History Theatre / FiddlerOnTheRoof

13th Nov '17 5:50:34 PM gurkle2
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** In "To Life," the chorus gives one to Tevye and Lazar Wolf: "We know that when good fortune favors two such men, it stands to reason we deserve it too."
17th Sep '17 9:18:41 PM Juicehead_Baby
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* KissingCousins: Distant cousins in this case. Motel is implied to be related to Tzeitel through her great grandmother's uncle.
2nd Sep '17 9:15:12 PM Steinman76
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** Ultimately subverted in that the thing he wants the most, the greatest luxury of all...is to study the holy books with the learned men all day.

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** Ultimately subverted in that the thing he wants the most, the greatest luxury of all...is to study the holy books with the learned men all every day.
2nd Sep '17 9:09:55 PM Steinman76
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** Ultimately subverted in that the thing he wants the most, the greatest luxury of all...is to study the holy books with the learned men all day.
27th Jul '17 2:49:48 PM Lawman592
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* BetrayalByOffspring: Tevye considers [[spoiler: Chava]] to have done this for wanting to marry a non-Jew.
30th Jun '17 12:06:05 PM glickmam
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The original Broadway production starred Zero Mostel in the role that would make him famous, but producer-director Creator/NormanJewison refused to cast him in the movie, feeling that his performance was too over the top, and chose Creator/ChaimTopol, star of the London production, instead. Mostel was so pissed off at the rejection, that when his son, Josh Mostel, later received a phone call from Jewison, offering him the role of King Herod in ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'', for which he accepted, Mostel reportedly retorted, "Tell him to hire Topol's son, instead." The movie was released in 1971. Originally, Jerome Robbins, the director-choreographer of the original musical, had shown an interest in directing the film as well, but the production company, Mirisch Pictures, refused to even consider the idea, due to the difficulties they had when Robbins was assigned to co-direct and choreograph ''Theatre/WestSideStory''. (Robbins had spent so much time shooting and re-shooting scenes in his quest for perfection, that by the time he had completed about 60% of the picture, the film had gone $1,000,000 over budget and six months behind schedule. He was summarily fired from the film shoot and producer and co-director Robert Wise completed the film alone.)

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The original Broadway production starred Zero Mostel in the role that would make him famous, but producer-director Creator/NormanJewison refused to cast him in the movie, feeling that his performance was too over the top, and chose Creator/ChaimTopol, star of the London production, instead. Mostel was so pissed off at the rejection, that when his son, Josh Mostel, later received a phone call from Jewison, offering him the role of King Herod in ''Music/JesusChristSuperstar'', for which he accepted, Mostel reportedly retorted, "Tell "You should have told him to hire Topol's son, instead." The movie was released in 1971. Originally, Jerome Robbins, the director-choreographer of the original musical, had shown an interest in directing the film as well, but the production company, Mirisch Pictures, refused to even consider the idea, due to the difficulties they had when Robbins was assigned to co-direct and choreograph ''Theatre/WestSideStory''. (Robbins had spent so much time shooting and re-shooting scenes in his quest for perfection, that by the time he had completed about 60% of the picture, the film had gone $1,000,000 over budget and six months behind schedule. He was summarily fired from the film shoot and producer and co-director Robert Wise completed the film alone.)
13th May '17 11:10:50 AM Eievie
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--->Yes, well, ''somewhere,'' it says '''''something''''' about a chicken.

to:

--->Yes, --->'''Tevye''': Yes, well, ''somewhere,'' it says '''''something''''' about a chicken.



* AwesomeMcCoolName: Lazar Wolf.
** Entirely by accident -- in the 1900s, it was just another Jewish name.
** Also sounds cooler in the film than in real life. In Russian language, the first a is pronounced as a long ah.
*** In ''Yiddish'', however, it ''is'' pronounced like "laser" (and often transcribed as Leyzer).

to:

* AwesomeMcCoolName: Lazar Wolf.
** Entirely
Wolf, though entirely by accident -- in the 1900s, it was just another Jewish name.
** Also
name. It also sounds cooler in the film than in real life. In Russian language, the first a is pronounced as a long ah. \n*** In ''Yiddish'', however, it ''is'' pronounced like "laser" (and often transcribed as Leyzer).



* BaitAndSwitch: The "New Arrival" at Motel and Tzeitel's that everyone is goo-gooing over is...a sewing machine. And done immediately in reverse when Tzeitel walks in with a newborn baby.

