History Theatre / Rigoletto

20th Nov '16 11:41:06 AM Divra
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* TenorBoy: PlayingAgainstType. While tenors are typically male ingenues and play TheHero, The Duke is at best morally gray, at worst the BigBad.

to:

* TenorBoy: PlayingAgainstType.Inverted. While tenors are typically male ingenues and play TheHero, The Duke is at best morally gray, at worst the BigBad.
23rd Oct '16 10:49:30 AM mlsmithca
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* IWantSong and IAmSong: The Duke's opening song, 'Questa o quella' ("This Woman or That"), fits both tropes by identifying the Duke as TheCasanova, a man who lives for the intimate company of women (especially other men's wives).

to:

* IWantSong and IAmSong: IWantSong: The Duke's opening song, 'Questa o quella' ("This Woman or That"), fits doubles as both tropes an "I Want" song and an IAmSong by identifying the Duke as TheCasanova, a man who lives for the intimate company of women (especially other men's wives).
27th Mar '16 6:22:36 PM Divra
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* EvilSoundsDeep: Zig-zags a ''lot'' among the male characters. Sparafucile's role gives him an F2--just one off from the E2, the lowest note you're ever supposed to ask a human being to sing, and he is evil, but relatively sympathetic. The Duke is a tenor and a villain, and was written as such specifically to invert this trope. Meanwhile, Rigoletto himself is a baritone and relatively sympathetic, but hardly a hero by any stretch. Among the women, it is played completely straight, as Maddalena is a contralto and Gilda a soprano.
** On the

to:

* EvilSoundsDeep: Zig-zags a ''lot'' among the male characters.
**
Sparafucile's role gives him an F2--just one off from the E2, the lowest note you're ever supposed to ask a human being to sing, and he is evil, but relatively sympathetic. sympathetic.
**
The Duke is a tenor and a villain, and was written as such specifically to invert this trope. Meanwhile, Rigoletto himself is a baritone and relatively sympathetic, but hardly a hero by any stretch.
**
Among the women, it is played completely straight, as Maddalena is a contralto and Gilda a soprano.
** On the
soprano.
27th Mar '16 6:20:07 PM Divra
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* EvilSoundsDeep: Sparafucile's role gives him an F2--just one off from the E2, the lowest note you're ever supposed to ask a human being to sing.

to:

* EvilSoundsDeep: Zig-zags a ''lot'' among the male characters. Sparafucile's role gives him an F2--just one off from the E2, the lowest note you're ever supposed to ask a human being to sing.sing, and he is evil, but relatively sympathetic. The Duke is a tenor and a villain, and was written as such specifically to invert this trope. Meanwhile, Rigoletto himself is a baritone and relatively sympathetic, but hardly a hero by any stretch. Among the women, it is played completely straight, as Maddalena is a contralto and Gilda a soprano.
** On the
11th Apr '15 10:14:51 AM Zerbinetta
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This is the source of "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8A3zetSuYRg La Donna è Mobile]]" ("[[HypocriticalHumor Woman is Fickle]]") and "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2Fx4xTgoVQ Cara Nome]]" ("[[LoveAtFirstSight Cherished Name]]"), two of the most famous opera tunes. Beautiful music and tragic love, what else does an opera need?

to:

This is the source of "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8A3zetSuYRg La Donna è Mobile]]" ("[[HypocriticalHumor Woman is Fickle]]") and "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2Fx4xTgoVQ Cara Caro Nome]]" ("[[LoveAtFirstSight Cherished Name]]"), two of the most famous opera tunes. Beautiful music and tragic love, what else does an opera need?
25th Mar '14 9:38:52 AM mlsmithca
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''Rigoletto'' is an 1851 opera by GiuseppeVerdi (based on the 1832 play ''Le roi s'amuse'' by Creator/VictorHugo) about the Duke of Mantua, a HandsomeLech if ever there was one, and his hunchbacked jester [[CharacterTitle Rigoletto]], a DeadpanSnarker whose quips hit a little too close to home. The opera opens with the Duke plotting the seduction of a young beauty he met in church while gossips whisper that Rigoletto has found a mistress. Count Monterone, whose daughter was seduced by the Duke, comes to complain of her ruined virtue, and the Duke, on Rigoletto's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong blithe advice]], shuts him up by [[DisproportionateRetribution having him executed]]. Monterone pronounces a curse on them both, and the other courtiers resolve to revenge themselves on Rigoletto for his callous jokes. On his way home from work, Rigoletto also runs into a ProfessionalKiller, Sparafucile, who offers his services in removing anyone Rigoletto might find inconvenient. Now, finally, enter TheIngenue, TheChick and TheHeart: Gilda, the woman who is simultaneously: the woman believed to be Rigoletto's mistress; the beautiful girl the Duke met at church; and, [[{{Masquerade}} unbeknownst to everyone]], Rigoletto's [[AchillesHeel daughter]].

