History Trivia / Mash

11th Feb '17 11:58:03 PM bowserbros
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WhatCouldHaveBeen: A film adaptation of the original novel's sequel ''MASH Goes to Maine'', following Hawkeye's life back in Maine after his discharge, was considered but never produced.

to:

* WhatCouldHaveBeen: A film adaptation of the original novel's sequel ''MASH Goes to Maine'', following Hawkeye's life back in Maine after his discharge, was considered but never produced. However, this did end up giving way to the highly popular TV series.
4th Feb '17 8:51:42 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* CaliforniaDoubling:
** As with the film, exteriors for the show were filmed at the Fox Ranch (now Malibu Creek State Park) near Malibu. California is about as mountainous as Korea, but the doubling is obvious in the winter episodes, where, aside from a lack of snow in any such episode, the surrounding plant life is green and alive.
** Additionally, due to a limited shooting schedule at the ranch quite a lot of "outdoor" scenes (particularly those taking place at night, and/or in the immediate vicinity of the compound) were rather obviously shot on a soundstage. During season eleven, ''all'' scenes were shot on the soundstage because the ranch set burnt down in a wildfire during production of the finale (which was actually the first episode shot that season), and it was deemed pointless to build a new one so close to the end.
9th Jan '17 6:06:51 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In Season 1's "The Ringbanger", Hawkeye and Trapper [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslight]] a gung-ho colonel (LeslieNielsen) - with twice the casualty rate but half the ground - into thinking he has battle fatigue and needs time to cool off. "White Gold", the penultimate episode of Season 3, ends with Hawkeye and Trapper removing Colonel Flagg's appendix to send him stateside for severel weeks. Season 7's "Preventative Medicine" has Hawkeye perform an unnecessary appendecemy on a colonel to stop him from provoking the enemy to attack him so he could take a hill he was ordered to avoid. [[note]]Interestingly enough, the original script for "Preventative Medicine" had B.J. going along with Hawkeye's scheme (just as Trapper had in the earlier episode), but actor Mike Farrell objected as he believed that B.J. would never do such a thing. The producers eventually agreed, so they let Farrell and Alda ad-lib their way through the scene, acting and reacting the way they felt their characters would.[[/note]]Ken Levine, writer of the latter episode, said the recycling was unintentional, and when they discovered it they were so embarrassed that they deliberately [[http://kenlevine.blogspot.ca/2007/01/mash-oscar-show.html had it scheduled opposite that year's Academy Awards]] so fewer people would see it.

to:

** In Season 1's "The Ringbanger", Hawkeye and Trapper [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslight]] a gung-ho colonel (LeslieNielsen) (Creator/LeslieNielsen) - with twice the casualty rate but half the ground - into thinking he has battle fatigue and needs time to cool off. "White Gold", the penultimate episode of Season 3, ends with Hawkeye and Trapper removing Colonel Flagg's appendix to send him stateside for severel weeks. Season 7's "Preventative Medicine" has Hawkeye perform an unnecessary appendecemy on a colonel to stop him from provoking the enemy to attack him so he could take a hill he was ordered to avoid. [[note]]Interestingly enough, the original script for "Preventative Medicine" had B.J. going along with Hawkeye's scheme (just as Trapper had in the earlier episode), but actor Mike Farrell objected as he believed that B.J. would never do such a thing. The producers eventually agreed, so they let Farrell and Alda ad-lib their way through the scene, acting and reacting the way they felt their characters would.[[/note]]Ken Levine, writer of the latter episode, said the recycling was unintentional, and when they discovered it they were so embarrassed that they deliberately [[http://kenlevine.blogspot.ca/2007/01/mash-oscar-show.html had it scheduled opposite that year's Academy Awards]] so fewer people would see it.
1st Jan '17 12:19:03 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DuelingShows: ''Series/HogansHeroes'', but only in reruns; ''Hogan's'' ran from 1965 to 1971, while ''M*A*S*H*'' started in 1972.[[note]]Incidentally, both shows shared some of the same behind-the-scenes personnel, including director Gene Reynolds, writer Laurence Marks, and cameraman William Jurgenson. And William Christopher appeared in several ''Hogan's'' episodes, [[YouLookFamiliar each time as a different character]].[[/note]]

to:

* DuelingShows: With ''Series/HogansHeroes'', but only in reruns; syndication; ''Hogan's'' originally ran from 1965 to 1971, while ''M*A*S*H*'' started in 1972.[[note]]Incidentally, both shows shared some of the same behind-the-scenes personnel, including director Gene Reynolds, writer Laurence Marks, and cameraman William Jurgenson. And William Christopher appeared in several ''Hogan's'' episodes, [[YouLookFamiliar each time as a different character]].[[/note]]
1st Jan '17 12:18:18 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DuelingShows: ''Series/HogansHeroes'', but only in reruns; ''Hogan's'' ran from 1965 to 1971, while ''M*A*S*H*'' started in 1972. (Incidentally, both shows shared some of the same behind-the-scenes personnel, including director Gene Reynolds, writer Laurence Marks, and cameraman William Jurgenson. And William Christopher appeared in several ''Hogan's'' episodes, [[YouLookFamiliar each time as a different character]].)