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* BaitAndSwitch: The "New Arrival" at Motel and Tzeitel's that everyone is goo-gooing over is... a sewing machine. And done immediately in reverse when Tzeitel walks in with a newborn baby.



* BittersweetEnding: The Jews of Anatevka may have been forced to leave Russia entirely, but at least they got out alive, and in time to avoid UsefulNotes/WorldWarI and the [[RedOctober Russian Civil War]]. Apart from those eight years of warfare wrecking the economy and killing a tenth of a population of the entire Empire, the latter was known for its ''even more'' violent pogroms against Russian Jews committed by the the Reds and Whites (the Greens opposed them, but were too weak to stop them happening). On the other hand, those of them who went to Poland not only would've had the frontlines move through the country thrice (once in the World War, twice in the Polish-Soviet War), but [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany later, well]]... As for Tevye and his family, his three daughters are married (not in the way he expected, though), and the fiddler follows them away, as does the traditions it symbolizes.[[note]] In some productions, Tevye leaves the fiddler behind.[[/note]]

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* BittersweetEnding: The Jews of Anatevka may have been forced to leave Russia entirely, but at least they got out alive, and in time to avoid UsefulNotes/WorldWarI and the [[RedOctober Russian Civil War]]. Apart from those eight years of warfare wrecking the economy and killing a tenth of a population of the entire Empire, the latter was known for its ''even more'' violent pogroms against Russian Jews committed by the the Reds and Whites (the Greens opposed them, but were too weak to stop them happening). On the other hand, those of them who went to Poland not only would've had the frontlines move through the country thrice (once in the World War, twice in the Polish-Soviet War), but [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany later, well]]... As for Tevye and his family, his three daughters are married (not in the way he expected, though), and the fiddler follows them away, as does the traditions it symbolizes.[[note]] In [[note]]In some productions, Tevye leaves the fiddler behind.[[/note]]



* ChildhoodMarriagePromise: Motel and Tzeitel.

to:

* ChildhoodMarriagePromise: ChildhoodMarriagePromise[=/=]VictoriousChildhoodFriend: Motel and Tzeitel.



* ComplimentBackfire: TWO right after the other. Tevye tells the constable it's a shame he's not a Jew. The constable laughs it off, and tells Tevye he likes his joking. Both of them, however, realize what the other was saying, and look pretty miffed afterward.

to:

* ComplimentBackfire: TWO right after the other. Tevye tells the constable ComplimentBackfire[=/=]MyGodYouAreSerious:
-->'''Tevye:''' Thank you, your honor. You are a good man. If I may say so,
it's a shame he's too bad you're not a Jew. The constable laughs it off, and tells Jew.\\
'''Constable:''' [laughs] That's what I like about you, Tevye. You're always joking.\\
''(Awkward silence ensues as the Constable realizes
Tevye he likes his joking. Both of them, however, realize what the other was saying, and look pretty miffed afterward.not joking.)''



* GriefSong: "Chavaleh". Although, if you actually listen to the lyrics, the whole THING is a sort of grief-song. Even "To Life", one of the boisterous upbeat songs, has the lyrics:
-->"May all your futures be pleasant ones,\\

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* GriefSong: "Chavaleh". Although, "Chavaleh".
**Although,
if you actually listen to the lyrics, the whole THING ''play'' is a sort of grief-song. Even "To Life", one of the boisterous upbeat songs, has the lyrics:
-->"May -->''May all your futures be pleasant ones,\\



'Let's live another day...'"

to:

'Let's "Let's live another day...'""''



* HumbleGoal: Ironically, the true motivation behind "If I Were a Rich Man." After describing all the nice things he and his wife could have and how important he'd seem to the rest of the village, Tevye quietly notes that being rich would free him to study Torah, pray in the synagogue, and discus the holy books with learned men ... things that a working man's life leaves him little time for.
--> "And that would be the sweetest thing of all."

to:

* HumbleGoal: Ironically, the true motivation behind "If I Were a Rich Man." After describing all the nice things he and his wife could have and how important he'd seem to the rest of the village, Tevye quietly notes that being rich would free him to study Torah, pray in the synagogue, and discus the holy books with learned men ...men... things that a working man's life leaves him little time for.
--> "And -->'''Tevye''': And that would be the sweetest thing of all."



** In the film, Tevye starts a huge argument between two groups arguing about whether Neighbor 1 sold Neighbor 2 a six-year-old or twelve-year-old horse. The whole village seems to get in on it.

to:

** In the film, Tevye starts a huge argument between two groups arguing about whether Neighbor 1 sold Neighbor 2 a six-year-old 6-year-old or twelve-year-old 12-year-old horse. The whole village seems to get in on it.



