History Theatre / TheBlueBird

20th May '16 12:45:41 PM jamespolk
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The second most famous adaptation, and the last film version, was directed by George Cukor in 1976 and was the first-ever cinematic collaboration between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., featuring Creator/ElizabethTaylor ([[Main/LoadsAndLoadsOfRoles Mother, Berylune, Light, and Maternal Love]]), Creator/JaneFonda (Night), Cicely Tyson (Tylette), Creator/AvaGardner, and Russian performers in most of the minor roles. Due in part to the severe culture clash between the Americans and Russians, [[TroubledProduction the shoot was difficult]] and the expensive result (while quite faithful to the play) was widely derided. It bombed at the box office, and has never had a legit video release in the U.S.

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The second most famous adaptation, and the last film version, was directed by George Cukor Creator/GeorgeCukor in 1976 and was the first-ever cinematic collaboration between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., featuring Creator/ElizabethTaylor ([[Main/LoadsAndLoadsOfRoles Mother, Berylune, Light, and Maternal Love]]), Creator/JaneFonda (Night), Cicely Tyson (Tylette), Creator/AvaGardner, and Russian performers in most of the minor roles. Due in part to the severe culture clash between the Americans and Russians, [[TroubledProduction the shoot was difficult]] and the expensive result (while quite faithful to the play) was widely derided. It bombed at the box office, and has never had a legit video release in the U.S.
6th Apr '16 5:54:41 PM jamespolk
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The second most famous adaptation, and the last film version, was directed by George Cukor in 1976 and was the first-ever cinematic collaboration between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., featuring Creator/ElizabethTaylor ([[Main/LoadsAndLoadsOfRoles Mother, Berylune, Light, and Maternal Love]]), Creator/JaneFonda (Night), Cicely Tyson (Tylette), Ava Gardner, and Russian performers in most of the minor roles. Due in part to the severe culture clash between the Americans and Russians, [[TroubledProduction the shoot was difficult]] and the expensive result (while quite faithful to the play) was widely derided. It bombed at the box office, and has never had a legit video release in the U.S.

to:

The second most famous adaptation, and the last film version, was directed by George Cukor in 1976 and was the first-ever cinematic collaboration between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., featuring Creator/ElizabethTaylor ([[Main/LoadsAndLoadsOfRoles Mother, Berylune, Light, and Maternal Love]]), Creator/JaneFonda (Night), Cicely Tyson (Tylette), Ava Gardner, Creator/AvaGardner, and Russian performers in most of the minor roles. Due in part to the severe culture clash between the Americans and Russians, [[TroubledProduction the shoot was difficult]] and the expensive result (while quite faithful to the play) was widely derided. It bombed at the box office, and has never had a legit video release in the U.S.



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20th Jan '16 5:08:20 PM jamespolk
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* InTheFutureEveryoneWillBeFamous: In this one it's Thomas Edison, who has already come up with the idea of the light bulb as he waits to be born.
20th Jan '16 3:02:21 PM jamespolk
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!!!This play contains examples of:

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!!!This !!This play contains examples of:



!!!The 1940 version includes examples of:

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!!!The !!The 1940 version includes examples of:
20th Jan '16 3:01:28 PM jamespolk
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* BluebirdOfHappiness: The kids are looking for it.



* ChekhovsGun: The big one turns out to be the children's pet bird. Less importantly, the children's father is a woodcutter, and the tree spirits of the forest -- already bitter with mankind's dominance over them -- are ''not'' happy to meet them as a result.

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* ChekhovsGun: The big one turns out to be the children's pet bird.bird, which is revealed in the end to be the Blue Bird.. Less importantly, the children's father is a woodcutter, and the tree spirits of the forest -- already bitter with mankind's dominance over them -- are ''not'' happy to meet them as a result.



!!The 1918 version includes examples of:

* InfantImmortality: Averted. When Mytyl and Tyltyl meet the spirits of their grandparents, they also meet the spirits of their half-dozen dead siblings, all of whom died very young.



