History Theatre / AntonyAndCleopatra

3rd Nov '17 3:07:01 PM JulianLapostat
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A Roman tragedy by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It can be viewed as a sequel to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', though more for historical than thematic reasons. Thematically it can be seen as a counterpoint to ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', contrasting the naive young lovers of the earlier play with the older, more experienced lovers here. Shakespeare's source for the play was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_North Thomas North's]] 1579 translation of ''Literature/ParallelLives'' and the play is essentially an adaptation of it.

The play focuses on the tragic fall of Mark Antony, a Roman general, as he is seduced by Egyptian queen UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Antony spends much of the play ignoring his duties as a general to Rome, while living it up in Alexandria with Cleo. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavius Caesar]], nephew of [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Julius]], is unhappy with this, because Rome is involved in a war with Pompey and could really use Antony's help. Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome, not realizing Octavius envies his power and plots to overthrow him when the war is over. Meanwhile, Cleopatra pines and beats up a messenger. And more stuff happens. The plot is extremely complicated; if you want the full story, go to Sparknotes or Wiki/TheOtherWiki. Or, you know, read/go see the play.

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A Roman tragedy by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It can be viewed as a sequel to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', though more for historical than thematic reasons.since Caesar, and his assassins, are repeatedly alluded to in the play. Thematically it can be seen as a counterpoint to ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', contrasting the naive young lovers of the earlier play with the older, more experienced lovers here. Shakespeare's source for the play was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_North Thomas North's]] 1579 translation of ''Literature/ParallelLives'' and the play is essentially an adaptation of it.

it, adapting dialogues, scenes, and entire descriptions from it, almost word-for-word.

The play focuses on the tragic fall of Mark Antony, a Roman general, as he is seduced by Egyptian queen UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Antony spends much of the play ignoring his duties as a general to Rome, while living it up in Alexandria with Cleo. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavius Octavian Caesar]], nephew of [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Julius]], is unhappy with this, because Rome is involved in a war with Pompey and could really use Antony's help.help, but he's also shrewd because this gives him a window into finally offing his fellow triumvirs (Antony, Lepidus) and become Emperor. Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome, not realizing Octavius envies his power and plots to overthrow him when the war is over. Meanwhile, Cleopatra pines for Antony in his absence. Events then unfold, as Antony and beats up Octavian Caesar fall out, and a messenger. And more stuff happens. The plot is extremely complicated; if you want CivilWar brews over who will be the full story, go to Sparknotes or Wiki/TheOtherWiki. Or, you know, read/go see single master of the play.
Empire, with the independence of Egypt hanging in balance.



* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: Antony, at least when his head isn't full of Cleopatra.

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* AuthorityEqualsAsskicking: Antony, at least when his head isn't full AthensAndSparta: Cleopatra's Alexandria is contrasted heavily with Rome, and Octavius finds it only too easy to spin Antony's romance with Cleopatra as being "un-Roman" and seeing the worldliness and richness of Cleopatra. Alexandria as unbecoming of stern, and austere Rome.



* TheExtremistWasRight: Whilst Antony and Cleopatra are more sympathetic overall, it becomes increasingly difficult to argue that the world would be better off with them in charge rather than Caesar.

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* TheExtremistWasRight: Whilst Antony and Cleopatra are more sympathetic overall, it becomes increasingly difficult to argue that the world would be better off with them in charge rather than Caesar.Caesar, at least if you measure authority by piety, probity, and other conservative values.



* FortuneTeller: The soothsayer.

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* FortuneTeller: The soothsayer. He tells Antony that Octavius is BornLucky, will always win at dice, in bets, and that Antony's fortune will only diminish before Octavius.



* HistoricalDomainCharacter: UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar all play important parts.
* HonorBeforeReason: Pompey has every single one of his enemies drunk and onboard his flagship. When Menas suggests that they simply sail away and force the others to terms, Pompey refuses, as he has already agreed to a peace treaty. [[spoiler: This gets him killed later on.]]

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII Agrippa, UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII, Mark Antony, Sextus Pompey, Lepidus, Octavia, and UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar all play important parts.
even Cleopatra's handmaidens, are retained from Plutarch.
* HonorBeforeReason: Sextus Pompey has every single one of his enemies drunk and onboard his flagship. When Menas suggests that they simply sail away and force the others to terms, Pompey refuses, as albeit not out of moral considerations. As he has already agreed to a peace treaty. [[spoiler: This gets explains, if Menas, having come up with that plot, acted on it and done it, giving Pompey plausible deniability, he would have pardoned and condoned Menas after the fact, but he cannot fully embark on this plan himself, since it would violate and compromise him killed later on.]]forever among the Romans, and give him no base on which to act.