* LivingProp: It is INCREDIBLY easy to forget that Tevye has two little daughters as well as his three teenage ones.

to:

* LivingProp: It is INCREDIBLY ''incredibly'' easy to forget that Tevye has two little daughters as well as his three teenage ones.



* MarriageBeforeRomance: The marriage of Tevye and Golde was arranged and they have been together for years, having already raised all their children to adulthood, but it isn't until one of their daughters wants to marry for love that they start thinking about romance with one another. Their duet 'Do You Love Me?' lampshades, describes and plays out the trope.

to:

* MarriageBeforeRomance: The marriage of Tevye and Golde was arranged and they have been together for years, having already raised all their eldest children to adulthood, but it isn't until one of their daughters wants to marry for love that they start thinking about romance with one another. Their duet 'Do "Do You Love Me?' Me?" lampshades, describes and plays out the trope.



* MyGodYouAreSerious:
-->'''Tevye:''' Thank you, your honor. You are a good man. If I may say so, it's too bad you're not a Jew.\\
'''Constable:''' [laughs] That's what I like about you, Tevye. You're always joking.\\
''(Awkward silence ensues as the Constable realizes Tevye was not joking.)''



-->Golde! What am I going to tell Golde?!

to:

-->Golde! -->'''Tevye''': Golde! What am I going to tell Golde?!



* PragmaticAdaptation: If the story's main theme is tradition vs. upheaval, the way the musical approaches that theme inverts the approach taken by its source material. Sholem Aleykhem's original stories, written for exclusively Jewish audiences around the turn of the (20th) century, stressed the importance of upholding tradition despite surrounding social change. The musical, which was intended for a more general audience, takes the position that change - both good and bad - is inevitable. (Which was pretty much the theme of TheSixties, if you think about it.)

to:

* PragmaticAdaptation: If the story's main theme is tradition vs. upheaval, the way the musical approaches that theme inverts the approach taken by its source material. Sholem Aleykhem's original stories, written for exclusively Jewish audiences around the turn of the (20th) century, stressed the importance of upholding tradition despite surrounding social change. The musical, which was intended for a more general audience, takes the position that change - both change--both good and bad - is bad--is inevitable. (Which was pretty much the theme of TheSixties, if you think about it.)



* RuleOfThree: Three girls, three marriages [[spoiler: that undo their father's expectations.]] They have ''more'' girls than that, of course, but only three have plot-important roles; the others are not yet of marriageable age. And in the stories, Tevye has seven daughters.

to:

* RuleOfThree: Three girls, three marriages [[spoiler: that [[spoiler:that undo their father's expectations.]] They have ''more'' girls than that, of course, but only three have plot-important roles; the others are not yet of marriageable age. And in the stories, Tevye has seven daughters.



%%* SlapSlapKiss: Hodel and Perchik.

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%%* * SlapSlapKiss: Hodel and Perchik.Perchik bicker, and then get married.



'''Tevye''' [shouting to the Heavens]: May God Smite me with it! AND MAY I ''NEVER'' RECOVER!

to:

'''Tevye''' [shouting '''Tevye''': ''[shouting to the Heavens]: Heavens]'' May God Smite me with it! AND MAY I ''NEVER'' RECOVER!



%%* VictoriousChildhoodFriend: Motel.
23rd Apr '17 5:51:18 PM ReturnedYetAgain
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* HumbleGoal: Ironically, the true motivation behind "If I Were a Rich Man." After describing all the nice things he and his wife could have and how important he'd seem to the rest of the village, Tevye quietly notes that being rich would free him to study Torah, pray in the synagogue, and discus the holy books with learned men ... things that a working man's life leaves him little time for.
--> "And that would be the sweetest thing of all."
23rd Apr '17 5:12:41 PM ReturnedYetAgain
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* IncrediblyLongNote: The Constable's "Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh... zaaaa, vaaaaa, sha zdarovia" in "To Life." It is not uncommon for betting to be going on backstage about when the actor will pass out. (Answer: not before he gets his applause, dammit!)

to:

* IncrediblyLongNote: The Constable's Fyedka's "Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh... zaaaa, vaaaaa, sha zdarovia" in "To Life." It is not uncommon for betting to be going on backstage about when the actor will pass out. (Answer: not before he gets his applause, dammit!)
9th Mar '17 6:07:10 PM Theatre_Maven_3695
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* PoliticalStereotype: Perchik, as the idealistic, left-wing university student.
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