History Theatre / Macbeth

10th Jan '18 2:25:29 PM PaulA
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* CrossCastRole: In the 1948 film, one of the witches is played by Brainerd Duffield - a man. As noted below, Orson Welles's daughter played Macduff's son.

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* CrossCastRole: In the 1948 film, one of the witches is played by Brainerd Duffield - Duffield, a man. As noted below, man, and Orson Welles's daughter played Macduff's son.
10th Jan '18 9:29:04 AM ClintEastwood
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Added DiffLines:

* CrossCastRole: In the 1948 film, one of the witches is played by Brainerd Duffield - a man. As noted below, Orson Welles's daughter played Macduff's son.
6th Jan '18 4:19:20 PM Thorion
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* YoungerAndHipper:
** Roman Polanski chose to make his leads in their twenties, feeling that older characters wouldn't be as ambitious.
** Patrick Stewart's version depicts Lady Macbeth as a young trophy wife, when historical record shows that she was older than him.

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* YoungerAndHipper:
**
YoungerAndHipper: Roman Polanski chose to make his leads in their twenties, feeling that older characters wouldn't be as ambitious.
** Patrick Stewart's version depicts Lady Macbeth as a young trophy wife, when historical record shows that she was older than him.
ambitious.
2nd Jan '18 8:00:21 PM PaulA
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* SinisterSilhouette: Orson Welles's film depicts the witches this way. Their faces are never seen, kept only in shadow with their long grey hair visible.

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* SinisterSilhouette: SinisterSilhouettes: Orson Welles's film depicts the witches this way. Their faces are never seen, kept only in shadow with their long grey hair visible.
2nd Jan '18 5:19:16 PM fearlessnikki
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* AdaptationExpansion:
** The 1948 adds more scenes for the witches to increase their significance. Notably they appear at the very end of the film to watch the carnage.
** The 2006 version suggests that Lady Macbeth lost a child and is partly motivated by that.



* AdaptedOut: Donalbain is cut from the 1948 film.



* {{Bowdlerization}}: The 1948 film had to censor the double entendres in the Porter's speech at the behest of the Hays Code.



* DemotedToExtra: Most of Duncan's scenes are cut from the 1948 film.



* IdenticalStranger:
** Orson Welles's film had the witches appearing as other characters - The First Murderer, Gentlewoman and Lady Macduff respectively.
** A couple of productions have had Hecate played by the same actress as Lady Macbeth, adding a new layer of subtext.



* MoreDeadlyThanTheMale: The 1948 film implies that Lady Macbeth already fatally stabbed Duncan before Macbeth attacked him.
* RuleOfSymbolism: Orson Welles inserted a Holy Man character into his film to illustrate a struggle between new religion and old religion (represented by the witches, who are portrayed like Celtic druids).



* SinisterSilhouette: Orson Welles's film depicts the witches this way. Their faces are never seen, kept only in shadow with their long grey hair visible.



* YoungerAndHipper: Roman Polanski chose to make his leads in their twenties, feeling that older characters wouldn't be as ambitious.

to:

* YoungerAndHipper: VoodooDoll: The 1948 film has the witches creating one of Macbeth at the start.
* YoungerAndHipper:
**
Roman Polanski chose to make his leads in their twenties, feeling that older characters wouldn't be as ambitious.ambitious.
** Patrick Stewart's version depicts Lady Macbeth as a young trophy wife, when historical record shows that she was older than him.
29th Dec '17 4:55:05 PM PaulA
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* ElectiveMonarchy: In the play, the Scottish kings are elected, which explains why the title character is chosen after Duncan, rather than his son. Reading between the lines, it may be that Duncan incurred some ire from the nobles for making his son heir-apparent while he was living. The 1971 film version by Creator/RomanPolanski actually showing Macbeth's election, which involves a special ceremony.

to:

* ElectiveMonarchy: In the play, the Scottish kings are elected, which explains why the title character is chosen after Duncan, rather than his son. Reading between the lines, it may be that Duncan incurred some ire from the nobles for making his son heir-apparent while he was living. The 1971 film version by Creator/RomanPolanski actually showing Macbeth's election, which involves a special ceremony.


Added DiffLines:

* ElectiveMonarchy: The 1971 film version goes further than the play by actually showing Macbeth's election, which involves a special ceremony.
29th Dec '17 2:59:02 PM Fireblood
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Added DiffLines:

* ElectiveMonarchy: In the play, the Scottish kings are elected, which explains why the title character is chosen after Duncan, rather than his son. Reading between the lines, it may be that Duncan incurred some ire from the nobles for making his son heir-apparent while he was living. The 1971 film version by Creator/RomanPolanski actually showing Macbeth's election, which involves a special ceremony.
18th Dec '17 7:36:57 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/lady_macbeth.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350: Fill me from the crown to the toe top full / Of direst cruelty!]]

to:

[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/lady_macbeth.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:350: [[caption-width-right:300: Fill me from the crown to the toe top full / Of direst cruelty!]]
21st Nov '17 2:40:29 PM Termin8r
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* EvenEvilHasLovedOnes: Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are typically depicted as loving each other.

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* EvenEvilHasLovedOnes: Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are typically depicted as loving each towards one other.



** Despite their horrific deeds, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are in love with each other. Critic Harold Bloom points out that it's the ''only'' happy marriage in Shakespeare among protagonists.

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** Despite their horrific deeds, Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are very much in love with each other. Critic Harold Bloom points out that it's the ''only'' happy marriage in Shakespeare among protagonists.
11th Oct '17 6:31:31 PM snichols1973
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* HeroicSelfDeprecation: Malcolm fears that he would become lustful, greedy for his subjects' land and money, and that he would make a poor king because he appears to lack the necessary royal virtues. After Macduff reminds him of the virtuous character of Duncan and his mother, he reveals that this was a SecretTestOfCharacter to Macduff, who had felt guilty about leaving his wife and son behind to be slaughtered.



* PapaWolf: A variation; Macduff is unable to protect his family (because he was elsewhere when they were murdered), so revenge for them becomes his motivation against Macbeth.

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* PapaWolf: A variation; Macduff is unable to protect his family (because he was elsewhere when they were murdered), so revenge for them avenging their slaughter becomes his motivation against Macbeth.
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