History Theatre / ThePiratesOfPenzance

21st Feb '16 4:18:44 PM Cleaningcaptain
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* HonorBeforeReason: Frederic's defining trope. Ironically, taught him by the pirates themselves, who never attack orphans or weaker enemies.

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* HonorBeforeReason: Frederic's defining trope. Ironically, taught him by the pirates themselves, who never attack orphans or weaker enemies. Last but not least, General Stanley deeply regrets subverting this trope to help himself and his daughters escape the pirates. It's arguable that deconstructing this trope is one of the play's main themes.
17th Jan '16 10:02:03 PM acrobox
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* PirateKing: The Pirate King seems to be the kind who commands only a single ship and just uses the title.
2nd Jan '16 7:33:27 AM erracht
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* AmbiguouslyGay: Perhaps he's just posh, but the Major-General seems to often be played this way.
13th Dec '15 11:53:11 AM Jeduthun
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* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything: Subverted, sort of--they attempt piratical activities, they're just useless at them, combining being very soft-hearted with being rather dim-witted.

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* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything: Subverted, sort of--they attempt piratical activities, they're just useless at them, combining being very soft-hearted with being rather dim-witted. Played straight in that they speak oft and loud about how they are rough men (rough!) and lead a rough life (rough, rough!), and how they live by strife, and so on... but every time they do, it's to point out that they'll make an exception just this time. It is eventually revealed that [[spoiler: the pirates are members of the peerage gone to the bad]]—which means that they weren't doing anything related to ''that'' position either.
13th Dec '15 7:41:14 AM Jeduthun
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** "Hail Poetry" comes out of nowhere, extols the vitrues of poetry in an {{acappella}} anthem, and is never mentioned again. The piece gets away with it by being [[{{AwesomeMusic}} a simply awesome choral number]].
** "Sighing Softly To The River" is a gag in which the major-general FailedASpotCheck ("It must have been the sighing of the breeze…") and proceeds to sing a random ballad about flowers and trees, accompanied by a chorus of the pirates ''and'' the policemen, none of whom have noticed each other. Still, it's sometimes cut for pacing, especially since the Major-General already has a perfectly good solo elsewhere.
5th Dec '15 4:34:06 PM Jeduthun
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* AffablyEvil: The pirates are technically, well, ''pirates'', but they're so endearingly dimwitted (and completely rubbish at their attempts at piracy) that you can't help but like them.


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* ExactWords: Frederic's indentures specify that he is bound to his apprenticeship until his 21st ''birthday''. This is a problem, since he was born on LeapDay.


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* TheGoldenAgeOfPiracy: [[{{Parodied}} Spoofed to high heaven]].
1st Dec '15 4:16:54 PM dreamofwritting
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* TwoWords: Subverted. The 'two words' are "we propose to marry your daughters."

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* TwoWords: TwoWordsAddedEmphasis: Subverted. The 'two words' are "we propose to marry your daughters."



* TwoWords: Directors love to have fun with this bit. In some productions, the 'two words' ("We propose to marry your daughters.") are delivered as two words each by three different pirates. Another production has it rendered as "We propose-to-marry-your-daughters" (with the pirate counting the words on his fingers, and being surprised when he reaches six (or seven, with "daugh" and "ters" as seperate words)). Others have a pirate deliver the first two, "We propose," and have the Major-General be confused or offended that he's being proposed to before the sentence continues.

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* TwoWords: TwoWordsAddedEmphasis: Directors love to have fun with this bit. In some productions, the 'two words' ("We propose to marry your daughters.") are delivered as two words each by three different pirates. Another production has it rendered as "We propose-to-marry-your-daughters" (with the pirate counting the words on his fingers, and being surprised when he reaches six (or seven, with "daugh" and "ters" as seperate words)). Others have a pirate deliver the first two, "We propose," and have the Major-General be confused or offended that he's being proposed to before the sentence continues.
22nd Nov '15 6:20:37 PM PaulA
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** The 1983 film lampshades it, as the second time the phrase comes up, the Major-Genera gives up on trying to make a rhyme with "strategy" and just says "rode a horse."


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* PorkyPigPronunciation: In the 1983 film, the second time the phrase comes up during his song, the Major-General gives up on trying to make a rhyme with "strategy" and just says "rode a horse."
20th Nov '15 11:41:00 AM Pren
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** The 1983 film lampshades it, as the second time the phrase comes up, the Major-Genera gives up on trying to make a rhyme with "strategy" and just says "rode a horse."
18th Nov '15 7:55:31 AM Jeduthun
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* ScoundrelCode: {{Parodied}}. The pirates' code entails that they will never hurt an orphan, so all anyone has to do to foil their attacks is claim to be one.
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