* ChekhovsGun: In this version, the bird Mytyl catches at the beginning turns out to be the Blue Bird.
5th Nov '15 12:16:14 AM PaulA
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* BillingDisplacement: Tyltyl and Mytyl (Todd Lookinland and Patsy Kensit) are billed ninth and tenth in the opening credits, and after the title to boot. Moreover, while Elizabeth Taylor's top billing makes sense (given her LoadsAndLoadsOfRoles and their relevance to the plot), and U.S. viewers of the time would certainly recognize her fellow American actresses in important supporting roles, the four Russian performers credited before the title all play ''much'' smaller roles. (Oleg Popov, as "The Clown" at the Palace of Luxury, is just TheCameo played up because he was the star of the Moscow Circus well into TheEighties.) Given the nature of the production, this was probably mandated so that the Russian side of it would not be marginalized.
5th Sep '15 7:01:04 PM nombretomado
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The 1918 film version, starring Tula Belle as Mytyl and Robin Macdougall as Tyltyl, is less well remembered today, but was inducted into the NationalFilmRegistry in 2002.

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The 1918 film version, starring Tula Belle as Mytyl and Robin Macdougall as Tyltyl, is less well remembered today, but was inducted into the NationalFilmRegistry UsefulNotes/NationalFilmRegistry in 2002.
5th Apr '15 10:44:40 AM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:

* CreepyCrows: A squawking crow lends atmosphere when the kids go into the graveyard to look for the Blue Bird.
5th Apr '15 10:07:30 AM jamespolk
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The original play tells the tale of Mytyl and Tyltyl, two poor children. One night an old crone (who resembles their neighbor Berylune) arrives at their cottage and tells the children they must seek the Blue Bird of Happiness for her sickly daughter. She gives the boy a cap with a magic diamond that reveals the true spirits (anthropomorphic personifications) of all things -- including their cat Tylette and their dog Tylo, and those of Sugar, Bread, Milk, Water, Fire, and Light. This band serves as their companions as they venture through many lands and encounter everyone from the spirits of their grandparents to the decadent Luxuries to the simpler but more enduring Happinesses to Father Time himself. [[spoiler: The Blue Bird proves elusive at every turn, but upon arriving home it turns out to be their own pet bird, which they give to Berylune's daughter. It flies away, and Tyltyl asks the audience to help them find it again...]]

In the 1940 film, Mytyl is a selfish bratty girl who always complains about not having everything the wealthy children have. One day she catches a bird in the royal forest and keeps it for herself rather than giving it to her bedridden sickly friend. Later, after complaining to her parents about how poor they are, her father gets a message telling him he must go to war. That night, she's visited by the fairy Berylune who tells her and her brother Tytyl that they can be happy if they find the Blue Bird of Happiness. The fairy transforms their dog Tylo and their cat Tylette into humans to help them and calls the {{Anthropomorphic Personification}} of Light to guide them. Together they visit the past, the land of luxury, the forest, and even the future, searching for the Blue Bird. Along the way, they learn some important lessons happiness and return empty-handed. [[spoiler:Only to find that the bird Mytyl caught at the beginning was blue all along. She gives it to her friend and it flies away...]]

to:

The original play tells the tale of Mytyl and Tyltyl, two poor children. One night an old crone (who resembles their neighbor Berylune) arrives at their cottage and tells the children they must seek the Blue Bird of Happiness for her sickly daughter. She gives the boy a cap with a magic diamond that reveals the true spirits (anthropomorphic personifications) of all things -- including their cat Tylette and their dog Tylo, and those of Sugar, Bread, Milk, Water, Fire, and Light. This band serves as their companions as they venture through many lands and encounter everyone from the spirits of their grandparents to the decadent Luxuries to the simpler but more enduring Happinesses to Father Time himself. [[spoiler: The Blue Bird proves elusive at every turn, but upon arriving home it turns out to be their own pet bird, which they give to Berylune's daughter. It flies away, and Tyltyl asks the audience to help them find it again...]]

again...