to:

''Rigoletto'' (1851) is an 1851 opera by GiuseppeVerdi (based on the 1832 play ''Le roi s'amuse'' (1832) by Creator/VictorHugo) about the Duke of Mantua, a HandsomeLech if ever there was one, and his hunchbacked jester [[CharacterTitle Rigoletto]], a DeadpanSnarker whose quips hit a little too close to home. The opera opens with the Duke plotting the seduction of a young beauty he met in church while gossips whisper that Rigoletto has found a mistress. Count Monterone, whose daughter was seduced by the Duke, comes to complain of her ruined virtue, and the Duke, on Rigoletto's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong blithe advice]], shuts him up by [[DisproportionateRetribution having him executed]]. Monterone pronounces a curse on them both, and the other courtiers resolve to revenge themselves on Rigoletto for his callous jokes. On his way home from work, Rigoletto also runs into a ProfessionalKiller, Sparafucile, who offers his services in removing anyone Rigoletto might find inconvenient. Now, finally, enter TheIngenue, TheChick and TheHeart: Gilda, the woman who is simultaneously: the woman believed to be Rigoletto's mistress; the beautiful girl the Duke met at church; and, [[{{Masquerade}} unbeknownst to everyone]], Rigoletto's [[AchillesHeel daughter]].
25th Mar '14 9:38:27 AM mlsmithca
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''Rigoletto'' is an opera by GiuseppeVerdi about the Duke of Mantua, a HandsomeLech if ever there was one, and his hunchbacked jester [[CharacterTitle Rigoletto]], a DeadpanSnarker whose quips hit a little too close to home. The opera opens with the Duke plotting the seduction of a young beauty he met in church while gossips whisper that Rigoletto has found a mistress. Count Monterone, whose daughter was seduced by the Duke, comes to complain of her ruined virtue, and the Duke, on Rigoletto's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong blithe advice]], shuts him up by [[DisproportionateRetribution having him executed]]. Monterone pronounces a curse on them both, and the other courtiers resolve to revenge themselves on Rigoletto for his callous jokes. On his way home from work, Rigoletto also runs into a ProfessionalKiller, Sparafucile, who offers his services in removing anyone Rigoletto might find inconvenient. Now, finally, enter TheIngenue, TheChick and TheHeart: Gilda, the woman who is simultaneously: the woman believed to be Rigoletto's mistress; the beautiful girl the Duke met at church; and, [[{{Masquerade}} unbeknownst to everyone]], Rigoletto's [[AchillesHeel daughter]].

to:

''Rigoletto'' is an 1851 opera by GiuseppeVerdi (based on the 1832 play ''Le roi s'amuse'' by Creator/VictorHugo) about the Duke of Mantua, a HandsomeLech if ever there was one, and his hunchbacked jester [[CharacterTitle Rigoletto]], a DeadpanSnarker whose quips hit a little too close to home. The opera opens with the Duke plotting the seduction of a young beauty he met in church while gossips whisper that Rigoletto has found a mistress. Count Monterone, whose daughter was seduced by the Duke, comes to complain of her ruined virtue, and the Duke, on Rigoletto's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong blithe advice]], shuts him up by [[DisproportionateRetribution having him executed]]. Monterone pronounces a curse on them both, and the other courtiers resolve to revenge themselves on Rigoletto for his callous jokes. On his way home from work, Rigoletto also runs into a ProfessionalKiller, Sparafucile, who offers his services in removing anyone Rigoletto might find inconvenient. Now, finally, enter TheIngenue, TheChick and TheHeart: Gilda, the woman who is simultaneously: the woman believed to be Rigoletto's mistress; the beautiful girl the Duke met at church; and, [[{{Masquerade}} unbeknownst to everyone]], Rigoletto's [[AchillesHeel daughter]].
24th Mar '14 5:56:12 PM mlsmithca
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''Rigoletto'' is an opera by GiuseppeVerdi about the Duke of Mantua, a HandsomeLech if ever there was one, and his hunchbacked jester [[CharacterTitle Rigoletto]], a DeadpanSnarker whose quips hit a little too close to home. The opera opens with the Duke plotting the seduction of a young beauty he met in church while gossips whisper that Rigoletto has found a mistress. Count Monterone, whose daughter was seduced by the Duke, comes to complain of her ruined virtue, and the Duke, on Rigoletto's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong blithe advice]], shuts him up by [[DisproportionateRetribution having him executed]]. Monterone pronounces a curse on them both, and the other courtiers resolve to revenge themselves on Rigoletto for his callous jokes. On his way home from work, Rigoletto also runs into a ProfessionalKiller, Sparafucile, who offers his services in removing anyone Rigoletto might find inconvenient. Now, finally, enter TheIngenue, TheChick and TheHeart: Gilda, the woman who is simultaneously: the woman believed to be Rigoletto's mistress; the beautiful girl the Duke met at church; and, [[{{Masquerade}} unbeknowest to everyone]], Rigoletto's [[AchillesHeel daughter]].