* LoveMakesYouDumb: The title characters.



* NameAndName
* OldMaid: Charmian is rather unhappy about having no children.

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* NameAndName
* OldMaid: Charmian is rather unhappy about having no children.



* ShooOutTheClowns: Weirdly averted -- at the play's climax, after Antony has died and Cleopatra has decided to kill herself rather than be paraded to Rome as Octavius' trophy, she calls for someone to bring her some asps... and that someone is a Clown, who proceeds to make bawdy puns about the "worm" eating women. This happens ''right before Cleopatra kills herself''.
* ShoutOut: Enobarbus' famous description of Cleopatra's barge is paraphrasing the description in North's Plutarch, Shakespeare's source.

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* ShooOutTheClowns: Weirdly averted -- at the play's climax, after Antony has died and Cleopatra has decided to kill herself rather than be paraded to Rome as Octavius' trophy, she calls for someone to bring her some asps... and that someone is a Clown, who proceeds to make bawdy puns about the "worm" eating women. [[MoodWhiplash This happens happens]] ''right before Cleopatra kills herself''.
* ShoutOut: Enobarbus' famous description of Cleopatra's barge is paraphrasing the description in North's Plutarch, Shakespeare's source.
herself''.



* WorthyOpponent: Pompey to the triumvirate. He refuses, for example, to kill the leading members when they're in a vulnerable position.

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* WorthyOpponent: Sextus Pompey to the triumvirate. He refuses, for example, to kill the leading members when they're in a vulnerable position.
3rd Nov '17 9:43:09 AM JulianLapostat
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A Roman tragedy by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It can be viewed as a sequel to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', though more for historical than thematic reasons. Thematically it can be seen as a counterpoint to ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', contrasting the naive young lovers of the earlier play with the older, more experienced lovers here. Shakespeare's source for the play was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_North Thomas North's]] 1579 translation of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_Lives Plutarch's Lives,]]'' and the play is essentially an adaptation of it.

to:

A Roman tragedy by Creator/WilliamShakespeare. It can be viewed as a sequel to ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', though more for historical than thematic reasons. Thematically it can be seen as a counterpoint to ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet'', contrasting the naive young lovers of the earlier play with the older, more experienced lovers here. Shakespeare's source for the play was [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_North Thomas North's]] 1579 translation of ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parallel_Lives Plutarch's Lives,]]'' ''Literature/ParallelLives'' and the play is essentially an adaptation of it.
30th Oct '17 6:04:27 PM JulianLapostat
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* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: Enobarbus' despair, after his [[spoiler:FaceHeelTurn]], is given much more time than in the Plutarch.

to:

* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: Enobarbus' despair, after his [[spoiler:FaceHeelTurn]], is given much more time than in the Plutarch.[[Literature/ParallelLives Plutarch]].
25th Jun '17 10:35:28 AM nombretomado
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The play focuses on the tragic fall of Mark Antony, a Roman general, as he is seduced by Egyptian queen UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Antony spends much of the play ignoring his duties as a general to Rome, while living it up in Alexandria with Cleo. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavius Caesar]], nephew of [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Julius]], is unhappy with this, because Rome is involved in a war with Pompey and could really use Antony's help. Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome, not realizing Octavius envies his power and plots to overthrow him when the war is over. Meanwhile, Cleopatra pines and beats up a messenger. And more stuff happens. The plot is extremely complicated; if you want the full story, go to Sparknotes or TheOtherWiki. Or, you know, read/go see the play.

to:

The play focuses on the tragic fall of Mark Antony, a Roman general, as he is seduced by Egyptian queen UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Antony spends much of the play ignoring his duties as a general to Rome, while living it up in Alexandria with Cleo. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavius Caesar]], nephew of [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Julius]], is unhappy with this, because Rome is involved in a war with Pompey and could really use Antony's help. Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome, not realizing Octavius envies his power and plots to overthrow him when the war is over. Meanwhile, Cleopatra pines and beats up a messenger. And more stuff happens. The plot is extremely complicated; if you want the full story, go to Sparknotes or TheOtherWiki.Wiki/TheOtherWiki. Or, you know, read/go see the play.
3rd Mar '17 12:29:31 PM Xtifr
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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar all play important parts.

