History Trivia / Mash

11th Jun '16 1:47:54 PM Mdumas43073
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** Allan Arbus's role as Sidney Freedman harks back to his appearance as Jesus in the 1972 film ''Film/GreaserPalace''. ("If you can feel, heal!")

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** Allan Arbus's role as Sidney Freedman harks back to his appearance as Jesus in the 1972 film ''Film/GreaserPalace''.''Film/GreasersPalace''. ("If you can feel, heal!")
11th Jun '16 1:47:36 PM Mdumas43073
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** Allan Arbus's role as Sidney Freedman harks back to his appearance as Jesus in the 1972 film ''Greaser's Palace''. ("If you can feel, heal!")

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** Allan Arbus's role as Sidney Freedman harks back to his appearance as Jesus in the 1972 film ''Greaser's Palace''.''Film/GreaserPalace''. ("If you can feel, heal!")
11th Jun '16 1:45:20 PM Mdumas43073
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** Long after Ugly was written out of the series, actor John Orchard returned in a season 8 episode as a different Australian, an MP named Muldoon who takes bribes to let Rosie's Bar stay open.

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** Long after Ugly John was written out of the series, actor John Orchard returned in a season 8 episode as a different Australian, an MP named Muldoon who takes bribes to let Rosie's Bar stay open.



* A letter printed in ''TV Guide'' in the late '70s from a doctor who had really worked in a MASH in Korea said that the craziest antics on the show, including practical jokes and dressing up, were real. They were not far-fetched or unrealistic, just coping mechanisms for the horrific situation these people lived in. Much of what you saw either really happened, or could really happen. Other MASH veterans have pointed out that some of it would ''not'', especially Klinger; he wouldn't have been allowed to go on crossdressing as long as he did.

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* A letter printed in ''TV Guide'' ''Magazine/TVGuide'' in the late '70s '70s, from a doctor who had really worked in a MASH in Korea Korea, said that the craziest antics on the show, including show (including practical jokes and dressing up, up) were real. They were not far-fetched or unrealistic, just coping mechanisms for the horrific situation these people lived in. Much of what you saw either really happened, or could really happen. Other MASH veterans have pointed out that some of it would ''not'', especially Klinger; he wouldn't have been allowed to go on crossdressing as long as he did.
11th Jun '16 1:38:32 PM Mdumas43073
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* EnforcedMethodActing: Used (though not to the extreme that is sometimes claimed) for the final scene in "Abyssinia, Henry". The cast were not given the script for the scene until just before they went to film it, the better to capture their shocked reactions. Unfortunately, a technical glitch forced the scene to be shot a second time. The second take featured ''another'' mishap, but it was one that [[ThrowItIn actually improved the scene]]; somebody accidentally dropped an instrument on the floor in the midst of the StunnedSilence, which further enhanced the emotion of the scene.

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* EnforcedMethodActing: Used (though not to the extreme that is sometimes claimed) for the final scene in "Abyssinia, Henry". The cast cast, save for Creator/AlanAlda, were not given the script for the scene until just before they went to film it, the better to capture their shocked reactions. Unfortunately, a technical glitch forced the scene to be shot a second time. The second take featured ''another'' mishap, but it was one that [[ThrowItIn actually improved the scene]]; somebody accidentally dropped an instrument on the floor in the midst of the StunnedSilence, which further enhanced the emotion of the scene.
11th Jun '16 1:36:48 PM Mdumas43073
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* EnforcedMethodActing: Used (though not to the extreme that is sometimes claimed) for the final scene in "Abyssinia, Henry". The cast were not given the script for the scene until just before they went to film it, the better to capture their shocked reactions. Unfortunately, a technical glitch forced the scene to be shot a second time. The second take featured ''another'' mishap, but it was one that [[ThrowItIn actually improved the scene]]; somebody accidentally dropped an instrument on the floor, which further enhanced the emotion of the scene.

to:

* EnforcedMethodActing: Used (though not to the extreme that is sometimes claimed) for the final scene in "Abyssinia, Henry". The cast were not given the script for the scene until just before they went to film it, the better to capture their shocked reactions. Unfortunately, a technical glitch forced the scene to be shot a second time. The second take featured ''another'' mishap, but it was one that [[ThrowItIn actually improved the scene]]; somebody accidentally dropped an instrument on the floor, floor in the midst of the StunnedSilence, which further enhanced the emotion of the scene.
28th Apr '16 7:52:35 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* HeyItsThatGuy: Many familiar faces turn up in various episodes.
** [[Film/PoliceAcademy Captain Harris]] as shifty Cajun greasemonkey Rizzo. (Fun fact: G. W. Bailey is from Port Arthur, Texas, so if you were wondering how he came by such a good Cajun accent...)
** [[Film/TheKarateKid Miyagi-sensei]] showed up in a few early episodes as a South Korean doctor and frequent drinking buddy of Henry.
** The late, venerable, and talented Japanese actor Mako showed up a few times, most memorably as the cold, cruel, loathesome South Korean interrogator and torture expert Lt. Park.
** [[Series/{{Lost}} Sun's father]] was a frequent guest actor.
** Larry Wilcox (''Series/{{CHiPs}}'') turns up in a season 5 episode.
** Keye Luke, aka [[CharlieChan Number One Son]], showed up a few times.
** Pat Hingle played a General in an AprilFoolsPlot episode..
** Colonel Potter was a mainstay in movie Westerns, and Det. Bill Gannon on ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}''. (One wonders if Harry Morgan was ''ever'' a young man.)
*** As Sgt. Gregovich he comes across as a young Potter in ''Film/TheTeahouseOfTheAugustMoon''.
** Serving in Korea must of prepared Nurse Cutler for living in [[Series/WelcomeBackKotter Brooklyn]].
** [[Series/{{Bewitched}} Darrin's father]] was General Mitchell throughout season 2.
** [[Series/TheBobNewhartShow Elliott Carlin]] turns up as a poker-playing camp dentist in a season 1 episode.
** [[Series/MaryHartmanMaryHartman Loretta Haggers]] is a love interest for Radar in a season 3 episode.
21st Apr '16 10:27:05 PM Ezclee4050
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* BreakawayPopHit: A couple cover versions of "Suicide is Painless" became minor hits in 1970, but the male vocal quartet version that plays over the opening credits was a surprise #1 hit in the UK in 1980, boosted by the popularity of the TV show.
16th Mar '16 1:46:19 AM morenohijazo
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* UnfinishedEpisode: It had a ''ton'' of them, although most were unsolicited "spec scripts" that were probably never actually considered for production.
** "Hawkeye on the Double," the most infamous example, was originally written for the first season, in which Hawkeye is secretly seeing two different nurses at the same time, and when they both find out about each other, they both pretend to be pregnant to get back at him. The subject matter was considered too risque for television at the time, so the episode was never produced; the original script is a special feature on the complete series DVD set.
** "Father Hawkeye Knows Best," was also written for the first season, and dealt with Frank's wife visiting the 4077th with the Congressman of Indiana, so the gang try to cover up Frank's affair with Margaret by having Margaret pretend that it's Radar she's seeing, and Frank is simply her confidant. [[spoiler: In the end, it turns out Louise is actually cheating on Frank as well with the Congressman]].
** "The Contract," was written for Season Seven, and dealt with Klinger saving Charles's life after he was nearly killed by mortar fire when collecting rare spices in the Korean countryside; afterwards, Charles wants to repay Klinger for saving his life, while Klinger wants it in writing. (The Klinger-saving-Charles premise was later used as a subplot in Season Nine's "Operation Friendship", albeit without the contract element.)
** "A Toast to Mildred," was written for Season Nine and has the subplots of Hawkeye indulging in a lobster cookbook from home, Klinger making his own perfume to sell, and B.J. suspects Potter is cheating on his wife with Margaret, even though they're both simply emotionally drained from Army life and had been leaning on each other's shoulders.
** "Peace is Hell," was originally written for Season Ten, and deals with a rumor that Klinger started that a ceasefire is in effect, and the war will soon be over, which starts a chain reaction of craziness among camp; it's possible this episode wasn't produced because it's virtually [[RecycledScript recycled]] from Season One's "Ceasefire."
** Reportedly, there are many other unproduced ''M*A*S*H'' scripts in existence as well; titles for these scripts have been released, but no other details are available. They: "War's a Grind" (written for Season One), "The Fighting 4077th" (written for Season One), "Yankees 7 - North Korea 8" (written for Season Two), "Hawkeye Go Home" (written for Season Three), "A Matter of Time" (written for Season Three), "The Tub" (written for Season Three), "The Key," or "Hawkeye for the Defense" (written for Season Three), "Dear Everyone" (written for Season Three), and "Up the Flagpole" (written for Season Five). Interestingly, "A Matter of Time," was written by Allan Katz & Don Reo who were later hired as producers for the show during Season Five, while, "The Tub," was written by Elias Davis & David Pollack, who were added to the writing and production staff later in Season Nine.
4th Mar '16 7:47:57 PM Mdumas43073
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** Creator/JamesCromwell was considered for the role of B.J. Hunnicutt. While he didn't get it, he ''was'' given the consolation prize of a guest appearance in Season 6, playing B.J.'s old college chum.

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** Creator/JamesCromwell was Creator/SamElliott, Creator/JamesCromwell, and Alan Fudge were all considered for the role of B.J. Hunnicutt. While he didn't get it, he ''was'' given Hunnicutt before it went to Mike Farrell. Fudge and Cromwell would eventually appear on the consolation prize of a guest appearance show as guests -- Fudge as Capt. Chandler in Season 6, playing B.J.'s old college chum.5's "Quo Vadis, Captain Chandler?" and Cromwell as Leo Bardonaro in Season 6's "Last Laugh".
4th Mar '16 6:14:03 PM ryanasaurus0077
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* FakeAustralian: English actor John Orchard did this twice: as Ugly John in the first season, and as MP Muldoon in a later season.
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