History Theatre / Macbeth

13th May '18 5:11:42 PM IukaSylvie
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* IHaveComeTooFar: "I am in blood / Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o'er"


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* IveComeTooFar: "I am in blood / Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o'er"
15th Apr '18 12:56:29 AM PaulA
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** The 2015 film does it own twist regarding Birnam Wood, where instead of Malcolm and MacDuff's army cutting down trees and carrying them to hide their numbers, they simply burn it, and the embers are blown toward Dunsinane.


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* ProphecyTwist: The 2015 film does its own twist regarding Birnam Wood, where instead of Malcolm and Macduff's army cutting down trees and carrying them to hide their numbers, they simply burn it, and the embers are blown toward Dunsinane.
14th Apr '18 8:19:41 AM FlimFlamFlim
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Added DiffLines:

** The 2015 film does it own twist regarding Birnam Wood, where instead of Malcolm and MacDuff's army cutting down trees and carrying them to hide their numbers, they simply burn it, and the embers are blown toward Dunsinane.
8th Apr '18 8:56:19 PM GoodGamer14
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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: The actual historical figure Macbeth is based on killed Duncan fairly on the field of battle (after Duncan invaded his lands), then proceeded to rule with little resistance for 17 years and was generally celebrated as a generous and decent king. However, James I, whom Shakespeare was no doubt aiming to please, was descended from the guy who overthrew him, ''[[WrittenByTheWinners sooooo...]]''

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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: The actual historical figure Macbeth is based on killed Duncan fairly on the field of battle (after Duncan invaded his lands), then proceeded to rule with little resistance for 17 years and was generally celebrated as a generous and decent king. However, James I, whom Shakespeare was no doubt aiming to please, was descended from the guy who overthrew him, ''[[WrittenByTheWinners sooooo...]]''
8th Apr '18 10:33:06 AM DustSnitch
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Shakespeare also takes liberties with the facts, although in his case his changes are {{justifi|edTrope}}able as they [[PragmaticAdaptation improve the dramatic tension and the flow of the action]]; after all, he was writing a play, not a history. For instance, he makes Duncan a wise, old good king ([[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation at least superficially]]) instead of a young wastrel, he has Macbeth [[DickDastardlyStopsToCheat kill him while sleeping instead of in a fair fight]], and he compresses the action into two seasons when the real Macbeth ruled for 17 years (and successfully). He also leaves aside the fact that the real Macbeth actually did have a legitimate claim to the throne[[labelnote: *]]For centuries, the succession rule in Scotland was called Tannistry, by which the throne alternated between different branches of descent from the first King, [=Kenneth MacAlpin=]. Duncan's father, Malcolm II, had been the first to attempt to abandon it in favour of his eldest son. By Tannistry, it would have been Macbeth's branch's turn[[/labelnote]].

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Shakespeare also takes liberties with the facts, although in his case his changes are {{justifi|edTrope}}able as they [[PragmaticAdaptation improve the dramatic tension and the flow of the action]]; after all, he was writing a play, not a history. For instance, he makes Duncan a wise, old good king ([[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation at least superficially]]) instead of a young wastrel, he has Macbeth [[DickDastardlyStopsToCheat kill him while sleeping instead of in a fair fight]], and he compresses the action into two seasons when the real Macbeth ruled for 17 years (and successfully). He also leaves aside the fact that the real Macbeth actually did have a legitimate claim to the throne[[labelnote: *]]For throne[[labelnote:*]]For centuries, the succession rule in Scotland was called Tannistry, by which the throne alternated between different branches of descent from the first King, [=Kenneth MacAlpin=]. Duncan's father, Malcolm II, had been the first to attempt to abandon it in favour of his eldest son. By Tannistry, it would have been Macbeth's branch's turn[[/labelnote]].
27th Mar '18 3:06:22 PM Arashi110
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** The 2006 version suggests that Lady Macbeth lost a child and is partly motivated by that.
* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Traditionally, the Witches are repulsive old hags, whose status as women (or even ''humans'') is questioned at least once. The 2006 Australian version chucks that out the window and turns them into sexy young Wiccan girls who gladly make out and even have a squicky ''four way'' with Macbeth. They're still really creepy, though.

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** The 2006 version and 2015 versions suggests that Lady Macbeth lost a child and is partly motivated by that.
* AdaptationalAttractiveness: Traditionally, the Witches are repulsive old hags, whose status as women (or even ''humans'') is questioned at least once. The 2006 Australian version chucks that out the window and turns them into sexy young Wiccan girls who gladly make out and even have a squicky ''four way'' with Macbeth. They're still really creepy, though. The 2015 version portrays them as TheHecateSisters: a young girl, a mature woman and a crone. None of them are ugly.
26th Mar '18 12:22:14 PM LordGro
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* MoreDeadlyThanTheMale: Lady Macbeth is the one who inspires her husband to actively kill for power. She's such a shining example of this trope that she named [[LadyMacbeth a subtrope of it]].
26th Mar '18 8:23:45 AM reppuzan
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* MoreDeadlyThanTheMale: Lady Macbeth is the one who inspires her husband to actively kill for power. She's such a shining example of this trope that she named [[LadyMacbeth a subtrope of it].

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* MoreDeadlyThanTheMale: Lady Macbeth is the one who inspires her husband to actively kill for power. She's such a shining example of this trope that she named [[LadyMacbeth a subtrope of it].it]].
3rd Mar '18 11:46:32 AM nombretomado
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* A 2006 Australian film starring Sam Worthington, with a SettingUpdate to the [[{{Underbelly}} Melbourne ganglands]]. It sticks to the play fairly well, but adds a few silent scenes, and suggests that Lady Macbeth acted out of grief of a dead child. And she's also a cocaine addict.

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* A 2006 Australian film starring Sam Worthington, with a SettingUpdate to the [[{{Underbelly}} [[Series/{{Underbelly}} Melbourne ganglands]]. It sticks to the play fairly well, but adds a few silent scenes, and suggests that Lady Macbeth acted out of grief of a dead child. And she's also a cocaine addict.
23rd Feb '18 6:51:52 PM PaulA
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* GoryDiscretionShot: Averted and how in the Polanski film; we see Macbeth stabbing Duncan several times.

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* GoryDiscretionShot: Averted and how in the Polanski film; we see Macbeth stabbing Duncan several times.
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