to:

* DuelingShows: ''Series/HogansHeroes'', but only in reruns; ''Hogan's'' ran from 1965 to 1971, while ''M*A*S*H*'' started in 1972. (Incidentally, [[note]]Incidentally, both shows shared some of the same behind-the-scenes personnel, including director Gene Reynolds, writer Laurence Marks, and cameraman William Jurgenson. And William Christopher appeared in several ''Hogan's'' episodes, [[YouLookFamiliar each time as a different character]].)[[/note]]
1st Jan '17 12:17:39 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* DuelingShows: ''Series/HogansHeroes'', but only in reruns; ''Series/HogansHeroes'' ran from 1965 to 1971; ''M*A*S*H*'' started in 1972.

to:

* DuelingShows: ''Series/HogansHeroes'', but only in reruns; ''Series/HogansHeroes'' ''Hogan's'' ran from 1965 to 1971; 1971, while ''M*A*S*H*'' started in 1972.1972. (Incidentally, both shows shared some of the same behind-the-scenes personnel, including director Gene Reynolds, writer Laurence Marks, and cameraman William Jurgenson. And William Christopher appeared in several ''Hogan's'' episodes, [[YouLookFamiliar each time as a different character]].)
1st Jan '17 12:09:34 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* WhatCouldHaveBeen: an adaptation of the original novel's sequel ''MASH Goes To Maine'', following Hawkeye's life back in Maine after his discharge.

to:

* WhatCouldHaveBeen: an A film adaptation of the original novel's sequel ''MASH Goes To to Maine'', following Hawkeye's life back in Maine after his discharge.discharge, was considered but never produced.
1st Jan '17 12:08:27 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BreakawayPopHit: A couple cover versions of "Suicide is Painless" became minor hits in 1970, but the male vocal quartet version that plays over the opening credits was a surprise #1 hit in the UK in 1980, boosted by the popularity of the TV show.

to:

* BreakawayPopHit: A couple instrumental cover versions of "Suicide is Painless" became minor hits in 1970, but the male vocal quartet version that plays over the opening credits was a surprise #1 hit in the UK in 1980, boosted by the popularity of the TV show.
3rd Dec '16 12:47:08 PM BlackJAC
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* WhatCouldHaveBeen: an adaptation of the original novel's sequel ''MASH Goes To Maine'', following Hawkeye's life back in Maine after his discharge.


Added DiffLines:

* DistaffCounterpart: the short-lived follow-up series ''After MASH'' is analogous to the original novel's sequel ''MASH Goes To Maine,'' which followed Hawkeye's post-Army life.
28th Oct '16 11:23:38 PM Chytus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** "Hanky Panky" (S5) - Margaret finally gets through to Donald and learns he had a double hernia [[note:Early in the episode, another scene where Margaret attempts to reach him the night before is also cut]]

to:

*** "Hanky Panky" (S5) - Margaret finally gets through to Donald and learns he had a double hernia [[note:Early [[note]]Early in the episode, another scene where Margaret attempts to reach him the night before is also cut]]cut[[/note]]



* RecycledScript: In Season 1's "The Ringbanger", Hawkeye and Trapper [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslight]] a gung-ho colonel (LeslieNielsen) - with twice the casualty rate but half the ground - into thinking he has battle fatigue and needs time to cool off. "White Gold", the penultimate episode of Season 3, ends with Hawkeye and Trapper removing Colonel Flagg's appendix to send him stateside for severel weeks. Season 7's "Preventative Medicine" has Hawkeye perform an unnecessary appendecemy on a colonel to stop him from provoking the enemy to attack him so he could take a hill he was ordered to avoid.\\
\\
Ken Levine, writer of the latter episode, said the recycling was unintentional, and when they discovered it they were so embarrassed that they deliberately [[http://kenlevine.blogspot.ca/2007/01/mash-oscar-show.html had it scheduled opposite that year's Academy Awards]] so fewer people would see it.

to:

* RecycledScript: RecycledScript:
**
In Season 1's "The Ringbanger", Hawkeye and Trapper [[{{Gaslighting}} gaslight]] a gung-ho colonel (LeslieNielsen) - with twice the casualty rate but half the ground - into thinking he has battle fatigue and needs time to cool off. "White Gold", the penultimate episode of Season 3, ends with Hawkeye and Trapper removing Colonel Flagg's appendix to send him stateside for severel weeks. Season 7's "Preventative Medicine" has Hawkeye perform an unnecessary appendecemy on a colonel to stop him from provoking the enemy to attack him so he could take a hill he was ordered to avoid.\\
\\
Ken
[[note]]Interestingly enough, the original script for "Preventative Medicine" had B.J. going along with Hawkeye's scheme (just as Trapper had in the earlier episode), but actor Mike Farrell objected as he believed that B.J. would never do such a thing. The producers eventually agreed, so they let Farrell and Alda ad-lib their way through the scene, acting and reacting the way they felt their characters would.[[/note]]Ken Levine, writer of the latter episode, said the recycling was unintentional, and when they discovered it they were so embarrassed that they deliberately [[http://kenlevine.blogspot.ca/2007/01/mash-oscar-show.html had it scheduled opposite that year's Academy Awards]] so fewer people would see it.it.
** Two conversations between a Swampman and his nominal nemesis (Trapper and Frank in "O.R.", Hawkeye and Charles in "Sons and Bowlers") were recycled pretty closely in subject matter. Being the different characters they were and the different points in the show, though, the scene with Frank saying he came from a loveless home was PlayedForLaughs, while Charles' admission of a distant family life and envy of Hawkeye was treated as showing his [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold good side]].
** In "Pay Day" in season three, Hawkeye complains to Radar about how he could have made $3,000 in his civilian practice, and Radar pulls a few strings and has him paid. "Back Pay", in season eight, has Hawkeye outraged that doctors in the states make $4 an x-ray for draft boards, so he bills the Army for his services. Both have him get into trouble with a bureaucratic officer.


Added DiffLines:

* WordOfDante: You have to come to expect some of this for such a LongRunner, and a really popular one at that.
** The biggest example is probably the infamous "lost episode" entitled, "A Sound, a Song, and a Surprise", which supposedly contains a version of the theme song with lyrics sung during the opening titles, and a plot basically filling in all the gaps that were left open during the rest of the series (including off-screen departures of Spearchucker and Trapper, among other things). Further examination and investigation seems to indicate that "A Sound, a Song, and a Surprise" may have actually existed, not as an actual episode of the series but rather as a localized retrospective special a TV station cobbled together to celebrate the show's GrandFinale.
** [=McLean=] Stevenson is supposed to have appeared in character as Henry Blake on ''Series/TheCarolBurnettShow'' (sitting in a rubber raft and shouting "I'm okay!"), the very next night after Henry was McLeaned on the show. However, there are no actual logs, data, or information to support that such a ''Carol Burnett Show'' appearance actually exists... because it aired as a clip on ''The Cher Show''[[note]] After Sonny Bono and Cher divorced, Sonny left ''The Sonny and Cher Show'', so Cher presented it solo for 26 episodes in 1975 and 1976.[[/note]] and not on ''The Carol Burnett Show''. During Cher's introduction for an episode in which Stevenson appeared as a guest, she joked that he had been reported "missing in action", leading to the cutaway to Stevenson dressed as Henry in a dinghy with plastic sheeting posing as water.
** Speaking of which, Stevenson's departure sheds some spotlight on Dante as well. Larry Gelbart and Gene Reynolds [[WordOfGod have said]], numerous, repeated times, that they decided to use Henry Blake's departure as an example to really show the true horrors of war, and remind people that not everybody was fortunate enough to make it home from a war, however, a number of people are convinced that killing off the character was a ploy pulled by both Gelbart and Reynolds, as well as the network, to permanently get rid of Stevenson, for being such a meddler on the set (in all fairness, he actually did speak up and protest the awful working conditions the actors were forced to work in, even when others were too afraid to speak for themselves, which apparently got him into hot water a lot).
** Many fans keep insisting that Radar kept appearing on the show less and less each season, to the point that his last full season on the show had him absent practically every other episode. This is certainly not the case at all. If one were to actually watch the series, and keep note, they will see that in Season Four, Radar appears in 23 out of 25 episodes; 23 out of 25 episodes in Season Five; 15 out of 25 episodes in Season Six; and 22 out of 26 episodes of Season Seven.
** There's an urban legend that's been around for years that Mike Farrell bears animosity towards Wayne Rogers, the legend was even joked about on ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', where Homer reads a book by Farrell and remarks, "Wow, he really ''does'' hate Wayne Rogers!", however, there is absolutely no RealLife evidence that supports this story.
*** Farrell said once that he ''is'' constantly confused with Wayne Rogers by fans, and that does get annoying after awhile.
*** Similarly, some fans insist that Jamie Farr hates Alan Alda, but likewise, there is no RealLife evidence to support this.
*** And, in fact, there's excellent reason to doubt it: Loretta Swit apparently organised annual reunions of the cast. According to Jamie Farr, the only two who regularly did not attend were Harry Morgan (whose age and health made it impossible) and David Ogden Stiers (who dislikes that ''M*A*S*H'' has overshadowed his career so heavily).
This list shows the last 10 events of 157. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Trivia.Mash