History Theatre / Alcestis

13th Nov '16 10:40:56 PM shatterstar
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%%* BackFromTheDead: [[spoiler:Alcestis]].

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%%* * BackFromTheDead: [[spoiler:Alcestis]].[[spoiler:Alcestis, thanks to Hercules's trip to the Underworld]].



%%* EquivalentExchange

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%%* EquivalentExchange* EquivalentExchange: The main drama of the play is the fact that Alcestis died for her husband because he was promised by Apollo to have immortality.



%%* HeroicSacrifice: Alcestis.

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%%* * HeroicSacrifice: Alcestis.Alcestis, who died so her husband can live.



%%* LoveHurts

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%%* LoveHurts* LoveHurts: Admetus is completely devastated by Alcestis's sacrifice to the point of swearing to never remarry and to commission a statue of her lie next to him every night. This is very surprising, even if a bit creepy, because this is Ancient Greek culture where women are little more than properties.



%%* TheMourningAfter

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%%* TheMourningAfter* TheMourningAfter: Admetus promised to never remarry after her death. [[spoiler:Thanks Zeus that didn't last too long thanks to Hercules]].



%%* SacredHospitality
%%* SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: Heracles does this for Admetus and Alcestis.

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%%* SacredHospitality
%%*
* SacredHospitality: A major conflict of the play is Hercules's surprising visit to Admetus's kingdom during a funeral. Admetus decided to hide this news from Hercules and invite him in anyway.
*
SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: Heracles [[spoiler:Heracles does this for Admetus and Alcestis. Alcestis by traveling to the Underworld to get her back. His reason is that he has been acting disrespectful because he didn't know about her death]].
9th Jul '16 11:36:37 AM Euagoras
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* BalancingDeathsBooks: Since not even the gods can grant immortality, for one to cheat death, another must die willingly in their stead.

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* BalancingDeathsBooks: Since not even the gods Gods can grant immortality, for one to cheat occasionally save select mortals from death, another must die willingly but Apollo is in their stead.no position to grant such a boon. The whole Cyclopes-killing story started with Apollo's son Asclepius raising the dead, which drove ire of Hades. The death god complained to Zeus that Asclepius was diminishing him of his subjects. Seeing that Apollo is already on sufferance from Zeus, he can have no recourse to him in that matter. On the other hand, the Underworld won't give anything for free: hence the victim swap idea.
3rd Jun '16 2:42:06 AM Morgenthaler
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** Justified in that Admetus did not wish to trouble his friend, and so Heracles went much of the night not knowing about his friend's loss.
** Also was considered part of SacredHospitality, which they took ''seriously'' even by Greek standards.
3rd Jun '16 2:41:52 AM Morgenthaler
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* AllDeathsFinal: [[spoiler:Averted once Heracles comes along]].
3rd Jun '16 2:41:37 AM Morgenthaler
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%%
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%% ZeroContextExample entries are not allowed on wiki pages. All such entries have been commented out. Add context to the entries before uncommenting them.
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* BackFromTheDead: [[spoiler:Alcestis]].

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* %%* BackFromTheDead: [[spoiler:Alcestis]].



* CharacterTitle

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* %%* CharacterTitle



* EquivalentExchange

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* %%* EquivalentExchange



* GreekChorus

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* %%* GreekChorus



* HeroicSacrifice: Alcestis.

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* %%* HeroicSacrifice: Alcestis.



* LoveHurts

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* %%* LoveHurts



* TheMourningAfter

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* %%* TheMourningAfter



* ProperLady: Alcestis.
* SacredHospitality
* SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: Heracles does this for Admetus and Alcestis.

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* %%* ProperLady: Alcestis.
* %%* SacredHospitality
* %%* SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong: Heracles does this for Admetus and Alcestis.
2nd Jun '16 1:10:11 PM Morgenthaler
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''Alcestis'' is a play by {{Euripides}}, one of the ancient Greek tragedians. The work was composed in 438BC, not as a tragedy, but in the place of one of the satyr plays the playwrights would enter in the competition. As such, Euripides gives the story a more comic treatment than tragic, though it has its fair share of tragedy and drama.

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''Alcestis'' is a play by {{Euripides}}, Creator/{{Euripides}}, one of the ancient Greek tragedians. The work was composed in 438BC, not as a tragedy, but in the place of one of the satyr plays the playwrights would enter in the competition. As such, Euripides gives the story a more comic treatment than tragic, though it has its fair share of tragedy and drama.
15th Apr '16 9:08:07 PM mlsmithca
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* [[spoiler:HappyEnding]]: Which isn't exactly common in the [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greek myths]]...

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* [[spoiler:HappyEnding]]: HappyEnding: Which isn't exactly common in the [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greek myths]]...
9th Feb '16 7:34:05 PM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

* BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: Admetus gets the chance to cheat death, a special one-time offer. Trouble is, no one is willing to go in his place. Finally Alcestis, his devoted wife, goes, and Admetus gets to live, alright... knowing he caused the death of the person who loved him the most.
3rd May '15 6:27:51 PM nombretomado
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* [[spoiler:HappyEnding]]: Which isn't exactly common in the [[ClassicalMythology Greek myths]]...

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* [[spoiler:HappyEnding]]: Which isn't exactly common in the [[ClassicalMythology [[Myth/ClassicalMythology Greek myths]]...
3rd Dec '13 11:37:12 PM mlsmithca
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* [[spoiler:BackFromTheDead]]: [[spoiler:Alcestis]].

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* [[spoiler:BackFromTheDead]]: BackFromTheDead: [[spoiler:Alcestis]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Theatre.Alcestis