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* HistoricalDomainCharacter: UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}}, UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII and Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar all play important parts.
3rd Mar '17 12:28:40 PM Xtifr
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The play focuses on the tragic fall of Mark Antony, a Roman general, as he is seduced by Egyptian queen UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Antony spends much of the play ignoring his duties as a general to Rome, while living it up in Alexandria with Cleo. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavius Caesar]], nephew of [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar Julius]], is unhappy with this, because Rome is involved in a war with Pompey and could really use Antony's help. Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome, not realizing Octavius envies his power and plots to overthrow him when the war is over. Meanwhile, Cleopatra pines and beats up a messenger. And more stuff happens. The plot is extremely complicated; if you want the full story, go to Sparknotes or TheOtherWiki. Or, you know, read/go see the play.

to:

The play focuses on the tragic fall of Mark Antony, a Roman general, as he is seduced by Egyptian queen UsefulNotes/CleopatraVII. Antony spends much of the play ignoring his duties as a general to Rome, while living it up in Alexandria with Cleo. [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Octavius Caesar]], nephew of [[Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar [[UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar Julius]], is unhappy with this, because Rome is involved in a war with Pompey and could really use Antony's help. Antony leaves Alexandria for Rome, not realizing Octavius envies his power and plots to overthrow him when the war is over. Meanwhile, Cleopatra pines and beats up a messenger. And more stuff happens. The plot is extremely complicated; if you want the full story, go to Sparknotes or TheOtherWiki. Or, you know, read/go see the play.
5th Nov '16 12:33:08 AM DustSnitch
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* BadAss: It is an incredibly poor idea to mess with Antony, or, on Caesar's side, Taurus.
18th Apr '16 11:29:31 PM MasoTey
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* RousingSpeech: Subverted-- Antony's speech to his troops is rather... depressing.

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* RoaringRampageOfRomance: The affair between Anthony and Cleopatra starts a war and turns all their people against them.
* RousingSpeech: Subverted-- Subverted -- Antony's speech to his troops is rather... depressing.



* ShooOutTheClowns: Weirdly averted-- at the play's climax, after Antony has died and Cleopatra has decided to kill herself rather than be paraded to Rome as Octavius' trophy, she calls for someone to bring her some asps... and that someone is a Clown, who proceeds to make bawdy puns about the "worm" eating women. This happens ''right before Cleopatra kills herself''.

to:

* ShooOutTheClowns: Weirdly averted-- averted -- at the play's climax, after Antony has died and Cleopatra has decided to kill herself rather than be paraded to Rome as Octavius' trophy, she calls for someone to bring her some asps... and that someone is a Clown, who proceeds to make bawdy puns about the "worm" eating women. This happens ''right before Cleopatra kills herself''.



----

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----
18th Nov '15 5:56:15 PM PaulA
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* DespairEventHorizon: Being a Shakespearean play, this happens to many characters. Enobarbus, for exactly, actually ''dies'' from despair.



* DespairEventHorizon: Being a Shakespearean play, this happens to many characters. Enobarbus, for exactly, actually ''dies'' from despair.



* TheExtremistWasRight: Whilst Antony and Cleopatra are more sympathetic overall, it becomes increasingly difficult to argue that the world would be better off with them in charge rather than Caesar.



* TheExtremistWasRight: Whilst Antony and Cleopatra are more sympathetic overall, it becomes increasingly difficult to argue that the world would be better off with them in charge rather than Caesar.
18th Nov '15 5:53:55 PM PaulA
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* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: Enobarbus, after his [[spoiler: FaceHeelTurn]].

to:

* AdaptationalAngstUpgrade: Enobarbus, Enobarbus' despair, after his [[spoiler: FaceHeelTurn]].[[spoiler:FaceHeelTurn]], is given much more time than in the Plutarch.



--->'''Enobarbus''' ''(seeing a man carry an unconscious Lepidus back to shore)'' There's a strong man, Menas.\\

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--->'''Enobarbus''' ''(seeing a man carry an unconscious Lepidus back to shore)'' shore)'': There's a strong man, Menas.\\



* DeathByDespair Enobarbus. But not before he finishes his nice long monologue, of course.
* [[DiscOneFinalBoss Decoy Antagonist]]: Pompey.

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* DeathByDespair DeathByDespair: Enobarbus. But not before he finishes his nice long monologue, of course.
* [[DiscOneFinalBoss Decoy Antagonist]]: Pompey.DiscOneFinalBoss: At the beginning of the play, Pompey seems to be the major threat, but he's settled before the halfway mark and the real threat turns out to be conflict between the Romans formerly allied against him.
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