History Theatre / Macbeth

6th May '16 7:29:29 AM snichols1973
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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: The murderers successfully kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes, which makes the Witches' prophecy to Banquo that "he shall get kings, though thou be none" more ominous when Macbeth asks if Banquo's descendants will ever reign, followed by a train of ghosts whose appearances resemble Banquo's future descendanta.

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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: The murderers successfully kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes, which makes the Witches' prophecy to Banquo that "he shall get kings, though thou be none" more ominous when Macbeth asks if Banquo's descendants will ever reign, followed by a train of ghosts whose appearances resemble Banquo's future descendanta.descendants.
6th May '16 7:28:33 AM snichols1973
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* Foreshadowing: Duncan mentions that the treacherous Thane of Cawdor who had just been executed for treason in Act I, Scene 4 "was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust." The irony is that Macbeth, the new Thane of Cawdor, is the one who will murder Duncan, who rewarded and praised Macbeth's heroic accomplishments on the battlefield.

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* Foreshadowing: {{Foreshadowing}}: Duncan mentions that the treacherous Thane of Cawdor who had just been executed for treason in Act I, Scene 4 "was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust." The irony is that In an ironic contrast, Macbeth, the new Thane of Cawdor, is the one who will murder Duncan, who has just rewarded and praised Macbeth's heroic accomplishments on the battlefield.


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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: The murderers successfully kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes, which makes the Witches' prophecy to Banquo that "he shall get kings, though thou be none" more ominous when Macbeth asks if Banquo's descendants will ever reign, followed by a train of ghosts whose appearances resemble Banquo's future descendanta.
6th May '16 7:06:20 AM snichols1973
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Added DiffLines:

* Foreshadowing: Duncan mentions that the treacherous Thane of Cawdor who had just been executed for treason in Act I, Scene 4 "was a gentleman on whom I built an absolute trust." The irony is that Macbeth, the new Thane of Cawdor, is the one who will murder Duncan, who rewarded and praised Macbeth's heroic accomplishments on the battlefield.
3rd May '16 3:51:10 PM Erivale
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Added DiffLines:

* VillainousValor: Macbeth, at the end. Having spent the latter half of the play convinced nobody can kill him, all the omens of his doom are before him and he loses his courage. Then, realizing he'll be captured and humiliated, he resolves to go down fighting, and does.
22nd Apr '16 11:28:54 PM masterofthehouse
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** The Porter in the Patrick Stewart version. A mere comic relief character in the original play, here, not only is he just as creepy as the witches, he's also one of the murderers that kills Macduff's family.

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** The Porter in the Patrick Stewart version. A mere comic relief character in the original play, here, not only is he he's just as creepy as the witches, he's also one of the murderers that kills and even helps Macbeth murder Macduff's family.
22nd Apr '16 11:23:39 PM masterofthehouse
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Added DiffLines:

** The Porter in the Patrick Stewart version. A mere comic relief character in the original play, here, not only is he just as creepy as the witches, he's also one of the murderers that kills Macduff's family.
3rd Apr '16 2:32:49 AM PaulA
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* RewardedAsATraitorDeserves: Macdonwald, the original Thane of Cawdor, betrayed Scotland and assisted King Sweno of Norway in his invasion of the country. After driving off the Norwegian invaders, Macbeth then confronts Macdonwald and decaptiates him in their resulting battle.
2nd Apr '16 11:24:11 PM JM1982
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Added DiffLines:

* RewardedAsATraitorDeserves: Macdonwald, the original Thane of Cawdor, betrayed Scotland and assisted King Sweno of Norway in his invasion of the country. After driving off the Norwegian invaders, Macbeth then confronts Macdonwald and decaptiates him in their resulting battle.
26th Mar '16 6:15:43 AM LordGro
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* TheHecateSisters: The Weird Sisters clearly invoke this trope, though atypically they are all crones.
19th Mar '16 2:02:59 PM LordGro
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-->--'''[[BlackMagic The Weird Sisters]]'''

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-->--'''[[BlackMagic The Weird Sisters]]'''
-->--'''TheWeirdSisters'''


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* TheWeirdSisters:
** Macbeth's descent into villainy is triggered by his encounter with three old and freakishly ugly witches who predict that he is destined to be king of Scotland, which prompts Macbeth to murder King Duncan. In act IV, Macbeth seeks out the witches again and receives three more prophecies which lull him into a false sense of security. While the witches manipulate Macbeth, their prophecies are truthful, just worded in ways apt to be misinterpreted by Macbeth, and they do not interfere with fate directly.
** There are also three more witches who form the company of Heccat (Hecate), and who do not have any speaking lines.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Macbeth