In the 1940 film, Mytyl is a selfish bratty girl who always complains about not having everything the wealthy children have. One day she catches a bird in the royal forest and keeps it for herself rather than giving it to her bedridden sickly friend. Later, after complaining to her parents about how poor they are, her father gets a message telling him he must go to war. That night, she's visited by the fairy Berylune who tells her and her brother Tytyl that they can be happy if they find the Blue Bird of Happiness. The fairy transforms their dog Tylo and their cat Tylette into humans to help them and calls the {{Anthropomorphic Personification}} of Light to guide them. Together they visit the past, the land of luxury, the forest, and even the future, searching for the Blue Bird. Along the way, they learn some important lessons happiness and return empty-handed. [[spoiler:Only Only to find that the bird Mytyl caught at the beginning was blue all along. She gives it to her friend and it flies away...]]
away...



* BreakingTheFourthWall: At the end, Tyltyl does this [[spoiler: to ask audience members to -- if any of them should find it -- return the Blue Bird to him and the sick girl]].

to:

* BreakingTheFourthWall: At the end, Tyltyl does this [[spoiler: to ask audience members to -- if any of them should find it -- return the Blue Bird to him and the sick girl]].girl.



* ChekhovsGun: The big one turns out to be [[spoiler: the children's pet bird]]. Less importantly, the children's father is a woodcutter, and the tree spirits of the forest -- already bitter with mankind's dominance over them -- are ''not'' happy to meet them as a result.

to:

* ChekhovsGun: The big one turns out to be [[spoiler: the children's pet bird]].bird. Less importantly, the children's father is a woodcutter, and the tree spirits of the forest -- already bitter with mankind's dominance over them -- are ''not'' happy to meet them as a result.



* ItWasWithYouAllAlong: Justified: [[spoiler: Their pet bird ''was'' black before the children set off, but after they're "en-Lightened" to what's truly important in life (as critic John Simon put it), they return to find it's turned blue]].

to:

* ItWasWithYouAllAlong: Justified: [[spoiler: Their pet bird ''was'' black before the children set off, but after they're "en-Lightened" to what's truly important in life (as critic John Simon put it), they return to find it's turned blue]].blue.



* OrWasItADream: The final scene reveals that the children's year-long quest for the Blue Bird is a dream that unfolds over one night, but not only is their neighbor Berylune's daughter actually ill, [[spoiler: their pet bird is now blue...]].
* ShootTheShaggyDog: The poor kids [[spoiler: ''finally'' get the Blue Bird only for it to fly away almost as soon as they give it to the sick girl]]!

to:

* OrWasItADream: The final scene reveals that the children's year-long quest for the Blue Bird is a dream that unfolds over one night, but not only is their neighbor Berylune's daughter actually ill, [[spoiler: their pet bird is now blue...]].
blue...
* ShootTheShaggyDog: The poor kids [[spoiler: ''finally'' get the Blue Bird only for it to fly away almost as soon as they give it to the sick girl]]!girl!



* AnAesop: [[spoiler:"We'll find it again because now, we know where to look for it, don't we?"]]

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* AnAesop: [[spoiler:"We'll "We'll find it again because now, we know where to look for it, don't we?"]]we?"



* CatsHaveNineLives: [[spoiler:Mytyl uses this to explain why Tylette is waiting back at the house after being burned to death in the forest.]]
* ChekhovsGun: In this version, [[spoiler:the bird Mytyl catches at the beginning turns out to be the Blue Bird]].

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* BreakingTheFourthWall: Mytyl/Shirley looks straight in the camera when saying "don't we?" at the very end of the movie (see AnAesop above). A slightly different version of Breaking The Fourth Wall than in the play.
* CatsHaveNineLives: [[spoiler:Mytyl Mytyl uses this to explain why Tylette is waiting back at the house after being burned to death in the forest.]]
forest.
* ChekhovsGun: In this version, [[spoiler:the the bird Mytyl catches at the beginning turns out to be the Blue Bird]].Bird.



* DisneyDeath: [[spoiler:Tylette, who still has eight lives left.]]

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* DisneyDeath: [[spoiler:Tylette, Tylette, who still has eight lives left.]]



* PanUpToTheSkyEnding: One that has [[spoiler: the Blue Bird in flight]].

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* PanUpToTheSkyEnding: One that has [[spoiler: the Blue Bird in flight]].flight.
28th Apr '14 2:18:15 PM Sapphirea2
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* AllStarCast: Both on the American and Russian sides of the equasion, but this does mean some...
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.TheBlueBird