to:

''Rigoletto'' is an opera by GiuseppeVerdi about the Duke of Mantua, a HandsomeLech if ever there was one, and his hunchbacked jester [[CharacterTitle Rigoletto]], a DeadpanSnarker whose quips hit a little too close to home. The opera opens with the Duke plotting the seduction of a young beauty he met in church while gossips whisper that Rigoletto has found a mistress. Count Monterone, whose daughter was seduced by the Duke, comes to complain of her ruined virtue, and the Duke, on Rigoletto's [[WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong blithe advice]], shuts him up by [[DisproportionateRetribution having him executed]]. Monterone pronounces a curse on them both, and the other courtiers resolve to revenge themselves on Rigoletto for his callous jokes. On his way home from work, Rigoletto also runs into a ProfessionalKiller, Sparafucile, who offers his services in removing anyone Rigoletto might find inconvenient. Now, finally, enter TheIngenue, TheChick and TheHeart: Gilda, the woman who is simultaneously: the woman believed to be Rigoletto's mistress; the beautiful girl the Duke met at church; and, [[{{Masquerade}} unbeknowest unbeknownst to everyone]], Rigoletto's [[AchillesHeel daughter]].



This is the source of ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8A3zetSuYRg La Donna è Mobile]]'' ("[[HypocriticalHumor Woman is Fickle]]") and ''[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2Fx4xTgoVQ Cara Nome]]'' ("[[LoveAtFirstSight Cherished Name]]"), two of the most famous opera tunes. Beautiful music and tragic love, what else does an opera need?

to:

This is the source of ''[[http://www."[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8A3zetSuYRg La Donna è Mobile]]'' Mobile]]" ("[[HypocriticalHumor Woman is Fickle]]") and ''[[http://www."[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2Fx4xTgoVQ Cara Nome]]'' Nome]]" ("[[LoveAtFirstSight Cherished Name]]"), two of the most famous opera tunes. Beautiful music and tragic love, what else does an opera need?
----



* BatheHerAndBringHerToMe: this is roughly the Count's reaction when he discovers that his court have kidnapped his beloved church-going lass.

to:

* BatheHerAndBringHerToMe: this This is roughly the Count's Duke's reaction when he discovers that his court have kidnapped his beloved church-going lass.



* TheCasanova: The Duke

to:

* TheCasanova: The DukeDuke. We see him seducing Gilda and Maddalena during the opera, and the first act makes it clear that they are just the latest in a long string of conquests.



* DiedInYourArmsTonight: Gilda.

to:

* DiedInYourArmsTonight: Gilda.Gilda survives her assassination by Sparafucile for just long enough for Rigoletto to discover her inside the sack and hold her as she dies.



* DownerEnding

to:

* DownerEndingDownerEnding: Rigoletto opens the sack Sparafucile has told him contains the Duke's body to find Gilda, who dies in his arms, apparently fulfilling Count Monterone's curse.



