History Theatre / LovesLaboursLost

11th Sep '15 7:15:31 AM Morgenthaler
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* AllThereInTheScript: Ferdinand, King of Navarre. Who's never actually called "Ferdinand" except in dialogue tags and stage directions, so you can watch the entire play and never find out his first name.



* WhoIsThisGuyAgain: Ferdinand, King of Navarre. Who's never actually called "Ferdinand" except in dialogue tags and stage directions, so you can watch the entire play and never find out his first name.
29th Dec '14 9:55:47 AM nombretomado
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-->--'''DorothyLSayers'''

to:

-->--'''DorothyLSayers'''
-->--'''Creator/DorothyLSayers'''
30th Nov '14 5:50:15 PM 102372
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->''"And why anyone should say that ''Love's Labour's Lost'' is a bad play, the Lord He knoweth; for to my mind it is one of the most ''réussi'' things of its kind ever made ... it is all pure [[FairyTale fairy-tale]]; and some of the loveliest lines in the lyrical-witty mode ever written."''
-->-- '''DorothyLSayers'''

''Love's Labour's Lost'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's earliest plays, possibly his first comedy. The King of Navarre and his attendant lords make a vow to devote themselves to scholarship and put away interest in women for three years -- just before the Princess of France and her attendant ladies arrive for a visit. HilarityEnsues.

It's not among Shakespeare's most popular plays. This may be largely due to the style, which has been described as "flamboyantly intellectual", full of wordplay and references to contemporary scholarly interests, many of which have not dated well. The script is 90% poetry and jokes and 10% plot. Also, for a romantic comedy it has a romantically unsatisfying ending, with all the lovers separated, to (maybe) be reunited in the future.

This latter point probably fed the popularity of the rumour that Shakespeare wrote a now-lost sequel titled ''Love's Labour's Won''[[note]]at least two records exist of a "Love's Labours Won" by Shakespeare, though it's also speculated this may be an alternative title of an existing work - possibly "Much Ado About Nothing", "Taming of the Shrew" or "The Merchant of Venice"[[/note]].

to:

->''"And ->''And why anyone should say that ''Love's Labour's Lost'' is a bad play, the Lord He knoweth; for to my mind it is one of the most ''réussi'' things of its kind ever made ... it is all pure [[FairyTale fairy-tale]]; and some of the loveliest lines in the lyrical-witty mode ever written."''
-->-- '''DorothyLSayers'''

''
-->--'''DorothyLSayers'''

''Love's Labour's Lost'' is one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's earliest plays, possibly his first comedy. The King of Navarre and his attendant lords make a vow to devote themselves to scholarship and put away interest in women for three years -- just years--just before the Princess of France and her attendant ladies arrive for a visit. HilarityEnsues.

It's not among Shakespeare's most popular plays. This may be largely due to the style, which has been described as "flamboyantly intellectual", full of wordplay and references to contemporary scholarly interests, many of which have not dated well. The script is 90% poetry and jokes and 10% plot. Also, for a romantic comedy it has a romantically unsatisfying romantically-unsatisfying ending, with all the lovers separated, to (maybe) be reunited in the future.

This latter point probably fed the popularity of the rumour rumor/theory (depending on your view) that Shakespeare wrote a now-lost sequel titled ''Love's Labour's Won''[[note]]at least two records exist of a "Love's Labours Labour's Won" by Shakespeare, though it's also speculated this may be an alternative title of an existing work - possibly "Much work, usually thought to be either ''Much Ado About Nothing", "Taming Nothing'', ''The Taming of the Shrew" Shrew'', or "The ''The Merchant of Venice"[[/note]].
Venice''[[/note]].






--> They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps.

to:

--> They -->"They have been at a great feast of languages, and stolen the scraps."
21st Feb '14 6:59:22 AM webgiant
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Added DiffLines:

* WeddingsForEveryone: Averted. The play is a comedy, which means technically it has to end with weddings, except everyone wants to get married and can't for completely non-tragedy reasons.
17th Dec '13 4:57:07 AM reconditarmonia
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Added DiffLines:

* SpoilerTitle: Wait, you mean all the courting didn't work out? Who could have seen that coming?
9th Dec '13 1:20:22 PM Lale
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''Love's Labour's Lost'' is a comedy by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. The King of Navarre and his attendant lords make a vow to devote themselves to scholarship and put away interest in women for three years -- just before the Princess of France and her attendant ladies arrive for a visit. HilarityEnsues.

It's not among Shakespeare's most popular plays. This may be largely due to the style, which has been described as "flamboyantly intellectual", full of wordplay and references to contemporary scholarly interests, many of which have not dated well. Also, for a romantic comedy it has a romantically unsatisfying ending, with all the lovers separated, to (maybe) be reunited in the future.

to:

''Love's Labour's Lost'' is a comedy by Creator/WilliamShakespeare.one of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's earliest plays, possibly his first comedy. The King of Navarre and his attendant lords make a vow to devote themselves to scholarship and put away interest in women for three years -- just before the Princess of France and her attendant ladies arrive for a visit. HilarityEnsues.

It's not among Shakespeare's most popular plays. This may be largely due to the style, which has been described as "flamboyantly intellectual", full of wordplay and references to contemporary scholarly interests, many of which have not dated well. The script is 90% poetry and jokes and 10% plot. Also, for a romantic comedy it has a romantically unsatisfying ending, with all the lovers separated, to (maybe) be reunited in the future.
19th Nov '13 2:46:43 PM Vilui
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This latter point probably fed the popularity of the persistent rumour that Shakespeare wrote a now-lost sequel titled ''Love's Labour's Won''[[note]]although at least one record exists of a "Love's Labours Won" by Shakespeare, it is thought now to be the title of an existing work - possibly "Much Ado", "Taming of the Shrew" or "The Merchant of Venice"[[/note]].

to:

This latter point probably fed the popularity of the persistent rumour that Shakespeare wrote a now-lost sequel titled ''Love's Labour's Won''[[note]]although at Won''[[note]]at least one record exists two records exist of a "Love's Labours Won" by Shakespeare, it is thought now to though it's also speculated this may be the an alternative title of an existing work - possibly "Much Ado", Ado About Nothing", "Taming of the Shrew" or "The Merchant of Venice"[[/note]].
10th Aug '13 4:57:05 PM mimitchi33
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Added DiffLines:

* CallBack: In the last newsreel at the end of the film, we see Costard carrying his bag with him while running into the street. He did the same thing earlier in the film just before asking the King about the word "remuneration".
4th Apr '13 11:06:46 PM reconditarmonia
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* ChekovsGun: Berowne mentions in Act I scene 1 that the Princess's father is "decrepit, sick, and bedrid." His illness never comes up again until he dies a few minutes from the end and screws up everything.

to:

* ChekovsGun: ChekhovsGun: Berowne mentions in Act I scene 1 that the Princess's father is "decrepit, sick, and bedrid." His illness never comes up again until he dies a few minutes from the end and screws up everything.
4th Apr '13 11:06:17 PM reconditarmonia
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Added DiffLines:

* ChekovsGun: Berowne mentions in Act I scene 1 that the Princess's father is "decrepit, sick, and bedrid." His illness never comes up again until he dies a few minutes from the end and screws up everything.
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