably helped by the band being burned out by years of touring, no one was satisfied with the recordings. Then during a UK minitour, drummer Taylor Hawkins had an overdose. As he left the hospital, the band rushed back to their Virginia studio, eventually moving to a top-notch LA one... and not only the frustration continued, but tensions were escalating. The band eventually decided to take a break - where, to make it worse, Music/DaveGrohl went touring with Music/QueensOfTheStoneAge, raising some ire from Hawkins. The band eventually decided they'd at least play the Coachella festival - where the rehearsals were mostly silent until guitarist Chris Shifflet (who was recording his first album with the band) said "Man, is it just me or we can cut the air here with a knife?" and fights broke out. But the concert was done, and since the band enjoyed their performance, they decided to re-record the album from scratch in Virginia during just two weeks. As Dave put out: "This version of 'All of My Life' cost $1 million and sounds like crap. This was recorded in half an hour in my basement and is the biggest fucking song we've ever had!"


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** ''Bridges to Babylon'' only saw problems emerge when it was time to record in LA, as Keith Richards did not like Mick Jagger's plan to invite outside producers such as Music/TheDustBrothers and would both berate those and record separatedly. Producer Don Was came to the point he kept Jagger and Richards separate, Richards and his engineer friend had to steal tapes to make sure a track was finished, and Charlie Watts, who only went through the conflicts by bonding with a percussionist with whom he would make a solo record later, flew out of Los Angeles as soon as he was not needed anymore.
10th Oct '16 3:21:01 PM igordebraga
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** The fact that the never-performed ''This Is It'' concert engagement at London's O2 arena was the subject of lawsuits for years after Jackson's death is telling. Different sides tell different stories, but what is clear is that Jackson was desperate for money, not in his right mind, hopelessly addicted to prescription drugs, and advised by an inner circle of opportunistic yes men. He signed off on what was announced as a ten-show engagement but quickly upped to fifty shows. Many of those shows were postponed to 2010 due to problems in pulling the production together -- even though much of the show would have simply restaged numbers from previous tours -- not least among them constant missed rehearsals on his part.

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** The fact that the never-performed ''This Is It'' concert engagement at London's O2 arena was the subject of lawsuits for years after Jackson's death is telling. Different sides tell different stories, but what is clear is that Jackson was desperate for money, not in his right mind, hopelessly addicted to prescription drugs, and advised by an inner circle of opportunistic yes men. While not toning down on spectacle, as the documentary ''This Is It'' shows. He signed off on what was announced as a ten-show engagement but quickly upped to fifty shows. Many of those shows were postponed to 2010 due to problems in pulling the production together -- even though much of the show would have simply restaged numbers from previous tours -- not least among them constant missed rehearsals on his part.
3rd Oct '16 7:57:40 PM KYCubbie
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* Another example was the 1959 Winter Dance Party tour, in which Music/BuddyHolly, Dion and the Belmonts, Music/RitchieValens, and The Big Bopper traveled through the upper Midwest. The tour organizers scheduled dates with no regard whatsoever to geography—see [[http://www.history-of-rock.com/winter_dance_party.htm this link]] for a map of the schedule of the tour's first 11 days. To make matters worse, the musicians traveled on a series of poorly maintained buses with heating systems that were inadequate at best even in ordinary winter weather, much less one of the worst winters the Midwest had seen in decades. After the January 31 show, the bus carrying the musicians broke down, and one of Holly's backing band suffered frostbite by the time help arrived. February 2 was supposed to be an off day, but organizers added a date in Clear Lake, Iowa, more than 350 miles from the previous day's show in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Tired of cramped and inadequate buses, Holly decided to charter a plane to take him and his band from Clear Lake to Fargo, North Dakota, near the next tour stop of Moorhead, Minnesota. Holly's band ultimately didn't get on the plane—Tom Allsup and Valens flipped a coin for his seat, with Valens winning, and Music/WaylonJennings gave up his seat to the flu-ridden Bopper. And now you know the lead-up to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_The_Music_Died The Day the Music Died]].

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* Another example was the 1959 Winter Dance Party tour, in which Music/BuddyHolly, Dion and the Belmonts, Music/RitchieValens, and The Big Bopper Music/TheBigBopper traveled through the upper Midwest. The tour organizers scheduled dates with no regard whatsoever to geography—see [[http://www.history-of-rock.com/winter_dance_party.htm this link]] for a map of the schedule of the tour's first 11 days. To make matters worse, the musicians traveled on a series of poorly maintained buses with heating systems that were inadequate at best even in ordinary winter weather, much less one of the worst winters the Midwest had seen in decades. After the January 31 show, the bus carrying the musicians broke down, and one of Holly's backing band suffered frostbite by the time help arrived. February 2 was supposed to be an off day, but organizers added a date in Clear Lake, Iowa, more than 350 miles from the previous day's show in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Tired of cramped and inadequate buses, Holly decided to charter a plane to take him and his band from Clear Lake to Fargo, North Dakota, near the next tour stop of Moorhead, Minnesota. Holly's band ultimately didn't get on the plane—Tom Allsup and Valens flipped a coin for his seat, with Valens winning, and Music/WaylonJennings gave up his seat to the flu-ridden Bopper. And now you know the lead-up to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Day_The_Music_Died The Day the Music Died]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=TroubledProduction.Music