* EvilSoundsDeep: Sparafucile's role gives him an F2--just one off from the E2, the lowest note you're ever supposed to ask a human being to sing. Having said that, he's also...
* HitmanWithAHeart to at least a degree. He takes his jobs seriously due to his honor, never double-crosses anyone, and cares for his younger sister Maddalena.
** [[GetTheeToANunnery "Sister" and "brother" may be nineteenth-century euphemisms for "prostitute" and "pimp"]].
* HoneyTrap: Maddalena.
* HypocriticalHumor: the love-'em-and-leave-'em Duke is the one claiming that "[[YourCheatingHeart Woman Is Fickle]]"? ([[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation Alternatively]], he's just using this as [[AllWomenAreLustful his excuse]] for his philandering ways, at which point he is still a jerkass but no longer a hypocrite.)

to:

* EvilSoundsDeep: Sparafucile's role gives him an F2--just one off from the E2, the lowest note you're ever supposed to ask a human being to sing. Having said that, he's also...
sing.
* HitmanWithAHeart HitmanWithAHeart: Sparafucile, to at least a degree. He takes his jobs seriously due to his honor, never double-crosses anyone, and cares for his younger sister Maddalena.
**
Maddalena. Though [[GetTheeToANunnery "Sister" and "brother" may be nineteenth-century euphemisms for "prostitute" and "pimp"]].
"pimp"]].
* HoneyTrap: Maddalena.
Maddalena has a habit of bedding Sparafucile's intended victims so that he can kill them while they are vulnerable, and follows this pattern with the Duke only to fall InLoveWithTheMark.
* HypocriticalHumor: the The love-'em-and-leave-'em Duke is the one claiming that "[[YourCheatingHeart Woman Is Fickle]]"? ([[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation Alternatively]], he's just using this as [[AllWomenAreLustful his excuse]] for his philandering ways, at which point he is still a jerkass but no longer a hypocrite.)



* TheIngenue: Gilda

to:

* TheIngenue: GildaGilda.



* InstantSeduction: The Count. He's good.
* IronicEcho: "La donna e mobile" is sung for the third time towards the finale... revealing to Rigoletto that the corpse in the boy bag isn't who he thinks it is.

to:

* InstantSeduction: The Count.Duke. He's good.
* IronicEcho: IronicEcho:
**
"La donna e mobile" is sung for the third time towards the finale... revealing to Rigoletto that the corpse in the boy body bag isn't who he thinks it is.



* IWantSong and IAmSong: 'Questa o quella' fits both tropes.
* KarmaHoudini: the Count. Particularly interesting in that the Duke of Monterone curses ''both'' of them, but only Rigoletto gets any real comeuppance.

to:

* IWantSong and IAmSong: The Duke's opening song, 'Questa o quella' ("This Woman or That"), fits both tropes.
tropes by identifying the Duke as TheCasanova, a man who lives for the intimate company of women (especially other men's wives).
* KarmaHoudini: the Count. The Duke. Particularly interesting in that the Duke of Count Monterone curses ''both'' of them, but only Rigoletto gets any real comeuppance.comeuppance (the Duke is last heard happily singing "La Donna è Mobile" in the distance, oblivious to the (failed) plot on his life).



* LadykillerInLove: the Count tries to imply this about Gilda. He does seem genuinely concerned when he discovers she's been kidnapped. (At first, that is.)

to:

* LadykillerInLove: the Count LadykillerInLove:
** The Duke
tries to imply this about Gilda. He does seem genuinely concerned when he discovers she's been kidnapped. (At first, that is.) )



* MonsterClown: Rigoletto is neither cheerful nor good-looking.
** SadClown: And his story? Pure drama.

to:

* MonsterClown: Rigoletto is neither cheerful nor good-looking.
** SadClown:
good-looking. [[SadClown And his story? Pure drama.]]



* TheUglyGuysHotDaughter: Gilda, again.
** Also implied with Count Monterone's (unseen) daughter.
* VillainSong: ''La Donna e Mobile,'' the Duke's self-justification for forcing himself on every fickle woman he meets.

to:

* TheUglyGuysHotDaughter: Gilda, again.
**
again. Also implied with Count Monterone's (unseen) daughter.
* VillainSong: ''La "La Donna e Mobile,'' Mobile", the Duke's self-justification for forcing himself on every fickle woman he meets.



10th Oct '13 3:16:15 PM DynamicDragon
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Added DiffLines:

27th Jun '13 12:28:29 AM slvstrChung
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* TenorBoy: Subverted. The Duke is the primary tenor role in the opera, but where most uses of this trope cast him as a male ingenue, he is villainous or at best morally grey.

to:

* TenorBoy: Subverted. PlayingAgainstType. While tenors are typically male ingenues and play TheHero, The Duke is the primary tenor role in the opera, but where most uses of this trope cast him as a male ingenue, he is villainous or at best morally grey.gray, at worst the BigBad.
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